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1

The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards - Destructive Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Support Program (USSP) to IAEA Safeguards priority of destructive analysis is aimed at strengthening the IAEA's ability to use destructive analysis as a safeguards tool. IAEA inspectors bring back nuclear and environmental samples from inspections, which are first cataloged by the IAEA and then analyzed by a network of laboratories located in many Member States and the IAEA's own Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria. Historically, the USSP was instrumental in introducing environmental sampling techniques to the IAEA in order to enhance its understanding of material processing activities conducted at nuclear facilities. The USSP has also worked with the IAEA to improve understanding of measurement uncertainty and measurement quality, incorporate new and improved analytical methods, and purchase analytical and computer equipment. Recent activities include a temporary increase in analysis of environmental samples using secondary ion mass spectrometry and provision of a cost-free expert to restore secondary ion mass spectroscopy laboratory functionality and to modernize the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Information System.

Hoffheins,B.

2008-07-13

2

Proficiency Testing as a tool to monitor consistency of measurements in the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) established a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (IAEA/WHO SSDL Network) in 1976. Through SSDLs designated by Member States, the Network provides a direct link of national dosimetry standards to the international measurement system of standards traceable to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Within this structure and through the proper calibration of field instruments, the SSDLs disseminate S.I. quantities and units. To ensure that the services provided by SSDL members to end-users follow internationally accepted standards, the IAEA has set up two different comparison programmes. One programme relies on the IAEA/WHO postal TLD service and the other uses comparisons of calibrated ionization chambers to help the SSDLs verify the integrity of their national standards and the procedures used for the transfer of the standards to the end-users. The IAEA comparisons include 60Co air kerma (NK) and absorbed dose to water (ND,W) coefficients. The results of the comparisons are confidential and are communicated only to the participants. This is to encourage participation of the laboratories and their full cooperation in the reconciliation of any discrepancy. This work describes the results of the IAEA programme comparing calibration coefficients for radiotherapy dosimetry, using ionization chambers. In this programme, ionization chambers that belong to the SSDLs are calibrated sequentially at the SSDL, at the IAEA, and again at the SSDL. As part of its own quality assurance programme, the IAEA has participated in several regional comparisons organized by Regional Metrology Organizations. The results of the IAEA comparison programme show that the majority of SSDLs are capable of providing calibrations that fall inside the acceptance level of 1.5% compared to the IAEA.

Meghzifene, Ahmed; Czap, Ladislav; Shortt, Ken

2008-08-01

3

Comparison of the air kerma standards of the IAEA and the BIPM in mammography x-rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dosimetry Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Seibersdorf, Austria, calibrates reference standards in mammography x-ray beams for IAEA/WHO SSDL Network members (more than 80 laboratories worldwide). As a signatory of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA), the IAEA laboratory maintains a Quality Management System (QMS) complying with ISO 17025 and requires updated 'supporting evidence' for its dosimetry calibration and measurement capabilities (CMC), first published in Appendix C of the CIPM MRA key comparison database in 2007. For this purpose, an indirect comparison has been made between the air kerma standards of the IAEA and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in the mammography x-ray range from 25 kV to 35 kV, using as transfer instruments two thin-window parallel-plate ionization chambers belonging to the IAEA. The IAEA and BIPM standards for mammography x-rays are shown to be in agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of 5.5 parts in 103. This agreement can be used to support the calibration and measurements capabilities of the IAEA listed in Appendix C of the key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Czap, L.; Csete, I.; Gomola, I.

2013-01-01

4

IAEA-MEL’s underground counting laboratory (CAVE) for the analysis of radionuclides in the environment at very low-levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  An underground laboratory for low-level gamma- and beta-spectrometry has been constructed at IAEA-MEL, Monaco, for the analysis of environmental radionuclides. The laboratory is situated at a depth of 35 m water equivalent underground and equipped with 4, large volume HPGe detectors placed in a common lead shield with anti-cosmic plastic scintillator shielding. There is also an anti-Compton gamma-spectrometer, comprized of

P. P. Povinec; J. F. Commanducci; I. Levy-Palomo

2005-01-01

5

Intercomparison of radon and decay product measurements in an underground mine and EPA radon laboratory: A study organized by the IAEA International Radon Metrology Programme  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna and the European Union (EU) in Bruxelles formed the International Radon Metrology Programme. The IRMP is designed to assess and foster the improvement of radon and decay product measurements that are made around the world. Within the framework of the IRMP, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory (EPA) in Las Vegas, Nevada, organized jointly with the U.S. Bureau of Mines an international intercomparison exercise at a former uranium mine (Twilight Mine, Colorado) and the EPA Radon Laboratory. The main objective of this exercise was to compare radon and radon decay product instruments under both well-controlled as well as widely fluctuating exposure conditions. The laboratory exposures occurred under relatively steady radon and decay product conditions, with a moderate equilibrium ratio, while the conditions in the mine fluctuated greatly and the equilibrium ratio was low. An additional purpose of the exercise was to provide a forum for manufacturers and measurement organizations worldwise to exchange information and plan improvements in their operations and calibration programs. Altogether 19 organizations from seven countries intercomparing 32 different radon and radon decay product instruments participated in this exercise. This paper summarizes the results from the analysis of the experimental data obtained in the Bureau of Mines Twilight Mine in July of 1994, as well as the results from the EPA Radon laboratory in August of 1994.

Budd, G.; Hopper, R.; Braganza, E.; Ronca-Battista, M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiation and Indoor Environments National Lab.; Steinhaeusler, F. [Univ. of Salzburg (Austria); Stegner, P. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

1998-11-01

6

k0-NAA quality assessment in an Algerian laboratory by analysis of SMELS and four IAEA reference materials using Es-Salam research reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Different types of synthetic multi-element standard material (SMELS) and four IAEA reference materials, 140, Sl-1, Soil-7 and Lichen-336 were analyzed for validation and QC/QA of the k0-standardised Neutron Activation Analysis (k0-NAA). The samples of SMELS and RMs were irradiated at Es-Salam research reactor and measured on an absolutely calibrated HPGe detector with 35% relative efficiency connected to a Canberra Genie 2k inspector. Concentrations of 33 elements such as As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, In, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Tm, U, Yb, Zn, and Zr were determined in SMELS and RMs. The analytical results agreed well with the assigned values of SMELS and certified values of RMs. In the case of RMs, concentrations of a few elements, whose certified values are not available, could be determined. The comparison between experimental values and assigned/certified data for SMELS and RMs was made by means of the results from Relative Bias, Z-score and U-score. The relatives bias of the elements determined in SMELS with respect to the assigned values were all within±4.6%. For RMs with respect to certified values were within±10% except for few elements for which RB varied from -28.6% to +12.8%. The Z-score values at 95% confidence level for most of the elements in both the materials were within ±1. The U-scores for most of the elements were lower than 1.

Hamidatou, L. A.; Dekar, S.; Boukari, S.

2012-08-01

7

TECHNICAL SUPPORT TO IAEA  

EPA Science Inventory

IAEA sponsors meetings of technical specialists from many nations on NORM and NORM industries in Member States, with particular emphasis on potential public exposure to, and the residual waste arising from, these activities, and aspects of how NORM differs from artificial, man-ma...

8

IAEA THEORY SUMMARY 1998 IAEA Meeting, Yokohama, Japan  

E-print Network

IAEA THEORY SUMMARY 1998 IAEA Meeting, Yokohama, Japan Oct. 17--24, 1998 Princeton University energy theory research presented at 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19--24 1998 Yokohama, Japan. Theory simulation results from conference provided encouraging evidence

9

IAEA reference materials for quality assurance of marine radioactivity measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The IAEA's Marine Environment Laboratory has been assisting laboratories in Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment since the early seventies. AQCS through world-wide and regional intercomparison exercises and the provision of reference methods and reference materials (RM) have been recognized as an important component of quality assurance\\/quality control. A total of 43

P. P. Povinec; M. K. Pham

2001-01-01

10

IAEA-CN-SO/G-I-2 DESIGN STUDY OF FUSION  

E-print Network

out by blanket test mod- ' On leave from Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan. 2 Toshiba Corporation Toshiba Corporation, Japan. 6 On leave from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. #12;IAEA

11

The US Support program to IAEA Safeguards - 2008  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) was established in 1977 to provide technical assistance to the IAEA Department of Safeguards. Since that time the U.S. Department of State has provided funding of over $200 million and over 900 tasks have been completed by USSP contractors on behalf of the KEA. The USSP is directed by a U.S. interagency subcommittee known as the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support (SSTS) and is managed by the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In recent years, the SSTS and ISPO have identified priorities to guide the process of determining which IAEA requests are aligned with US. policy and will be funded. The USSP priorities are reviewed and updated prior to the USSP Annual Review Meeting which is hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) each spring in Vienna, Austria. This paper will report on the 2008 USSP priorities and be an introduction for a session which will consist of four papers on USSP priorities and four other papers related to USSP activities.

Pepper,S.

2008-06-09

12

A brief history of NDA at the IAEA.  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 30 years ago, the first portable nondestructive assay instrument, a SAM-II, was brought to Vienna for IAEA consideration. This initial foray into the usage of nondestructive assay (NDA) as an independent assessment tool has materialized into one of the important tools for IAEA inspections. NDA instruments have several inherent advantages for inspectors; their measurements generate no radioactive waste, provide immediate answers, do not require specialized operators, and can be either taken to the items to be measured (portable instruments), or the items for measurement can be brought to the instruments, such as can be applied in on-site IAEA laboratories or off-site IAEA lab at Siebersdorf. The SAM-II was a small, lightweight, battery-powered, gamma-ray instrument used for uranium enrichment measurements. It was also found to be usehl for locating nuclear material, distinguishing between uranium and plutonium, and determining the active length of items like fuel pins. However it was not well suited for determining the amount of bulk material present, except for small containers of low-density materials. A 6-sided neutron coincidence counter, easily disassembled so it could be shipped and carried by airplane, was developed for bulk measurements of plutonium. The HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) was immediately useful for quantitative measurements of pure plutonium oxide. However, the IAEA had to make a trade-off between the ease of use of NDA instruments on-site, and the problems of obtaining small samples for shipment to an independent lab for more accurate analysis. NDA does not create radioactive waste, so as waste handling has become more cautious and more regulated, NDA looks better and better. After acceptance of NDA by the IAEA for routine use, the follow-up question was naturally, 'How much better can this measurement be made?' The Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) supported multiple and varied efforts in this direction, such as improving both the plutonium isotopic distribution measurement and the multiplicity counter, so that the assays can be performed on any plutonium samples instead of only pure oxides. Advances have also been made on uranium bulk measurements by the development of the active well coincidence counter. Meanwhile, several large bulk-handling facilities have been coming on line under IAEA safeguards. These facilities require full-time inspectors to be present whenever the plant is operating. The IAEA requested help so that measurements can be made even when inspectors are not present. The evolution and success of unattended NDA has been responsible for the capability of the IAEA to monitor large bulk-handling facilities without substantial increase in inspection effort. The integration of NDA with containment & surveillance measures and automation has been crucial to reducing inspection manpower. These systems have developed to the point where the IAEA can make credible conclusions on large high-throughput plants such as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication or reprocessing plants.

Sprinkle, J. K. (James K.); Sinkule, B. J. (Barbara J.); Hsue, S.-T. (Sin-Tao); Abhold, M. E. (Mark E.)

2001-01-01

13

IAEA reorganizes nuclear information services  

SciTech Connect

As part of an overall restructuring of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Nuclear Energy, the agency has established the Nuclear Information Section (NIS). The restructuring, recently announced by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, also includes the creation of a separate Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) Section, as demand for assistance in this area is growing among member countries. According to the NIS Web site, 'This restructuring and the creation of the NIS provides an opportunity for further enhancing existing information products and services and introducing new ones-all with an eye towards advancing higher organizational efficiency and effectiveness.'

Levine, E.

2012-08-15

14

10 CFR 75.7 - Notification of IAEA safeguards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Notification of IAEA safeguards. 75.7 Section 75.7...NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT General Provisions § 75.7 Notification of IAEA safeguards. (a) The licensee must...

2010-01-01

15

10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Communication of information to IAEA. 75.12 Section 75.12 Energy...NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information...12 Communication of information to IAEA. (a) Except as otherwise...

2010-01-01

16

10 CFR 75.8 - IAEA inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...whom the NRC has provided written or electronic authorization that the IAEA representative...representative and shall accept written or electronic confirmation of the credentials from...use, in accordance with applicable packaging and export licensing regulations,...

2010-01-01

17

Trip report on IAEA Training Workshop on Implementation of Integrated Management Systems for Research Reactors (T3-TR-45496).  

SciTech Connect

From 17-21 June 2013, Sandia National Laboratories, Technical Area-V (SNL TA-V) represented the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Training Workshop (T3-TR-45486). This report gives a breakdown of the IAEA regulatory structure for those unfamiliar, and the lessons learned and observations that apply to SNL TA-V that were obtained from the workshop. The Safety Report Series, IAEA workshop final report, and SNL TA-V presentation are included as attachments.

Pratt, Richard J.

2013-11-01

18

IAEA workshop and field trial at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site  

SciTech Connect

In March 1994, members of the International Safeguards Department in the National Security Program Office (NSPO) hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The workshop was held at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and its primary purpose was to train the inspectors in the techniques needed for effective environmental sample collection and handling. The workshop emphasized both sampling theory and practice. First, detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water-associated sampling were covered in the classroom. Subsequently, the inspectors were divided into three groups for actual sample collection in and around the K-25 locale. The collected samples were processed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Network of Analytical Laboratories using established analytical techniques. This activity is part of the IAEA ``Programme 93+2 in. assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards.

Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Ross, H.H.; Carter, J.A.

1995-03-01

19

Misused and misleading IAEA leach test  

SciTech Connect

Examples of data from IAEA leach tests on spent fuel elements are shown that were displayed, not in the recommended manner in the IAEA leach test, but in the manner of the modifications of this leach test. The main difference in the display methods is in the plotting of incremental leach rates as a function of cumulative time of leaching rather than as a function of the mean time of leaching of each individual sample. This difference in display can lead to wrong conclusions if the display methods are not carefully considered.

Ogard, A.E.; Bryant, E.A.

1980-01-01

20

Inspections talks with IAEA again broken off  

SciTech Connect

North Korea again appears likely to resist more detailed safeguards inspections of its disputed nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The country's loner status was reinforced during the IAEA General Conference in September, when no other nation joined North Korea in voting against the placement of the inspection issue on the conference's agenda.

Not Available

1993-11-01

21

10 CFR 110.11 - Export of IAEA safeguards samples.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export of IAEA safeguards samples. 110.11 Section...MATERIAL Exemptions § 110.11 Export of IAEA safeguards samples. A person is...person exports special nuclear material in IAEA safeguards samples, if the...

2010-01-01

22

RECRUITMENT OF U.S. CITIZENS FOR VACANCIES IN IAEA SAFEGUARDS.  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on its member states to assist with recruiting qualified individuals for positions within the IAEA's secretariat. It is likewise important to the U.S. government for U.S. citizens to take positions with the IAEA to contribute to its success. It is important for persons within and outside the U.S. nuclear and safeguards industries to become aware of the job opportunities available at the IAEA and to be informed of important vacancies as they arise. The International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is tasked by the U.S. government with recruiting candidates for positions within the Department of Safeguards at the IAEA and since 1998, has been actively seeking methods for improving outreach. In addition, ISPO has been working more closely with the IAEA Division of Personnel. ISPO staff members attend trade shows to distribute information about IAEA opportunities. The shows target the nuclear industry as well as shows that are unrelated to the nuclear industry. ISPO developed a web site that provides information for prospective candidates. They have worked with the IAEA to understand its recruitment processes, to make suggestions for improvements, and to understand employment benefits so they can be communicated to potential U.S. applicants. ISPO is also collaborating with a State Department working group that is focused on increasing U.S. representation within the United Nations as a whole. Most recently Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice issued a letter to all Federal Agency heads encouraging details and transfers of their employees to international organizations to the maximum extent feasible and with due regard to their manpower requirements. She urged all federal agencies to review their detail and transfer policies and practices to ensure that employment in international organizations is promoted in a positive and active manner. In addition, she wrote that it is important that agencies examine their policies and practices for returning employees from details and transfer to ensure that reintegration procedures result in both the agency and such employees receiving optimal benefit from the international organization experience. This paper follows a 1999 paper on the same topic.

OCCHIOGROSSO, D.; PEPPER, S.

2006-07-16

23

Analysis of historical delta values for IAEA/LANL NDA training courses  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by providing training for IAEA inspectors in neutron and gamma-ray Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of nuclear material. Since 1980, all new IAEA inspectors attend this two week course at LANL gaining hands-on experience in the application of NDA techniques, procedures and analysis to measure plutonium and uranium nuclear material standards with well known pedigrees. As part of the course the inspectors conduct an inventory verification exercise. This exercise provides inspectors the opportunity to test their abilities in performing verification measurements using the various NDA techniques. For an inspector, the verification of an item is nominally based on whether the measured assay value agrees with the declared value to within three times the historical delta value. The historical delta value represents the average difference between measured and declared values from previous measurements taken on similar material with the same measurement technology. If the measurement falls outside a limit of three times the historical delta value, the declaration is not verified. This paper uses measurement data from five years of IAEA courses to calculate a historical delta for five non-destructive assay methods: Gamma-ray Enrichment, Gamma-ray Plutonium Isotopics, Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting, Active Neutron Coincidence Counting and the Neutron Coincidence Collar. These historical deltas provide information as to the precision and accuracy of these measurement techniques under realistic conditions.

Geist, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santi, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bonner, Elisa [FORMER N-4 STUDENT

2009-01-01

24

Automated Controlled-Potential Coulometer for the IAEA  

SciTech Connect

An automated controlled-potential coulometer has been developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the determination of plutonium for use at the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Siebersdorf, Austria. The system is functionally the same as earlier systems built for use at the Savannah River Site`s Analytical Laboratory. All electronic circuits and printed circuits boards have been upgraded with state-of-the-art components. A higher amperage potentiostat with improved control stability has been developed. The system achieves electronic calibration accuracy and linearity of better than 0.01 percent, with a precision and accuracy better than 0.1 percent has been demonstrated. This coulometer features electrical calibration of the integration system, electrolysis current background corrections, and control-potential adjustment capabilities. These capabilities allow application of the system to plutonium measurements without chemical standards, achieving traceability to the international measurement system through electrical standards and Faraday`s constant. the chemist is provided with the capability to perform measurements without depending upon chemical standards, which is a significant advantage for applications such as characterization of primary and secondary standards. Additional benefits include reducing operating cost to procure, prepare and measure calibration standards and the corresponding decrease in radioactive waste generation. The design and documentation of the automated instrument are provided herein. Each individual module`s operation, wiring, layout, and alignment are described. Interconnection of the modules and system calibration are discussed. A complete set of prints and a list of associated parts are included.

Cordaro, J.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Holland, M.K.; Fields, T.

1998-01-29

25

Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

1994-09-01

26

USSP-IAEA WORKSHOP ON ADVANCED SENSORS FOR SAFEGUARDS.  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA Medium Term Strategy (2006-2011) defines a number of specific goals in respect to the IAEA's ability to provide assurances to the international community regarding the peaceful use of nuclear energy through States adherences to their respective non-proliferation treaty commitments. The IAEA has long used and still needs the best possible sensors to detect and measure nuclear material. The Department of Safeguards, recognizing the importance of safeguards-oriented R&D, especially targeting improved detection capabilities for undeclared facilities, materials and activities, initiated a number of activities in early 2005. The initiatives included letters to Member State Support Programs (MSSPs), personal contacts with known technology holders, topical meetings, consultant reviews of safeguards technology, and special workshops to identify new and novel technologies and methodologies. In support of this objective, the United States Support Program to IAEA Safeguards hosted a workshop on ''Advanced Sensors for Safeguards'' in Santa Fe, New Mexico, from April 23-27, 2007. The Organizational Analysis Corporation, a U.S.-based management consulting firm, organized and facilitated the workshop. The workshop's goal was to help the IAEA identify and plan for new sensors for safeguards implementation. The workshop, which was attended by representatives of seven member states and international organizations, included presentations by technology holders and developers on new technologies thought to have relevance to international safeguards, but not yet in use by the IAEA. The presentations were followed by facilitated breakout sessions where the participants considered two scenarios typical of what IAEA inspectors might face in the field. One scenario focused on an enrichment plant; the other scenario focused on a research reactor. The participants brainstormed using the technologies presented by the participants and other technologies known to them to propose techniques and methods that could be used by the IAEA to strengthen safeguards. Creative thinking was encouraged during discussion of the proposals. On the final day of the workshop, the OAC facilitators summarized the participant's ideas in a combined briefing. This paper will report on the results of the April 2007 USSP-IAEA Workshop on Advanced Sensors for Safeguards and give an overview of the proposed technologies of greatest promise.

PEPPER,S.; QUEIROLO, A.; ZENDEL, M.; WHICHELLO, J.; ANNESE, C.; GRIEBE, J.; GRIEBE, R.

2007-11-13

27

Reducing the risks from radon indoors: an IAEA perspective.  

PubMed

The IAEA has a mandate to develop, in collaboration with other relevant international organisations, 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimisation of danger to life and property', and to provide for the application of these standards. The most recent edition of the International Basic Safety Standards includes, for the first time, requirements to protect the public from exposure due to radon indoors. As a result, the IAEA has already developed guidance material in line with accepted best international practice and an international programme to assist its Member States in identifying and addressing high radon concentrations in buildings is being prepared. This paper overviews the current situation around the world and summarises the management approach advocated by the IAEA. A number of important scientific and policy issues are identified and discussed from the point-of-view of how they may impact on national action plans and strategies. Finally, the assistance and support available through the Agency is described. PMID:24743761

Boal, T; Colgan, P A

2014-07-01

28

IAEA-TECDOC-1450 Thorium fuel cycle --Potential  

E-print Network

of this publication in the IAEA was: Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section International Atomic Energy Agency associated with 233 U, necessitates remote reprocessing and refabrication of fuel. The protactinium formed and H.P. Nawada of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology. #12;EDITORIAL NOTE The use

Laughlin, Robert B.

29

IAEA activities in the area of partitioning and transmutation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four major challenges are facing the long-term development of nuclear energy: improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptance. Meeting the sustainability criteria is the driving force behind the topic of this paper. In this context, sustainability has two aspects: natural resources and waste management. IAEA's activities in

Alexander Stanculescu

2006-01-01

30

Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol in the Philippines: USDOE/PNRI Cooperation  

SciTech Connect

The Philippines entered into force the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Additional Protocol (AP) in February 2010. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the government agency responsible for implementing the AP. In June 2010 the IAEA invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to help conduct a joint national training seminar on the AP. DOE presented to PNRI its AP international technical assistance program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), which helps partner countries implement the AP. In coordination with the IAEA, DOE established this program in 2008 to complement IAEA AP seminars with long-term country-specific cooperation from the perspective of a Member State. The US version of the AP is the same version as that of non-nuclear weapon states except for the addition of a national security exclusion. Due to this, DOE cooperation with other countries enables the sharing of valuable lessons learned in implementing the AP. DOE/INSEP described to PNRI the various areas of cooperation it offers to interested countries, whether they are preparing for entry into force or already implementing the AP. Even countries that have entered the AP into force are sometimes not fully prepared to implement it well, and welcome cooperation to improve their implementation process. PNRI and DOE/INSEP subsequently agreed to cooperate in several areas to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the Philippines AP implementation. These areas include providing working-level training to PNRI staff and preparing an information document that details that training for future reference, assisting with the development of an outreach program and procedures for AP reporting and complementary access, and identifying Annex II equipment and non-nuclear materials whose export must be reported under the AP. DOE laboratory representatives, funded by INSEP, met again with PNRI in February 2011 to provide training for PNRI AP staff and investigate specific ways to improve implementation. Another meeting in July 2011 focused on preparations for outreach to industry and universities. In this paper PNRI describes current implementation of the AP in the Philippines, and both DOE/INSEP and PNRI provide their perspectives on their cooperation to enhance that implementation.

Sequis, Julietta E.; Cain, Ronald A.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Hansen, Linda H.; VanSickle, Matthew; Killinger, Mark H.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

2011-07-19

31

49 CFR 171.26 - Additional requirements for the use of the IAEA Regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Additional requirements for the use of the IAEA Regulations. 171.26 Section 171...Additional requirements for the use of the IAEA Regulations. A Class 7 (radioactive...transportation or transported in accordance with the IAEA Regulations (IBR, see § 171.7)...

2010-10-01

32

21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Chengdu, 16 21 October 2006 1 Max-Planck-Institut  

E-print Network

21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Chengdu, 16 ­ 21 October 2006 1 Max-Planck-Institut fürst IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Chengdu, 16 ­ 21 October 2006 2 Overview Introduction Status Design Stellarator Conclusions and Recommendations #12;21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Chengdu, 16 ­ 21 October

33

Technical implementation in support of the IAEA`s remote monitoring field trial at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

A remote monitoring system (RMS) field trial will be conducted for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on highly enriched uranium materials in a vault at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Remote monitoring technologies are being evaluated to verify their capability to enhance the effectiveness and timeliness of IAEA safeguards in storage facilities while reducing the costs of inspections and burdens on the operator. Phase one of the field trial, which involved proving the satellite transmission of sensor data and safeguards images from a video camera activated by seals and motion sensors installed in the vault, was completed in September 1995. Phase two involves formal testing of the RMS as a tool for use by the IAEA during their tasks of monitoring the storage of nuclear material. The field trial to be completed during early 1997 includes access and item monitoring of nuclear materials in two storage trays. The RMS includes a variety of Sandia, Oak Ridge, and Aquila sensor technologies that provide video monitoring, radiation attribute measurements, and container identification to the on-site data acquisition system (DAS) by way of radio-frequency and Echelon LONWorks networks. The accumulated safeguards information will be transmitted to the IAEA via satellite (COMSAT/RSI) and international telephone lines.

Corbell, B.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moran, B.W.; Pickett, C.A.; Whitaker, J.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Resnik, W. [Aquila Technologies Group Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Landreth, D. [COMSAT/RSI, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-08-01

34

IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

NONE

1997-12-31

35

IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

NONE

1996-12-31

36

The IAEA's 'ALMERA Network' proficiency test on the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides: a test of results comparability.  

PubMed

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinates the work of a world-wide network of analytical laboratories, the Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) network. A proficiency test for ALMERA members was organized in 2006 based on the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides ((54)Mn, (60)Co, (65)Zn, (109)Cd, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (210)Pb) in three matrices: water, soil and grass. This paper presents the methodology applied in this proficiency test and discusses the results of the analytical performance evaluation for 38 participating laboratories. The paper also addresses some technical root causes, which could explain low performances in the determination of (109)Cd and (210)Pb. PMID:18499463

Shakhashiro, Abdulghani; Trinkl, Alexander; Sansone, Umberto

2008-11-01

37

Quality assurance measures applicable to IAEA anomaly and discrepancy resolution (ISPO Task D. 52). Program for technical assistance to IAEA safeguards  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards program provides assurance to the international community that nations comply with their commitments for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This assurance is based on the capabilities of the IAEA safeguards program to detect diversion of nuclear material. Anomalies and discrepancies, which occur in the event of a diversion or concealment, are detected as part of the IAEA safeguards program. Anomalies and discrepancies normally result from innocent causes and it is the purpose of the resolution process to determine the significance of them. The IAEA is instituting quality assurance measures for the IAEA inspection process. This paper reviews the anomaly and discrepancy resolution process and describes quality control measures which are the basis for quality assurance. 13 references, 6 tables.

Harms, N.L.; Smith, B.W.

1984-11-01

38

Comparison of air kerma measurements between the PTB and the IAEA for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in general diagnostic radiology and mammography, identified as EURAMET.RI(I)-S10 (EURAMET project #1221), was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two spherical and two parallel-plate reference-class ionization chambers of the IAEA and 12 beam qualities standardized in the IEC standard 61267:2005 plus 7 additional standard beam qualities established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in September 2012 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show the calibration coefficients of both laboratories to be in good agreement within the standard uncertainty of the comparison of about 0.47%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

Csete, István; Büermann, Ludwig; Gomola, Igor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

2013-01-01

39

IAEA activities on the safe handling and disposition of plutonium  

SciTech Connect

The buildup of the inventory of plutonium from dismantled warheads as well as from civilian nuclear programs and its disposition are under intense international debate. The activities of the IAEA in the technical area will be presented in this paper. It deals with (1) estimation of world wide inventories of civil plutonium both current and projected, (2) preparation of a safety document on safe handling and storage of plutonium, (3) exchange of information and discussion on some reactor technologies associated with the disposition of plutonium and it provides the necessary support to the ongoing initiatives for more transparency in management of plutonium.

Oi, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management

1995-12-31

40

[Nuclear energy and environment: review of the IAEA environmental projects].  

PubMed

The review of the environmental projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented. Basic IAEA documents intended to protect humans and the Environment are considered and their main features are discussed. Some challenging issues in the area of protection of the Environment and man, including the impact of nuclear facilities on the environment, radioactive waste management, and remediation of the areas affected by radiological accidents, nuclear testing and sites of nuclear facilities are also discussed. The need to maintain the existing knowledge in radioecology and protection of the environment is emphasised. PMID:23516895

Fesenko, S; Fogt, G

2012-01-01

41

The 1995 IAEA intercomparison of ?-ray spectrum analysis software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an intercomparison organized by the IAEA, 12 PC-based programs for ?-ray spectrum analysis were tested using seven reference spectra and a sum of squared differences method. It was found that all programs yield peak areas without bias, relative to each other. Most of the programs could analyze a spectrum containing only singlets in reasonable statistical control with respect to peak areas. Peak positions generally are reported with too small or absent uncertainties. Statistical control was found to be lacking in the analysis of doublet peak areas.

Blaauw, M.; Osorio Fernandez, V.; van Espen, P.; Bernasconi, G.; Capote Noy, R.; Manh Dung, H.; Molla, N. I.

1997-02-01

42

System certification progress in concept recognition in IAEA regulation  

SciTech Connect

System Certification is a regulatory concept which is intended to expand the scope of radioactive material transport regulations by allowing alternative means for proving compliance with the requisite standards of safety set out in transport regulations. In practice it may allow more stringent requirements in one aspect of the regulations to be substituted for less stringent application in other areas so long as the safety standard provided by regulation is preserved. The concept is widely perceived as the imposition of operational controls in exchange for relaxation of packaging standards, but that is only one possibility in the spectrum of potential actions under a System Certification provision in IAEA or national regulations.

Luna, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Pollog, T. [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31

43

RECRUITMENT OF U.S. CITIZENS FOR VACANCIES IN IAEA SAFEGUARDS  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on its member states to assist with recruiting qualified individuals for positions within the IAEA's secretariat. It is important that persons within and outside the US nuclear and safeguards industries become aware of career opportunities available at the IAEA, and informed about important vacancies. The IAEA has established an impressive web page to advertise opportunities for employment. However, additional effort is necessary to ensure that there is sufficient awareness in the US of these opportunities, and assistance for persons interested in taking positions at the IAEA. In 1998, the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support (SSTS) approved a special task under the US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) for improving US efforts to identify qualified candidates for vacancies in IAEA's Department of Safeguards. The International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) developed a plan that includes increased advertising, development of a web page to support US recruitment efforts, feedback from the US Mission in Vienna, and interaction with other recruitment services provided by US professional organizations. The main purpose of this effort is to educate US citizens about opportunities at the IAEA so that qualified candidates can be identified for the IAEA's consideration.

PEPPER,S.E.; DECARO,D.; WILLIAMS,G.; CARELLI,J.; ASSUR,M.

1999-07-25

44

The IAEA Workshop on Requirements and Potential Technologies for Replacement of 3He Detectors in IAEA Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect

From 22 – 24 March, 2011, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held an international workshop to address the question of a possible replacement for helium-3 based neutron detectors. Within this wider scope, the workshop was focused on those applications used in IAEA verification activities. There were two principle objectives of the workshop: 1) to determine the specific requirements that a potential replacement technology would have to satisfy, and 2) to identify alternative detector technologies that appear promising for meeting those requirements. The workshop was successful in achieving both objectives. A set of detailed and quantitative specifications was developed and achieved a general consensus among the conference participants. These included operational considerations such as temperature stability, safety, weight, and cost in addition to a number of performance requirements. The performance requirements were derived from an analysis of the spectrum of IAEA applications that use neutron detectors. After analyzing these applications, it was determined that the most common application for 3He detectors was for neutron coincidence counting, comprising over 95% of 3He use. The details and rationale for this assessment will be provided. The performance requirements for neutron coincidence counting can be directly calculated from the standard variance expressions. From these, a basic figure of merit (FOM) was developed that can be used to rank various different options. For neutron coincidence counting, the figure of merit is: , where ? is the detection efficiency and is the detector die away time. Both the FOM and the calculations will be presented. The full list of requirements is included in this paper. The second purpose of the workshop was to identify promising replacement technologies. There were multiple presentations of candidate detection technologies over the course of the workshop, covering a wide spectrum of approaches and detection physics. These technologies were judged relative to the performance of a 3He-based system, as well as its ability to meet the replacement technology requirements as developed in this workshop. The paper will present a summary of this assessment.

Pickrell, Mark; Lavietes, Anthony; Gavron, Victor A.; Henzlova, D.; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Menlove, H. O.

2013-01-01

45

Radionuclide transfer to fruit in the IAEA TRS No. 472  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the approach taken to present the information on fruits in the IAEA report TRS No. 472, supported by the IAEA-TECDOC-1616, which describes the key transfer processes, concepts and conceptual models regarded as important for dose assessment, as well as relevant parameters for modelling radionuclide transfer in fruits. Information relate to fruit plants grown in agricultural ecosystems of temperate regions. The relative significance of each pathway after release of radionuclides depends upon the radionuclide, the kind of crop, the stage of plant development and the season at time of deposition. Fruit intended as a component of the human diet is borne by plants that are heterogeneous in habits, and morphological and physiological traits. Information on radionuclides in fruit systems has therefore been rationalised by characterising plants in three groups: woody trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. Parameter values have been collected from open literature, conference proceedings, institutional reports, books and international databases. Data on root uptake are reported as transfer factor values related to fresh weight, being consumption data for fruits usually given in fresh weight.

Carini, F.; Pellizzoni, M.; Giosuè, S.

2012-04-01

46

The IAEA's activities on radiation protection in interventional cardiology  

PubMed Central

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its mandate of developing and applying standards of radiation safety has initiated a number of activities in recent years on radiation protection in interventional cardiology. These activities are implemented through four mechanisms, namely training, providing information through the website, research projects and assistance to Member States through Technical Cooperation (TC) projects. Major international initiatives have been taken in the area of training where more than half a dozen regional training courses have been conducted for cardiologists from over 50 countries. Additionally four national training events for over 300 medical and paramedical staff members involved in interventional procedures were held. The training material is freely available on CD from the IAEA. The newly established website provides information on radiation protection issues [1]. Two coordinated research projects have just been completed where peak skin doses to patients undergoing high dose interventional procedures were studied and factors to manage patient doses were identified. The technical cooperation projects involving protection in cardiac interventional procedures have 30 countries as participants. PMID:21614275

Rehani, MM

2007-01-01

47

Role of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards in confidence building  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, I will examine some attributes of confidence building and connect them with how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) interacts with its member states in carrying out its safeguards function. These interactions and the structure set up to define them help maintain and strengthen confidence between the IAEA and the member states and among these states. 3 refs.

Augustson, R.H.

1989-01-01

48

Seabed gamma-ray spectrometry: applications at IAEA-MEL.  

PubMed

The technique of underwater gamma-ray spectrometry has been developed to complement or replace the traditional sampling-sample analysis approach for applications with space-time constraints, e.g. large areas of investigation, emergency response or long-term monitoring. IAEA-MEL has used both high-efficiency NaI(Tl) and high-resolution HPGe spectrometry to investigate contamination with anthropogenic radionuclides in a variety of marine environments. Surveys at the South Pacific nuclear test sites of Mururoa and Fangataufa have been used to guide sampling in areas of high contamination around ground zero points. In the Irish Sea offshore from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant, a gamma-ray survey of seabed sediment was carried out to obtain estimates of the distribution and subsequently, for the inventory of 137Cs in the investigated area. PMID:11379061

Osvath, I; Povinec, P P

2001-01-01

49

Nuclear Analytical Applications within the IAEA Nuclear Data Section  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, supports Member States development of nuclear techniques through a number of targeted actions and projects. The Section fulfills this role by organizing Coordinated Research Projects, or through less formal Data Development Projects and/or Technical Meetings. Training workshops are also regularly organized in conjunction with the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. A number of projects relating to materials analysis techniques have been recently undertaken, e.g. neutron activation analysis, ion beam analysis, and proton induced X- or ?-ray emission. In particular, details of the Coordinated Research Project focusing on the nuclear data requirements for the k0 method of neutron activation analysis are given. The paper illustrates how the IAEA strives to bring together relevant partners and provides a unique and structured basis for international collaboration.

Kellett, Mark A.

2011-12-01

50

End user needs for enhanced IAEA Safeguards Information Management Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency is undertaking a program for strengthening its safeguards on the recognition that safeguards must give assurance not only of the non-diversion of declared material or that declared facilities are not being misused, but also of the absence of any undeclared nuclear activities in States which have signed comprehensive safeguards agreements with the Agency. The IAEA has determined that the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and the creation of confidence in the continuing peaceful use of declared material and facilities is largely dependent on more information being made available to the Agency and on the capability of the Agency to make more effective use of this additional information, as well as existing information.

Badalamente, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Deland, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-07-01

51

Nuclear Analytical Applications within the IAEA Nuclear Data Section  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, supports Member States development of nuclear techniques through a number of targeted actions and projects. The Section fulfills this role by organizing Coordinated Research Projects, or through less formal Data Development Projects and/or Technical Meetings. Training workshops are also regularly organized in conjunction with the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. A number of projects relating to materials analysis techniques have been recently undertaken, e.g. neutron activation analysis, ion beam analysis, and proton induced X- or {gamma}-ray emission. In particular, details of the Coordinated Research Project focusing on the nuclear data requirements for the k{sub 0} method of neutron activation analysis are given. The paper illustrates how the IAEA strives to bring together relevant partners and provides a unique and structured basis for international collaboration.

Kellett, Mark A. [Nuclear Data Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2011-12-13

52

22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic  

E-print Network

22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Zonca, Liu Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 2 Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 3 2 Linear

Zonca, Fulvio

53

Four Years of Practical Arrangements between IAEA and Moscow SIA 'Radon': Preliminary Results - 13061  

SciTech Connect

The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries- IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) was signed between SIA 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveikin, P.P. [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

54

IAEA programme on the quality of marine radioactivity data.  

PubMed

Society's growing interest in environmental issues requires the production of reliable information for policy-makers, stakeholders and society in general. This information must be based on accurate data produced by qualified laboratories and data need to be comparable between numerous laboratories for joint assessments, e.g. in International Conventions. The Marine Environment Laboratories of the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing Quality Assurance services to laboratories involved in marine radioactivity studies for the past 30 years. This has included training, organization of laboratory intercomparison exercises, production of Reference Materials (RMs) and more recently, production of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) that comply with relevant ISO standards. Here, the overall process of Certification of Reference Materials is reviewed, past work summarized and future needs of marine radioactivity laboratories briefly discussed. PMID:18572286

Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pham, M K; Povinec, P P

2008-10-01

55

Radiation processing of natural polymers: The IAEA contribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation processing offers a clean and additive-free method for preparation of value-added novel materials based on renewable, non-toxic, and biodegradable natural polymers. Crosslinked natural polymers can be used as hydrogel wound dressings, face cleaning cosmetic masks, adsorbents of toxins, and non-bedsore mats; while low molecular weight products show antibiotic, antioxidant, and plant-growth promoting properties. Recognizing the potential benefits that radiation technology can offer for processing of natural polymers into useful products, the IAEA implemented a coordinated research project (CRP) on "Development of Radiation-processed products of Natural Polymers for application in Agriculture, Healthcare, Industry and Environment". This CRP was launched at the end of 2007 with participation of 16 MS to help connecting radiation technology and end-users to derive enhanced benefits from these new value-added products of radiation-processed natural materials. In this paper the results of activities in participating MS related to this work will be presented.

Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Safrany, Agnes; Sampa, Maria Helena de O.; Ramamoorthy, Natesan

2010-03-01

56

The IAEA handbook on radionuclide transfer to wildlife.  

PubMed

An IAEA handbook presenting transfer parameter values for wildlife has recently been produced. Concentration ratios (CRwo-media) between the whole organism (fresh weight) and either soil (dry weight) or water were collated for a range of wildlife groups (classified taxonomically and by feeding strategy) in terrestrial, freshwater, marine and brackish generic ecosystems. The data have been compiled in an on line database, which will continue to be updated in the future providing the basis for subsequent revision of the Wildlife TRS values. An overview of the compilation and analysis, and discussion of the extent and limitations of the data is presented. Example comparisons of the CRwo-media values are given for polonium across all wildlife groups and ecosystems and for molluscs for all radionuclides. The CRwo-media values have also been compared with those currently used in the ERICA Tool which represented the most complete published database for wildlife transfer values prior to this work. The use of CRwo-media values is a pragmatic approach to predicting radionuclide activity concentrations in wildlife and is similar to that used for screening assessments for the human food chain. The CRwo-media values are most suitable for a screening application where there are several conservative assumptions built into the models which will, to varying extents, compensate for the variable data quality and quantity, and associated uncertainty. PMID:22513215

Howard, B J; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Telleria, D; Proehl, G; Fesenko, S; Jeffree, R A; Yankovich, T L; Brown, J E; Higley, K; Johansen, M P; Mulye, H; Vandenhove, H; Gashchak, S; Wood, M D; Takata, H; Andersson, P; Dale, P; Ryan, J; Bollhöfer, A; Doering, C; Barnett, C L; Wells, C

2013-07-01

57

The IAEA Assistance and Training Programme for Transport Security  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

Hawk, Mark B [ORNL] [ORNL; Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge] [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01

58

The IAEA Assistance Training Programme for Transport Security  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

2010-01-01

59

International Atomic Energy Agency 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference  

E-print Network

Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, United States of America 4) NumerEx, Albuquerque, NM, United States of America 5) U of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States of America e-mail contact of main author: wurden Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, United States of America 4) NumerEx, Albuquerque, NM, United States

60

IAEA activities related to radiation biology and health effects of radiation.  

PubMed

The IAEA is involved in capacity building with regard to the radiobiological sciences in its member states through its technical cooperation programme. Research projects/programmes are normally carried out within the framework of coordinated research projects (CRPs). Under this programme, two CRPs have been approved which are relevant to nuclear/radiation accidents: (1) stem cell therapeutics to modify radiation-induced damage to normal tissue, and (2) strengthening biological dosimetry in IAEA member states. PMID:22395066

Wondergem, Jan; Rosenblatt, Eduardo

2012-03-01

61

Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K. [Nuclear Data Section, NAPC Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, P. O. Box 100, Vienna International Centre, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-11

62

Containment and surveillance -- A principal IAEA safeguards measure  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the safeguards inspectorate of the Agency, spanning more than 40 years, has produced a variety of interesting subjects (legal, technical, political, etc.) for recollection, discussion, and study. Although the Agency was established in 1957, the first practical inspections did not occur until the early 1960s. In the early inspections, thee was little C/S equipment available, and no optical surveillance was used. However, by the third decade of the IAEA, the 1980s, many technology advances were made, and the level of C/S equipment activities increased. By the late 1980s, some 200 Twin Minolta film camera systems were deployed by the Agency for safeguards use. At the present time, the Agency is evaluating and beginning to implement remote monitoring as part of the Strengthened Safeguards System. However, adoption of remote monitoring by international agencies cannot occur rapidly because of the many technical and policy issues associated with this activity. A glimpse into the future indicates that an important element of safeguards instrumentation will be the merging of C/S and NDA equipment into integrated systems. The use of modern interior area monitors in International Safeguards also offers a great potential for advancing C/S measures. The research in microsensors is in its infancy, and the opportunities for their reducing the cost, increasing the life time, and increasing the reliability of sensors for safeguards applications are manifold. A period may be approaching in which the terminology of C/S will no longer have its original meaning, as integrated systems combining NDA instruments and C/S instruments are already in use and are expected to be the norm in the near future.

Drayer, D.D.; Dupree, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnier, C.S. [Jupiter Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31

63

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Peru.  

PubMed

The tissue bank "Rosa Guerzoni Chambergo" (RGCTB) located at the Child's Health Institute was inaugurated in 1996, with the financial and technical support of the IAEA program on radiation and tissue banking. Since 1998, the biological bandage of fresh and lyophilised pigskin, amnion and bone tissue is processed routinely in this bank. In all cases, the tissue is sterilised with the use of Cobalt-60 radiation, process carried out at the Laboratories of Irradiation of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). The tissue bank in the Child's Health Institute helped to save lives in an accident occurred in Lima, when a New Year's fireworks celebration ran out of control in January 2002. Nearly 300 people died in the tragic blaze and hundreds more were seriously burned and injured. Eight Lima hospitals and clinics suddenly were faced with saving the lives of severely burned men, women and children. Fortunately, authorities were ready to respond to the emergency. More than 1,600 dressings were sterilised and supplied to Lima surgeons. The efforts helped save the lives of patients who otherwise might not have survived the Lima fire. Between 1998 and September 2007, 35,012 tissue grafts were produced and irradiated. Radiation sterilised tissues are used by 20 national medical institutions as well as 17 private health institutions. The tissue bank established in Peru with the support of the IAEA is now producing the following tissues: pigskin dressings, fresh and freeze-dried; bone allografts, chips, wedges and powdered, and amnion dressings air-dried. It is also now leading the elaboration of national standards, assignment being entrusted by ONDT (Organización Nacional de Donación y Transplantes; National Organisation on Donation and Transplant). This among other will permit the accreditation of the tissue bank. In this task is also participating IPEN. PMID:18612849

Gamero, Emma Castro; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

64

IAEA programs in empowering the nuclear medicine profession through online educational resources.  

PubMed

The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme in human health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases through the application of nuclear techniques. It has the specific mission of fostering the application of nuclear medicine techniques as part of the clinical management of certain types of diseases. Attuned to the continuous evolution of this specialty as well as to the advancement and diversity of methods in delivering capacity building efforts in this digital age, the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA has enhanced its program by incorporating online educational resources for nuclear medicine professionals into its repertoire of projects to further its commitment in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Through online educational resources such as the Human Health Campus website, e-learning modules, and scheduled interactive webinars, a validation of the commitment by the IAEA in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine is strengthened while utilizing the advanced internet and communications technology which is progressively becoming available worldwide. The Human Health Campus (www.humanhealth.iaea.org) is the online educational resources initiative of the Division of Human Health of the IAEA geared toward enhancing professional knowledge of health professionals in radiation medicine (nuclear medicine and diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical radiation physics), and nutrition. E-learning modules provide an interactive learning environment to its users while providing immediate feedback for each task accomplished. Webinars, unlike webcasts, offer the opportunity of enhanced interaction with the learners facilitated through slide shows where the presenter guides and engages the audience using video and live streaming. This paper explores the IAEA's available online educational resources programs geared toward the enhancement of the nuclear medicine profession as delivered by the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA. PMID:23561452

Pascual, Thomas Nb; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Kashyap, Ravi; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

2013-05-01

65

Safeguards Implementation: Establishment of Indonesian Safeguards Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Under the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), U.S. National Laboratories support the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ''collaborate with international partners to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development.'' This engagement in safeguards implementation cooperation is the basis for the security and safeguards arrangement with the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BAPETEN) and includes strengthening of the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC). There are many components in a robust SSAC. While INSEP carries on its program in a holistic approach, it is more effective and efficient to address individual components, rather than the entire system at one time, with the objective of strengthening the system as a whole. Nuclear material accountancy is one of these components. Nuclear material accountancy necessitates that a State periodically take an inventory of its material and record changes. To better perform these activities, BAPETEN requested assistance with establishing a safeguards laboratory where its staff could perform independent material characterization, maintain nondestructive assay equipment, and facilitate hands-on training of BAPETEN safeguards inspectors. In compliance with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidelines and safety series documents, INSEP and BAPETEN opened the BAPETEN Safeguards Laboratory in February 2010 to provide these competencies. BAPETEN showcased these new capabilities in July 2010 at the IAEA-sponsored Regional Workshop on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Facilities where hands-on activities were held at BAPETEN's Headquarters in Jakarta using the equipment supplied by INSEP. Discussions have begun on the establishment of a security and safeguards laboratory at the BAPETEN Training Center located in Cisarua. This paper describes the many steps involved with the Safeguards Laboratory Implementation Plan from its drafting in August 2007 to the completion of the laboratory in February 2010.

Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Steven E [ORNL] [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL] [ORNL; Suharyanta, Suharyanta [ORNL] [ORNL; Sunaryadi, Dedi [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

66

Testing the validity of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety culture model.  

PubMed

This paper takes the first steps to empirically validate the widely used model of safety culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), composed of five dimensions, further specified by 37 attributes. To do so, three independent and complementary studies are presented. First, 290 students serve to collect evidence about the face validity of the model. Second, 48 experts in organizational behavior judge its content validity. And third, 468 workers in a Spanish nuclear power plant help to reveal how closely the theoretical five-dimensional model can be replicated. Our findings suggest that several attributes of the model may not be related to their corresponding dimensions. According to our results, a one-dimensional structure fits the data better than the five dimensions proposed by the IAEA. Moreover, the IAEA model, as it stands, seems to have rather moderate content validity and low face validity. Practical implications for researchers and practitioners are included. PMID:24076304

López de Castro, Borja; Gracia, Francisco J; Peiró, José M; Pietrantoni, Luca; Hernández, Ana

2013-11-01

67

Project plan international atomic energy agency (IAEA) safeguards project plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the PFP Integrated Project Management Plan (PMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP IAEA project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the IAEA project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-05-13

68

JOINT UNITED STATES/IAEA PROPOSED APPROACH FOR SAFEGUARDS DURING PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND SHIPMENT  

SciTech Connect

For safety reasons, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to stabilize and package plutonium oxide currently subject to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) beginning in the year 2001. The Hanford Site will also stabilize and package plutonium materials under IAEA safeguards. The U.S. and the IAEA began consultations in late 1996 to develop an approach to the application of safeguards during stabilization and packaging. With the plans to ship RFETS plutonium to Savannah River for interim storage prior to final disposition, this work has been extended to include safeguards during shipment. This paper will discuss the elements of a joint U.S./IAEA proposal for this task.

L. KWEI; B. SMITH; ET AL

2001-02-01

69

Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10  

E-print Network

Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller.87 Ã? 10-7 kg-m2 , and Jl = 3 Ã? 10-5 kg-m2 . Page 1 of 7 #12;Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE;Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 10.3 Laboratory Preparation 1. Write a MATLAB script

70

LANGUAGE LABORATORIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE USE OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY HAS GIVEN MANY THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS GOOD LISTENING AND SPEAKING PRACTICE AND HAS BECOME AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING TOOL. THE BASIC PIECE OF EQUIPMENT OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS THE TAPE RECORDER-AND-PLAYBACK, DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH AUDIOPASSIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE-COMPARATIVE STUDY, AND…

BRUBAKER, CHARLES WILLIAM

71

The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards - How It Works  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Support Program to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards (USSP) was established in 1977 to transfer US technology and expertise to assist the IAEA Department of Safeguards because its limited budget and scope would not allow for R&D activities and the procurement of specialized or customized equipment. Over the years, the USSP and the Department of Safeguards have worked together continuously to develop and improve processes for requesting, selecting, and managing projects that support the Safeguards verification mission. This paper will discuss the main USSP processes for accepting and processing Safeguards requests, and managing and reporting task progress.

Nock,C.; Hoffheins,B.

2008-07-13

72

The IAEA system and experience as a model for Information Management under the Chemical Weapons Convention  

SciTech Connect

Similarities in the verification aims of the monitoring regimes of the future Organization for the Prohibition of chemical Weapons (OPCW) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), make their general data requirements similar: data are needed for planning inspections, for evaluating inspections, and for preparation of reports on compliance with the relevant treaty In this paper we discuss the legal, procedural and administrative structure behind the data system associated with IAEA safeguards, and, after comparing this to the CWC regime, suggest possible improvements for consideration during the development of national implementation programs and of the declaration and inspection data management system for the OPCW.

Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Kempf, C.R.

1992-01-01

73

The IAEA system and experience as a model for Information Management under the Chemical Weapons Convention  

SciTech Connect

Similarities in the verification aims of the monitoring regimes of the future Organization for the Prohibition of chemical Weapons (OPCW) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), make their general data requirements similar: data are needed for planning inspections, for evaluating inspections, and for preparation of reports on compliance with the relevant treaty In this paper we discuss the legal, procedural and administrative structure behind the data system associated with IAEA safeguards, and, after comparing this to the CWC regime, suggest possible improvements for consideration during the development of national implementation programs and of the declaration and inspection data management system for the OPCW.

Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Kempf, C.R.

1992-09-01

74

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Program on Radiation and Tissue Banking: a Successful Program for Developing Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its inception the IAEA program in radiation and tissue banking supported the establishment of twenty five tissue banks in different countries. Now more than 103 tissue banks are now operating in these countries. The production of sterilized tissues has grown in an exponential mode within the IAEA program. From 1988 until the end of 2000 the production of sterilized

Jorge Morales Pedraza

2006-01-01

75

Paleomagnetics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

76

Project Management Plan (PMP) for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Project  

SciTech Connect

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the PFP IAEA project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) HNF-3617 Rev 0.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-09-14

77

Negotiating Global Nuclearities: Apartheid, Decolonization, and the Cold War in the making of the IAEA  

Microsoft Academic Search

After years of relative obscurity, the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a lot of public attention over the past decade. International political discourse - and journalistic coverage thereof - portray the IAEA as the most authoritative judge of a nation's ability to produce atomic weapons. In this discourse, the agency's impartiality is guaranteed both by the technical qualifications of

Gabrielle Hecht

78

Implementation of IAEA /1/INT/054 Project in Nuclear Analytical Techniques Group of Argentina: Current State  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the implementation of the training received through the IAEA Project "Preparation of Reference Materials and Organization of Proficiency Tests Rounds" in the Nuclear Analytical (NAT) Group of CNEA. Special emphasis is done on those activities related to the first Proficiency Test being carried out by the NAT Group.

Sara, Resnizky; Rita, Plá; Alba, Zaretzky

2008-08-01

79

An overview of the IAEA HEEP software and international programmes on hydrogen production using nuclear energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have witnessed an increasing interest in hydrogen production using nuclear energy. A number of countries are actively exploring the option of nuclear hydrogen production and have established concrete roadmaps for near and far term achievements. This paper presents a summary of information presented at some IAEA technical meetings on status of nuclear hydrogen production including ongoing related R&D

I. Khamis

2011-01-01

80

Synopsis : 2008 IAEA Temperature gradients are supported by cantori in chaotic fields  

E-print Network

. On KAM surfaces, we may expect that the temperature will be constant. Also, the temperature will flattenSynopsis : 2008 IAEA Temperature gradients are supported by cantori in chaotic fields S, this paper will show that chaotic fields can sup- port significant temperature gradients, despite the fact

Hudson, Stuart

81

20IAEA Vilamoura, 2004/11/04 Boundary modulation effects on MHD  

E-print Network

20IAEA Vilamoura, 2004/11/04 Boundary modulation effects on MHD instabilities in Heliotrons N discrepancy on MHD stability between theory and experiment discrepancy on MHD equilibrium between theory and experiment · Properties of peripheral magnetic field · Selected free boundary MHD equilibria · Linearized

Hudson, Stuart

82

Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaks to the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation  

ScienceCinema

On Sept. 14, 2009, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu addressed the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation. Chu is the first Cabinet official to discuss President Obama's nuclear security and nonproliferation agenda outside the United States since the President delivered his landmark speech in Prague in April 2009.

Secretary Chu

2010-09-01

83

Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11  

E-print Network

Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11 State Feedback Controller of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible joint) introduced in the Laboratory 8 (refer to [1 of the flexible joint: Page 1 of 7 #12;Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 · : motor shaft position

84

Comparison of the IAEA unyielding surface to various yielding targets  

SciTech Connect

An experimental program was conducted to determine the effects of target characteristics on the structural response of radioactive material transport containers subjected to impact tests. A cylindrical half-scale model without any energy mitigating devices represented the impacting projectile. The models were impacted at different velocities in an end-on orientation into soil, concrete, and unyielding targets. As expected, the impact into an unyielding target resulted in damage to the unit that enveloped the deformation produced from the tests into the yielding targets. Only striking the 18-inch thick concrete runway at twice the impact velocity obtained from a 30-ft fall onto an unyielding target (88 ft/s vs. 44 ft/s) resulted in relatively similar cask damage. In the past, tests have been performed to qualify the severity of the unyielding target with respect to yielding surfaces. The British staged a spectacular train crash into a truck cask at an impact velocity of 100 mph. A German rail cask was dropped 66 ft and impacted a simulated asphalt roadbed at 45 mph. Sandia National Laboratories performed a series of crash tests involving a train colliding into a radioactive materials transport cask at 80 mph, and a cask on a railcar impacting into a concrete wall. All of these demonstrations resulted in cask damage that was less severe than obtained from the regulatory 30-ft drop onto an unyielding target. These tests provide an environment in which the energy absorbing capabilities of the vehicle structure interact with the hardness of the target. It must be emphasized that the complete description of an impact accident situation combines the impact velocity with the target hardness.

Gonzales, A.

1987-08-01

85

Marked disequilibrium between 234Th and 230Th of the 238U natural radioactive decay chain in IAEA reference materials n. 312, 313 and 314.  

PubMed

A new laboratory for the spectroscopy of natural radioactivity with a good energy resolution is presented. It consists of two distinct parts equipped, respectively, the first one with a HpGe ?-ray detector, whose setup has been already completed, and the second one with large area Silicon ?-ray detectors and a radiochemical section for thin ?-samples preparation, whose setup is yet in progress and will be the argument of a separate work. The ?-ray spectrometer was calibrated by means of IAEA Reference Materials n. 312, 313, 314 and 375. A large difference from the predictions of secular equilibrium emerged between the activities of (234)Th and (230)Th in Materials n. 312, 313 and 314. PMID:21195514

Colaianni, A; D'Erasmo, G; Pantaleo, A; Schiavulli, L

2011-02-01

86

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

87

BROOKHAVEN LABORATORY  

E-print Network

, and decision-making processes. We will endeavor to support parents in their critical role. 2. Children develop that stimulates academic/cognitive growth, language, social-emotional development and physical developmentBROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Child Development Center Parent Handbook Revised 2009

Ohta, Shigemi

88

Laboratory Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for flexibility in science research facilities is discussed, with emphasis on the effect of that need on the design of laboratories. The relationship of office space, bench space, and special equipment areas, and the location and distribution of piping and air conditioning, are considered particularly important. This building type study…

Barnett, Jonathan

89

Appalachian Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

2011-06-14

90

Lessons learned in implementing IAEA safeguards on U.S. excess fissile materials, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

Highly enriched uranium (HEU) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was the initial US excess fissile material to be placed under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. This presentation describes the setting in which the US offer was made and five lessons learned from that experience which are: Lesson 1--Things may happen quickly; Lesson 2--Facility and supporting areas must provide for need of the IAEA to perform their inspection activities; Lesson 3--Familiarize site personnel with IAEA safeguards; Lesson 4--Prepare for the initial inventory verification; and Lesson 5--Prepare for inspections.

Whitaker, J.M.

1997-02-21

91

Neutron activation analysis of NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and IAEA animal bone (H-5)  

SciTech Connect

Data have been presented for 35 elements determined by INAA for NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and for 38 elements determined by INAA and RNAA for IAEA animal bone (H-5). The experimental data showed excellent agreement with published values wherever the comparison exists. Additional trace-element data in the ppb range have been presented for the elements Sc, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W and Th in NBS oyster tissue. Also, additional trace-element data for IAEA animal bone (H-5) in the ppb range for the elements Al, Sc, Co, Rb, Cs, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm, Yb, lu, Hf, Ta and Th have been presented.

Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.

1983-10-01

92

The IAEA programme and perspectives for environmental radionuclide monitoring and preparation of reference materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent achievements of and perspectives for the IAEA programme on measurements of radionuclides in the environment are reviewed. The programme includes sampling and measurement campaigns for the assessment of the radiological situation in potentially contaminated regions and the establishment of a world-wide network to assist the IAEA in carrying out those assessments. Furthermore the programme includes the different actions pertaining to the improvement of the quality of radioanalytical measurements in the Member States. In addition to training and assistance in the implementation of quality systems, the programme includes the development, compilation, review and dissemination of radioanalytical methods, the organisation of interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency tests and the preparation, characterisation and distribution of reference materials.

de Regge, P.; Burns, K.; Danesi, P. R.

1999-01-01

93

A review of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) international standards for tissue banks.  

PubMed

The IAEA International Standards for Tissue Banks published in 2003 were based on the Standards then currently in use in the USA and the European Union, among others, and reflect the best practices associated with the operation of a tissue bank. They cover legal, ethical and regulatory controls as well as requirements and procedures from donor selection and tissue retrieval to processing and distribution of finished tissue for clinical use. The application of these standards allows tissue banks to operate with the current good tissue practice, thereby providing grafts of high quality that satisfy the national and international demand for safe and biologically useful grafts. The objective of this article is to review the IAEA Standards and recommend new topics that could improve the current version. PMID:20714807

Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Lobo Gajiwala, Astrid; Martinez Pardo, María Esther

2012-03-01

94

Enhancing tsetse fly refractoriness to trypanosome infection--a new IAEA coordinated research project.  

PubMed

To date, IAEA-supported Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) projects for tsetse and trypanosomiasis control have been in areas without human sleeping sickness, but future projects could include areas of actual or potential human disease transmission. In this context it would be imperative that released sterile tsetse flies are incompetent to transmit the disease-causing trypanosome parasite. Therefore, development of tsetse fly strains refractory to trypanosome infection is highly desirable as a simple and effective method of ensuring vector incompetence of the released flies. This new IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) focuses on gaining a deeper knowledge of the tripartite interactions between the tsetse fly vectors, their symbionts and trypanosome parasites. The objective of this CRP is to acquire a better understanding of mechanisms that limit the development of trypanosome infections in tsetse and how these may be enhanced. PMID:22841950

Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Bourtzis, Kostas; Weiss, Brian; Cordón-Rosales, Celia; Miller, Wolfgang; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Parker, Andrew

2013-03-01

95

The US Support Program Assistance to the IAEA Safeguards Information Technology, Collection, and Analysis 2008  

SciTech Connect

One of the United States Support Program's (USSP) priorities for 2008 is to support the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) development of an integrated and efficient safeguards information infrastructure, including reliable and maintainable information systems, and effective tools and resources to collect and analyze safeguards-relevant information. The USSP has provided funding in support of this priority for the ISIS Re-engineering Project (IRP), and for human resources support to the design and definition of the enhanced information analysis architecture project (nVision). Assistance for several other information technology efforts is provided. This paper will report on the various ongoing support measures undertaken by the USSP to support the IAEA's information technology enhancements and will provide some insights into activities that the USSP may support in the future.

Tackentien,J.

2008-06-12

96

NOTE: Monte Carlo simulation of correction factors for IAEA TLD holders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IAEA standard thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holder has been developed for the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose program for audits of high-energy photon beams, and it is also employed by the ESTRO-QUALity assurance network (EQUAL) and several national TLD audit networks. Factors correcting for the influence of the holder on the TL signal under reference conditions have been calculated in the present work from Monte Carlo simulations with the PENELOPE code for 60Co ?-rays and 4, 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV photon beams. The simulation results are around 0.2% smaller than measured factors reported in the literature, but well within the combined standard uncertainties. The present study supports the use of the experimentally obtained holder correction factors in the determination of the absorbed dose to water from the TL readings; the factors calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations may be adopted for the cases where there are no measured data.

Hultqvist, Martha; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Izewska, Joanna

2010-03-01

97

Lunar laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

1986-01-01

98

A new Certified Reference Material for radionuclides in Irish sea sediment (IAEA385)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in sediment (IAEA-385) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Eleven radionuclides (40K, 137Cs, 226Ra, 228Ra, 230Th, 232Th, 234U, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am) have been certified and information mass activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for seven other radionuclides (90Sr, 210Pb(210Po), 235U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu).

M. K. Pham; J. A. Sanchez-Cabeza; P. P. Povinec; K. Andor; D. Arnold; M. Benmansour; I. Bikit; F. P. Carvalho; K. Dimitrova; Z. H. Edrev; C. Engeler; F. J. Fouche; J. Garcia-Orellana; C. Gascó; J. Gastaud; A. Gudelis; G. Hancock; E. Holm; F. Legarda; T. K. Ikäheimonen; C. Ilchmann; A. V. Jenkinson; G. Kanisch; G. Kis-Benedek; R. Kleinschmidt; V. Koukouliou; B. Kuhar; J. LaRosa; S.-H. Lee; G. LePetit; I. Levy-Palomo; L. Liong Wee Kwong; M. Llauradó; F. J. Maringer; M. Meyer; B. Michalik; H. Michel; H. Nies; S. Nour; J.-S. Oh; B. Oregioni; J. Palomares; G. Pantelic; J. Pfitzner; R. Pilvio; L. Puskeiler; H. Satake; J. Schikowski; G. Vitorovic; D. Woodhead; E. Wyse

2008-01-01

99

Laboratory accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

Pettit, R.B.

1998-08-01

100

Fostering applications of neutron scattering techniques in developing countries: IAEA's role  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last 60 years research reactors have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind. Neutron scattering has been the workhorse for research and development in materials science. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactors have also been involved in using this technique. The reactors and the facilities around them have a large potential for applications, while their under-utilization has been a concern for many member states. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been supporting its member states in the enhancement of utilization of their research reactors. Technical meetings focussing on the area of current interests with potential applications are organized under the project on “effective utilization of research reactors,” e.g. on residual stress measurement, neutron reflectometry. Coordinated research projects (CRPs) bring together scientists from developed and developing countries, build collaborations, and exchange expertise and technology. The CRPs on research reactor utilization include topics like development of small-angle neutron scattering applications and development of sources and imaging systems for neutron radiography. New CRPs on the measurement of residual stress and accelerator-driven neutron sources will be initiated soon. The results from these meetings of CRPs are published as technical documents of the IAEA that would act as guidelines for capacity building for research reactor managers. This paper will present some of the salient features of IAEA activities in promoting research reactor utilization.

Paranjpe, Shriniwas K.; Mank, G.; Ramamoorthy, N.

2006-11-01

101

Technical results of Y-12/IAEA field trial of remote monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

A Remote Monitoring System (RMS) field trial has been conducted with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on highly enriched uranium materials in a vault at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The RMS included a variety of Sandia, Oak Ridge, and Aquila sensor technologies which provide containment seals, video monitoring, radiation asset measurements, and container identification data to the on-site DAS (Data Acquisition System) by way of radio-frequency and Echelon LonWorks networks. The accumulated safeguards information was transmitted to the IAEA via satellite (COMSAT/RSI) and international telephone lines. The technologies tested in the remote monitoring environment are the RadCouple, RadSiP, and SmartShelf sensors from the ORSENS (Oak Ridge Sensors for Enhancing Nuclear Safeguards) technologies; the AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System) motion sensor (AMS), AIMS fiber-optic seal (AFOS), ICAM (Image Compression and Authentication Module) video surveillance system, DAS (Data Acquisition System), and DIRS (Data and Image Review Station) from Sandia; and the AssetLAN identification tag, VACOSS-S seal, and Gemini digital surveillance system from Aquila. The field trial was conducted from October 1996 through May 1997. Tests were conducted during the monthly IAEA Interim Inventory Verification (IIV) inspections for evaluation of the equipment. Experience gained through the field trials will allow the technologies to be applied to various monitoring scenarios.

Corbell, B.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitaker, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Welch, J. [Aquila Technologies Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01

102

Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12  

E-print Network

Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12 State Feedback Controller of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible link) introduced in the Laboratory 9 (refer to [1 Systems Laboratory ECE3557 · : motor shaft position, measured using channel 1 encoder "ENC1" · : angular

103

PREFACE: Third IAEA Technical Meeting on ECRH Physics and Technology in ITER  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This meeting belongs to a series of topical events which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna) organizes in a regular basis on crucial aspects of nuclear fusion research, or related in particular to ITER physics or a technological application relevant to the nuclear fusion reactor. Each Technical Meeting series has a specific object; the events are called on a two-three years basis and are recommended by the IAEA advisory body for Fusion, the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) . The object of the IAEA-TM held in Como, Italy, 2-5 May 2005, was the application in ITER of powerful Electron Cyclotron waves in the millimeter wave frequency range for plasma Heating and noninductive Current Drive. The meeting was the third on this subject. There were 42 presentations to an audience of about 60 delegates from 16 countries. The main goal of this series of IAEA-TM is to bring together specialists of the different branches involved in the project, in the effort of the best understanding of the limits and capabilities of each one of the different fields of research and development. Millimeter-wave source developers, millimeter-wave system designers and plasma physicists, theoreticians and experimentalists in all of the fields, exposed their way of addressing the problem in plenary sessions attended by all participants. Discussions on the different topics of gyrotron development, launcher options and physics application were continued in forums following the presentations. The specialist reader will find in this volume in particular the latest developments concerning the frequency, the output power and the efficiency of the gyrotrons which are now being considered the preferred type of high power millimeter wave generators for ECH/ECCD applications in the fusion reactor. The debate on the launcher of the EC waves, in the form of Gaussian beams, is presently very active, with a few options on the table to be merged in one optimized and integrated design. Concerning the applications to the ITER plasma, most attention was dedicated to the use of ECCD to actively control and stabilize Magneto-Hydrodynamic instability Modes, with an increasing attention to the need and the crucial issues of the automation of such a control in the reactor. The general reader should find an up-to-date presentation of the potential and of the limits of the use of high power millimeter waves in fusion plasmas, and have a vivid image of the interplay between sources, systems and plasma physics in such an application. The conference was held under the scientific responsibility of IAEA, Vienna, and hosted and organized in Como, Italy, by the Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan.

Cirant, S.

2005-01-01

104

Archimedes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

105

The Development of Low-Level Measurement Capabilities for Total and Isotopic Uranium in Environmental Samples at Brazilian and Argentine Laboratories by ABACC  

SciTech Connect

In June 1998, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), began a program to assess environmental sampling and analysis capabilities at laboratories in Argentina and Brazil. The program began with staff training conducted in South America and the United States by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Both laboratories are participating members of DOE’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) that support IAEA’s environmental sampling program. During the initial planning meeting, representatives from ABACC and all the participating analytical laboratories supporting ABACC were briefed on how the first exercise would be managed and on key aspects necessary to analyze low-level environmental samples for uranium. Subsequent to this training, a laboratory evaluation exercise (Exercise 1) was conducted using standard swipe samples prepared for this exercise by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The results of Exercise 1 determined that sample contamination was a major factor in the analysis, and a thorough review of laboratory procedures was required to reduce the level of contamination to acceptable levels. Following modification of sample preparation procedures, the laboratories performed Exercise 2, an analysis of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1547, Peach Leaves. The results of Exercise 2 demonstrated that several laboratories were capable of accurately determining the total uranium and uranium isotopic distribution in the peach leaves. To build on these successes, Exercise 3 was performed using a series of standard swipe samples prepared by the IAEA and distributed to laboratories supporting ABACC and to PNNL and ORNL. The results of Exercise 3 demonstrate that ABACC now has support laboratories in both Argentina and Brazil, which are capable of accurately measuring both the quantity and isotopic composition of uranium at the levels expected in typical environmental samples (i.e., nanogram quantities).

Guidicini, Olga M.; Olsen, Khris B.; Hembree, Doyle M.; Carter, Joel A.; Whitaker, Michael; Hayes, Susan M.

2005-07-01

106

A long-term performance evaluation of the gamma-ray activity measurement laboratory in CPST, Lithuania.  

PubMed

The quality control procedures used for two HPGe detectors (a well-type and a GAMMA-X coaxial) are described. Since 2001, check sources containing (137)Cs have been measured weekly for 7200s each, and the gamma-ray spectrometry system background was determined once per month for an acquisition time of 100,000 s. The laboratory participated in the international comparisons at environmental radioactivity level organized by the IAEA, Risø National Laboratory and NPL. PMID:24315285

Gudelis, A; Gorina, I; Butkus, P; Nedveckait?, T

2014-05-01

107

Virtual Laboratories  

E-print Network

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07

108

Laboratory investigations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

Russell, Ray W.

1988-01-01

109

Virtual Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

2012-04-27

110

International contributions to IAEA-NEA heat transfer databases for supercritical fluids  

SciTech Connect

An IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs' is being conducted to facilitate collaboration and interaction among participants from 15 organizations. While the project covers several key technology areas relevant to the development of SCWR concepts, it focuses mainly on the heat transfer aspect, which has been identified as the most challenging. Through the collaborating effort, large heat-transfer databases have been compiled for supercritical water and surrogate fluids in tubes, annuli, and bundle subassemblies of various orientations over a wide range of flow conditions. Assessments of several supercritical heat-transfer correlations were performed using the complied databases. The assessment results are presented. (authors)

Leung, L. K. H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Yamada, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01

111

Neutron activation analysis of NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and IAEA animal bone (H-5)  

SciTech Connect

Instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (INAA and RNAA) were employed to measure about 37 major, minor, and trace elements in two standard reference materials: oyster tissue (SRM 1566) supplied by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and animal bone (H-5) supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Wherever the comparison exists, our data show excellent agreement with accepted values for each SRM. These SRM's are useful as reference standards for the analysis of biological materials. Additionally, the chondritic normalized rare earth element pattern of animal bone behaves as a smooth function of the ionic radii, as previously observed for biological materials.

Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.

1984-03-01

112

Establishing a national register of occupational doses based on the IAEA regulatory authority information system (RAIS).  

PubMed

IAEA Safety Standards require countries to establish and maintain registers of occupational doses. This paper demonstrates a possibility of the use of the regulatory authority information system (RAIS) for this purpose. A two-level classification scheme for work activities, based on UNSCEAR categorisation, is adopted. The implementation approach presented in this paper covers all types of occupational exposure to artificial as well as to natural sources of ionising radiation. Although the presented model is general, it can be adjusted to specific national needs by simply changing certain settings or making use of the extensive RAIS customisation capabilities. PMID:22155749

Suman, H

2012-06-01

113

22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: summary of contributions on Fusion Technology and ITER Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contributions to the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) in the categories of Fusion Technology (FT), ITER Activities (IT) and Safety and Economic Studies (SE) are reviewed. In the FT category, 68 papers were submitted, along with 57 papers submitted through the ITER Organisation in the IT category. Finally two papers were submitted in the SE category. The assembled body of work gave a good overview of the worldwide effort in fusion technology and particularly the prolific activity surrounding the ITER Design Review and the major progress with the ITER technology programme.

Stork, D.

2009-10-01

114

A new reference material for radionuclides in the mussel sample from the Mediterranean Sea (IAEA437)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new Reference Material (RM) for radionuclides in mussel (Mytilus\\u000a galloprovincialis) from the Mediterranean Sea (IAEA-437) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Four radionuclides\\u000a (40K, 234U, 238U, and 239+240Pu) have been certified, and information values on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for nine radionuclides\\u000a (137Cs, 210Pb(210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 230Th, 232Th, 235U,

M. K. PhamM; M. Betti; P. P. Povinec; M. Benmansour; R. Bojanowski; P. Bouisset; E. C. Calvo; G. J. Ham; E. Holm; M. Hult; C. Ilchmann; M. Kloster; G. Kanisch; M. Köhler; J. La Rosa; F. Legarda; M. Llauradó; A. Nourredine; J.-S. Oh; M. Pellicciari; U. Rieth; A. M. Rodriguez y Baena; J. A. Sanchez-Cabeza; H. Satake; J. Schikowski; M. Takeishi; H. Thébault; Z. Varga

2010-01-01

115

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Argentina.  

PubMed

Tissue banking activities in Argentina started in 1993. The regulatory and controlling national authority on organ, tissue and cells for transplantation activity is the National Unique Coordinating Central Institute for Ablation and Implant (INCUCAI). Three tissue banks were established under the IAEA program and nine other banks participated actively in the implementation of this program. As result of the implementation of the IAEA program in Argentina and the work done by the established tissue banks, more and more hospitals are now using, in a routine manner, radiation sterilised tissues processed by these banks. During the period 1992-2005, more than 21 016 tissues were produced and irradiated in the tissue banks participating in the IAEA program. Within the framework of the training component of the IAEA program, Argentina has been selected to host the Regional Training Centre for Latin American. In this centre, tissue bank operators and medical personal from Latin American countries were trained. Since 1999, Argentina has organised four regular regional training courses and two virtual regional training courses. More than twenty (20) tissue bank operators and medical personnel from Argentina were trained under the IAEA program in the six courses organised in the country. In general, ninety (96) tissue bank operators and medical personnel from eight Latin-American countries were trained in the Buenos Aires regional training centre. From Argentina 16 students graduated in these courses. PMID:18651244

Kairiyama, Eulogia; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

116

Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL-modified IAEA method. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has conducted a long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test of the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu, and various stable elements were measured at 25/sup 0/ and 75/sup 0/C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The purposes of the study were: (1) to compare SPCF leaching results with the results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL); (2) to establish elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition; and (3) to gain insight into the leaching mechanisms. The LLNL and PNL leach tests yielded results which appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10/sup -5/ grams of glass/cm/sup 2/ geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements.

Buddemeier, R.W.; Coles, D.G.; Mensing, R.W.; Rego, J.; Weed, H.C.

1982-08-20

117

ELECTRONICS UPGRADE TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY COULOMETER FOR PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ASSAY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the analytical measurement capability to perform high-precision plutonium concentration measurements by controlled-potential coulometry. State-of-the-art controlled-potential coulometers were designed and fabricated by the Savannah River National Laboratory and installed in the Analytical Laboratories process control laboratory. The Analytical Laboratories uses coulometry for routine accountability measurements of and for verification of standard preparations used to calibrate other plutonium measurement systems routinely applied to process control, nuclear safety, and other accountability applications. The SRNL Coulometer has a demonstrated measurement reliability of {approx}0.05% for 10 mg samples. The system has also been applied to the characterization of neptunium standard solutions with a comparable reliability. The SRNL coulometer features: a patented current integration system; continuous electrical calibration versus Faraday's Constants and Ohm's Law; the control-potential adjustment technique for enhanced application of the Nernst Equation; a wide operating room temperature range; and a fully automated instrument control and data acquisition capability. Systems have been supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Russia, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL). The most recent vintage of electronics was based on early 1990's integrated circuits. Many of the components are no longer available. At the request of the IAEA and the Department of State, SRNL has completed an electronics upgrade of their controlled-potential coulometer design. Three systems have built with the new design, one for the IAEA which was installed at SAL in May 2011, one system for Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL) and one for the SRS Analytical Laboratory. The LANL and SRS systems are undergoing startup testing with installation scheduled for this summer.

Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Reeves, G.; Nichols, S.; Kruzner, A.

2011-07-08

118

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

2009-01-01

119

Pantak Therapax SXT 150: performance assessment and dose determination using IAEA TRS-398 protocol.  

PubMed

The performance assessment and beam characteristics of the Therapax SXT 150 unit, which encompass both low and medium-energy beams, were evaluated. Dose determination was carried out by implementing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) TRS-398 protocol and measuring all the dosimetric parameters in order to have a solid, consistent and reliable data set for the unit. Mechanical movements, interlocks and applicator characteristics agreed with specifications. The timer exhibited good accuracy and linearity. The output was very stable, with good repeatability, long-term reproducibility and no dependence on tube head orientation. The measured dosimetric parameters included beam first and second half-value layers (HVLs), absorbed dose rate to water under reference conditions, central axis depth dose distributions, output factors and beam profiles. Measured first HVLs agreed with comparable published data, but the homogeneity coefficients were low in comparison with typical values found in the literature. The timer error was significant for all filters and should be taken into consideration for the absorbed dose rate determination under reference conditions as well as for the calculation of treatment times. Percentage depth-dose (PDD) measurements are strongly recommended for each filter-applicator combination. The output factor definition of the IAEA TRS-398 protocol for medium-energy X-ray qualities involves the use of data that is difficult to measure. Beam profiles had small penumbras and good symmetry and flatness except for the lowest energy beam, for which a heel effect was observed. PMID:16046424

Jurado, D; Eudaldo, T; Carrasco, P; Jornet, N; Ruiz, A; Ribas, M

2005-08-01

120

IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

Yamada, K. [Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Aksan, S. N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01

121

Results of Joint Experiments and other IAEA activities on research using small tokamaks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an overview of the results obtained during the Joint Experiments organized in the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Joint Research Using Small Tokamaks' that have been carried out on the tokamaks CASTOR at IPP Prague, Czech Republic (2005), T-10 at RRC 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow, Russia (2006), and the most recent one at ISTTOK at IST, Lisbon, Portugal, in 2007. Experimental programmes were aimed at diagnosing and characterizing the core and the edge plasma turbulence in a tokamak in order to investigate correlations between the occurrence of transport barriers, improved confinement, electric fields and electrostatic turbulence using advanced diagnostics with high spatial and temporal resolution. On CASTOR and ISTTOK, electric fields were generated by biasing an electrode inserted into the edge plasma and an improvement of the global particle confinement induced by the electrode positive biasing has been observed. Geodesic acoustic modes were studied using heavy ion beam diagnostics on T-10 and ISTTOK and correlation reflectometry on T-10. ISTTOK is equipped with a gallium jet injector and the technical feasibility of gallium jets interacting with plasmas has been investigated in pulsed and ac operation. The first Joint Experiments have clearly demonstrated that small tokamaks are suitable for broad international cooperation to conduct dedicated joint research programmes. Other activities within the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Joint Research Using Small Tokamaks are also overviewed.

Gryaznevich, M.; Van Oost, G.; Peleman, P.; Brotankova, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Dufkova, E.; ?uran, I.; Hron, M.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Stöckel, J.; Weinzettl, V.; Zajac, J.; Berni, L. A.; DelBosco, E.; Ferreira, J. G.; Simões, F. J. R.; Berta, M.; Dunai, D.; Tál, B.; Zoletnik, S.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Figueiredo, H.; Kuznetsov, Y.; Ruchko, L.; Hegazy, H.; Ovsyannikov, A.; Sukhov, E.; Vorobjev, G. M.; Dreval, N.; Singh, A.; Budaev, V.; Kirnev, G.; Kirneva, N.; Kuteev, B.; Melnikov, A.; Nurov, D.; Sokolov, M.; Vershkov, V.; Talebitaher, A.; Khorshid, P.; Gonzales, R.; El Chama Neto, I.; Kraemer-Flecken, A. W.; Soldatov, V.; Brotas, B.; Carvalho, P.; Coelho, R.; Duarte, A.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, J.; Fonseca, A.; Gomes, R.; Nedzelski, I.; Neto, A.; Ramos, G.; Santos, J.; Silva, C.; Valcárcel, D.; Gutierrez Tapia, C. R.; Krupnik, L. I.; Petrov, L.; Kolokoltsov, M.; Herrera, J.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Balan, P.; Sharnin, A.; Pavlov, V.

2009-10-01

122

The IAEA CRP on Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the IAEA has initiated the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, is to increase the capability of Member States in developing and applying advanced technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. Twenty institutions from 15 Member States and one international organization participated in this CRP. The CRP concentrated on the assessment of the dynamic behavior of various transmutation systems. The reactor systems investigated comprise critical reactors, sub-critical accelerator driven systems with heavy liquid metal and gas cooling, critical molten salt systems, and hybrid fusion/fission systems. Both fertile and fertile-free fuel options have been investigated. Apart from the benchmarking of steady state core configurations (including the investigation of transmutation potential, burn-up behavior and decay heat of minor actinide (MA) bearing fuels), the CRP participants determined the safety coefficients for the individual systems and, in a second stage, performed transient analyses which reflected the generic safety related behavior of the various reactors types. (authors)

Maschek, W.; Chen, X.; Rineiski, A.; Schikorr, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O.Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, Post Office Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Arien, B.; Malambu, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Bai, Y.; Li, J.; Wu, Y.; Zheng, S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, ASIPP, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chabert, C.; Peneliau, Y. [CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Chebeskov, A.; Dekoussar, V.; Vorotyntsev, M. [SSC-IPPE, Bondarenko Square 1, Obninsk 249033, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); da Cruz, D.F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Harish, R.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Pandikumar, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 2, 10129 Torino (Italy); Feynberg, O.; Ignatiev, V.; Subbotin, V.; Surenkov, A.; Zakirov, R. [RRC - Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kophazi, J.; Szieberth, M. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem rkp. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Morita, K. [Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Srivenkatesan, R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Taczanowski, S. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Tucek, K.; Wider, H. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Vertes, P. [Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Uhlir, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc., CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 13 (Czech Republic)

2007-07-01

123

Information on the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station and its consequences prepared for IAEA  

SciTech Connect

On August 25-29, 1986, a conference of experts was held at the IAEA in Vienna, at which the Soviet delegation (Head Academician V.A. Legasov) presented information on the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station and its consequences. The experts prepared the information from material provided by the following organizations: the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, the Power Engineering Research and Development Institute, the Khlopin Radium Institute, the Zhuk Gidroproekt Institute, the Khlopin Radium Institute, the Zhuk Gidroproekt Institute, the Institute of Biophysics, the Institute of Applied Geophysics, the State Commission on Atomic Energy of the USSR, the State Hydrometeorological Commission of the USSR, the USSR Ministry of Health, the State Atomic Energy Inspectorate of the USSR, the Ministry of Defense of the USSR, the main board on fire protection of the Ministry of the Water Economy of the USSR, and the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. The authors give a brief summary of the information presented by the Soviet experts to IAEA.

Not Available

1987-05-01

124

Measurement of ²²?Ra in soil from oil field: advantages of ?-ray spectrometry and application to the IAEA-448 CRM.  

PubMed

The analytical performance of gamma-ray spectrometry for the measurement of (226)Ra in TENORM (Technically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) soil was investigated by the IAEA. Fast results were obtained for characterization and certification of a new TENORM Certified Reference Material (CRM), identified as IAEA-448 (soil from oil field). The combined standard uncertainty of the gamma-ray spectrometry results is of the order of 2-3% for massic activity measurement values ranging from 16500 Bq kg(-1) to 21500 Bq kg(-1). Methodologies used for the production and certification of the IAEA-448 CRM are presented. Analytical results were confirmed by alpha spectrometry. The "t" test showed agreement between alpha and gamma results at 95% confidence level. PMID:24332337

Ceccatelli, A; Katona, R; Kis-Benedek, G; Pitois, A

2014-05-01

125

Creep Laboratory manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

A manual for the NPL Creep Laboratory, a collective name given to two testing laboratories, the Uniaxial Creep Laboratory and the Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing Laboratory, is presented. The first laboratory is devoted to uniaxial creep testing and houses approximately 50 high sensitivity creep machines including 10 constant stress cam lever machines. The second laboratory houses a low cycle

S. Osgerby; M. S. Loveday

1992-01-01

126

Analysis of IAEA Environmental Samples for Plutonium and Uranium by ICP/MS in Support Of International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

A method for the separation and determination of total and isotopic uranium and plutonium by ICP-MS was developed for IAEA samples on cellulose-based media. Preparation of the IAEA samples involved a series of redox chemistries and separations using TRU® resin (Eichrom). The sample introduction system, an APEX nebulizer (Elemental Scientific, Inc), provided enhanced nebulization for a several-fold increase in sensitivity and reduction in background. Application of mass bias (ALPHA) correction factors greatly improved the precision of the data. By combining the enhancements of chemical separation, instrumentation and data processing, detection levels for uranium and plutonium approached high attogram levels.

Farmer, Orville T.; Olsen, Khris B.; Thomas, May-Lin P.; Garofoli, Stephanie J.

2008-05-01

127

Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

1998-02-01

128

Using the IAEA Safety Culture Model as a Basis for Security Culture  

SciTech Connect

In the last ten years, the practice of nuclear material physical protection control and accounting (MPC&A) in Russia has significantly changed. Under the cooperative US-Russian MPC&A Program, the MPC&A Culture Project team has developed the fundamentals of a pilot program to strengthen MPC&A Culture at nuclear sites. The pilot program is based on the IAEA Safety Culture Principles and Model Characteristics. There has been some debate on how easily these are transferable to Security Culture. While there may be operational differences, culture characteristics remain the same. This paper will compare and contrast the two cultures of Safety and Security, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each discipline.

De Castro, Kara; Thurmond, Paul; de Boer, Gloria; Mladineo, Stephen V.

2008-08-01

129

Activities of the IAEA in the area of radioactive waste management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) organizational structure and activities in the field of predisposal radioactive waste managemen are described. The present activities undertaken by the Agency’s Waste Technology Section and Waste Safety Section are outlined, with the emphasis to the technical assistance to the Member States and the technology development for safe waste management practices. The three main types of documents produced by the Agency for disseminating safety requirements and rules and the technical information to the Member States are listed. The Agency’s involvement in organizing/sponsoring conferences, coordinating research programmes, providing assistance on technical projects and training of staff on waste management subjects is detailed.

Efremenkov, V. M.

1999-01-01

130

IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Benchmark Definition and Test Cases  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are essential elements of the reactor simulation code verification and validation process. Although several international uncertainty quantification activities have been launched in recent years in the LWR, BWR and VVER domains (e.g. the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program [1], from which the current OECD/NEA LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) benchmark [2] effort was derived), the systematic propagation of uncertainties in cross-section, manufacturing and model parameters for High Temperature Reactor (HTGR) designs has not been attempted yet. This paper summarises the scope, objectives and exercise definitions of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR UAM [3]. Note that no results will be included here, as the HTGR UAM benchmark was only launched formally in April 2012, and the specification is currently still under development.

Gerhard Strydom; Frederik Reitsma; Hans Gougar; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

2012-11-01

131

IAEA coordinated research projects on core physics benchmarks for high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs present special computational challenges related to their core physics characteristics, in particular neutron streaming, double heterogeneities, impurities and the random distribution of coated fuel particles in the graphite matrix. In recent years, two consecutive IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRP 1 and CRP 5) have focused on code-to-code and code-to-experiment comparisons of representative benchmarks run by several participating international institutes. While the PROTEUS critical HTR experiments provided the test data reference for CRP-1, the more recent CRP-5 data has been made available by the HTTR, HTR-10 and ASTRA test facilities. Other benchmark cases are being considered for the GT-MHR and PBMR core designs. This paper overviews the scope and some sample results of both coordinated research projects. (authors)

Methnani, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2006-07-01

132

A new Certified Reference Material for radionuclides in Irish sea sediment (IAEA-385).  

PubMed

A new Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in sediment (IAEA-385) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Eleven radionuclides ((40)K, (137)Cs, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (230)Th, (232)Th, (234)U, (238)U, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am) have been certified and information mass activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for seven other radionuclides ((90)Sr, (210)Pb((210)Po), (235)U, (239)Pu, (240)Pu and (241)Pu). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides ((60)Co, (99)Tc, (134)Cs, (155)Eu, (224)Ra and (239)Np) and information on some activity and mass ratios are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in sediment samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. PMID:18513984

Pham, M K; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Povinec, P P; Andor, K; Arnold, D; Benmansour, M; Bikit, I; Carvalho, F P; Dimitrova, K; Edrev, Z H; Engeler, C; Fouche, F J; Garcia-Orellana, J; Gascó, C; Gastaud, J; Gudelis, A; Hancock, G; Holm, E; Legarda, F; Ikäheimonen, T K; Ilchmann, C; Jenkinson, A V; Kanisch, G; Kis-Benedek, G; Kleinschmidt, R; Koukouliou, V; Kuhar, B; Larosa, J; Lee, S-H; Lepetit, G; Levy-Palomo, I; Liong Wee Kwong, L; Llauradó, M; Maringer, F J; Meyer, M; Michalik, B; Michel, H; Nies, H; Nour, S; Oh, J-S; Oregioni, B; Palomares, J; Pantelic, G; Pfitzner, J; Pilvio, R; Puskeiler, L; Satake, H; Schikowski, J; Vitorovic, G; Woodhead, D; Wyse, E

2008-11-01

133

An overview of the activities carried out by the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is a group of experts to provide advice and support programme implementation, reflecting a global network of excellence and expertise in the area of advanced technologies and R and O for fast reactors and sub-critical hybrid systems. Consistent with its mandate, the TWG-FR assists in defining and carrying out the Agency's activities in the field of nuclear power technology development for fast reactors and sub-critical hybrid systems. It promotes the exchange of information on national and multi-national programmes and new developments and experience, with the goal to identify and review problems of importance and to stimulate and facilitate cooperation, development and practical application of fast reactors and sub-critical hybrid systems. Finally, the TWG-FR provides Member States with information about the current status and development trends of advanced technologies for fast reactors and sub-critical hybrid systems. The TWG-FR coordinates its activities with other IAEA projects and initiatives, especially those of the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options (TWG-NFCO), the Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security and, last but not least, the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and the Fuel Cycle INPRO. It also cooperates with FR-related initiatives implemented within the framework of other international programmes (e.g. GIF, OECD/NEA, ESNII, etc.). The paper presents the recent relevant activities of the TWG-FR as well as the status of the current Coordinated Research Projects jointly carried out by a number of organizations representing the various Member States within the TWG-FR. In particular they concern benchmark analyses of: - the sodium natural circulation tests performed during Phenix End-of-Life experiments; - the sodium natural convection in the upper plenum of the Monju reactor vessel; - an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test. (authors)

Monti, S.; Toti, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01

134

Use of PET and PET\\/CT for Radiation Therapy Planning: IAEA expert report 2006–2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a significant advance in cancer imaging with great potential for optimizing radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning and thereby improving outcomes for patients. The use of PET and PET\\/CT in RT planning was reviewed by an international panel. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized two synchronized and overlapping consultants’ meetings with experts from different regions

Michael MacManus; Ursula Nestle; Kenneth E. Rosenzweig; Ignasi Carrio; Cristina Messa; Otakar Belohlavek; Massimo Danna; Tomio Inoue; Elizabeth Deniaud-Alexandre; Stefano Schipani; Naoyuki Watanabe; Maurizio Dondi; Branislav Jeremic

2009-01-01

135

Preliminary fact finding mission following the accident at the nuclear fuel processing facility in Tokaimura, Japan (Vienna: IAEA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of the accident on 30 September 1999 at Tokaimura, Japan the IAEA were asked from numerous sources for information regarding the accident. Thus a preliminary report has now been issued which looks at the technical information available at that time. It does not provide conclusions on the cause or the overall consequences. The report is based on

Kath Bhanot

2000-01-01

136

Characterisation of the IAEA152 milk powder reference material for radioactivity with assigned values traceable to the SI units  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) participated in a research project initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to upgrade some of its existing reference materials (RMs). The aim of the project is to improve the RM metrological status by establishing traceability of their assigned values to SI units. The purpose of the work described in this

T. Altzitzoglou; A. Bohnstedt

2008-01-01

137

Power move: The nuclear salesman target the third world. [IAEA advocates nuclear energy for electrical power in developing countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the question of why the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a UN organization, is advocating the building of nuclear power plants for rapidly growing electric power needs in countries such as Thailand. Other options and opinions of how to Thailand can meet its energy needs are explored, and the debate in Thailand itself over nuclear energy is

Ryan

2009-01-01

138

Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (Report on the 9th IAEA International Conference, Baltimore, 1982)  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past decade of IAEA Conferences on controlled fusion research, the topic of principal interest has shifted from the feasibility of fusion power to the optimization of economically favourable reactor characteristics: efficient plasma heating systems, high beta values, quasi-steady-state operating capabilities, simple coil structures, etc. At the present Conference, the experimental tokamak papers (about half the total number of

H. P. Furth; B. B. Kadomtsev; C. Yamanaka; W. M. Lomer

1983-01-01

139

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-print Network

is a critical facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supporting environmental, nuclear, national and environmental remediation researching, testing, and validating process flowsheets designing, installingRadiochemical Processing Laboratory #12;Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Housed within the U

140

Numerical modeling of the radionuclide water pathway with HYDRUS and comparison with the IAEA model of SR 44.  

PubMed

This study depicts a theoretical experiment in which the radionuclide transport through the porous material of a landfill consisting of concrete rubble (e.g., from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants) and the subsequent migration through the vadose zone and aquifer to a model well is calculated by means of the software HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2008). The radionuclides originally contained within the rubble become dissolved due to leaching caused by infiltrated rainwater. The resulting well-water contamination (in Bq/L) is calculated numerically as a function of time and location and compared with the outcome of a simplified analytic model for the groundwater pathway published by the IAEA (2005). Identical model parameters are considered. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the predictive capacity of the more simple IAEA model using HYDRUS-1D as a reference. For most of the radionuclides considered (e.g., ¹²?I, and ²³?Pu), results from applying the IAEA model were found to be comparable to results from the more elaborate HYDRUS modeling, provided the underlying parameter values are comparable. However, the IAEA model appears to underestimate the effects resulting from, for example, high nuclide mobility, short half-life, or short-term variations in the water infiltration. The present results indicate that the IAEA model is suited for screening calculations and general recommendation purposes. However, the analysis of a specific site should be accompanied by detailed HYDRUS computer simulations. In all models considered, the calculation outcome largely depends on the choice of the sorption parameter K(d). PMID:22230022

Merk, Rainer

2012-02-01

141

Sample Vial Secure Container  

SciTech Connect

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors must maintain continuity of knowledge on all safeguard samples and, in particular, on those samples drawn from plutonium product and spent fuel input tanks at a nuclear reprocessing plant`s blister sampling station. Integrity of safeguard samples must be guaranteed from the sampling point to the moment of sample analysis at an accepted local laboratory or at the IAEA`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) in Seibersdorf, Austria. The safeguard samples are drawn at a blister sampling station with inspector participation and then transferred via a pneumatic post system to the facility`s analytical laboratory. Transfer of the sample by the pneumatic post system, arrival of the sample in the operator`s analytical laboratory, and storage of the sample awaiting analysis are very time consuming activities for an inspector, particularly if continuous human surveillance is required for all these activities. These activities could be observed by ordinary surveillance methods, such as a video monitoring system, but this would be cumbersome and time consuming for both the inspector and the operator. This paper describes a secure container designed to assure sample vial integrity from the point the sample is drawn to treatment of the sample at a facility`s analytical laboratory.

Baumann, M.J.

1993-07-01

142

DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY MEDICINE CLINICAL LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY MEDICINE ­ CLINICAL LABORATORIES ­ Phone: 415-353-4731 Email: hangt of the patient. #12;2. Herbal medications. Many herbal medications contain substances and adulterants that can is not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is significant heterogeneity in the herbal

Lim, Wendell

143

Rapid development of tissue bank achieved by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Tissue Banking Programme in China.  

PubMed

Before 1986, the development of tissue banking in China has been slow and relatively uncoordinated. Under the support of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Tissue Banking in China experienced rapid development. In this period, China Institute for Radiation Protection tissue bank mastered systematic and modern tissue banking technique by IAEA training course and gradually developed the first regional tissue bank (Shanxi Provincial Tissue Bank, SPTB) to provide tissue allograft. Benefit from training course, SPTB promoted the development of tissue transplantation by ways of training, brochure, advertisement and meeting. Tissue allograft transplantation acquired recognition from clinic and supervision and administration from government. Quality system gradually is developing and perfecting. Tissue allograft transplantation and tissue bank are developing rapidly and healthy. PMID:23959505

Zhang, Yu-Min; Wang, Jian-Ru; Zhang, Nai-Li; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Mo; Ma, Shao-Ying; Yang, Ting; Li, Bao-Xing

2014-09-01

144

Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology: status of practice in five Eastern-European countries, based on IAEA project.  

PubMed

The purpose of this work was to investigate status of imaging technology and practice in five countries in Eastern-European region and evaluate the impact of IAEA projects on radiation protection of patients. Information collected using standardized IAEA protocol included status of technology, practices and patient dose levels in interventional procedure, radiography, mammography and computed tomography (CT). In spite of increased number of digital units, single phase generators or units older than 30 year are still in use. Examples of obsolete practice such as using fluoroscopy for positioning, photofluorography, chest fluoroscopy and soft-beam technique for chest radiography are also in use. Modern multi-slice CT or digital mammography units are available; however, there is lack of adequate radiation protection and medical physics support in hospitals. Information on patient doses in interventional procedures, conventional radiography, mammography and CT was collected to have baseline data and corrective measures were proposed with appropriate follow up actions taken. PMID:21507590

Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Beganovic, Adnan; Faj, Dario; Gershan, Vesna; Ivanovic, Sonja; Videnovic, Ivan R; Rehani, Madan M

2011-08-01

145

Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories  

E-print Network

Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell Laboratories July 1998 #12;Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell;#12;Home Systems `94 Bell LaboratoriesBell Laboratories Rich Janow July 6, 1994 Bell Laboratories Converted

Janow, Rich

146

US technical assistance to the IAEA and the chemical weapons convection (CWC) - a review and look to the future  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the Safeguards mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and describes U.S. technical support programs. We also review the mandate of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and speculate on the technical areas where U.S. assistance may prove useful. The IAEA was organized in 1957 in response to President Eisenhower`s {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace{close_quotes} initiative presented to the UN General Assembly on December 8, 1953. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) has been organized by a Preparatory Commission (PREPCOM) to prepare for the entry-into-force of this new convention which prohibits the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons and on their destruction. The safeguards mandate of the IAEA is to carry out verifications of nuclear material pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other voluntary but legally binding agreements. U.S. technical support programs have provided and continue to provide assistance in the form of Cost-Free Experts (CFE`s), systems studies on new safeguards approaches, training, computerized information systems, and equipment for nuclear materials measurements and containment and surveillance systems. Because the CWC just recently entered into force (April 29, 1997), verification procedures of the OPCW are not yet fully developed. However, it is expected, and can already be seen for many aspects of the technical task, that there are many similarities between the verification activities of the OPCW and those carried out by the IAEA. This paper will discuss potential technical support areas that can help strengthen the OPCW. 9 refs.

Indusi, J.; Parsick, R.J.; Reisman, A.W.

1997-08-01

147

Further factors for the estimation of mean glandular dose using the United Kingdom, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Kingdom, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography make use of s-factors which allow for the use of different target\\/filter combinations. To supplement the existing protocols, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate s-factors for mammography using a tungsten target with silver filters of thicknesses 50–75 µm and for the same target filtered

D R Dance; K C Young; R E van Engen

2009-01-01

148

Further factors for the estimation of mean glandular dose using the United Kingdom, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Kingdom, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography make use of s-factors which allow for the use of different target\\/filter combinations. To supplement the existing protocols, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate s-factors for mammography using a tungsten target with silver filters of thicknesses 50-75 µm and for the same target filtered

D. R. Dance; K. C. Young; R. E. van Engen

2009-01-01

149

Concentration of particulate plutonium in surface and deep-water samples collected during the IAEA’97 expedition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of particulate plutonium together with dissolved plutonium and the biogenic unique organic ligand (SOL) in particulate matter (PM) in surface and deep waters were determined in samples collected during the IAEA’97 cruise to the Pacific Ocean. Concentrations of particulate 239,240Pu in the water column ranged from 0.04 to 0.28mBqm?3. The percentage of particulate 239,240Pu to total 239,240Pu in seawater

Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama; Pavel P. Povinec

2003-01-01

150

Hybrid imaging worldwide-challenges and opportunities for the developing world: a report of a Technical Meeting organized by IAEA.  

PubMed

The growth in nuclear medicine, in the past decade, is largely due to hybrid imaging, specifically single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Introduction and use of hybrid imaging has been growing at a fast pace. This has led to many challenges and opportunities to the personnel dealing with it. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) keeps a close watch on the trends in applications of nuclear techniques in health by many ways, including obtaining inputs from member states and professional societies. In 2012, a Technical Meeting on trends in hybrid imaging was organized by IAEA to understand the current status and trends of hybrid imaging using nuclear techniques, its role in clinical practice, and associated educational needs and challenges. Perspective of scientific societies and professionals from all the regions of the world was obtained. Heterogeneity in value, educational needs, and access was noted and the drivers of this heterogeneity were discussed. This article presents the key points shared during the technical meeting, focusing primarily on SPECT-CT and PET-CT, and shares the action plan for IAEA to deal with heterogeneity as suggested by the participants. PMID:23561459

Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Mariani, Guliano

2013-05-01

151

Radiation processing techniques in remediation of pollutants, and the role of the IAEA in supporting capacity building in developing countries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation treatment, or a combination of radiation with conventional biological-chemical-physical processes, can help in the remediation of contaminated surfaces and in combating industrial chemical effluents and air pollution. The use of ionizing radiation as a powerful tool for inactivation of microbes is a valuable option to address likely threats from biohazard contamination that could be introduced either deliberately or inadvertently into areas where the public are exposed to, as well as for treatment of volatile organic compounds and similar hazardous chemical agents is an emerging development in tackling harmful pollutants. The role of the IAEA has been crucial both in supporting the development of local capabilities as well as in fostering international cooperation due to the multidisciplinary expertise required for achieving sustainable benefits. The IAEA is implementing Coordinated Research Projects, (CRP) thematic topical reviews of issues and challenges involved, and Technical Cooperation (TC) assistance in establishing and maintaining infrastructure in the MS. This paper will give an insight into the above mentioned IAEA activities, with examples of successes achieved through CRPs, as well as challenges on the road for broader dissemination of radiation processing technology for environmental remediation.

Haji-Saeid, S. Mohammad.; Sampa, M. H.; Safrany, A.; Sabharwal, S.; Ramamoorthy, N.

2012-08-01

152

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Singapore.  

PubMed

The National University Hospital (NUH) Tissue Bank was established in October 1988. The National University of Singapore (NUS) was officially appointed by IAEA to be the IAEA/NUS Regional Training Centre (RTC) for RCA Member States for training of tissue bank operators on September 18, 1996. In the first five years since its establishment the National University Hospital Tissue Bank concentrated its work on the sterile procurement and production of deep frozen femoral heads and were used in patients for bone reconstruction. The cost of producing these tissues were about SGD$ 250 per femoral head although cost fees were initially charged at SGD$ 50 per femoral head. The most important activity carried out by Singapore within the IAEA was training. Between November 1997 and April 2007, a total of nine courses were conducted by RTC with a total of 180 tissue bank operators registered, 133 from Asia and the Pacific region (13 countries, including 2 from Iran), 14 from Africa (Zambia, Libya, Egypt, Algeria, and South Africa), 6 from Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru, and Uruguay), 9 from Europe (Greece, Slovakia, Poland, and Ukraine), and 2 from Australia. The last batch (ninth batch) involved 20 students registered in April 2007 and will be due to sit for the terminal examination in April 2008. PMID:18716899

Nather, Aziz; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

153

National Laboratory Christine Brakel  

E-print Network

of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The technique provides a sensitive reliable method of detectingBrookhaven National Laboratory Christine Brakel Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: brakel@bnl.gov METHOD FOR ASSAYING CLUSTERED DNA DAMAGES Brookhaven National Laboratory

154

National Laboratory Dorene Price  

E-print Network

-attracting reagent and form the mercury sulfide compound. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE #12;Brookhaven National Laboratory Dorene Price Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored Research: price@bnl.gov SOIL REMEDIATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINANTS Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

155

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: the Fusion Laboratories facilities and mission, including the recent tokamak experiments which resulted in the production of more than 9 million watts of thermonuclear energy.

156

Employment at National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

2007-04-01

157

EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

1993-01-01

158

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

Annual Report 2001 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 2001 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 6 2.3 Applied Electrophysics 7 2.3.1 Accelerator

Haviland, David

159

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

i Annual Report 2003 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 Stockholm #12;ii #12;i ANNUAL REPORT 2003 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 7 2

Haviland, David

160

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

Annual Report 2002 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology SE 100 44 Stockholm #12;ii #12;ANNUAL REPORT 2002 Alfvén Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 3 2.1 Plasma Physics 5 2.1.1 Plasma Physics ­ Space Group 5

Haviland, David

161

Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

1982-01-01

162

Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory  

E-print Network

1 TENS Text Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory University of Wollongong TENS Text and delivering the text data to the user by electrically stimulating the fingers. Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong #12;2 The TENS Unit Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong

Ward, Koren

163

Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

Steere, Norman V.

1965-01-01

164

INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

2010-01-01

165

The Instructional Development Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Instructional Development Laboratory of Florida State University's Center for Educational Design (CED) is described. Among the major projects of the Laboratory has been the design and implementation of the PLATO computer-assisted instruction system. Included in the report are descriptions of (1) the facilities layout of the Laboratory, (2) the…

Towle, Nelson J.

166

Division of Laboratory Sciences  

E-print Network

and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing#12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers

167

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA khatib@cs.stanford.edu Oliver Brock Laboratory for Perceptual Robotics Department of Computer Luis Sentis Sriram Viji Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford

Sentis, Luis

168

PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in physics understanding of dynamics, mitigation and control of ELMs J Rice (MIT, USA): Spontaneous rotation and momentum transport in tokamak plasmas K Ida (NIFS, Japan): Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields F Jenko (IPP, Germany): Transport barriers: Recent progress in theory and simulation T Hoang (CEA, France): Internal transport barriers: Projection to ITER Every talk satisfied the objective of the meeting. A discussion period followed each invited talk in order to expand physics understandings, projection capabilities, and the direction of research around the topic. Short talks were presented by contributing speakers in addition to questions, answers, comments and discussion among the participants. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, and lively discussion took place in front of every poster. Through the meeting six invited papers and 77 contributed papers were presented in total. The final session of the meeting was devoted to summaries; R Groebner, T S Hahm and K Ida of the IAC summarized the fruits of topics 1 and 2, 3 and 5, and 4 and 6, respectively. I would like to thank Dr A Malaquias, the IAEA Scientific Secretary, for his continuous support and useful suggestions on the arrangements of the meeting. I am very grateful to the IAC members for their cooperation in selecting topics and invited speakers, and for their important advices on the meeting strategy and proceedings publication. I also wish to express my gratitude to LOC colleagues for their hard work organizing the meeting. Young students of the University of Tsukuba helped us during the meeting. Financial and personel support from JAEA and the University of Tsukuba were essential. Finally I would like to acknowledge the participants of the meeting and the referees for the present proceedings. All of the above contributions contributed to the success of the meeting. Tomonori Takizuka Editor Group photograph International Advisory Committee T Takizuka (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan: Chair) R J Groebner (General Atomics, USA) T S Hahm (Pr

Takizuka, Tomonori

2008-07-01

169

Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS “Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle”, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: “Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy” for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

Brent Dixon

2012-09-01

170

Integrated monitoring technology developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory staff have participated in the development and installation of unattended monitoring systems in facilities in Europe, North America, Asia, and Central Asia. These systems were designed to respond to needs generated by safeguards inspectors and plant operators to have around-the-clock inspection capabilities. The unattended monitoring systems in support of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards require that the inspectors visit the facilities at intervals of 1-3 months rather than having a continuous presence. A first generation of instruments and software was developed to instrument facilities from approximately 1988-1996 and is still in use today. This paper describes a second generation of instrumentation and software now under development at Los Alamos to meet the increased needs of the end users. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Klosterbuer, S.F.; Abhold, M.E.; Buenafe, C. [and others

1997-10-01

171

Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.  

SciTech Connect

Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

2009-03-01

172

Skylab mobile laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

1975-01-01

173

Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations.  

PubMed

On 3 August 2008, five glass vials containing around 7 GBq of (240)Pu in nitric acid solution burst in a laboratory operated by the IAEA in Seibersdorf, Austria. The vials were located in a fire-proof safe in the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, and the release of the (240)Pu caused an air contamination in the room and in adjoining rooms. Immediate emergency work was carried out, which was then followed by a long period of clean-up operations. A large number of conventional individual and workplace monitoring measurements were carried out immediately after the incident and during the clean-up work. In addition, due to the fact that (240)Pu has a very low background presence in the environment, and that the IAEA laboratories operate an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry system capable of very low levels of detection of this radionuclide, a number of non-conventional measurements were made to detect (240)Pu on, for example, the photographic camera used to document the incident, on nasal swabs from the first responders, etc. Plastic beakers were left in the corridor of the controlled area to accumulate (240)Pu from precipitation to see whether it was possible to detect traces of the radionuclide. This paper presents the measurements obtained, and discusses their relevance to occupational radiation protection. PMID:21450704

Hochmann, R; Eisenwagner, H; Benesch, T; Hunt, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Bulyha, S; Schmitzer, C

2011-03-01

174

SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON Technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum: Comparison CCRI(II)-S5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the frame of mutual cooperation between the IAEA and the BIPM, the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation Section II—Measurement of Radionuclides accepted an IAEA-organized interlaboratory comparison in 2008 on the determination of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum. The study was piloted by the Chemistry Unit at the IAEA's Laboratories in Seibersdorf (Austria). This report presents the methodology applied in conducting this comparison and the results. Activity results for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234, U-235 and U-238 were reported by three national metrology institutes (NMI) and five other expert laboratories or designated institutes. Four different approaches were used to calculate the nominal value of the reported results and associated uncertainties, and the results from each individual participant were evaluated and compared with this nominal reference value. The reported evaluation of the measurement results demonstrated agreement amongst the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section II, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

Shakhashiro, A.; Sansone, U.; Wershofen, H.; Bollhöfer, A.; Kim, C. K.; Kim, C. S.; Korun, M.; Moune, M.; Lee, S. H.; Tarjan, S.

2010-01-01

175

Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util-  

E-print Network

RLUOB Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util- ity Office Research building. Capabilities RLUOB provides: � Nearly 20,000 square feet of radiological laboratory

176

Comprehensive inter-laboratory calibration of reference materials for delta18O versus VSMOW using various on-line high-temperature conversion techniques.  

PubMed

Internationally distributed organic and inorganic oxygen isotopic reference materials have been calibrated by six laboratories carrying out more than 5300 measurements using a variety of high-temperature conversion techniques (HTC)a in an evaluation sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). To aid in the calibration of these reference materials, which span more than 125 per thousand, an artificially enriched reference water (delta(18)O of +78.91 per thousand) and two barium sulfates (one depleted and one enriched in (18)O) were prepared and calibrated relative to VSMOW2b and SLAP reference waters. These materials were used to calibrate the other isotopic reference materials in this study, which yielded: Reference material delta(18)O and estimated combined uncertainty IAEA-602 benzoic acid+71.28 +/- 0.36 per thousand USGS 35 sodium nitrate+56.81 +/- 0.31 per thousand IAEA-NO-3 potassium nitrate+25.32 +/- 0.29 per thousand IAEA-601 benzoic acid+23.14 +/- 0.19 per thousand IAEA-SO-5 barium sulfate+12.13 +/- 0.33 per thousand NBS 127 barium sulfate+8.59 +/- 0.26 per thousand VSMOW2 water 0 per thousand IAEA-600 caffeine-3.48 +/- 0.53 per thousand IAEA-SO-6 barium sulfate-11.35 +/- 0.31 per thousand USGS 34 potassium nitrate-27.78 +/- 0.37 per thousand SLAP water-55.5 per thousand The seemingly large estimated combined uncertainties arise from differences in instrumentation and methodology and difficulty in accounting for all measurement bias. They are composed of the 3-fold standard errors directly calculated from the measurements and provision for systematic errors discussed in this paper. A primary conclusion of this study is that nitrate samples analyzed for delta(18)O should be analyzed with internationally distributed isotopic nitrates, and likewise for sulfates and organics. Authors reporting relative differences of oxygen-isotope ratios (delta(18)O) of nitrates, sulfates, or organic material should explicitly state in their reports the delta(18)O values of two or more internationally distributed nitrates (USGS 34, IAEA-NO-3, and USGS 35), sulfates (IAEA-SO-5, IAEA-SO-6, and NBS 127), or organic material (IAEA-601 benzoic acid, IAEA-602 benzoic acid, and IAEA-600 caffeine), as appropriate to the material being analyzed, had these reference materials been analyzed with unknowns. This procedure ensures that readers will be able to normalize the delta(18)O values at a later time should it become necessary.The high-temperature reduction technique for analyzing delta(18)O and delta(2)H is not as widely applicable as the well-established combustion technique for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope determination. To obtain the most reliable stable isotope data, materials should be treated in an identical fashion; within the same sequence of analyses, samples should be compared with working reference materials that are as similar in nature and in isotopic composition as feasible. PMID:19263478

Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T; Böhlke, J K; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Jansen, Henk G; Meijer, Harro A J; Mroczkowski, Stanley J; Qi, Haiping; Soergel, Karin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Weise, Stephan M; Werner, Roland A

2009-04-01

177

Creep Laboratory manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A manual for the NPL Creep Laboratory, a collective name given to two testing laboratories, the Uniaxial Creep Laboratory and the Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing Laboratory, is presented. The first laboratory is devoted to uniaxial creep testing and houses approximately 50 high sensitivity creep machines including 10 constant stress cam lever machines. The second laboratory houses a low cycle fatigue testing machine of 100 kN capacity driven by a servo-electric actuator, five machines for uniaxial tensile creep testing of engineering ceramics at temperatures up to 1600C, and an electronic creep machine. Details of the operational procedures for carrying out uniaxial creep testing are given. Calibration procedures to be followed in order to comply with the specifications laid down by British standards, and to provide traceability back to the primary standards are described.

Osgerby, S.; Loveday, M. S.

1992-06-01

178

CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular for materials selection which will have a large impact on waste disposal and recycling and in the real limits of radiation releases if indexed to the real impact on individuals and the environment given the differences in the types of radiation emitted by tritium when compared with the fission products. Round table sessions resulted in some common recommendations. The discussions also created the awareness of the need for a larger involvement of the IAEA in support of fusion safety standards development.

Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

2008-01-01

179

Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation  

SciTech Connect

Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo [Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: I.Goldman@iaea.org, E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan [Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: N.Ramamoorthy@iaea.org

2008-07-15

180

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-print Network

of Technology CONTENTS Section page 1 HIGHLIGHTS 1 2 THE ALFV�N LABORATORY 5 2.1 Plasma Physics 7 2.2 Fusion Plasma Physics 10 2.3 Applied Electrophysics 15 2.3.1 Accelerator Technology 15 2.3.2 IndustrialAnnual Report 2004 Alfvén Laboratory Alfvén Laboratory RoyalInstitute ofTechnology SE 100 44

Haviland, David

181

1MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT Lincoln Laboratory  

E-print Network

of excellence ... ... a history of innovation Brett Levasseur (WPI CS `08) John Meklenburg (WPI ECE/BME `11, ECE Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Systems & Technology Communications and Information Technology Laboratory Admission · Selection is competitive -- academic standing is strong factor ­ Performed by WPI

Clancy, Ted

182

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

183

International law problems for realisation of the IAEA conventions on notification and assistance in the case of a nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

The Chernobyl accident underscored the need for an early warning system and international assistance plan in case of a nuclear accident. Shortly after Chernobyl, two conventions were adopted under the auspices of the IAEA. The convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, in force since 1986, establishes an early warning system for all nuclear accidents whose effects might cross national boundaries. Under the convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear accident or radiological Emergency,in force since 1987, countries must facilitate prompt assistance in case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, to minimize it`s consequences. Issues with the conventions are described.

Petrov, M.M.

1993-12-31

184

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in India.  

PubMed

The banking of tissues such bone and skin began in India in the 1980s and 1990s. Although eye banking started in 1945 there was little progress in this field for the next five decades. As part of the IAEA/RCA program to use ionising radiation for the sterilisation of biological tissues in Asia and the Pacific Region, the Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) in 1986 decided to set up a tissue bank in Mumbai funded by the Government of India. The TMH Tissue Bank became operational in January 1988, and stands as a pioneering effort in the country to provide safe, clinically useful and cost-effective human allografts for transplantation. It uses the IAEA International Standards on Tissue Banking. All the grafts are sterilised terminally by exposure to a dose of 25 kGy of gamma radiation, which has been validated as recommended by the IAEA Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilisation of Tissues Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control. The TMH Tissue Bank is registered with the Maharashtra State Health Authorities, and in May 2004, it became India's first Tissue Bank to receive ISO 9001:2000 certification of its Quality Management System. From 1989 to September 2007, the TMH Tissue Bank has supplied 11,369 allografts to 310 surgeons operating in 69 hospitals in Mumbai and 56 hospitals in other parts of India. These numbers have been limited by difficulties with the retrieval of tissues from deceased donors due to inadequate resources and tissue donation policies of hospitals. As the Government of India representative in the IAEA program, the TMH Tissue Bank has promoted and co-coordinated these activities in the country and the development of tissue banks using radiation sterilisation of tissue grafts. Towards this end it has been engaged in training personnel, drawing up project proposals, and supporting the establishment of a Tissue Retrieval Centre in Mumbai. Currently it networks with the Zonal Transplant Co-ordination Centre of the Government of Maharashtra, and the newly instituted National Deceased Donor Transplantation Network, which will work with the Government of India to set up rules and regulations for organ and tissue donation and transplantation. PMID:18581258

Lobo Gajiwala, Astrid; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

185

Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

Gilliom, Laura R.

1992-01-01

186

New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL`s interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL`s status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL`s small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide.

NONE

1997-04-01

187

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

188

LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY WAS ESTABLISHED TO IMPROVE READING ABILITY AND OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS AS AN AID IN THE PREVENTION OF DROPOUTS. THE LABORATORY WAS OPERATED ON A SUMMER SCHEDULE WITH A FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF FROM 45 MINUTES TO 2 1/2 HOURS DAILY. ALL PUPILS WERE 14 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, AND EXPRESSED A DESIRE TO IMPROVE THEIR READING…

ROBERTS, HERMESE E.

189

Laboratory?Acquired Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory-acquired infections due to a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been described. Although the precise risk of infection after an exposure remains poorly defined, surveys of laboratory-acquired infections suggest that Brucella species, Shigella species, Salmonella species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common causes. Infections due to the bloodborne pathogens (hepatitis B virus, hepatitis

Kamaljit Singh

2009-01-01

190

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

of Energy. Competitive Advantage The technology can be used to engineer viral tropism. In additionBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Human Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor - CAR Brookhaven National Laboratory

191

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

. Competitive Advantage The technology provides a MRI scanner combined with a PET scanner whose outputBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Combined PET/MRI Scanner Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

192

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

, and nanocomponents in smart displays. Competitive Advantage The system is simple, modular and allows high throughputBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov Generation of Janus-Type Nanoparticles Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

193

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

. Competitive Advantage The gantry accepts particles and transports through the gantry magnets with very smallBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Gantry for a Particle Therapy Facility Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

194

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The advantages of using a carbon nanotube-assisted drug delivery systemBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov CARBON NANOTUBE ­ BASED DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE Brookhaven National Laboratory

195

National Laboratory Dorene Price  

E-print Network

. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE This spectrometer is an important addition to the currently available particle sizeBrookhaven National Laboratory Dorene Price Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored Research: price@bnl.gov MEASUREMENT OF AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

196

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

and Associated Equipment, 527 (1-2), 166-170. Competitive Advantage The RatCAP is a light self-contained portableBrookhaven National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: pupadhya@bnl.gov Small Animal PET Tomograph - RatCAP Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi

197

Laboratory for Oceans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is made of the activities of the Laboratory for Oceans. The staff and the research activities are nearly evenly divided between engineering and scientific endeavors. The Laboratory contributes engineering design skills to aircraft and ground based experiments in terrestrial and atmospheric sciences in cooperation with scientists from labs in Earth sciences.

1988-01-01

198

Hoods for Science Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

Horowitz, Harold; and others

199

Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory  

E-print Network

Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Galveston, Texas Penaeid Shrimp Life Cvcle ^.y Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Circular 307 #12;The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory at commercially important species of shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico through four research programs: (1) Shrimp

200

An Independent Freshman Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a first-year laboratory course designed to fulfill laboratory objectives of reinforcing lecture material, teaching experimental methodology, developing hands-on skills, and imparting a sense of error. The course's six segments examine: digital electronics with students building a photogate timer; error analysis; linear accelerated…

Spencer, C. D.; Seligmann, P. F.

1992-01-01

201

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

202

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory  

E-print Network

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory Multi-scale,multi-mode imaging tools to understand the recalcitrant nature of biomass feedstocks and the performance of techniques to deconstruct biomass NREL, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL

203

Waterhighlights 4 CAUSES Laboratory  

E-print Network

Associate Dean for Land-Grant Programs in CAUSES. This is an exciting moment to serve as the WRRI director in curriculum development for the new CAUSES college, I spearheaded the establishment of two new state-of-the-art- lation Laboratory (2010). In 2010, based on the cutting-edge research laboratories of the Institute, new

District of Columbia, University of the

204

The Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This condensed article on the language laboratory describes educational and financial possibilities and limitations, often citing the foreign language program at Purdue University as an example. The author discusses: (1) costs and amortization, (2) preventive maintenance, (3) laboratory design, (4) the multichannel recorder, and (5) visuals. Other…

Hocking, Elton

205

Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

1989-01-01

206

Dental Laboratory Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

207

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric current ­ charges in motion. The current in the CRT was simple

Minnesota, University of

208

LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-print Network

Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric

Minnesota, University of

209

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

1999-09-01

210

The Virtual Robotics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01

211

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-print Network

electricity when the sun's output is insufficient and to funnel excess energy back to the grid when sunlightNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory

212

PREFACE: 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains invited and contributed papers presented at the 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego, California, on 24-26 September, 2003, and it was organized by General Atomics. As has been the tradition at the last four meetings of this series, the programme was sub-divided into six topics. For each topic there was an invited talk whose purpose was to give an overview of the topic, based on contributed papers presented at the meeting and on external results. These talks were followed by discussion periods, which were used for extended question and answer sessions for the invited speakers or for additional short presentations by contributing speakers. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, of which there were about 70. The topics were: Structure and dynamics of internal transport barriers Structure and dynamics of the H-mode pedestal Understanding transport barriers through modelling Control of transport barriers Transport within transport barriers: theorist's view of the future Diagnostic and analysis issues for transport barriers The topics were focused on the physics of edge and core transport barriers. Similar to the previous meeting, held in Toki, Japan, the universality of this physics in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric machines was featured. In addition, the physics of transport barriers in relation to burning plasma experiments was emphasized. In particular, one of the hopes and goals of the participants is that the physics of transport barriers can be used to enhance the prospects for burning plasmas. Because this meeting occurred approximately 21 years after the discovery of the H-mode in 1982, a special session was held to commemorate more than 20 years of research on transport barriers. In this session, Dr R Stambaugh and Professor K Itoh presented personal views on the implications of the discovery and memories of the early days of H-mode research. In addition, Dr F Wagner, the leader of the team that published the seminal paper announcing the discovery of the H-mode, prepared remarks that were presented by Dr Stambaugh. The discovery of the H-mode provided great hope that a fusion reactor could be developed and opened the door to the field of transport barriers, a field that was beyond the dreams of most researchers in 1982. The selection of topics and invited speakers and general organization of the scientific programme were carried out by the International Programme Committee, consisting of: S Lebedev (Ioffe, Russia) K Ida (NIFS, Japan) T Takizuka (JAERI, Japan) G Saibene (EFDA, Germany) W Suttrop (IPP, Germany) M Greenwald (MIT, USA) E Synakowski (PPPL, USA) R Groebner (GA, USA) I am very grateful to the committee members for their work and advice on the preparation of the meeting. In addition, I express deep thanks to Dr Punit Gohil, the Chair of the Local Organizing Committee, and to Lupe Cerda, the Conference Coordinator, who very ably took care of numerous details related to the organization of the meeting.

Groebner, Richard

2004-05-01

213

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report  

SciTech Connect

The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

2009-03-01

214

The laboratory module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Of the five modules comprising the Orbiting Quarantine Facility, the Laboratory Module must provide not only an extensive research capability to permit execution of the protocol, but also the flexibility to accommodate second-order testing if nonterrestrial life is discovered in the sample. The biocontainment barriers that protect the sample and the researchers from cross contamination are described. Specifically, the laboratory layout, laboratory equipment, the environmental control and life support system, and containment assurance procedures are discussed. The metal manipulation arm proposed for use within the biocontainment cabinets is described. Sample receipt and processing procedures are outlined.

1981-01-01

215

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOEpatents

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01

216

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

217

NIST Laboratory Programs and the National Voluntary Laboratory  

E-print Network

, Chief, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program #12;2 What Is Laboratory Accreditation of products in U.S. and world markets. What Is the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP#12;#12;11 NIST Laboratory Programs and the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

218

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of covert conflict Shishir Nagaraja, Ross Anderson July 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Nagaraja, Ross Anderson Computer Laboratory JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK forename.surname @ cl

Haddadi, Hamed

219

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

, link graphs and Petri nets James J. Leifer, Robin Milner August 2004 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK 3 #12;Contents: Introduction 5 PART

Haddadi, Hamed

220

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

systems: basic theory Robin Milner September 2001 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory William Gates Building, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK

Haddadi, Hamed

221

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Gateway with publish-subscribe paradigm over wireless network Eiko Yoneki, Jean Bacon February 2003 15 JJ Thomson and Jean Bacon University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building, J J Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

222

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

for language-based transactions Tim Harris August 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD tim

Harris, Timothy

223

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of a coordinate based location system David R. Spence November 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United David Spence University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, UK, CB3 0FD

Hand, Steven

224

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

for bigraphical structure Robin Milner February 2004 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone of Cambridge, The Computer Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK February 2004 Abstract

Haddadi, Hamed

225

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Milner January 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http Robin Milner University of Cambridge, Computer Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK

Haddadi, Hamed

226

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

policy for an NHS electronic health record service Moritz Y. Becker March 2005 15 JJ Thomson Avenue electronic health record service Moritz Y. Becker Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge JJ Thomson

Haddadi, Hamed

227

LABORATORY POLICY WORKING ALONE  

E-print Network

& Responsibilities Template Issued By: Environmental Health &Safety Template Revision #: --Part: Laboratory Policy: ______________________________________________________________ Building and Room #'s under supervision of Dr working alone policy. 1. Policy: The following operations/experiments/conditions (specified by principal

Garousi, Vahid

228

The Microscale Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are two microscale chemistry laboratory experiments including "Microscale Syntheses of Heterocyclic Compounds," and "Microscale Acid-Base Extraction--A Colorful Introduction." Materials, procedures and probable results are discussed. (CW)

Zipp, Arden P., Ed.

1990-01-01

229

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - CORVALLIS  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Research Laboratory - Corvallis is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's - national research center for terrestrial and watershed ecology, aquatic ecoregions, and for the ecological effects of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric p...

230

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

231

Ecosystems in the Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

Madders, M.

1975-01-01

232

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Computer Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476 the Crucible network, creating software tools for use by a wide range of artists including musicians (Nash

Haddadi, Hamed

233

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining......................................................................................................................................6 Reservoir Architecture and Structural Style of Carbonate Shelf-to-Basin Transitions

Texas at Austin, University of

234

Computer Systems Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Computer Systems Laboratory (CSL) Annual Report - 1993 describes the annual activities and accomplishments of the laboratory. Following the Director's Foreword, a CSL overview is presented, followed by overviews of the five technical divisions. The Technology Transfer section describes the vehicles used by CSL to disseminate research and technical information to the public. A list of Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) and FIPS order information conclude the annual report.

Lennon, E. B.; Radack, S. M.; Roach, R. K.

1993-02-01

235

Laboratory Heat Recovery System  

E-print Network

. This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet.... This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet...

Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

1981-01-01

236

Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory  

Cancer.gov

CGR’s high throughput laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and automation systems for a large number of applications. CGR supports DCEG in all stages of cancer research from planning to publishing, including experimental design and project management, sample handling, genotyping and sequencing assay design and execution, development and implementation of bioinformatic pipelines, and downstream scientific research and analytical support.

237

Safer Science: Laboratory Relocation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The movement of hazardous chemicals found in high school science laboratories and chemical storerooms can be risky business due to the increased likelihood of an accidental spill, contamination, or other type of mishap. Prudent safety planning and practice need to be addressed in order to eliminate or minimize the potential for chemical incidents. Giving thought to the guidelines outlined in this article will help initiate the process of moving chemical inventories within and between school laboratories and storerooms.

Roy, Ken

2008-10-01

238

Laboratory of Population Genetics  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Population Genetics (LPG) utilizes genetic analysis to gain insight into human biologic processes. Until recently, genetic dissection of phenotypes had been largely limited to investigations in experimental organisms. The dawn of the post-genome era presents the opportunity to extend these investigations to humans. It is the major goal of this laboratory to exploit emerging resources and technology in order to understand the genetic basis of the complex phenotypes related to human cancer.

239

POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

EPA Science Inventory

These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

240

Radiation protection in pediatric interventional cardiology: An IAEA PILOT program in Latin America.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to present a methodology and some initial results for a pilot program on radiation protection (RP) in pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The starting point of the program was a workshop involving several pediatric cardiologists leading this specialty in 11 Latin American countries. The workshop included a pilot RP training course and additional sessions during which the objectives of the program and the methodology to collect and process data on patient and staff radiation doses were discussed. Special attention was dedicated to agree on a common quality control (QC) protocol for the x-ray and imaging systems used in the different catheterization laboratories. The preliminary data showed that only 64% of the cardiologists used their personal dosimeters regularly and that only 36% were aware of their personal dose values. The data on pediatric interventional activity were collected from 10 centers from nine different countries. A total of 2,429 procedures (50% diagnostic and 50% therapeutic) were carried out during 2009 in these centers. Patient dose data were available in only a few centers and were not analyzed on a regular basis in any of the catheterization laboratories involved. Plans were developed for a basic QC protocol of the x-ray systems and construction of a Latin American database on pediatric cardiology with patient and staff dose values with the idea in mind of obtaining distributions of these dose values before promoting several optimization strategies. PMID:21799339

Vano, Eliseo; Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando; Durán, Ariel; Nader, Alejandro

2011-09-01

241

NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol  

SciTech Connect

In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

242

Development and validation of a model for tritium accumulation by a freshwater bivalve using the IAEA EMRAS scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A six-compartment metabolic model for tritium accumulation by bivalves was developed and validated using two observed data sets supplied in an international IAEA program for validation of environmental models, EMRAS (Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety, 2003-2007). The data observed were presented in scenarios for model prediction of temporal change of HTO and OBT concentrations in Barnes mussels (Elliptio complanata). In the Uptake Scenario, mussels were transplanted from a site with background tritium concentrations into a lake, which has historically received tritium inputs over time from up-gradient waste management areas. Another data set was presented in the Depuration Scenario for model prediction of the temporal decrease in HTO and OBT concentrations in the mussels following transplantation from the lake into another lake with significantly lower tritium levels. The model simulation was able to reproduce the observation that the amount of hydrogen taken from sediment was very small compared with that taken from lake water. (authors)

Miyamoto, K.; Inoue, Y.; Takeda, H.; Yanagisawa, K.; Fuma, S.; Ishii, N.; Kuroda, N. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Yankovich, T.; Kim, S. B.; Davis, P. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-07-15

243

Use of IAEA's phase-space files for the implementation of a clinical accelerator virtual source model.  

PubMed

In the present work, phase-space data files (phsp) provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for different accelerators were used in order to develop a Virtual Source Model (VSM) for clinical photon beams. Spectral energy distributions extracted from supplied phsp files were used to define the radiation pattern of a virtual extended source in a hybrid model which is completed with a virtual diaphragm used to simulate both electron contamination and the shape of the penumbra region. This simple virtual model was used as the radiation source for dosimetry calculations in a water phantom. The proposed model proved easy to build and test, and good agreement with clinical accelerators dosimetry measurements were obtained for different field sizes. Our results suggest this simple method could be useful for treatment planning systems (TPS) verification purposes. PMID:23932845

Rucci, Alexis; Carletti, Claudia; Cravero, Walter; Strbac, Bojan

2014-03-01

244

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Indonesia.  

PubMed

In 1986, the National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan) in Jakarta started the research and development for the setting up of a tissue bank (Batan Research Tissue Bank/BRTB) by preserving fresh amnion or fetal membranes by lyophilisation and then sterilising by gamma irradiation. During the period of 1990 and 2000, three more tissue banks were set up, i.e., Biomaterial Centre in Surabaya, Jamil Tissue Bank in Padang, and Sitanala Tissue Bank in Tangerang. In 1994, BRTB produced bone allografts. The banks established under the IAEA program concentrated its work on the production of amnion, bone and soft tissues allografts, as well as bone xenografts. These tissues (allografts and xenografts) were sterilised using gamma irradiation (about 90%) and the rest were sterilized by ETO and those products have been used in the treatment of patients at more than 50 hospitals in Indonesia. In 2004, those tissue banks produced 8,500 grafts and 5,000 of them were amnion grafts for eye treatment and wound dressing. All of those grafts were used for patients as well as for research. In 2006, the production increased to 9,000 grafts. Although the capacity of those banks can produce more grafts, we are facing problems on getting raw materials from suitable donors. To fulfill the demand of bone grafts we also produced bone xenografts. The impact of the IAEA program in tissue banking activities in Indonesia can be summarised as follows: to support the national program on importing substitutes for medical devices. The price of imported tissues are between US$ 50 and US$ 6,000 per graft. Local tissue bank can produce tissues with the same quality with the price for about 10-30% of the imported tissues. PMID:18651245

Hilmy, Nazly; Manjas, Menkher; Ferdiansyah; Abbas, Basril; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

245

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

and testing areas, magnet experiment cells, and laser laboratory areas. The laboratory is used 24 hours perNATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY NHMFL FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY SAFETY PROCEDURE SP-3 TITLE Dalton ______________________________________________________ ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH

Weston, Ken

246

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Nonconformities #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Definitions Nonconformity ­ nonfulfillment assessors Nonconformities - September 24, 2013 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

247

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Calibration Certificate Review Discussion #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Calibration Certificate Review calibration so it must be correct, right? #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Annex B's 5

248

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Working for NVLAP #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Presentation Overview · Assessor roles · Assessor Training ­ 2014 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Assessor Definitions · Lead

249

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Outline · Purpose of the Types of Assessments Meeting · Case Study Assessment Techniques ­ September 24, 2013 2 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory

250

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

E-print Network

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating Assessor Performance #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Why NVLAP Evaluates? ISO/IEC 17011 - 6 to perform competently. 2Assessor Performance - September 24, 2013 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory

251

3. Blackwell et al., Proc. 9th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Contr. Nucl. Fusion (Balti-more), IAEA, Vienna, ~, 227 (1983).  

E-print Network

3. Blackwell et al., Proc. 9th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Contr. Nucl. Fusion (Balti- more. Pogutse, in: Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, IAEA, Vienna, Vol. 2, 69 (1985). 6. Contr. Fusion and Plasma Physics, Budapest, Vol. I (!985), p. 38. 8~ M. Murakami et al., Plasma Physics

Shepelyansky, Dima

252

Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

2009-03-23

253

MEETING REPORT: IAEA Meeting: International Conference of National Regulatory Authorities with Competence in the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buenos Aires, 11-15 December 2000 The meeting was the outcome of one of the actions arising from an IAEA sponsored meeting held in Dijon in 1998 on these issues. The action plan included inter alia the production of a `Code of Conduct' (published December 2000), the production of a scheme for the `Categorisation of Sources' (published December 2000) and a

Chris Englefield

2001-01-01

254

[Laboratory animal; allergy; asthma].  

PubMed

Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) may develop when susceptible persons are exposed to allergens produced by laboratory animals. LAA is associated with exposure to urine, fur, and salivae of rats, guinea pigs, dogs and rabbits. Approximately 30% of persons who are exposed to laboratory animals may develop LAA and some will also develop asthma. LAA is most likely to occur in persons with previously known allergies, especially to domestic pets. The majority of LAA sufferers experience symptoms within six months their first exposure to laboratory animals; almost all develop symptoms within three years. The most common symptoms are watery eyes and an itchy, runny nose, although skin symptoms and lower respiratory tract symptoms may also occur. Feeding and handling laboratory animals or cleaning their cages generates ten times the amount of allergens compared with undisturbed conditions. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work environment and on organizational and individual protection measures. Pre-placement evaluation and periodic medical surveillance of workers are important pieces of the overall occupational health programme. The emphasis of these medical evaluations should be on counselling and early disease detection. PMID:22022762

Corradi, M; Romano, C; Mutti, A

2011-01-01

255

NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

2004-01-01

256

Mote Marine Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website presents the Mote Marine Laboratory (MML), "an independent, nonprofit research organization dedicated to excellence in marine science and education." The MML website links to information about the laboratory's various research centers including the Center for Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Research, Center for Shark Research, Center for Eco-Toxicology, and Center for Fisheries Enhancement. The MML Center for Coastal Ecology links to information on its three research programs -- Coastal Resources, Benthic Ecology, and Chemical Ecology. The MML research efforts are focused on the Southwest Florida coastal region, and they have academic connections with Florida State University, the University of South Florida, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The MML website also contains information about the lab's staff, Tropical Research Laboratory, and Arthur Vining Davis Library which offers online journals, and links to bibliographic databases.

257

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

Zirbel, E. L.

2002-12-01

258

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11

259

Laboratory Notebook for Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

All students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook. The notebook is to be either a bound notebook or a spiral notebook. All of your work in class is to be recorded in your notebook. Your laboratory notebook is: --a place to record what you see and do (including mistakes) --a place to record what you THINK about what you see and do --a place to ask QUESTIONS and draw conclusions about the experiences and results --a place to track your feelings and attitudes about your experiences --a seedbed of ideas for experiments and creativity --a record of your accomplishments during your time in this class

Schulz, Barbara

1994-07-30

260

National Media Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is presented. The mission of the NML is to support current government user data storage needs and assist them in getting the most efficient 'commercial' solutions in the future. The motivation for a National Media Laboratory is as follows: recording systems are the major government image and data exploitation bottleneck; government data recording performance and storage requirements lead commercial practice by 3-5 years; the supporting commercial recorder industry is large but principally focused on video not data formats; lack of standards; and lack of transfer of commercial knowledge base to program offices and operational sites.

Clark, Robert

1992-01-01

261

Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory (MEL) is a division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Its function is to work with companies and perform research to improve manufacturing performance. Because of its broad scope, MEL has five divisions -- Precision Engineering, Manufacturing Metrology, Intelligent Systems, Manufacturing Systems Integration, and Fabrication Technology. The laboratory's homepage offers descriptions, research project information, conference and workshop times, and photo and movie galleries from various projects. There is also a link to an Engineering Metrology Toolbox used to "solve real problems in dimensional measurement."

2001-01-01

262

Requirements for reference (calibration) laboratories in laboratory medicine.  

PubMed

In addition to reference measurement procedures and reference materials, reference or calibration laboratories play an integral role in the implementation of measurement traceability in routine laboratories. They provide results of measurements using higher-order methods, e.g. isotope dilution mass spectrometry and may assign values to materials to be used for external quality assessment programs and to secondary reference materials. The requirements for listing of laboratories that provide reference measurement services include a statement of the metrological level or principle of measurement, accreditation as a calibration laboratory according to ISO 15195 and the participation in a proficiency testing system (regular inter-laboratory comparisons) for reference laboratories. Ring trials are currently conducted for thirty well-defined measurands and the results are made available to all laboratories. Through the use of reference laboratory services that are listed by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine there is the opportunity to further promote traceability and standardisation of laboratory measurements. PMID:18392129

Siekmann, Lothar

2007-11-01

263

Laboratory Safety Principles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This workshop covers major principles and regulations pertinent to working in laboratories with hazardous materials. It is divided into 45 minute segments dealing with: Radioactive Materials (Staiger); Toxic, Reactive, Carcinogenic, and Teratogenic Chemicals (Carlson); Infectious Agents (Laver); and Fire Safety Concepts and Physical Hazards (Arnston).

Jerry Staiger, Keith Carlson, Jim Laver, Ray Arntson (University of Minnesota;); Keith Carlson (University of Minnesota;); Jim Lauer (University of Minnesota;); Ray Amtson (University of Minnesota;)

2008-04-11

264

Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

Grisaffe, S. J.

1985-01-01

265

Laboratory investigation of hypercoagulability.  

PubMed

For many years, the laboratory investigation of patients with thrombophilia has lagged behind that of patients with bleeding diathesis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control and regulate coagulation, and the resultant recognition of new defects, have greatly stimulated clinical laboratory interest in this area. Assays to detect resistance to activated protein C; deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S; and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies are widely available and should form part of the investigation of patients that present with idiopathic thrombosis. Such a work-up will likely provide an explanation for thrombosis in 40 to 60% of patients. Abnormalities of fibrinogen and fibrinolysis may explain still more, although such defects are currently considered rare. In addition, presently unrecognized defects almost certainly exist, and the identification of such individuals will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the hemostatic mechanism. Laboratory tests to define the hypercoagulable state are continually being developed. They include whole blood coagulation and platelet function tests and novel activation markers. However, acceptance of these approaches by clinical laboratories has been slow. PMID:9579632

Francis, J L

1998-01-01

266

Microcomputers in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-semester hour laboratory course introduced junior and senior physics majors to assembly language programing and to interfacing KIM-1 microcomputer to experiments. A general purpose interface to a standard breadboard was developed. Course details, apparatus, and some interfacing projects are given. (Author/SK)

Rafert, Bruce; Nicklin, R. C.

1982-01-01

267

The Neutron Star Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neutron stars provide a rich and unique cosmic laboratory for studying fundamental questions in physics and astrophysics, including the effects of superstrong magnetic fields, nuclear deflagration and detonation in dense matter, neutron superfluidity and proton superconductivity, the properties of the nuclear force at high densities, the expected transition to quark matter, and gravitational physics in the strong-field regime. X- and

Frederick K. Lamb

1998-01-01

268

National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess  

E-print Network

.S. Department of Energy. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE The technology provides a novel method for controllableBrookhaven National Laboratory Kimberley Elcess Office of Intellectual Property and Sponsored address: elcess@bnl.gov SYNTHESIS OF METAL-METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS AND ELECTROCATALYSTS Brookhaven National

269

Laboratory Fish Egg Incubator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The construction and use of a laboratory fish egg incubator are described. The water reservoir is a standard 5-gal aquarium and the incubator and egg containers are constructed from readily available acrylic materials, silicon caulk, and nylon mesh. This system provides a means of separately incubating eggs from several experimental treatments.

Kent H. Blacklidge; Christopher A. Bidwell

1993-01-01

270

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES  

E-print Network

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

Polly, David

271

Mobile Environmental Education Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In May, 1972, the Kingsport (Tennessee) City School System received financial assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority to plan, develop, and implement, as a demonstration environmental education project, the utilization of a mobile laboratory for conducting environmental studies. The project, as described in this booklet, identified four…

Childress, Ronald B.

272

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mike Bond, George Danezis June 2006 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, UK {Mike.Bond, George.Danezis}@cl.cam.ac.uk 6th June 2006

Haddadi, Hamed

273

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Terminating Consensus Piotr Zieli´nski June 2006 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone Cavendish Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK piotr.zielinski@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract

Haddadi, Hamed

274

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Server Team University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory 15 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FD, ENGLAND Xeno Kotsovinos, Anil V.S. Madhavapeddy, Rolf Neugebauer, Ian A. Pratt, Andrew K. Warfield January 2003 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2003

Harris, Timothy

275

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

: A personal projected display for interacting with documents Mark Ashdown, Peter Robinson June 2002 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12;c 2002 Mark Ashdown and Peter Robinson University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory J J Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

276

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

July 2010 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http Rice, Andrew W. Moore Computer Laboratory, University Of Cambridge William Gates Building, 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, CB3 0FD, UK Email: firstname.lastname@cl.cam.ac.uk Kieran Mansley Solarflare

Haddadi, Hamed

277

Laboratory analysis of stardust.  

PubMed

Tiny dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites are identified to have originated in the atmospheres of stars on the basis of their anomalous isotopic compositions. Although isotopic analysis with the ion microprobe plays a major role in the laboratory analysis of these stardust grains, many other microanalytical techniques are applied to extract the maximum amount of information. PMID:23231704

Zinner, Ernst

2013-02-01

278

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY  

E-print Network

logistics operations and secondary services in the area of insurance, customs and carbon footprint trackingFUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space

Heiser, Gernot

279

National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory  

E-print Network

capable accelerator facilities, the next generation of nuclear scientists will have at their dispos- al security, energy, materials science and quantum information processing. In short, the future of nuclear· laboratory in the United States Training ground for 10% of all U.S. nuclear science· doctoral students

280

RAS Laboratory Groups  

Cancer.gov

The RAS Program is using multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. Accordingly, the resources of the FNLCR allocated to the RAS Hub have been organized into seven laboratory groups, with each group contributing the most advanced technology available to the collaborative effort.

281

The Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines  

E-print Network

of Health Population and Public Health Branch Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response #12;Our mission, ON Louise Linarez Technical Supervisor Provincial Laboratory of Public Health Edmonton, AB Jim Orzechowski is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Health Canada Ã?galement disponible en

Bolch, Tobias

282

PENNSYLVANIA APPALACHIAN LABORATORY  

E-print Network

;#12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARYI 1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 05 2. Plan Vision 09 3.V. Rachel Carson 04 #12;05 1. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Mission Statement Through its four laboratories across Maryland, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Boynton, Walter R.

283

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

of Cambridge, Homerton College. Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory for program instrumentation in the spirit of Popek and Goldberg's work. Instrumentation also incurs during my studies, Homerton College for the excellent accommodation and the Computer Lab for making

Haddadi, Hamed

284

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

285

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

2013-05-28

286

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 826 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-826 ISSN 1476-2986 GREEN IPTV: a resource and energy efficient network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos December 2012 15 JJ Thomson Avenue://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12;GREEN IPTV: A Resource and Energy Efficient Network for IPTV Fernando M. V. Ramos

Haddadi, Hamed

287

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

technologies. This dissertation specifically focuses on examining the utility of facial affect analysisTechnical Report Number 793 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-793 ISSN 1476-2986 Affect inference in learning environments: a functional view of facial affect analysis using naturalistic data Shazia Afzal

Haddadi, Hamed

288

Standardizing calibration laboratory practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of the calibration lab is becoming more and more important in view of the `global business' environment. Scheduled, regular calibration of test and measuring instruments with measurement traceability to the nationally accepted standards is a prerequisite. Certification to ISO 9000-Quality System Standards becoming a must for exports, the calibration activity being the backbone for quality, calibration laboratory practices

C. Muralikrishna Kumar

1993-01-01

289

ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341  

E-print Network

Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

290

Russell Furr Laboratory Safety &  

E-print Network

; Cal/OSHA investigated the accident UCLA fined $31,875 in 2009 Failure to ensure employees wore appropriate PPE Failure to maintain health & safety training records for laboratory employees Failure Learned from UCLA #12;1. Demonstrate commitment to safety 2. Assess risks and plan for hazards 3

291

Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory  

E-print Network

of electrical energy, hot and cold running sea water, hot and cold domestic water, fresh well water, natural gas, and com- pressed air. Eleven of the research laboratories have constant-temperature water tables. Two to be planted in open water with mini- mum loss. The effect of the rate of flow of sea wat

292

Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

293

Marine Biological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Marine Biological Laboratory is an international center for research, education, and training in biology, biomedicine, and ecology. Site features the latest news and research developments from MBL. Explore all the latest research, education information, including graduate admissions and teacher workshops, and a glimpse at MBL history, facilities, and more. Current news and links to all kinds of additional MBL resources are also available.

294

Laboratory Animal Science Program  

Cancer.gov

The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

295

A Lean Laboratory  

PubMed Central

During certain months of the year, viral respiratory infections lead to a dramatic increase in pediatric emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Rapid identification of the infectious organism results in timely treatment and reductions in hospital cost and length of stay. Before the introduction of molecular testing to the virology laboratory, diagnosis relied on the standard methods of immunofluorescence and culture. These tests can be labor-intensive and costly. Recent studies have demonstrated the higher sensitivity, faster turnaround, and broader diagnostic spectrum provided by multiplexed RT-PCR assays. Data comparing the laboratory cost and labor efficiency of the tests are lacking. To address this issue, we chose to implement the principles of operational workflow analysis using lean methodology to critically evaluate the potential advantages of a multiplexed RT-PCR assay both in terms of workflow and cost effectiveness. Our results indicated that the implementation of the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel (RVP) resulted in a standardized workflow with decreased requirements in laboratory cost as well as improvement in efficiency. In summary, we demonstrate that, in our laboratory, the Luminex xTAG RVP is more operationally streamlined and cost-effective than standard viral direct fluorescent antibody and culture. Further studies are needed to highlight additional benefits of the test, including shortened hospital stay and improved patient outcome. PMID:21354052

Dundas, Nicola E.; Ziadie, Mandolin S.; Revell, Paula A.; Brock, Evangeline; Mitui, Midori; Leos, N. Kristine; Rogers, Beverly B.

2011-01-01

296

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Technical Report Number 532 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-532 ISSN 1476-2986 Internet traffic are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/TechReports/ Series editor: Markus Kuhn ISSN 1476-2986 #12;Abstract Due to the dramatically increasing popularity of the services provided over

Hand, Steven

297

Laboratory Density Functionals  

E-print Network

We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

B. G. Giraud

2007-07-26

298

National Laboratory Poornima Upadhya  

E-print Network

is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department, pharmaceutical or cleaning products. Applications The technology allows the formation of optically active chiral synthetic pathways for producing pharmaceutical compounds. 3. The advantage of performing racemic resolution

299

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Labs Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory Metamaterials Laboratory Surface and Interface Physics Laboratory Molecular Genetics Laboratory Structural Biology Laboratory Initiative Research Units

Fukai, Tomoki

300

Open Laboratories in College Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One viable alternative to the conventional, regularly scheduled laboratory session is the open laboratory concept. In this chapter, the authors use the open laboratory system developed at Eastern Kentucky University as a case study to provide insight into the system, including its benefits and challenges. The authors also report on plans to use current and emerging computer technologies to automate laboratory operations.

Tofan, Daniel; Goodbey, Susan; Otieno, Tom

2006-01-01

301

Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

Cambridge, University of

302

ChemPages Laboratory Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

303

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review  

E-print Network

1 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 - July 2, 2009June 30 - July 2, 2009 #12;Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review June 30 - July 2 to vertical structure of temperature change] #12;8 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review Geophysical

304

Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

305

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory  

E-print Network

Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics Science Laboratory Biofunctional Synthetic Chemistry Laboratory RNA Biology Laboratory Astrophysical Big

Fukai, Tomoki

306

GRADUATE AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-print Network

GRADUATE AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Experiments and modeling Firestone Flight Sciences Laboratory Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory Karman Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics

307

Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

1998-01-01

308

Surgical Planning Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

309

Flight Dynamics Laboratory overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Flight Dynamics Laboratory (FDL) is one of four Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) and part of the Aeronautical Systems Division located at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The FDL is responsible for the planning and execution of research and development programs in the areas of structures and dynamics, flight controls, vehicle equipment/subsystems, and aeromechanics. Some of the areas being researched in the four FDL divisions are as follows: large space structures (LSS) materials and controls; advanced cockpit designs; bird-strike-tolerant windshields; and hypersonic interceptor system studies. Two of the FDL divisions are actively involved in programs that deal directly with LSS control/structures interaction: the Flight Controls Division and the Structures and Dynamics Division.

Sandford, Thaddeus

1986-01-01

310

Quaternary GIS Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

2007-02-27

311

Marine Biological Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1888, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) was started in Woods Hole, and since then it has served as a place for world-class biologists and ecologists to gather and work together. Their ambitions are very broad and admirable, and visitors should start by reading through the introduction in the "About MBL" section before looking around further. Most visitors will then want to go to the "Education" area. Here they will find such resources as a marine organism database, a number of full-text classic works on marine organisms, and several image databases. Moving on, visitors might also want to look at the "Research" area, which contains materials on their laboratories, research opportunities at the MBL, and an overview of their current research projects.

312

Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia  

PubMed Central

The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

Wallerstein, Ralph O.

1987-01-01

313

Keeping a Laboratory Notebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The HURI SURI project is developing a regional biotechnology workforce pipeline by expanding and supporting biotechnology research experiences for Jamestown Community College (JCC) undergraduates and disseminating these research experiences and materials to area high school teachers and students. This Microsoft Word document details how to keep a laboratory notebook in a high school or undergraduate science class. This is important because "a laboratory notebook is really required by law for investigators that either work in an industry (e.g. pharmaceutical industry) that is federally regulated or for investigators who have federal grant funding for research (e.g. from the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation)." The document explains how the notebook needs a table of contents, experiment details, and conclusion.

2013-08-26

314

Space Radiation Effects Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

1969-01-01

315

Coastal Research Laboratory USF  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is the home page of the laboratory. Users may click to find descriptions of the Coastal Research Program which focuses on two key areas of coastal geology: the process-response systems of beaches, inlets, and tidal sand bodies; and the Holocene history and development of coastal barrier systems. Research projects are primarily concentrated on the west coast of Florida, with some projects encompassing areas of Florida's east coast, the Florida Keys, the southwest Florida shallow shelf, and Puerto Rico. Under Projects, users may see brief descriptions of thesis research. The Geolinks on this site are extensive- over six hundred at the time of review- to: Coastal and Oceanographic Sites, Data and Software, General Geology, Geological Surveys in the United States and International, Government Agencies, Institutes, Issues, Journals and Magazines, Professional Organizations, References, Indexes, and Catalogs, University Geology Departments and Laboratories in the United States and International, and Weather. Users are invited to add sites.

316

A lunar laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration.

Keaton, P. W.; Duke, M. B.

1987-01-01

317

A lunar laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration.

Keaton, P. W.; Duke, M. B.

318

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory advances the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter and energy by providing leadership and resources for qualified researchers to conduct basic research at the frontiers of high energy physics and related disciplines. Fermilab's mission is to advance the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter and energy. Fermilab's world-class scientific research facility allows qualified researchers from around the world to conduct fundamental research at the frontiers of high-energy physics and related disciplines.

2009-05-18

319

Virtual Laboratory: Potential Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page provides an introduction to mechanical energy, focusing on gravity. It includes a java simulation of a dropped ball showing the conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. Non-elastic collisions with the ground are included, although there is no discussion of the resultant lost energy. Users can change the mass, initial energy, and percentage of the energy lost during collisions. This item is part of a larger collection of virtual laboratories for physics, astronomy, and environmental science.

Bothun, Gregory

2007-12-03

320

Naval Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Washington, D.C., the NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps and conducts a broad program of scientific research, technology and advanced development. Site provides insight into the many accomplishments and on-going research of the lab. Learn about how GPS began and advances in meteorology and radar applications. Information includes the history of the lab, a visitor's guide, and more.

321

Sedimentary System Laboratory Photomicrographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains numerous images of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including images photographed at the Laboratory of Sedimentary System at the Seoul National University and photographs from textbooks. Original photographs include photomicrographs of both clastic and carbonate rocks along with back-scattered electron images and photographs of sedimentary rocks and structures in outcrops. Photographs from texts include terrigenous clastic rocks, carbonate rocks and sedimentary structures.

Ii, Yong L.

322

Hanford cultural resources laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

Wright, M.K.

1995-06-01

323

NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) presents its weather, climate, and air quality investigations. Visitors can discover ETL's theoretical and field observations and sensor and model developments to address complex environmental issues. The website provides detailed descriptions of the Study of Environmental Artic Change (SEARCH), the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) project, and other 2005 programs. Teachers can find educational resources for elementary, middle, and high school.

324

Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory (NREL) at Colorado State University conducts multi-disciplinary research in ecosystem science, with the purpose of improving knowledge of "the complex interactions between humans, management activities, and ecosystems." The recently launched homepage, which is still under construction, includes background information on NREL; descriptions of research projects (a substantial and diverse list); publications, reports, and data; teaching and outreach; and contact information.

325

Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

1973-01-01

326

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-print Network

core calculus for Java and Java with effects G.M. Bierman, M.J. Parkinson, A.M. Pitts April 2003 15 JJ G.M. Bierman, M.J. Parkinson, A.M. Pitts Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge.M. Bierman M.J. Parkinson A.M. Pitts University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, J.J. Thomson Avenue

Haddadi, Hamed

327

Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) at the University of Maryland is investigating human and robotic performance in space. Among the many projects being conducted at the SSL are a telerobotic spacecraft servicer called Ranger--to be launched into Earth orbit via an expendable rocket in 1997, and a Space Shuttle flight experiment which will investigate human fatigue during extravehicular activities (spacewalks). The SSL Home Page presents the projects, personnel, and facilities of the lab.

328

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking.

E. L. Zirbel

2002-01-01

329

Mercy Hall, Science Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students working in the Science Laboratory in Mercy Hall.Back of photograph: Science Lab Mercy Hall Circa 1947-1948. Anon Studios 193 Thames Street, Newport, Rhode Island 02840. German Cote, Rose Marie Jalette, Barbara (?), Sarah Conalty. Now 1987 , it is part of Megley Theater.Circa 1947-1948. Black and white photograph. 24.13 x 19.05 cm. (9.75 x 7.75 in.)

Anon Studios

2008-01-01

330

Mars Science Laboratory Mission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Jet Propulsion Laboratory website contains the science mission overview of the Mars Rover Curiosity. Links provide information about the scientific studies to be performed and the technologies to be employed, both established and innovative. From this overview page the visitor can navigate to numerous other well-illustrated pages that discuss the various vehicles involved, the mission timeline, communication with Earth, the mission team, and more.

2012-08-27

331

Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

332

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01

333

Laboratory Diagnosis of Amebiasis  

PubMed Central

The detection of Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis, is an important goal of the clinical microbiology laboratory. To assess the scope of E. histolytica infection, it is necessary to utilize accurate diagnostic tools. As more is discovered about the molecular and cell biology of E. histolytica, there is great potential for further understanding the pathogenesis of amebiasis. Molecular biology-based diagnosis may become the technique of choice in the future because establishment of these protozoa in culture is still not a routine clinical laboratory process. In all cases, combination of serologic tests with detection of the parasite (by antigen detection or PCR) offers the best approach to diagnosis, while PCR techniques remain impractical in many developing country settings. The detection of amebic markers in serum in patients with amebic colitis and liver abscess appears promising but is still only a research tool. On the other hand, stool antigen detection tests offer a practical, sensitive, and specific way for the clinical laboratory to detect intestinal E. histolytica. All the current tests suffer from the fact that the antigens detected are denatured by fixation of the stool specimen, limiting testing to fresh or frozen samples. PMID:14557296

Tanyuksel, Mehmet; Petri, William A.

2003-01-01

334

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument of Energy (DoE). Objectives · Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations · Develop a Solar Energy Resources · Offer Unique Training Methods for Solar Monitoring Network Design, Operation

335

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER base that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, pathology, and obstetrical services that are provided services. This arrangement permits the possibility of participation in other components of genetic services

Thompson, Michael

336

Brookhaven National LaboratoryBrookhaven National Laboratory ENERGY INNOVATIONENERGY INNOVATION  

E-print Network

IMPROVING BIOFUEL PRODUCTION Harnessing the power of plants and algae, nature's green factories 28 ScienceBrookhaven National LaboratoryBrookhaven National Laboratory ENERGY INNOVATIONENERGY INNOVATION #12;ENERGY INNOVATION Brookhaven Lab tackles the nation's energy challenges PARTNERS IN DISCOVERY Working

Ohta, Shigemi

337

The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Thailand.  

PubMed

Tissue banking started in Thailand in 1979. Five years after this, the Bangkok Biomaterial Centre (BBC) was established in the Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, with the support of the IAEA program. The objective of the Centre was to provide sterile bones and tissues for clinical use. Through the passage of time, the Bangkok Biomaterial Centre has gained confidence from the end user and by 2007 has processed 33,872 allografts from 491 deceased donors and 4,035 live donors were used in medical treatment in 3,596 patients in more than 79 different hospitals. More than 305 surgeons from Thailand used the tissue produced in the BBC. At the beginning of its work the BBC concentrate its activities on the production of the following tissues: freeze dried bone, freeze dried dura mater and freeze dried fascia lata. All of these tissues were sterilised using ethylene oxide gas until the end of year 1984. Since 1985 the BBC sterilise tissue using ionising radiation. The BBC is now producing deep-frozen; bone tendon, cartilage, trachea and soft tissue; freeze-dried; bone, fascia lata, dura mater, amniotic membrane, bone hydroxyapatite, bone tablet and fresh preserved amniotic membrane. PMID:18663602

Vajaradul, Yongyudh; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2009-05-01

338

Bilateral comparison COOMET.RI(I)-S2 of the air-kerma standards of the IAEA and the VNIIM, Russian Federation in medium energy x-rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A bilateral comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the IAEA and the VNIIM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the stated standard uncertainty for the comparison of 4.1 parts in 103. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer chamber, is expressed as a ratio of the IAEA and the VNIIM standards for air kerma, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

Czap, L.; Gomola, I.; Oborin, A. V.; Villevalde, A. Y.

2014-01-01

339

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal  

E-print Network

for NSTX: (1) pressure-driven start-up by ECH (CDX-U scenario), (2) RF ionization + PF induction (JT-60U preionization and outboard PF coil induction only [Y. Takase, et al., IAEA Fusion Energy Conf. (Vilamoura, 2004 of the large heating power provided by reconnection, this scenario is suitable for forming a high- ST plasma

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

340

Allergy to laboratory animals in laboratory technicians and animal keepers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of allergy to laboratory animals (LAA) was investigated in laboratory technicians and animal keepers. In a questionnaire 41 of 101 technicians reported symptoms provoked by work with laboratory animals. On clinical investigation 30 were found to have symptoms and signs related to contact with animals, and allergy was confirmed by radioallergosorbent tests (RAST) and skin tests in 19.

G Agrup; L Belin; L Sjöstedt; S Skerfving

1986-01-01

341

Calibrated sulfur isotope abundance ratios of three IAEA sulfur isotope reference materials and V-CDT with a reassessment of the atomic weight of sulfur  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calibrated values have been obtained for sulfur isotope abundance ratios of sulfur isotope reference materials distributed by the IAEA (Vienna). For the calibration of the measurements, a set of synthetic isotope mixtures were prepared gravimetrically from high purity Ag2S materials enriched in32S, 33S, and 34S. All materials were converted into SF6 gas and subsequently, their sulfur isotope ratios were measured

T. Ding; S. Valkiers; H. Kipphardt; P. De Bièvre; P. D. P. Taylor; R. Gonfiantini; R. Krouse

2001-01-01

342

Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

Not Available

2011-10-01

343

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28

344

Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study the interplanetary medium, asteroids, comets, and planets. Suborbital sounding rockets and groundbased observing platforms form an integral part of these research activities. This report covers the period from approximately October 1999 through September 2000.

Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

345

MIT Space Systems Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1995 to engage in "cutting edge research projects with the goal of directly contributing to the present and future exploration and development of space." Users can find materials on current and past flight projects such as the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) and the Interferometry Program Experiment (IPEX). The website also features SSL's ground programs and research facilities. Researchers can view lists of published papers and can download student theses.

346

Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

1972-01-01

347

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

Not Available

1990-01-01

348

A Useful Laboratory Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recently, a high school Science Club generated a large number of questions involving temperature. Therefore, they decided to construct a thermal gradient apparatus in order to conduct a wide range of experiments beyond the standard "cookbook" labs. They felt that this apparatus could be especially useful in future ninth-grade biology classes, in which students must design and conduct individual, inquiry-based experiments as part of their training in scientific methodology. This article describes their experience building and testing a thermal gradient for laboratory use.

Johnson, Samuel A.; Tutt, Tye

2008-10-01

349

The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

350

The Virtual Chemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This networked laboratory simulation provides an environment in which students can select from hundreds of standard chemical reagants and combine them in any way they see fit. Instructors may use this environment in a variety of settings including student homework, group projects, computer lab activities and pre- and post-lab exercises to support varied approaches to chemical education. Activities are stored in our online homework repository which currently includes: acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, molarity, redox chemistry, solubility, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and quantitative analysis.

Yaron, David

1999-01-01

351

Mercenaria Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Invertebrate Anatomy Online exercise, featuring the hard-shell clam Mercenaria mercenaria (quahog), is part of an Internet laboratory manual for courses in Invertebrate Zoology. This exercise features an introduction to Mollusca and a step-by-step dissection guide, including hand-drawn figures, defined terms, and detailed explanations of form and function. Students will learn about the external anatomy (shell), muscles, mantle skirts, mantle cavity, mantle folds, siphons, gills, labial palps, hemal system, exhalant chamber, excretory system, digestive system, nervous system, and reproductive system.

Fox, Richard; Online, Invertebrate A.

352

Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

2001-01-01

353

Materials Science Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

Jackson, Dionne

2005-01-01

354

COMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE  

E-print Network

different layers, like operating system and applications, or computer and network. The Laboratory's research. Thus we are researching across the spectrum from hardware compilation to biological modellingCOMPUTER LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Leaders in Computing Research and Teaching William

Haddadi, Hamed

355

DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)  

Cancer.gov

As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

356

ChemTeacher: Laboratory Methods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Laboratory Methods page includes resources for teaching students about basic laboratory equipment.

2011-01-01

357

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories  

E-print Network

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories The Environmental Health group occupies, and low temperature freezer. Major analytical equipment in the Environmental Health group includes the laboratories for Toxicology, Occupational Health, and Global Health. Available equipment includes an aerosol

Stuart, Amy L.

358

Probing Microcomputer-Based Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) refer to a laboratory where a microcomputer gathers and displays data directly from the environment. Program listings for a response timer (using game paddles) to illustrate the nature of MBLs are presented. (JN)

Lam, Tom

1985-01-01

359

EM laboratories for linear coupling  

SciTech Connect

Broadband, well calibrated, sensitive, and automated laboratories are essential for conducting meaningful phenomenology and susceptibility characterization studies. This presentation gives an overview reflecting the facilities and experiences at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

King, R.J.; Hudson, H.G.; McLeod R.R.

1987-01-01

360

Multiple equilibrium laboratory devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Devices{* } will be demonstrated and videotapes played of a number of laboratory studies that exhibit multiple equilibrium. All devices have two competing effects driving the flow. In two of them, temperature and salinity oppose each other. In another, air and water compete. In a fourth, wave propagation is opposed by inertia. Connection with hypothesized ocean behavior will be made. {* } Whitehead, J. A. 2000 Stratified Convection with Multiple States. Ocean Modelling, 2, 109-121. Whitehead, J. A. W. Gregory Lawson and John Salzig. 2001 Multistate flow devices for geophysical fluid dynamics and climate. American Journal of Physics, 69 546-553. Whitehead, J. A. and P. G. Baines. 2000. Hydraulic Jump Location as a Multiple Equilibrium feature. 2000 Ocean Sciences Meeting, American Geophysical Union, San Antonio Texas, January 25, 2000. Abstract: EOS 80 #46 (Supplement), OS125. Whitehead, J. A. , M. L. E. Timmermans, W. Gregory Lawson, S. N. Bulgakov, A. M. Zatarian, J. F. A. Medina, and John Salzig, Laboratory studies of thermally and/or Salinity-driven flows with partial mixing: Part 1 Stommel transitions and multiple flow states. In preparation

Whitehead, J. A.

2001-12-01

361

Laboratory Diagnostics of Botulism  

PubMed Central

Botulism is a potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin. Human pathogenic neurotoxins of types A, B, E, and F are produced by a diverse group of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, including Clostridium botulinum groups I and II, Clostridium butyricum, and Clostridium baratii. The routine laboratory diagnostics of botulism is based on the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in the patient. Detection of toxin-producing clostridia in the patient and/or the vehicle confirms the diagnosis. The neurotoxin detection is based on the mouse lethality assay. Sensitive and rapid in vitro assays have been developed, but they have not yet been appropriately validated on clinical and food matrices. Culture methods for C. botulinum are poorly developed, and efficient isolation and identification tools are lacking. Molecular techniques targeted to the neurotoxin genes are ideal for the detection and identification of C. botulinum, but they do not detect biologically active neurotoxin and should not be used alone. Apart from rapid diagnosis, the laboratory diagnostics of botulism should aim at increasing our understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of the disease. Therefore, the toxin-producing organisms should be routinely isolated from the patient and the vehicle. The physiological group and genetic traits of the isolates should be determined. PMID:16614251

Lindstrom, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

2006-01-01

362

Inter-laboratory comparison of oxygen isotope compositions from biogenic silica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several techniques have been introduced in the last decades for the dehydration and release of O 2 from biogenic silica (opal-A) for oxygen-isotope analysis. However, only one silica standard is universally available: a quartz standard (NBS28) distributed by the IAEA, Vienna. Hence, there is a need for biogenic silica working standards. This paper compares the existing methods of oxygen-isotope analyses of opal-A and aims to characterize additional possible working standards to calibrate the ?18O values of biogenic silica. For this purpose, an inter-laboratory comparison was organized. Six potential working standard materials were analysed repeatedly against NBS28 by eight participating laboratories using their specific analytical methods. The materials cover a wide range of ?18O values (+23 to +43‰) and include diatoms (marine, lacustrine), phytoliths and synthetically-produced hydrous silica. To characterize the proposed standards, chemical analyses and imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were also performed. Despite procedural differences at each laboratory, all methods are in reasonable agreement with a standard deviation (SD) for ?18O values between 0.3‰ and 0.9‰ (1?). Based on the results, we propose four additional biogenic silica working standards (PS1772-8: 42.8‰; BFC: 29.0‰; MSG60: 37.0‰; G95-25-CL leaves: 36.6‰) for ?18O analyses, available on request through the relevant laboratories.

Chapligin, Bernhard; Leng, Melanie J.; Webb, Elizabeth; Alexandre, Anne; Dodd, Justin P.; Ijiri, Akira; Lücke, Andreas; Shemesh, Aldo; Abelmann, Andrea; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Meyer, Hanno; Moschen, Robert; Okazaki, Yusuke; Rees, Nicholas H.; Sharp, Zachary D.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Sonzogni, Corinne; Swann, George E. A.; Sylvestre, Florence; Tyler, Jonathan J.; Yam, Ruth

2011-11-01

363

Chemistry laboratory safety manual available  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemistry laboratory safety manual outlines safe practices for handling hazardous chemicals and chemistry laboratory equipment. Included are discussions of chemical hazards relating to fire, health, explosion, safety equipment and procedures for certain laboratory techniques and manipulations involving glassware, vacuum equipment, acids, bases, and volatile solvents.

Elsbrock, R. G.

1968-01-01

364

Computer Systems Laboratory Research Review  

E-print Network

Computer Systems Laboratory Research Review Joseph Pasquale George Polyzos Computer Systems 92093­0114 April 1991 UCSD Technical Report CS91­181 Abstract At the Computer Systems Laboratory at UCSD, and the UC Micro Program. For more information, send mail to the authors at Computer Systems Laboratory

Polyzos, George C.

365

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to set down a large, mobile laboratory -- the rover Curiosity -- using precision landing technology that makes many of Mars' most the 23 months after landing, Curiosity

366

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to set down a large, mobile laboratory -- the rover Curiosity -- using precision landing technology that makes many of Mars' most intriguing regions viable destinations

Christian, Eric

367

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-print Network

#12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1985 December 1985 Eugene J and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 .........................Contracts and Grants 48 Front Cover: Water levels on the Great Lakes have been in a high regimefor the past

368

Introductory Archaeology: The Inexpensive Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a number of student-focused laboratory exercises that are inexpensive, yet show the scientific character of archaeology. Describes the environmental laboratory exercise which includes the following analysis topics: (1) pollen; (2) earth core; (3) microfaunal; and (4) microwear. Describes the ceramic laboratory which involves…

Rice, Patricia C.

1990-01-01

369

Total laboratory automation in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of systematized automation in clinical laboratories in Japan started in 1981. At that time, about 12 laboratory technicians worked in a typical private University hospital laboratory (average size 1000 beds), whereas in national university hospitals (typical size 600 beds), the number of technicians was as low as 18–25. In 1981, the Kochi Medical School was founded as a

Masahide Sasaki; Takeshi Kageoka; Katsumi Ogura; Hiromi Kataoka; Tadashi Ueta; Shigeyoshi Sugihara

1998-01-01

370

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY SUPPORTED BY: THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION and THE STATE OF FLORIDA OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA · LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 15 2005 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2005 ANNUAL REPORT National High magnetic Field Laboratory 2005 NHMFL

Weston, Ken

371

Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to cover the situations that these labs, which respectively represent nuclear weapons labs, nuclear energy labs, and science labs and environmental management sites, would encounter during a complementary access. Each of the three labs hosted a mock complementary access activity, which included mock inspectors from the BNL-LANL team. In addition to reviewing the draft declarations from each of the host labs, the BNL-LANL team conducted open source research in a manner similar to what IAEA inspectors would do to research the activities at a location and prepare questions for the location to answer and that would be the focus of a complementary access. The host labs and other labs attending the training found the training to be extremely useful and helpful in making sure that each lab's Additional Protocol team had made correct declarations of nuclear activities, had properly trained staff ready to host and answer IAEA inquiries, and would implement managed access during a complementary access that would provide access by the IAEA team to resolve questions or inconsistencies about a particular declaration and still protect the information addressed by Articles 1 and 7 of the U.S. AP.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John U [BNL; Jo, Jae H [BNL; Sellen, Joana [U.S. DOE/NNSA; Wonder, Edward [QINETIQ-NORTH AMERICA

2009-01-01

372

Materials in Nanotechnology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. The six labs available here focus on materials in Nanotechnology. The labs are titled Block Copolymers, Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles, Solar Cells, Ni Nanowires, Silicon Nanowires, and Statistical Process Control. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials

2011-03-09

373

The autonomic laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

1999-01-01

374

Basic Nanotechnology Processes Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. These twelve labs focus on basic processes in Nanotechnology. Some of the labs are titled Gold Nucleation Analysis, Introduction to LPCVD and PECVD, Introduction to Plasma-based Processing, Liftoff and Surface Modification, and Intro to Scanning Electron Microscopy. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials.

2011-03-08

375

PETC fuel rheology laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of investigations into the rheological properties of alternate fuel mixtures, such as coal-oil mixtures, coal-water mixtures, and coal-alcohol mixtures. Primary emphasis in this paper is placed on the procedures and techniques used to evaluate alternate slurry fuels in the rheology laboratory at PETC through the spring of 1983. Sophisticated, bench-scale equipment was used to examine viscometric properties and to make settling velocity measurements. Examples of the data developed during this program are given to support the choice of measurement procedures and test conditions. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the applicability of various mathematical models for settling characteristics and rheological properties are included. Areas in which additional development of techniques is required are discussed. 25 references, 21 figures, 7 tables.

Ekmann, A.C.; Ekmann, J.M.

1984-08-01

376

FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

2011-01-01

377

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-19

378

Scalable Computing Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Scalable Computing Laboratory was created by the Department of Energy, Ames Lab, and Iowa State University to "improve parallel computing through clustering techniques for use in scientific and engineering computation." One of their past projects included rebuilding the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), the first electronic digital computer. Here visitors can read about building a working replica of the historical computer as well as the background of the original machine and its inventors. Visitors interested in seeing the ABC in action should click on the link "Video" on the left hand side of the homepage. There are two videos here: the first is a seven-minute demonstration of the operation of the ABC and the second an eleven-minute tutorial about the ABC. The "Photos/Diagrams" link contains over two dozen photographs of the large amount of work that went into the making of the working replica of this machine, which was originally built between 1937 and 1942.

2003-01-22

379

Laminar laboratory rivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A viscous fluid flowing over fine plastic grains spontaneously channelizes into a few centimeters-wide river. After reaching its equilibrium shape, this stable laboratory flume is able to carry a steady load of sediments, like many alluvial rivers. When the sediment discharge vanishes, the river size, shape and slope fit the threshold theory proposed by Glover and Florey (1951), which assumes that the Shields parameter is critical on the channel bed. As the sediment discharge is increased, the river widens and flattens. Surprisingly, the aspect ratio of its cross section depends on the sediment discharge only, regardless of the water discharge. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these findings based on the balance between gravity, which pulls particles towards the center of the channel, and the diffusion of bedload particles, which pushes them away from areas of intense bedload.

Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Éric; Métivier, François

2014-05-01

380

Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Online Psychology Laboratory (OPL) consists of (1) highly interactive, web-deliverable psychology experiments and demonstrations, (2) a cumulative data archive from which students can retrieve datasets for analysis, and (3) user-controlled data extraction and analysis tools designed for the diverse needs of end users. One of the goals of the collection is to offer support for student research and educators who are not adept in experimental design and data analysis. Psychology students will be able to collect data, analyze data, and report their findings for class assignments or individual projects. Because psychology is allied to many disciplines--biology, sociology, and political science among them--OPL will contribute to the set of experiments available to students who wish to study psychologically-based issues in related scientific disciplines.

2006-03-08

381

MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

382

First International Microgravity Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

1990-01-01

383

The Development of a Contextual Information Framework Model as a Potential IAEA Strategy to Maintain Radioactive Waste Knowledge  

SciTech Connect

A contextual framework comprises 'entities' that exhibit one or more definable relationships with a particular 'event'. People, organisations, concepts, ideas, places, natural phenomena, events themselves, cultural artefacts including records, books, works of art can all be conceptualised as entities. If these entities are registered in an information management system where the relationships between them can be defined and systematically managed then it is possible to create a contextual information framework that represents a particular view of what occurs in real life. The careful identifying and mapping of the relationships between these entities and the selected event can lead rapidly to the creation of an information network that closely reflects the human approach to knowledge acquisition and application. The 'event' referred to in this paper is the safe management of radioactive waste. It is widely accepted that society will expect that knowledge about the waste will be maintained for many decades, if not centuries. Delivering on this expectation will demand the application of management approaches that are both innovative and sustainable. Effective inter-generational transfer of information using many 'conventional' techniques will be highly dependent on societal stability - something that cannot be guaranteed over such long periods of time. Consequently, alternative approaches should be explored and, where appropriate, implemented to give reasonable assurance that future generations of waste custodians will not be unduly burdened by the need to recreate information about the waste long after its disposal. In actual fact, the contextual information framework model is not 'new technology' but simply a means for rationalising and representing the way humans naturally tend to use information in the pursuit of knowledge enhancement. By making use of multiple information entities and their relationships, it is often possible to convert otherwise impossibly complex socio-technical environments into information architectures or networks with remarkable and useful properties. The International Atomic Energy Agency, in its ongoing work to encourage the application of systems to manage radioactive waste information over the long term, has embraced the contextual information framework as a potentially viable approach to this particular challenge. To this end, it invited Member States to contribute to the production of a Safety Report that used the contextual information framework model, building on the wealth of existing IAEA guidance. The report focuses, not on the important area of records management, but on the benefits that can arise from the development of an information management approach that increases the likelihood that future generations will recognise the significance and value of the information contained in these records. Our understanding of 'inter-generational transfer' should extend beyond the simple physical transfer of records into an archival repository towards the establishment of a working culture that places sufficient contemporary information into a form that ensures it remains accessible, and ultimately enhances, the knowledge of future generations. Making information accessible is therefore the key and whilst the use of stable records media, storage environments and quality assurance are important elements, they cannot be considered solutions in themselves. This paper articulates some of the lessons that have been learned about using the contextual information framework model when applied to the long term management of radioactive waste. The draft IAEA Safety Report entitled 'Preservation and Transfer to Future Generations of Information Important to the Safety of Waste Disposal Facilities', on which this paper is based, is expected to be published in 2007. (authors)

Upshall, I.R. [United Kingdom Nirex Limited, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX (United Kingdom); McCarthy, G.J. [Melbourne Univ., Australian Science and Technology Heritage Centre (Australia)

2007-07-01

384

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

2003-01-01

385

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology and Laboratory Science: The Basics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology provides students with the basic laboratory skills and knowledge to pursue a career in biotechnology. The manual, written by four biotechnology instructors with over 20 years of teaching experience, incorporates instruction, exercises, and laboratory activities that the authors have been using and perfecting for years. These exercises and activities serve to engage students and help them understand the fundamentals of working in a biotechnology laboratory. Building students' skills through an organized and systematic presentation of materials, procedures, and tasks, the manual will help students explore overarching themes that relate to all biotechnology workplaces. The fundamentals in this manual are critical to the success of research scientists, scientists who develop ideas into practical products, laboratory analysts who analyze samples in forensic, clinical, quality control, environmental, and other testing laboratories.

Brandner, Diana; Kraus, Mary E.; Mowery, Jeanette; Seidman, Lisa A.

2012-03-19

386

Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

NONE

1997-09-01

387

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

...2014-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2014-01-01

388

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2011-01-01

389

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2012-01-01

390

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2010-01-01

391

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Reports § 211.194 Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...United States Pharmacopeia, National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2010-04-01

392

21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Reports § 211.194 Laboratory records. (a) Laboratory records shall include...United States Pharmacopeia, National Formulary, AOAC INTERNATIONAL...charts, and spectra from laboratory instrumentation,...

2011-04-01

393

15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. ...and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS...Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation ...subpart, or by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation...

2013-01-01

394

Knowledge Media Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do students learn in the classroom? How can teachers best utilize new and emerging technologies in the classroom? What can teachers do to seamlessly incorporate technology into the learning experience? These are all questions that are asked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Knowledge Media Laboratory. On their website, users can learn about their work with communities of teachers, faculty, programs, and institutions over the past several years, and also look over some of their informative case studies. The Gallery of Teaching and Learning is a good place to start one’s exploration of the site, as it contains a number of exhibitions that look at how web-based tools can be used in teaching and how scholarship may change as a result of an increasingly networked milieu. One seminal resource on the site is the KEEP Toolkit. With the Toolkit, teachers and others can create engaging knowledge representations on the web for their own use. For visitors who might feel a bit overwhelmed by this, there is also a nice tutorial that explains how the Toolkit can be used.

395

Laboratory development TPV generator  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory model of a TPV generator in the kilowatt range was developed and tested. It was based on methane/oxygen combustion and a spectrally matched selective emitter/collector pair (ytterbia emitter-silicon PV cell). The system demonstrated a power output of 2.4 kilowatts at an overall efficiency of 4.5{percent} without recuperation of heat from the exhaust gases. Key aspects of the effort include: (1) process development and fabrication of mechanically strong selective emitter ceramic textile materials; (2) design of a stirred reactor emitter/burner capable of handling up to 175,000 Btu/hr fuel flows; (3) support to the developer of the production silicon concentrator cells capable of withstanding TPV environments; (4) assessing the apparent temperature exponent of selective emitters; and (5) determining that the remaining generator efficiency improvements are readily defined combustion engineering problems that do not necessitate breakthrough technology. The fiber matrix selective emitter ceramic textile (felt) was fabricated by a relic process with the final heat-treatment controlling the grain growth in the porous ceramic fiber matrix. This textile formed a cylindrical cavity for a stirred reactor. The ideal stirred reactor is characterized by constant temperature combustion resulting in a uniform reactor temperature. This results in a uniform radiant emission from the emitter. As a result of significant developments in the porous emitter matrix technology, a TPV generator burner/emitter was developed that produced kilowatts of radiant energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Holmquist, G.A.; Wong, E.M. [Quantum Group, Inc., 11211 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Waldman, C.H. [Consultant, P.O. Box 231157, Encinitas, California 92023-1157 (United States)

1996-02-01

396

BNL Sources Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS has a long-standing interest in providing the best possible synchrotron radiation sources for its user community, and hence, has recently established the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) to pursue research into fourth generation synchrotron radiation sources. A major element of the program includes development of a high peak power FEL meant to operate in the vacuum ultraviolet. The objective of the program is to develop the source, and experimental technology together to provide the greatest impact on UV science. The accelerator under construction for the SDL consists of a high brightness RF photocathode electron gun followed by a 230 MeV short pulse linac incorporating a magnetic chicane for pulse compression. The gun drive laser is a wide bandwidth Ti: Sapphire regenerative amplifier capable of pulse shaping which will be used to study non- linear emittance compensation. Using the compressor, 1 nC bunches with a length as small as 50 {mu}m sigma (2 kA peak current) are available for experiments. In this paper we briefly describe the facility and detail our plans for utilizing the 10 m long NISUS wiggler to carry out single pass FEL experiments. These include a 1 {mu}m SASE demonstration, a seeded beam demonstration at 300 nm, and a High Gain Harmonic Generation experiment at 200 mn. The application of chirped pulse amplification to this type of FEL will also be discussed.

Ben-Zvi, I.; Graves, W.; Heese, R.; Johnson, E.D.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

1997-01-01

397

Spectrometers beyond the laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Two new types of miniature Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) presently being built have enabled this technology to be taken out of the laboratory and into the field. Both designs are very rugged, use little power to run, and can be made extremely small and lightweight. They are excellent candidates for airborne use, both in aircraft and satellite applications. One, the Mcro FT, is a mass balanced linear reciprocating scan operating in the 1-2 scan per second speed range. The other, the Turbo FT, uses a rotary scan, enabling it to run at much higher speeds, from 10 to 1000 scans per second. Either type can be built in the visible, near K and thermal IR wavelength ranges, and provide spectral resolution of 1-2 wave-numbers. Results obtained in all these wavelength ranges are presented here. The rotary configuration is more suited to airborne and satellite survey type deployments, due mostly to its rapid scan rate. Either of these sensors will fit into a small, commercially available stabilized pod which can easily be attached to a helicopter or light plane. This results in a very economical flight spectrometer system. 11 figs.

Wadsworth, W. [Designs & Prototypes, West Simsbury, CT (United States)

1996-11-01

398

Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory of Michigan State University is on the cutting edge of pest control in the Upper Midwest, whether on agricultural or non-agricultural lands, public or private. Visitors interested in seeing the pesky adversaries of the lab, should click on "Bugs of The Lab", on the left hand side of the page, then click on the subcategory "Research Subjects". Along with photos of a dozen pests, including the "Plum Curculio", "Mites", and the "Oblique-Banded Leaf Roller", visitors can read a description of the pest, learn about and see images of the damage they do to specific crops, and discover where they are found on the plant. The Resistant Pest management Newsletter section on the left-hand side of the page has numerous subsections that should be of interest to visitors. Visitors can "Subscribe to the Newsletter" and peruse "Archives of Past Issues". Also interesting is the "Ask an Expert About Resistance Issues" section, which lists ten regions of the earth, and when one of the regions is clicked on, several experts' names pop up with their area of expertise, e-mail, and location. Additionally, anyone who is an expert and qualified, but is not on the list, may have their name added after filling out the "Expert Application", available on the "Ask an Expert..." homepage. All of the experts are volunteers.

399

Current Trends in Remote Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote laboratories have been introduced during the last few decades into engineering education processes as well as integrated within e-learning frameworks offered to engineering and science students. Remote laboratories are also being used to support life-long learning and student's autonomous learning activities. In this paper, after a brief overview of state-of-the-art technologies in the development of remote laboratories and presentation

LuÍs Gomes; Seta Bogosyan

2009-01-01

400

Brookhaven National Laboratory Internship Program  

E-print Network

1 Brookhaven National Laboratory Internship Program New Appointment should the intern contact if they cannot come in? How? ___________________________________ What What project will the intern be collaborating on? _____________________________________________ What

Ohta, Shigemi

401

Mice examined in Animal Laboratory of Lunar Receiving Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landrum Young (seated), Brown and Root-Northrup, and Russell Stullken, Manned Spacecraft Center, examine mice in the Animal laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory which have been inoculated with lunar sample material. wish for peace for all mankind. astronauts will be released from quarantine on August 11, 1969. Donald K. Slayton (right), MSC Director of Flight Crew Operations; and Lloyd Reeder, training coordinator.

1969-01-01

402

UF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory  

E-print Network

the upper 6 inches. If soil is wet, spread soil on clean paper or other suitable material to air dryUF/IFAS Analytical Services Laboratories Extension Soil Testing Laboratory 2390 Mowry Road/PO Box through the mail. Note: � Consult an expert to determine if plant growth problems require soil testing

Florida, University of

403

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gross alpha\\/beta\\/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed

Buddemeier

1999-01-01

404

Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

2012-01-01

405

Laboratory singing sand avalanches.  

PubMed

Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

2010-02-01

406

Meeting the challenges of global nuclear medicine technologist training in the 21st century: the IAEA Distance Assisted Training (DAT) program.  

PubMed

Many countries have made significant investments in nuclear medicine (NM) technology with the acquisition of modern equipment and establishment of facilities, however, often appropriate training is not considered as part of these investments. Training for NM professionals is continually evolving, with a need to meet changing requirements in the workforce. Even places where established higher education courses are available, these do not necessarily cater to the practical component of training and the ever-changing technology that is central to medical imaging. The continuing advances in NM technology and growth of applications in quantitative clinical assessment place increases the pressure on technologists to learn and practice new techniques. Not only is training to understand new concepts limited but often there is inadequate training in the basics of NM and this can be a major constraint to the effective use of the evolving technology. Developing appropriate training programs for the broader international NM community is one of the goals of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A particularly successful and relevant development has been the program on 'distance assisted training (DAT) for NM professionals'. The development of DAT was initiated in the 1990s through Australian Government funding, administered under auspices of the IAEA through its Regional Cooperative Agreement, involving most countries in Asia that are Member States of the IAEA. The project has resulted in the development of a set of training modules which are designed for use under direct supervision in the workplace, delivered through means of distance-learning. The program has undergone several revisions and peer reviews with the current version providing a comprehensive training package that is now available online. DAT has been utilized widely in Asia or the Pacific region, Latin America, and parts of Africa and Europe. Currently there are approximately 1000 registered participants, including persons providing student support, in the program. PMID:23561457

Patterson, Heather E; Nunez, Margarita; Philotheou, Geraldine M; Hutton, Brian F

2013-05-01

407

The Target Preparation Laboratory at Daresbury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Target Preparation Laboratory at Daresbury Laboratory is described. This laboratory provides targets for the UK Nuclear Physics community whose experimental programme is performed in several laboratories worldwide. Details are given of its present capabilities and range of targets produced.

Morrall, P. S.

2008-06-01

408

RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences Laboratory for Cell Signaling  

E-print Network

for Lymphocyte Differentiation Laboratory for Transcriptional Regulation Laboratory for Immune Cell System Laboratory for Integrative Genomics Laboratory for Disease Systems Modeling Laboratory for Cell Functional Systems Laboratory for Molecular Live-Cell Quantification Laboratory for Metabolomics Laboratory

Fukai, Tomoki

409

The use of the internet training course modality in the field of tissue banking: the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/National University of Singapore (NUS) experience.  

PubMed

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promoted and supported an important training program for the training of tissue bank operators and medical doctors within its radiation and tissue banking program. The purpose of the program was to train an increase number of tissue bank operators and medical doctors in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and Eastern Europe, that were working or were associated to a number of tissue banks established in these regions under the IAEA program during the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. The National University of Singapore Tissue Bank was designated, in 1996, as the Regional Training Centre (RTC) for Asia and the Pacific region and later on, in 2002, as the International Training Centre (ITC) for the whole IAEA program. The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Buenos Aires were also designated, in 1999, as the Regional Training Centre for the Latin American region. The objective of the ITC was to train tissue banks operators and medical doctors from all over the world and the RTCs to train tissue bank operators and medical doctors mainly from the Asia and the Pacific and the Latin American regions. Since 1997, training of tissue bank operators and medical doctors were carried out using the modality of distance training courses. However, due to its limitation, this type of courses was transformed, in 2002, in an Internet training course modality, with the purpose to increase not only the number of participants but, at the same time to reduce, as much as possible, the costs associated with the organisation of these courses. Since November 1997, the number of training courses carried out in the RTCs established under the IAEA program was 14, eight of them under the Internet training course modality. The total number of students registered in these courses was 261 and the total number of students graduated was 166 for a rate of approval of 63.6%. The National University of Singapore and the Faculty of Medicine from the University of Buenos Aires are the academic institutions that provide the certificate/diploma to the graduated students. PMID:20676938

Morales Pedraza, Jorge

2011-08-01

410

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

working with animals should be aware of the potential danger from animal bites and/or other mishaps3.F.1 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for EXPOSURE what to do in event of an injury related to working with Laboratory Animals. 2.0 Scope This procedure

Krovi, Venkat

411

Laboratory Air Handling Unit System  

E-print Network

An innovative AHU system is presented in this paper. The proposed AHU system is called a Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) system since it is most suitable for the buildings where one section (laboratory) has 100% exhaust while the other section...

Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01

412

OCCUPATION--LANGUAGE LABORATORY DIRECTOR.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TRUE PROFESSIONAL STATUS FOR A LABORATORY DIRECTOR, PLUS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT OF SUCH INSTRUCTION, WILL GIVE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ADEQUATE RETURN FOR THEIR INVESTMENT IN ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. BY BEING INVOLVED IN IMPORTANT RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES, THE DIRECTOR OF A LANGUAGE LABORATORY CAN SERVE ALSO TO FREE THE TEACHER AND…

TURNER, DAYMOND

413

Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection  

E-print Network

Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility #12;Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF ArgonneNationalLaboratory's NaturalConvection will incorporate passive safety systems, many in the form of natural circulation loops, to ensure safe and long

Kemner, Ken

414

Programming for the Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present book is an attempt to stimulate thinking on the nature of the problems involved in writing material for language laboratory use in relation to the teaching of five languages widely taught in Britain today. All the contributors to this volume are language teachers currently using the language laboratory in their work. The editor notes…

Turner, John D., Ed.

415

The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The Jackson Laboratory was started in 1929 and in 1983 it was designated as an NCI cancer center. The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center (JLCC) conducts basic research using the mouse as a research tool since mice and humans share 95 percent of the same genes and basic physiology.

416

The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation  

E-print Network

? NVLAP is: · A system for accrediting laboratories found competent to perform specific tests · Nearly 800 testing and calibration laboratories 3An Introduction to NVLAP (rev. 2010-10-29) #12;NVLAP · Cryptographic & Security Testing ~ 12 labs · Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry ~ 25 labs · Environmental Testing

417

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

3.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PROPER procedures conducted in animal laboratories. Exposure to these allergens can trigger allergic symptoms to using NIOSH N95 dust-mist respirator, all employees must have respiratory fit-testing performed through

Krovi, Venkat

418

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY EQUAL OPPORTUNITY &  

E-print Network

opportunity for all employees in an environment free from harassment should be regarded as the Laboratory, citizenship, age, different abilities, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender continue to be proud of the inclusive work environment at the Laboratory. We will recognize individual

419

Adapting lean to histology laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histology laboratories (histolabs) can increase productivity and reduce turnaround time and errors by using any one of several available management tools. After a few years of operation, all histolabs develop workflow problems. Histology laboratories handling more than 20 000 cases per year benefit the most from implementing management tools, as occurred in the 25 facilities summarized in this article. Discontinuous workflow,

René J. Buesa

2009-01-01

420

Laboratory studies of volcanic jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the fluid dynamics volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good

Susan Werner Kieffer; Bradford Sturtevant

1984-01-01

421

Communication Laboratories: Genesis, Assessment, Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Claims the quality of educational preparation in basic communication skills is insufficient for students to compete in the new millennium. Discusses the communication laboratory as one educational strategy for addressing the issue of communication competency. Describes the rationale for creating a communication laboratory, curricula and…

Ellis, Kathleen; Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela; Hackman, Michael Z.

2000-01-01

422

Forest Pathology and Mycology Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Much of this Laboratory's current research is focused on Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death. The site links to downloadable files for a collection of research publication and posters. The website is available in both Spanish and English, and contains links for related laboratories and organizations.

Garbelotto, Matteo

2007-09-04

423

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-print Network

.8.1 The veterinary technicians will submit the white card, animal removal card, and complete animal medical record2.C.2 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR ANIMAL animal rooms and in the Laboratory Animal Facilities office, at all locations. 3.2 The animal removal

Krovi, Venkat

424

Blood Loss from Laboratory Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Laboratory tests can be an important source of blood loss in hospitals, especially for new- borns and patients in intensive care. The aim of this study was to quantify blood loss for laboratory diagnos- tic tests in a large number of patients in a teaching hospital. Methods: We estimated blood loss by multiplying the number and volumes of sampling

Dirk Wisser; Klaus van Ackern; Ernst Knoll; Hermann Wisser; Thomas Bertsch

425

A MULTIDISCPLINARY CONTROL SYSTEMS LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hallmark of the newly configured Rowan College of Engineering undergraduate program is multidisciplinary education with a laboratory emphasis. The development of a new multidisciplinary control laboratory upholds our hallmark very well. We attempt to address the demand of industry for acquiring control engineers (1) with a broad set of skills and a comprehension of the diverse practical applications of

Ravi P. Ramachandran; Stephanie Farrell; Jawaharlal Mariappan

426

Mound Laboratory's quality control organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A philosophy of quality sets the stage for quality achievement at Mound Laboratory. Quality does not just happen; it is effected by management programs which encompass cost effectiveness and productivity, which establish realistic quality standards for products and services, and which, then, require compliance to those standards (tolerance for error). The organization chart for quality control at Mound Laboratory is

Wysong

1976-01-01

427

Mound Laboratory environmental control program  

Microsoft Academic Search

From symposium on the physical behavior of radioactive containment in ; the atmosphere; V1enna, Austria (12 Nov 1973). The radiation monitoring progrann ; at Mound Laboratory is reviewed briefly. The in-plant monitoring system detects ; and measures continuously all waste discharges, and this is supplemented by ; weekly deta1led laboratory analysis of samples to ensure compliance with air ; quality

Hebb

1974-01-01

428

Jet Propulsion Laboratory ANNUAL REPORT  

E-print Network

Jet Propulsion Laboratory ANNUAL REPORT National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 1 2 #12 page: A colorful bow shock in dust clouds sur- rounding the giant star Zeta Ophiuchi, imaged," and with Mars Curiosity, we did. Director'sMessage Director, Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2 #12;JANUARY FEBRUARY

Waliser, Duane E.

429

Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

Barnett, Sara

430

Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head  

E-print Network

Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head Laboratory for Motor Learning Control RIKEN Brain Science.yamaguchi@riken.jp Education 1975 BSc in Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo 1980 PhD in Biology, School of Science, University of Tokyo 1987 PhD in Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Tokyo Research

Kazama, Hokto

431

GUIDELINES FOR SAFE LABORATORY PRACTICES  

E-print Network

-3914 ____________________________________________________ Fall 2004 #12;2 Table of Contents I. Introduction 3 II. Safety Links on the Internet 3 III. Cardinal Health & Safety: 5-3550 Yale Health Services: 2-0123 Chemistry Business Manager (Joanne Bentley): 2 Rules of Laboratory Safety 4 IV. Cardinal Rules of Laser Safety 5 V. Laboratory Accidents 6 A-i. General

Haller, Gary L.

432

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics  

E-print Network

Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics Joined Laboratory of mobile robotics has been foun- ded is dedicated to provide achievement of following goals: 1. research and development activities in robotics (Robotna£ka robot, telepresentation lab, and furt- her projects), 2. promotion and popularization

Lucny, Andrej

433

Mars Science Laboratory Drill  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the bit is a thick-walled maraging steel collection tube allowing the powdered sample to be augured up the hole into the sample chamber. For robustness, the wall thickness of the DBA was maximized while still ensuring effective sample collection. There are four recesses in the bit tube that are used to retain the fresh bits in their bit box. The rotating bit is supported by a back-to-back duplex bearing pair within a housing that is connected to the outer DBA housing by two titanium diaphragms. The only bearings on the drill in the sample flow are protected by a spring-energized seal, and an integrated shield that diverts the ingested powdered sample from the moving interface. The DBA diaphragms provide radial constraint of the rotating bit and form the sample chambers. Between the diaphragms there is a sample exit tube from which the sample is transferred to the CHIMRA. To ensure that the entire collected sample is retained, no matter the orientation of the drill with respect to gravity during sampling, the pass-through from the forward to the aft chamber resides opposite to the exit tube.

Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

2012-01-01

434

75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...include additional specific responsibilities of sponsors of nonclinical laboratory studies. 5. Animal Welfare In the United States, the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C 2131-2159) governs the treatment and use of [[Page 80013

2010-12-21

435

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Safety in the Analytical Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety issues specifically related to the analytical laboratory are discussed including hazardous reagents, transferring samples, cleaning apparatus, eye protection, and equipment damage. Special attention is given to techniques which not only endanger the technician but also endanger expensive equipment. (CW)

Ewing, Galen W.

1990-01-01

436

Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

Sizemore, Jim

2011-10-01

437

Overall results of and lessons learned from the IAEA CRP on sodium natural circulation test performed during the Phenix end-of-life experiments  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the Phenix End-of-Life Experiments'. The overall purpose of the CRP, performed within the framework of the IAEA programme in support of innovative fast reactor technology development and deployment, is to improve the Member States' analytical capabilities in the various fields of research and design of sodium-cooled fast reactors through data and codes verification and validation. In particular the CRP, taking advantage of the End-of-Life set of experiments performed before the final shut-down of the French prototype fast breeder power reactor Phenix, aims at improving fast reactor simulation methods and design capabilities in the field of temperature and power distribution evaluation, as well as of the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The paper presents the overall results of the CRP, including blind calculations and post-test and sensitivity analyses carried out by the CRP participants, as well as lessons learned and recommendations for further future implementations to resolve open issues. (authors)

Monti, S.; Toti, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Tenchine, D.; Pialla, D. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives - CEA, DEN, DM2S/STMF, F-17 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France)

2012-07-01

438

Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases. Methods An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education. Results A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation. Conclusions Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system. PMID:24164781

2013-01-01

439

Microwave remote sensing laboratory design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Application of active and passive microwave remote sensing to the study of ocean pollution is discussed. Previous research efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory were surveyed to derive guidance for the design of a laboratory program of research. The essential issues include: choice of radar or radiometry as the observational technique; choice of laboratory or field as the research site; choice of operating frequency; tank sizes and material; techniques for wave generation and appropriate wavelength spectrum; methods for controlling and disposing of pollutants used in the research; and pollutants other than oil which could or should be studied.

Friedman, E.

1979-01-01

440

Introduction to Biotechnology: Laboratory Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By Linnea Fletcher, Evelyn Goss, Patricia Phelps, and Angela Wheeler, this is the laboratory manual for an introductory biotechnology course. This 134-page Word document describes the basic skills necessary for the biotechnology laboratory, such as safety, mathematics, documentation, calibration, and equipment. Each chapter contains objectives for students to accomplish, some practice lessons and questions, and laboratory activities. Students will also learn some basic processes, such as Restriction Enzyme Mapping of DNA, DNA Fingerprinting, and Southern Blot Analysis. There is also a section on bioinformatics.

Wheeler, Angela; Fletcher, Linnea; Goss, Evelyn; Phelps, Patricia

2009-09-30

441

Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

Not Available

2011-10-01

442

Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands  

E-print Network

A total of 62 cohesiveness sands were tested to rographics. investigate the importance of the water content, grain size distribution, grading of the soil, particle shape, grain crushing during testing and laboratory compaction test method...

Delphia, John Girard

2012-06-07

443

Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From D.B. McWhorterand D. K. Sunda's 1977 Ground-Water Hydrology and Hydraulics, this two page excerpt outlines and details Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. Here, visitors will find illustrations and formula to understand the concept.

2008-02-07

444

User Manual Frick Chemistry Laboratory  

E-print Network

facility houses the chemistry department and accommodates labora- tory space for both research and teaching to ensure prompt resolutions to any building-related issues, with minimal disruption to your laboratory

Torquato, Salvatore

445

University of Maryland: Geochemistry Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This extensive website features the University of Maryland's Geochemistry Laboratories' efforts to "produce the highest quality elemental and isotopic data, to teach students and visitors the techniques involved with gathering such data," and to develop new methods and instrumentation in the field of elemental and isotope measurements." Users can discover the Thermal Ionization, Plasma, and Gas Source laboratories; as well as the Chemical Processing Lab and the Mineral Separation and Rock Preparation Laboratories. Through the links to the staff members and three of the laboratories, researchers can learn about the department's studies of the Earth's core, mantle, and crust; the atmosphere and hydrosphere; and the isotopic evolution of the solar system. Throughout the website, students and educators can find educational materials on topics including ablation spot characteristics and environmental safety.

446

NASA Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory. The capabilities and research interests of the lab are: Structural, thermal, & dynamic analysis; Structural, thermal, & dynamic ground-test techniques; Advanced structural instrumentation; and Flight test support.

Horn, Tom

2008-01-01

447

Computer-Aided Laboratory Instruction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter introduces how computer-aided instruction may be used in the biology laboratory setting. Descriptions of programs, suggestions on how to find instructional software, and general guides and resources are included.

Catherine J. Schaap (University of Prince Edward Island;)

1989-06-06

448

Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

449

Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

December 2, 2003

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

2003-01-01

450

Lab VII -1 LABORATORY VII  

E-print Network

, whether you are discussing baseball, galaxies, or subatomic particles. Describing rotations requires, the approximation of objects as point particles gives an incomplete picture of the real world. This laboratory

Minnesota, University of

451

Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

Clark, Douglas W.

1979-01-01

452

Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

Wood, H. John

2004-01-01

453

Commissioning a materials research laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the process of commissioning a new 150,000 sq. ft. research facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The laboratory being constructed is a showcase of modern design methods being built at a construction cost of less than $180 per sq. ft. This is possible in part because of the total commissioning activities that are being utilized for this project. The laboratory's unique approach to commissioning will be presented in this paper. The process will be followed through from the conceptual stage on into the actual construction portion of the laboratory. Lessons learned and cost effectiveness will be presented in a manner that will be usable for others making commissioning related decisions. Commissioning activities at every stage of the design will be presented along with the attributed benefits. Attendees will hear answers to the what, when, who, and why questions associated with commissioning of this exciting project.

SAVAGE,GERALD A.

2000-03-28

454

Laboratory Techniques for the Blind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

Tombaugh, Dorothy

1972-01-01

455

Strategic Technology JET PROPULSION LABORATORY  

E-print Network

Strategic Technology Directions JET PROPULSION LABORATORY National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 0 9 #12;© 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged. #12;Strategic Technology Directions 2009 offers a distillation of technologies, their links to space missions

Waliser, Duane E.

456

Practical Interfacing in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This text describes in practical terms how to use a desk-top computer to monitor and control laboratory experiments. The author clearly explains how to design electronic circuits and write computer programs to sense, analyse and display real-world quantities, including displacement, temperature, force, sound, light, and biomedical potentials. The book includes numerous laboratory exercises and appendices that provide practical information on microcomputer architecture and interfacing, including complete circuit diagrams and component lists. Topics include analog amplification and signal processing, digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion, electronic sensors and actuators, digital and analog interfacing circuits, and programming. Only a very basic knowledge of electronics is assumed, making it ideal for college-level laboratory courses and for practising engineers and scientists. Everything you need to know about using a PC to monitor and control laboratory experiments Full of practical circuit designs and C-code examples Ideal for students and practising scientists

Derenzo, Stephen E.

2003-05-01

457

Digital Techniques for Laboratory Measurements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes techniques and equipment intended to both improve laboratory measurements and also form a background for more advanced work by introducing the concepts of electronic and digital circuits. (GS)

Dart, S. Leonard

1975-01-01

458

PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014)  

E-print Network

- 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Chiang 235 Physics chiang@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 Tony Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Joe Mitchell 512

Yoo, S. J. Ben

459

Polymer Preparations in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six laboratory procedures for preparing polymers which have been used in a course for undergraduate industrial arts students, who have a concentration in plastics technology but have not taken more than one year of college chemistry. (BT)

Lampman, Gary M.; And Others

1979-01-01

460

A laboratory animal science pioneer.  

PubMed

Nikolaos Kostomitsopoulos, DVM, PhD, Head of Laboratory Animal Facilities and Designated Veterinarian, Center of Clinical, Experimental Surgery and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. PMID:25333597

2014-10-21

461

A Virtual Digital Forensics Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the concept of a virtual digital forensic laboratory, which incorporates networked examination and storage\\u000a machines, secure communications, multi-factor authentication, role-based access control, and case management and digital asset\\u000a management systems. Laboratory activities such as the examination, storage and presentation of digital evidence can be geographically\\u000a distributed and accessed over a network by users with the appropriate credentials.

Philip Craiger; Paul Burke; Christopher Marberry; Mark Pollitt

2008-01-01

462

RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation  

E-print Network

RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation Laboratory for Neurobiology of Synapse Laboratory for Neural Circuit Theory Laboratory for Circuit and Behavioral Physiology Laboratory for Cortical Circuit Plasticity Laboratory for Memory Mechanisms Laboratory for Behavioral

Fukai, Tomoki

463

[Errors in laboratory daily practice].  

PubMed

Legislation set by GBEA (Guide de bonne exécution des analyses) requires that, before performing analysis, the laboratory directors have to check both the nature of the samples and the patients identity. The data processing of requisition forms, which identifies key errors, was established in 2000 and in 2002 by the specialized biochemistry laboratory, also with the contribution of the reception centre for biological samples. The laboratories follow a strict criteria of defining acceptability as a starting point for the reception to then check requisition forms and biological samples. All errors are logged into the laboratory database and analysis report are sent to the care unit specifying the problems and the consequences they have on the analysis. The data is then assessed by the laboratory directors to produce monthly or annual statistical reports. This indicates the number of errors, which are then indexed to patient files to reveal the specific problem areas, therefore allowing the laboratory directors to teach the nurses and enable corrective action. PMID:17264047

Larrose, C; Le Carrer, D

2007-01-01

464

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01

465

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY E  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EXTERIORS AND INTERIORS OF THE SPACE POWER RESEARCH LABORATORY SPRL - ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY ECL - REDOX - RESEARCH ANALYSIS CENTER RAC - BASIC MATERIALS LABORATORY BML - VERTICAL LIFT FACILITY VLF

1980-01-01

466

Commercialization of a DOE Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

On April 1, 1998, Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc) began business as an employee-owned, commercial, applied research laboratory offering services to both government and commercial clients. The laboratory had previously been a support laboratory to DoE's gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge (K-25). When uranium enrichment was halted at the site, the laboratory was expanded to as an environmental demonstration center and served from 1992 until 1997 as a DOE Environmental User Facility. In 1997, after the laboratory was declared surplus, it was made available to the employee group who operated the laboratory for DOE as a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. This paper describes briefly the process of establishing the business. Attributes that contributed to the success of MCLinc are described. Some attention is given to lessons learned and to changes that could facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. Lessons learnt: as with any business venture, operation over time has revealed that some actions taken by the laboratory founders have contributed to its successful operation while others were not so successful. Observations are offered in hopes that lessons learned may suggest actions that will facilitate future attempts to make similar transitions. First, the decision to vest significant ownership of the business in the core group of professionals operating the business is key to its success. Employee-owners of the laboratory have consistently provided a high level of service to its customers while conducting business in a cost-efficient manner. Secondly, an early decision to provide business support services in-house rather than purchasing them from support contractors on site have proven cost-effective. Laboratory employees do multiple tasks and perform overhead tasks in addition to their chargeable technical responsibilities. Thirdly, assessment of technical capabilities in view of market needs and a decision to offer these capabilities as a niche market play to success. The niche was further defined by preservation of the ability to handle samples contaminated with radiological materials and those with classification concerns. These decisions enabled early marketing plans to be built on existing clientele and provided an identifiable group to which future marketing could be expanded. Finally, recruitment of key players with commercial laboratory experience proved to be a key factor for success. This experience base was valuable in avoiding early mistakes in the laboratory startup phase and provided some connection to a commercial client base. As the business has grown, professionals with commercial laboratory experience have been recruited and offered ownership in the business as an incentive for joining the group. If the process were to be repeated, early involvement of an individual with commercial sales experience would be helpful in broadening the base of commercial clients. An increased emphasis on research funding such as funding received from Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) sources would be used to form a portion of the economic base for the business. More partnerships with businesses whose services compliment those of the laboratory would expand available client base. More flexible staffing arrangements would be negotiated early on as a cost-control measure. In conclusion, the re-industrialization concept can be successful. Candidates for re-industrialization must be chosen by matching services to be offered to market needs. Implementation is best accomplished by entrepreneurs who personally profit from a successful operation of the business.

Stephenson, Barry A. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCLinc), East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-1702 (United States)

2008-01-15

467

Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system  

E-print Network

Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system Arnaud LELEVE, Hcene BENMOHAMED, Patrick laboratory systems bound to be integrated in a global homogeneous educational environment (providing other a system (with appropriate commandability and observability), to let learners follow a remote laboratory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

468

Laborlandschaft : redesigning the industrial laboratory module  

E-print Network

This thesis proposes to redesign the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory typology by rethinking the composition of the laboratory module; the smallest functional sub-unit of the laboratory type. The design for this thesis ...

Farley, Alexander H. (Alexander Hamilton)

2014-01-01

469

http://cls.sfsu.edu/ Clinical Laboratory  

E-print Network

health labs, community health projects, environmental testing, Peace Corps) Specialty Laboratorieshttp://cls.sfsu.edu/ Clinical Laboratory Science Internship Program Performs laboratory analyses in all departments of the clinical laboratory, using samples (blood, urine, etc.) from the human body

470

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2010-07-01

471

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2013-07-01

472

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2011-07-01

473

40 CFR 60.535 - Laboratory accreditation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Laboratory accreditation...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 60.535 Laboratory accreditation...necessary to perform testing in accordance...requirements that affect testing laboratories, and...

2012-07-01

474

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2010-04-01

475

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2011-04-01

476

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2014-04-01

477

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2013-04-01

478

Laboratory Testing for Anthrax: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Confirming Anthrax Through the Laboratory Response Network Laboratory Testing - FAQs Collecting Specimens Recommended Specimens Information for Specific Groups Laboratory Professionals People Who Work with Animal Products Exposure to Hides/Drums Treatment of Products ...

479

21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

2012-04-01

480

Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

481

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

LBNL-254E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;LBNL Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

482

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-print Network

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume II July 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

483

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-print Network

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume I JULY 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

484

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

LBNL-6349E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Assessing the Costs and Benefits Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Ridah Sabouni and Tracy Evans Energetics Incorporated Paul Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. Acknowledgment This work

485

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume I SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

486

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume II SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

487

AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman  

E-print Network

AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Jet Propulsion, and the Firestone Flight Sciences Laboratory form the Graduate Aeronautical disciplines making up the broad field known as aeronautics. Areas of Research Aeronautics has evolved

Greer, Julia R.

488

Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.  

PubMed

Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable. PMID:20097923

Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

2010-04-01

489