Sample records for iaea seibersdorf laboratory

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory support to IAEA environmental safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dry, Don E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roensch, Fred R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kinman, Will S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roach, Jeff L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Mont, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    The nuclear and radiochemistry group provides sample preparation and analysis support to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL). These analyses include both non-destructive (alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry) and destructive (thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) methods. On a bi-annual basis the NWAL laboratories are invited to meet to discuss program evolution and issues. During this meeting each participating laboratory summarizes their efforts over the previous two years. This presentation will present Los Alamos National Laboratories efforts in support of this program. Data showing results from sample and blank analysis will be presented along with capability enhancement and issues that arose over the previous two years.

  2. The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards - Destructive Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins,B.

    2008-07-13

    The U.S. Support Program (USSP) to IAEA Safeguards priority of destructive analysis is aimed at strengthening the IAEA's ability to use destructive analysis as a safeguards tool. IAEA inspectors bring back nuclear and environmental samples from inspections, which are first cataloged by the IAEA and then analyzed by a network of laboratories located in many Member States and the IAEA's own Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria. Historically, the USSP was instrumental in introducing environmental sampling techniques to the IAEA in order to enhance its understanding of material processing activities conducted at nuclear facilities. The USSP has also worked with the IAEA to improve understanding of measurement uncertainty and measurement quality, incorporate new and improved analytical methods, and purchase analytical and computer equipment. Recent activities include a temporary increase in analysis of environmental samples using secondary ion mass spectrometry and provision of a cost-free expert to restore secondary ion mass spectroscopy laboratory functionality and to modernize the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Information System.

  3. Proficiency Testing as a tool to monitor consistency of measurements in the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Czap, Ladislav; Shortt, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) established a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (IAEA/WHO SSDL Network) in 1976. Through SSDLs designated by Member States, the Network provides a direct link of national dosimetry standards to the international measurement system of standards traceable to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Within this structure and through the proper calibration of field instruments, the SSDLs disseminate S.I. quantities and units. To ensure that the services provided by SSDL members to end-users follow internationally accepted standards, the IAEA has set up two different comparison programmes. One programme relies on the IAEA/WHO postal TLD service and the other uses comparisons of calibrated ionization chambers to help the SSDLs verify the integrity of their national standards and the procedures used for the transfer of the standards to the end-users. The IAEA comparisons include 60Co air kerma (NK) and absorbed dose to water (ND,W) coefficients. The results of the comparisons are confidential and are communicated only to the participants. This is to encourage participation of the laboratories and their full cooperation in the reconciliation of any discrepancy. This work describes the results of the IAEA programme comparing calibration coefficients for radiotherapy dosimetry, using ionization chambers. In this programme, ionization chambers that belong to the SSDLs are calibrated sequentially at the SSDL, at the IAEA, and again at the SSDL. As part of its own quality assurance programme, the IAEA has participated in several regional comparisons organized by Regional Metrology Organizations. The results of the IAEA comparison programme show that the majority of SSDLs are capable of providing calibrations that fall inside the acceptance level of 1.5% compared to the IAEA.

  4. Proficiency Testing as a tool to monitor consistency of measurements in the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Czap, Ladislav; Shortt, Ken [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section Wagramer Strasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-08-14

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) established a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (IAEA/WHO SSDL Network) in 1976. Through SSDLs designated by Member States, the Network provides a direct link of national dosimetry standards to the international measurement system of standards traceable to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Within this structure and through the proper calibration of field instruments, the SSDLs disseminate S.I. quantities and units.To ensure that the services provided by SSDL members to end-users follow internationally accepted standards, the IAEA has set up two different comparison programmes. One programme relies on the IAEA/WHO postal TLD service and the other uses comparisons of calibrated ionization chambers to help the SSDLs verify the integrity of their national standards and the procedures used for the transfer of the standards to the end-users. The IAEA comparisons include {sup 60}Co air kerma (N{sub K}) and absorbed dose to water (N{sub D,W}) coefficients. The results of the comparisons are confidential and are communicated only to the participants. This is to encourage participation of the laboratories and their full cooperation in the reconciliation of any discrepancy.This work describes the results of the IAEA programme comparing calibration coefficients for radiotherapy dosimetry, using ionization chambers. In this programme, ionization chambers that belong to the SSDLs are calibrated sequentially at the SSDL, at the IAEA, and again at the SSDL. As part of its own quality assurance programme, the IAEA has participated in several regional comparisons organized by Regional Metrology Organizations.The results of the IAEA comparison programme show that the majority of SSDLs are capable of providing calibrations that fall inside the acceptance level of 1.5% compared to the IAEA.

  5. Hp(0.07) photon irradiations at Seibersdorf for the EURADOS extremity dosemeter intercomparison 2009.

    PubMed

    Stadtmann, H; Hranitzky, C

    2011-03-01

    In August 2009, almost 1000 passive extremity dosemeters were irradiated at the Dosimetry Laboratory Seibersdorf as part of the EURADOS intercomparison IC2009. Forty-four European individual monitoring services participated, with a total of 59 dosimetry systems (46 finger ring, 4 finger tip and 9 wrist/ankle dosemeter systems). Additionally, finger-ring dosemeters from the Dosimetry Service Seibersdorf were irradiated in a non-competitive manner. Dosemeter irradiations on rod and pillar phantoms in four photon-radiation fields complying with the ISO standard 4037 were performed with personal dose equivalent values (H(p)(0.07)) ranging from 4 to 480 mSv. Traceability was established by using an air-kerma-calibrated monitor ionisation chamber together with the X-ray facility as well as a calibrated (137)Cs gamma radiation field with a collimated beam geometry. The ISO-tabulated conversion coefficients from air kerma free-in-air to H(p)(0.07) were applied, resulting in the main contribution to the expanded measurement uncertainties. PMID:21208935

  6. Progress in inertial fusion research at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Paper No. IAEA-CN-38/B-2

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion Program is reviewed. Experiments using the Helios CO/sub 2/ laser system delivering up to 6 kJ on target are described. Because breakeven energy estimates for laser drivers of 1 ..mu..m and above have risen and there is a need for CO/sub 2/ experiments in the tens-of-kilojoule regime as soon as practical, a first phase of Antares construction is now directed toward completion of two of the six original modules in 1983. These modules are designed to deliver 40 kJ of CO/sub 2/ laser light on target.

  7. TECHNICAL SUPPORT TO IAEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IAEA sponsors meetings of technical specialists from many nations on NORM and NORM industries in Member States, with particular emphasis on potential public exposure to, and the residual waste arising from, these activities, and aspects of how NORM differs from artificial, man-ma...

  8. k0-NAA quality assessment in an Algerian laboratory by analysis of SMELS and four IAEA reference materials using Es-Salam research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidatou, L. A.; Dekar, S.; Boukari, S.

    2012-08-01

    Different types of synthetic multi-element standard material (SMELS) and four IAEA reference materials, 140, Sl-1, Soil-7 and Lichen-336 were analyzed for validation and QC/QA of the k0-standardised Neutron Activation Analysis (k0-NAA). The samples of SMELS and RMs were irradiated at Es-Salam research reactor and measured on an absolutely calibrated HPGe detector with 35% relative efficiency connected to a Canberra Genie 2k inspector. Concentrations of 33 elements such as As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, In, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Tm, U, Yb, Zn, and Zr were determined in SMELS and RMs. The analytical results agreed well with the assigned values of SMELS and certified values of RMs. In the case of RMs, concentrations of a few elements, whose certified values are not available, could be determined. The comparison between experimental values and assigned/certified data for SMELS and RMs was made by means of the results from Relative Bias, Z-score and U-score. The relatives bias of the elements determined in SMELS with respect to the assigned values were all within±4.6%. For RMs with respect to certified values were within±10% except for few elements for which RB varied from -28.6% to +12.8%. The Z-score values at 95% confidence level for most of the elements in both the materials were within ±1. The U-scores for most of the elements were lower than 1.

  9. CTBTO Contractor Laboratory Test Sample Production Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Hague; Tracy Houghton; Nick Mann; Matt Watrous

    2013-08-01

    In October 2012 scientists from both Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria designed a system and capability test to determine if the INL could produce and deliver a short lived radio xenon standard in time for the standard to be measured at the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria. The test included sample standard transportation duration and potential country entrance delays at customs. On October 23, 2012 scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared and shipped a Seibersdorf contract laboratory supplied cylinder. The canister contained 1.0 scc of gas that consisted of 70% xenon and 30% nitrogen by volume. The t0 was October 24, 2012, 1200 ZULU. The xenon content was 0.70 +/ 0.01 scc at 0 degrees C. The 133mXe content was 4200 +/ 155 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty). The 133Xe content was 19000 +/ 800 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty).

  10. 1 IAEA-CN-94/IC-1 Physics Considerations in the Design of NCSX*

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    1 IAEA-CN-94/IC-1 Physics Considerations in the Design of NCSX* G. H. Neilson1 , M. C. Zarnstorff1 Laboratory. #12;2 IAEA-CN-94/IC-1 The National Compact Stel- lara t o r E x p e r i m e n t (NCSX) [7

  11. Reference dosimeter system of the iaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Kishor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    1995-09-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation processing facilities to satisfy national and international Standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit.

  12. Combustion Engineering, Inc. experience under IAEA safeguards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bowie

    1985-01-01

    After ten inspections over a 22-month period Combustion Engineering CE-W Nuclear Manufacturing personnel have developed extensive experience in working with IAEA Safeguards personnel at its low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication facility. This paper examines: The CE experience with IAEA Safeguards inspections and reporting requirements; The IAEA inspection activities carried out by IAEA personnel at CE's Fuel Fabrication facility; The ways in

  13. Development of an IAEA Training Course for Future U.S. Inspectors

    SciTech Connect

    Savannah Avgerinos Fitzwater; Amanda R. Rynes; David S. Bracken; Richard R. M. Metcalf; James D. West

    2011-07-01

    U.S. citizens currently make up only 12% of the positions held in the IAEA’s Department of Safeguards. While the United States has maintained a high level of support for the Agency over the duration of its history, the number of American inspectors currently in the field does not reflect this level of involvement. As a result, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of International Relations, as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) mission, has tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to develop a rigorous two week hands-on training program to encourage and operationally acclimatize U.S. Citizens who are interested in applying for IAEA inspector positions using IAEA authorized equipment at INL. Idaho National Laboratory is one-of-a-kind in its ability to train IAEA inspectors by including training at nuclear facilities on site and includes, for example, direct measurement of an active spent fuel storage cooling pond. This accredited course will introduce and train attendees on the major IAEA systems used in collecting nuclear safeguards data and performing safeguards inspections. Unique in the United States, these classes will give attendees direct hands-on training and will address equipment purpose, function, operating principles, application, and troubleshooting, based upon what would be expected of an IAEA Safeguards Inspector in the field and in the office. Upon completion, U.S. applicants will be better qualified to pursue a position in the IAEA Department of Safeguards Operational Divisions. In support, INL has recently established a new laboratory space to house state of the art nuclear safeguards instrumentation. Currently, equipment installed in the laboratory space includes attended systems: 3DLR (3-D Imaging Laser) for design information verification, a Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device for measurement of spent fuel, HM-5 handheld radiation detectors, quantitative neutron and gamma systems; unattended monitoring systems including: NGAM and MiniGRAND radiation systems and a DMOS camera system, and VACOSS/EOSS Optical Sealing Systems..

  14. A brief history of NDA at the IAEA.

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J. K. (James K.); Sinkule, B. J. (Barbara J.); Hsue, S.-T. (Sin-Tao); Abhold, M. E. (Mark E.)

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, the first portable nondestructive assay instrument, a SAM-II, was brought to Vienna for IAEA consideration. This initial foray into the usage of nondestructive assay (NDA) as an independent assessment tool has materialized into one of the important tools for IAEA inspections. NDA instruments have several inherent advantages for inspectors; their measurements generate no radioactive waste, provide immediate answers, do not require specialized operators, and can be either taken to the items to be measured (portable instruments), or the items for measurement can be brought to the instruments, such as can be applied in on-site IAEA laboratories or off-site IAEA lab at Siebersdorf. The SAM-II was a small, lightweight, battery-powered, gamma-ray instrument used for uranium enrichment measurements. It was also found to be usehl for locating nuclear material, distinguishing between uranium and plutonium, and determining the active length of items like fuel pins. However it was not well suited for determining the amount of bulk material present, except for small containers of low-density materials. A 6-sided neutron coincidence counter, easily disassembled so it could be shipped and carried by airplane, was developed for bulk measurements of plutonium. The HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) was immediately useful for quantitative measurements of pure plutonium oxide. However, the IAEA had to make a trade-off between the ease of use of NDA instruments on-site, and the problems of obtaining small samples for shipment to an independent lab for more accurate analysis. NDA does not create radioactive waste, so as waste handling has become more cautious and more regulated, NDA looks better and better. After acceptance of NDA by the IAEA for routine use, the follow-up question was naturally, 'How much better can this measurement be made?' The Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) supported multiple and varied efforts in this direction, such as improving both the plutonium isotopic distribution measurement and the multiplicity counter, so that the assays can be performed on any plutonium samples instead of only pure oxides. Advances have also been made on uranium bulk measurements by the development of the active well coincidence counter. Meanwhile, several large bulk-handling facilities have been coming on line under IAEA safeguards. These facilities require full-time inspectors to be present whenever the plant is operating. The IAEA requested help so that measurements can be made even when inspectors are not present. The evolution and success of unattended NDA has been responsible for the capability of the IAEA to monitor large bulk-handling facilities without substantial increase in inspection effort. The integration of NDA with containment & surveillance measures and automation has been crucial to reducing inspection manpower. These systems have developed to the point where the IAEA can make credible conclusions on large high-throughput plants such as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication or reprocessing plants.

  15. IAEA reorganizes nuclear information services

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.

    2012-08-15

    As part of an overall restructuring of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Nuclear Energy, the agency has established the Nuclear Information Section (NIS). The restructuring, recently announced by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, also includes the creation of a separate Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) Section, as demand for assistance in this area is growing among member countries. According to the NIS Web site, 'This restructuring and the creation of the NIS provides an opportunity for further enhancing existing information products and services and introducing new ones-all with an eye towards advancing higher organizational efficiency and effectiveness.'

  16. Malaysian participation in the IAEA/WHO postal TLD and postal ionisation chamber intercomparison programmes: analysis of results obtained during 1985-2008.

    PubMed

    Samat, S B; Evans, C J; Kadni, T; Dolah, M T

    2009-02-01

    During the years 1985-2008, the Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory of Malaysia (SSDL Malaysia) has participated 37 times in the IAEA/WHO intercomparison programmes. This paper reports an analysis of the intercomparison data and demonstrates that the quality of the SSDL calibration service is well within the limits required by IAEA. PMID:19299478

  17. Trip report on IAEA Training Workshop on Implementation of Integrated Management Systems for Research Reactors (T3-TR-45496).

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Richard J.

    2013-11-01

    From 17-21 June 2013, Sandia National Laboratories, Technical Area-V (SNL TA-V) represented the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Training Workshop (T3-TR-45486). This report gives a breakdown of the IAEA regulatory structure for those unfamiliar, and the lessons learned and observations that apply to SNL TA-V that were obtained from the workshop. The Safety Report Series, IAEA workshop final report, and SNL TA-V presentation are included as attachments.

  18. The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zifferero, M.

    1993-04-01

    With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

  19. Facility preparations for the initial IAEA inspection of Hanford excess material

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.D.; Delegard, C.H.; McRae, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This article is a review of the Hanford efforts to prepare the facility for the initial IAEA inspections. It describes the activities and team work by DOE, Westinghouse Hanford, and Battelle/Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff to successfully prepare the plutonium finishing plant for the initial inspection. It also describes the resolution of administrative and technical topics.

  20. Comparison of NDA and DA measurement techniques for excess Pu powders at the Hanford Site: Operator and IAEA experience

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, T.L.; McRae, L.P.; Delegard, C.H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Quantitative physical measurements are necessary components of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear material safeguards verification regime. In December 1994, IAEA safeguards were initiated on an inventory of plutonium-bearing oxide and scrap items in Vault 3 of the 2736-Z Building of the Plutonium Finishing Plant on the United States Department of Energy`s (USDOE) Hanford Site. The material originated in the United States nuclear weapons complex. The diversity of the chemical form and the heterogenous physical form of the plutonium in this inventory were expected to challenge the target precision and accuracy of methods employed by IAEA: quantitative destructive analytical techniques (which are susceptible to sampling error) and quantitative coincident neutron measurements (which rely on knowledge of the material`s chemical form and purity). Because of the diverse and heterogenous nature of plutonium-bearing scrap, plant operations increasingly have adopted calorimetric techniques both for item inventory measurements and for verification purposes. During the recent advent of IAEA safeguards at Vault 3, a set of destructive and nondestructive methods were applied to a number of inventory items (cans of plutonium-bearing powders) with widely ranging chemical purities. Results of these measurements, gathered by the operator`s and IAEA`s laboratories and instruments as well as by instruments from Pacific Northwest Laboratory and USDOE`s Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are presented and statistically compared.

  1. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper S. E.; .; Worrall, L.; Pickett, C.; Bachner, K.; Queirolo, A.

    2014-08-08

    The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, the U.S. Department of State, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a a workshop on the subject of ”Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation.” The workshop was held at the Vienna International Centre in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. The workshop participants included software and hardware experts from national laboratories, industry, government, and IAEA member states who were specially selected by the workshop organizers based on their experience with software that is developed for the control and operation of safeguards instrumentation. The workshop included presentations, to orient the participants to the IAEA Department of Safeguards software activities related to instrumentation data collection and processing, and case studies that were designed to inspire discussion of software development, use, maintenance, and upgrades in breakout sessions and to result in recommendations for effective software practices and management. This report summarizes the results of the workshop.

  2. IAEA workshop and field trial at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Ross, H.H.; Carter, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    In March 1994, members of the International Safeguards Department in the National Security Program Office (NSPO) hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The workshop was held at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and its primary purpose was to train the inspectors in the techniques needed for effective environmental sample collection and handling. The workshop emphasized both sampling theory and practice. First, detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water-associated sampling were covered in the classroom. Subsequently, the inspectors were divided into three groups for actual sample collection in and around the K-25 locale. The collected samples were processed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Network of Analytical Laboratories using established analytical techniques. This activity is part of the IAEA ``Programme 93+2 in. assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards.

  3. IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-14

    This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

  4. Technology recommendations for pre-screening of IAEA swipe samples

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Smith, Nicholas A.; Lee, Denise L.; Huckabay, Heath A.; Ticknor, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories have prepared an analysis of recommended, possible, and not recommended technologies for pre-screening and prioritizing IAEA swipes. The analytical techniques listed under the recommended technology list are the most promising techniques available to date. The recommended list is divided into two sections: Argonne’s recommended techniques and Oak Ridge’s recommended techniques. This list was divided based upon the expertise of staff in each subject area and/or the instrumentation available at each laboratory. The following section, titled Possible Techniques, is a list of analytical techniques that could be used for pre-screening and prioritizing swipes if additional instrumentation and effort were provided. These techniques are not necessarily top priority, but should not be discounted for future or expanded efforts. Lastly, a list of not recommended techniques is provided to outline the analytical methods and instrumentation that were investigated by each lab but deemed not suitable for this task. In addition to the recommendation list, a short procedure is provided outlining the steps followed for destructive analysis by the Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) for determination of uranium concentrations, isotopic content of sample and swipe. Swipes generated for this project will be given to ORNL’s NWAL laboratory for analysis after analysis by other techniques at both laboratories.

  5. Nonproliferation, Disarmament and the IAEA in Tomorrow's World

    SciTech Connect

    Jill Cooley

    2008-09-09

    Jill Cooley, Director of the Division of Concepts and Planning in the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards, gives an overview of the IAEA safeguards system and describe current verification challenges and potential new roles for the agency.

  6. IAEA-TECDOC-1695 Application of

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    IAEA-TECDOC-1695 Application of Isotope Techniques for Assessing Nutrient Dynamics in River Basins Abstract Phosphorus (P) is a limiting macro-nutrient for primary productivity and anthropogenic P to be accompanied by a 2.4 to 2.7 fold increase in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-driven eutrophication

  7. RECRUITMENT OF U.S. CITIZENS FOR VACANCIES IN IAEA SAFEGUARDS.

    SciTech Connect

    OCCHIOGROSSO, D.; PEPPER, S.

    2006-07-16

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on its member states to assist with recruiting qualified individuals for positions within the IAEA's secretariat. It is likewise important to the U.S. government for U.S. citizens to take positions with the IAEA to contribute to its success. It is important for persons within and outside the U.S. nuclear and safeguards industries to become aware of the job opportunities available at the IAEA and to be informed of important vacancies as they arise. The International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is tasked by the U.S. government with recruiting candidates for positions within the Department of Safeguards at the IAEA and since 1998, has been actively seeking methods for improving outreach. In addition, ISPO has been working more closely with the IAEA Division of Personnel. ISPO staff members attend trade shows to distribute information about IAEA opportunities. The shows target the nuclear industry as well as shows that are unrelated to the nuclear industry. ISPO developed a web site that provides information for prospective candidates. They have worked with the IAEA to understand its recruitment processes, to make suggestions for improvements, and to understand employment benefits so they can be communicated to potential U.S. applicants. ISPO is also collaborating with a State Department working group that is focused on increasing U.S. representation within the United Nations as a whole. Most recently Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice issued a letter to all Federal Agency heads encouraging details and transfers of their employees to international organizations to the maximum extent feasible and with due regard to their manpower requirements. She urged all federal agencies to review their detail and transfer policies and practices to ensure that employment in international organizations is promoted in a positive and active manner. In addition, she wrote that it is important that agencies examine their policies and practices for returning employees from details and transfer to ensure that reintegration procedures result in both the agency and such employees receiving optimal benefit from the international organization experience. This paper follows a 1999 paper on the same topic.

  8. Analysis of historical delta values for IAEA/LANL NDA training courses

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santi, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bonner, Elisa [FORMER N-4 STUDENT

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by providing training for IAEA inspectors in neutron and gamma-ray Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of nuclear material. Since 1980, all new IAEA inspectors attend this two week course at LANL gaining hands-on experience in the application of NDA techniques, procedures and analysis to measure plutonium and uranium nuclear material standards with well known pedigrees. As part of the course the inspectors conduct an inventory verification exercise. This exercise provides inspectors the opportunity to test their abilities in performing verification measurements using the various NDA techniques. For an inspector, the verification of an item is nominally based on whether the measured assay value agrees with the declared value to within three times the historical delta value. The historical delta value represents the average difference between measured and declared values from previous measurements taken on similar material with the same measurement technology. If the measurement falls outside a limit of three times the historical delta value, the declaration is not verified. This paper uses measurement data from five years of IAEA courses to calculate a historical delta for five non-destructive assay methods: Gamma-ray Enrichment, Gamma-ray Plutonium Isotopics, Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting, Active Neutron Coincidence Counting and the Neutron Coincidence Collar. These historical deltas provide information as to the precision and accuracy of these measurement techniques under realistic conditions.

  9. Estimated incremental costs for NRC licensees to implement the US/IAEA safeguards agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.G.; Brouns, R.J.; Chockie, A.D.; Davenport, L.C.; Merrill, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was recently completed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commision (NRC) by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify the incremental cost of implementing the US/IAEA safeguards treaty agreement to eligible NRC licensees. Sources for the study were cost estimates from several licensees who will be affected by the agreement and cost analyses by PNL staff. The initial cost to all eligible licensees to implement the agreement is estimated by PNL to range from $1.9 to $7.2 million. The annual cost to these same licensees for the required accounting and reporting activities is estimated at $0.5 to $1.5 million. Annual inspection costs to the industry for the limited IAEA inspection being assumed is estimated at $80,000 to $160,000.

  10. Automated Controlled-Potential Coulometer for the IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Holland, M.K.; Fields, T.

    1998-01-29

    An automated controlled-potential coulometer has been developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the determination of plutonium for use at the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Siebersdorf, Austria. The system is functionally the same as earlier systems built for use at the Savannah River Site`s Analytical Laboratory. All electronic circuits and printed circuits boards have been upgraded with state-of-the-art components. A higher amperage potentiostat with improved control stability has been developed. The system achieves electronic calibration accuracy and linearity of better than 0.01 percent, with a precision and accuracy better than 0.1 percent has been demonstrated. This coulometer features electrical calibration of the integration system, electrolysis current background corrections, and control-potential adjustment capabilities. These capabilities allow application of the system to plutonium measurements without chemical standards, achieving traceability to the international measurement system through electrical standards and Faraday`s constant. the chemist is provided with the capability to perform measurements without depending upon chemical standards, which is a significant advantage for applications such as characterization of primary and secondary standards. Additional benefits include reducing operating cost to procure, prepare and measure calibration standards and the corresponding decrease in radioactive waste generation. The design and documentation of the automated instrument are provided herein. Each individual module`s operation, wiring, layout, and alignment are described. Interconnection of the modules and system calibration are discussed. A complete set of prints and a list of associated parts are included.

  11. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  12. 10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...12 Section 75.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and...considering such a request, it is the policy of the Commission to...

  13. 10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...12 Section 75.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and...considering such a request, it is the policy of the Commission to...

  14. 10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...12 Section 75.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and...considering such a request, it is the policy of the Commission to...

  15. 10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...12 Section 75.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and...considering such a request, it is the policy of the Commission to...

  16. 10 CFR 75.12 - Communication of information to IAEA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...12 Section 75.12 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and...considering such a request, it is the policy of the Commission to...

  17. Assessment of Alternative Funding Mechanisms for the IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Ford, Benjamin E.

    2012-06-15

    While the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is growing concern that global demographic trends, advances in technology and the trend towards austerity in Member State budgets will stretch the Agency’s resources to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As part of an ongoing effort by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to evaluate the IAEA’s long-term budgetary concerns , this paper proposes a series of alternate funding mechanisms that have the potential to sustain the IAEA in the long-term, including endowment, charity, and fee-for-service funding models.

  18. International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

    2003-07-14

    A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

  19. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

  20. Chemistry and technology of radioactive waste management —the IAEA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenkov, V. M.

    2003-01-01

    The paper refers the consideration of chemical composition of radioactive waste in selection of particular method and technology for waste treatment and conditioning, importance of physicochemical parameters of waste processing techniques for optimisation of waste processing to produce waste form of appropriate quality. Consideration of waste chemistry is illustrated by several IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and by outlining the scope of some selected technical reports on different waste management subjects. Different components of the IAEA activities on radioactive waste management and on technology transfer are presented and discussed.

  1. Estimated Incremental Costs for NRC Licensees to Implement the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. G.; Brouns, R. J.; Chockie, A. D.; Davenport, L. C.

    1979-07-19

    At the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy, conducted a brief study to identify the incremental cost for implementing the US/IAEA safeguards treaty agreement. The purpose of the study was to develop an estimate of the cost impact to eligible NRC licensees for complying with the proposed Part 75 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 75), the rule which will implement the treaty. The study was conducted using cost estimates from several eligible licensees who will be affected by the agreement and from cost analyses by PNL staff. A survey instrument was developed and sent to 25 NRC licensees, some of whom had more than one licensed facility. Their responses were obtained primarily by telephone after they had reviewed the survey insttument and a list of assumptions. The primary information received from the licensees was the incremental cost to their particular facility in the form of manpower, dollars or both. In summary, the one-time cost to all eligible NRC licensees to implement 10 CFR 75 is estimated by PNL to range from $1.9 to $7.2 millions. The annual cost to the industry for the required accounting and reporting activities is estimated by PNL at $0.5 to $1.4 millions. Annual inspection costs to the industry for the limited IAEA inspection being assumed is $80,000 to $160,000.

  2. Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol in the Philippines: USDOE/PNRI Cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Sequis, Julietta E.; Cain, Ronald A.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Hansen, Linda H.; VanSickle, Matthew; Killinger, Mark H.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

    2011-07-19

    The Philippines entered into force the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Additional Protocol (AP) in February 2010. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the government agency responsible for implementing the AP. In June 2010 the IAEA invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to help conduct a joint national training seminar on the AP. DOE presented to PNRI its AP international technical assistance program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), which helps partner countries implement the AP. In coordination with the IAEA, DOE established this program in 2008 to complement IAEA AP seminars with long-term country-specific cooperation from the perspective of a Member State. The US version of the AP is the same version as that of non-nuclear weapon states except for the addition of a national security exclusion. Due to this, DOE cooperation with other countries enables the sharing of valuable lessons learned in implementing the AP. DOE/INSEP described to PNRI the various areas of cooperation it offers to interested countries, whether they are preparing for entry into force or already implementing the AP. Even countries that have entered the AP into force are sometimes not fully prepared to implement it well, and welcome cooperation to improve their implementation process. PNRI and DOE/INSEP subsequently agreed to cooperate in several areas to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the Philippines AP implementation. These areas include providing working-level training to PNRI staff and preparing an information document that details that training for future reference, assisting with the development of an outreach program and procedures for AP reporting and complementary access, and identifying Annex II equipment and non-nuclear materials whose export must be reported under the AP. DOE laboratory representatives, funded by INSEP, met again with PNRI in February 2011 to provide training for PNRI AP staff and investigate specific ways to improve implementation. Another meeting in July 2011 focused on preparations for outreach to industry and universities. In this paper PNRI describes current implementation of the AP in the Philippines, and both DOE/INSEP and PNRI provide their perspectives on their cooperation to enhance that implementation.

  3. Indo-US Nuclear Agreement and IAEA Safeguards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Ramachandran

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear transfers to a non-nuclear weapon state (NNWS) are conditioned on IAEA safeguards on all current and future peaceful nuclear activities, what are called the full-scope safeguards (FSS) or comprehensive safeguards. Since India is a NNWS according to the NPT definition, the NSG Guidelines as currently implemented would, therefore, invoke FSS if India seeks nuclear technology or nuclear power plants

  4. IAEA activities in the area of partitioning and transmutation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2006-01-01

    Four major challenges are facing the long-term development of nuclear energy: improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptance. Meeting the sustainability criteria is the driving force behind the topic of this paper. In this context, sustainability has two aspects: natural resources and waste management. IAEA's activities in

  5. IAEA-CN-SO/F-I-4 ITER: CONCEPT DEFINITION*

    E-print Network

    IAEA-CN-SO/F-I-4 ITER: CONCEPT DEFINITION* Presented by K. TOMABECHI Abstract ITER: CONCERT DEFINITION. On the basis of the results of the investigation carried out since May 1988, an ITER concept has) is conducted under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency jointly by Euratom, Japan, the Union

  6. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  7. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  8. Iaea Activities Supporting the Applications of Research Reactors in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peld, Nathan D.; Ridikas, Danas

    2014-02-01

    As the underutilization of research reactors around the world persists as a primary topic of concern among facility owners and operators, the IAEA responded in 2013 with a broad range of activities to address the planning, execution and improvement of many experimental techniques. The revision of two critical documents for planning and diversifying a facility's portfolio of applications, TECDOC 1234 “The Applications of Research Reactors” and TECDOC 1212 “Strategic Planning for Research Reactors”, is in progress in order to keep this information relevant, corresponding to the dynamism of experimental techniques and research capabilities. Related to the latter TECDOC, the IAEA convened a meeting in 2013 for the expert review of a number of strategic plans submitted by research reactor operators in developing countries. A number of activities focusing on specific applications are either continuing or beginning as well. In neutron activation analysis, a joint round of inter-comparison proficiency testing sponsored by the IAEA Technical Cooperation Department will be completed, and facility progress in measurement accuracy is described. Also, a training workshop in neutron imaging and Coordinated Research Projects in reactor benchmarks, automation of neutron activation analysis and neutron beam techniques for material testing intend to advance these activities as more beneficial services to researchers and other users.

  9. 21.st IAEA FEC TH/3-2 Electron fishbones: theory and experimental evidence 1 IAEA FEC 2006 F. Zonca et al.

    E-print Network

    Zonca, Fulvio

    et al. Electron Fishbones: theory and experimental evidence F. Zonca 1), P. Buratti 1), A. Cardinali and experimental evidence 2 IAEA FEC 2006 F. Zonca et al. Outline Experimental observations of electron fishbones IAEA FEC 2006 F. Zonca et al. Experimental Observations I: historic background · Fishbone - like

  10. The use of isotopic age for improved groundwater assessment and management: recent IAEA initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, P. K.; Matsumoto, T.; Araguás Araguás, L. J.; Han, L. F.; Van Duren, M.; Philipp, P. M.; Choudhry, M. A.; Kralik, M.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater provides more than half of the world's freshwater supply and fossil groundwater sustains a significant portion of the current food production by irrigated agriculture, as well as contributes to baseflow of rivers. In spite of the importance of groundwater, a number of fundamental aspects of aquifer hydrogeology, including recharge, groundwater-surface water interactions, and the extent and distribution of fossil groundwater remain poorly characterized in most countries. Aquifer assessments at regional or national scales can be conducted more effectively and rapidly by using groundwater isotope signatures and ages, but a lack of easy access to analytical facilities and discordant ages estimated from multiple isotope tracers have been two of the important impediments in the wider use of age dating for groundwater investigations. We have recently established a noble gas facility at the IAEA to increase the availability of groundwater ages and have demonstrated the use of tritium-helium isotope pair in a shallow aquifer and river baseflow in Austria for characterizing groundwater residence time. Carbon-14 data collected prior to the advent of accelerator mass spectrometry is subject to large uncertainties because of potentially large contamination with atmospheric carbon dioxide during ampling. Using field and laboratory experiments, we demonstrate that carbon-14 values as much as 10 pMC in the Nubian Aquifer can be attributed to contamination during sampling. In this presentation, we will discuss recent IAEA initiatives for a wider application of tritium-helium-3, carbon-14 and krypton-81 for groundwater dating and to increase the availability of comprehensive, national assessments of water resources.

  11. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Chile.

    PubMed

    Aguirre Herrera, Paulina; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    The Tissue Banking Project in Chile started as an idea in 1996. Before 1996 in Chile there were only a few small bone banks working with their own standards of quality. The first tissue bank (LPTR) was established in 1998, with the technical and financial support of the IAEA. Since 2001, the laboratory began to produce tissues for clinical use, starting with the processing of 6 amniotic membranes, 2 femoral heads and 19 batches of pig skin. In 2002, the laboratory began the processing of human skin. Five students from Chile have graduated from training courses carried out in Singapore and in Buenos Aires under the IAEA training program since 1998. The amount of tissues produced and sterilized using ionizing radiation by the LPTR in the last years was 320,000 cm(2) of human skin, 553,600 cm(2) of pig skin, 5,400 cm(2) of amniotic membrane, 49 femoral heads, 3 large bones and 300 g of bovine bone. The patients treated with sterilized tissues produced by the LPTR were 200 deep burns treated with human skin and pig skin, 40 bone transplants from femoral heads, 77 ophthalmologic patients treated with amniotic membrane and 150 bovine bone transplants for dental treatments. PMID:18663601

  12. The new IAEA reference material: IAEA-434 technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) in phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Shakhashiro, A; Sansone, U; Wershofen, H; Bollhöfer, A; Kim, C K; Kim, C S; Kis-Benedek, G; Korun, M; Moune, M; Lee, S H; Tarjan, S; Al-Masri, M S

    2011-01-01

    A reliable determination of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with radiation protection and environmental regulations. In this respect, a new phosphogypsum reference material was produced and certified to assist in the validation of analytical methods and the quality assurance of produced analytical results. This paper presents the sample preparation methodology, material homogeneity assessment, characterization campaign results and assignment of property values, and associated uncertainties. The reference values and associated uncertainties for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238 were established based on consensus values calculated from analytical results reported by three National Metrology Institutes and five expert laboratories. PMID:20869259

  13. IAEA activities in the area of partitioning and transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, Alexander

    2006-06-01

    Four major challenges are facing the long-term development of nuclear energy: improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptance. Meeting the sustainability criteria is the driving force behind the topic of this paper. In this context, sustainability has two aspects: natural resources and waste management. IAEA's activities in the area of Partitioning and Transmutation (P&T) are mostly in response to the latter. While not involving the large quantities of gaseous products and toxic solid wastes associated with fossil fuels, radioactive waste disposal is today's dominant public acceptance issue. In fact, small waste quantities permit a rigorous confinement strategy, and mined geological disposal is the strategy followed by some countries. Nevertheless, political opposition arguing that this does not yet constitute a safe disposal technology has largely stalled these efforts. One of the primary reasons cited is the long life of many of the radioisotopes generated from fission. This concern has led to increased R&D efforts to develop a technology aimed at reducing the amount and radio-toxicity of long-lived radioactive waste through transmutation in fission reactors or sub-critical systems. In the frame of the Project on Technology Advances in Fast Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS), the IAEA initiated a number of activities on utilization of plutonium and transmutation of long-lived radioactive waste, ADS, and deuterium-tritium plasma-driven sub-critical systems. The paper presents past accomplishments, current status and planned activities of this IAEA project.

  14. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1980-10-01

    Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

  15. [Nuclear energy and environment: review of the IAEA environmental projects].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, S; Fogt, G

    2012-01-01

    The review of the environmental projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented. Basic IAEA documents intended to protect humans and the Environment are considered and their main features are discussed. Some challenging issues in the area of protection of the Environment and man, including the impact of nuclear facilities on the environment, radioactive waste management, and remediation of the areas affected by radiological accidents, nuclear testing and sites of nuclear facilities are also discussed. The need to maintain the existing knowledge in radioecology and protection of the environment is emphasised. PMID:23516895

  16. Strengthening IAEA safeguards in an era of nuclear cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R.

    1995-11-01

    Since the end of the Cold War the world has witnessed a remarkable series of events demonstrating that universal adherence to the principles of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament are no longer utopian dreams. The author reviews the actions of various countries to terminate or reduce nuclear weapons programs and those that are resisting the non-proliferation efforts. The author addresses efforts of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to safeguard declared nuclear material more cost-effectively and deal with the possibility of undeclared nuclear activities.

  17. Safety-Related Activities of the IAEA for Radioactive Waste, Decommissioning and Remediation - 13473

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Pil-Soo; Vesterlind, Magnus [Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, International Atomic Energy Agency, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)] [Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, International Atomic Energy Agency, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    To fulfil its mandate and serve the needs of its Member States, the IAEA is engaged in a wide range of safety-related activities pertaining to radioactive waste management, decommissioning and remediation. One of the statutory obligations of the IAEA is to establish safety standards and to provide for the application of these standards. The present paper describes recent developments in regard to the IAEA's waste safety standards, and some of the ways the IAEA makes provision for their application. The safety standards and supporting safety demonstration projects seek to establish international consensus on methodologies and approaches for dealing with particular subject areas, for example, safety assessment for radioactive waste disposal. (authors)

  18. RECRUITMENT OF U.S. CITIZENS FOR VACANCIES IN IAEA SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect

    PEPPER,S.E.; DECARO,D.; WILLIAMS,G.; CARELLI,J.; ASSUR,M.

    1999-07-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on its member states to assist with recruiting qualified individuals for positions within the IAEA's secretariat. It is important that persons within and outside the US nuclear and safeguards industries become aware of career opportunities available at the IAEA, and informed about important vacancies. The IAEA has established an impressive web page to advertise opportunities for employment. However, additional effort is necessary to ensure that there is sufficient awareness in the US of these opportunities, and assistance for persons interested in taking positions at the IAEA. In 1998, the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support (SSTS) approved a special task under the US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) for improving US efforts to identify qualified candidates for vacancies in IAEA's Department of Safeguards. The International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) developed a plan that includes increased advertising, development of a web page to support US recruitment efforts, feedback from the US Mission in Vienna, and interaction with other recruitment services provided by US professional organizations. The main purpose of this effort is to educate US citizens about opportunities at the IAEA so that qualified candidates can be identified for the IAEA's consideration.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of correction factors for IAEA TLD holders.

    PubMed

    Hultqvist, Martha; Fernández-Varea, José M; Izewska, Joanna

    2010-03-21

    The IAEA standard thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holder has been developed for the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose program for audits of high-energy photon beams, and it is also employed by the ESTRO-QUALity assurance network (EQUAL) and several national TLD audit networks. Factors correcting for the influence of the holder on the TL signal under reference conditions have been calculated in the present work from Monte Carlo simulations with the PENELOPE code for (60)Co gamma-rays and 4, 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV photon beams. The simulation results are around 0.2% smaller than measured factors reported in the literature, but well within the combined standard uncertainties. The present study supports the use of the experimentally obtained holder correction factors in the determination of the absorbed dose to water from the TL readings; the factors calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations may be adopted for the cases where there are no measured data. PMID:20197601

  20. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juergen Kupitz

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). It defines its rationale, key objectives and specifies the organizational structure. The IAEA General Conference (2000) has invited 'all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining

  1. The IAEA CRP on Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Maschek; X. Chen; A. Rineiski; M. Schikorr; A. Stanculescu; B. Arien; E. Malambu; Y. Bai; J. Li; Y. Wu; S. Zheng; C. Chabert; Y. Peneliau; A. Chebeskov; V. Dekoussar; M. Vorotyntsev; D. F. da Cruz; K. Devan; V. Gopalakrishnan; R. Harish; P. Mohanakrishnan; G. Pandikumar; S. Dulla; P. Ravetto; O. Feynberg; V. Ignatiev; V. Subbotin; A. Surenkov; R. Zakirov; J. Kophazi; M. Szieberth; K. Morita; R. Srivenkatesan; S. Taczanowski; K. Tucek; H. Wider; P. Vertes; J. Uhlir

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, the IAEA has initiated the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, is to increase the capability of Member States in developing and applying advanced technologies in

  2. End user needs for enhanced IAEA Safeguards Information Management Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Badalamente, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Deland, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is undertaking a program for strengthening its safeguards on the recognition that safeguards must give assurance not only of the non-diversion of declared material or that declared facilities are not being misused, but also of the absence of any undeclared nuclear activities in States which have signed comprehensive safeguards agreements with the Agency. The IAEA has determined that the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and the creation of confidence in the continuing peaceful use of declared material and facilities is largely dependent on more information being made available to the Agency and on the capability of the Agency to make more effective use of this additional information, as well as existing information.

  3. IAEA coordinated research activities on materials for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, A.; Inozemtsev, V.; Kamendje, R.; Beatty, R. L.

    2013-11-01

    After the recent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, public resentment towards nuclear energy is very high; however it is also important to emphasise that for other facilities the safety record has been remarkably good when compared to those of other new or conventional energy technologies. In addition to clear safety improvements new systems will have increased thermal efficiency, maximised fuel use, and reduced nuclear waste production. In order to initiate commercial deployment of power reactors, small scale demonstrations of such new systems are urgently needed. This will help to develop, test and qualify new structural materials with improved properties with respect to radiation, corrosion, thermal and other degradation processes. To solve all challenges related to the performance parameters of such materials, internationally driven efforts must focus on research, targeted testing, and final selection of appropriate materials. This is recognised as a key milestone in successful demonstration and future deployment of newly designed nuclear reactors. Because of clear synergies between fusion and fission research and development communities have been identified, closer cooperation of research groups has been stimulated. Although some operational conditions are expected to change, many basic features will remain similar. In addition to the material science effort, new experimental facilities are being developed for the study of high-radiation damage effects on the microstructure of candidate materials prior to their qualification. During last 5 years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched several coordinated research activities in this specific, but very important field. This paper gives a summary of on-going IAEA activities related to the development and characterisation of structural and plasma facing materials for nuclear energy.

  4. The future of IAEA safeguards: challenges and responses

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    For nearly two decades, the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) has been transforming its safeguards system to address the challenges posed by undeclared nuclear programs, the associated revelation of an extensive non-State nuclear procurement network and other issues, including past limits to its verification mandate and the burden of noncompliance issues. Implementing the new measures, including those in the Additional Protocol, and integrating new and old safeguards measures, remains a work in progress. Implementation is complicated by factors including the limited teclmological tools that are available to address such issues as safeguarding bulk handling facilities, detection of undeclared facilities/activities, especially related to enrichment, etc. As this process continues, new challenges are arising, including the demands of expanding nuclear power production worldwide, so-called safeguards by design for a new generation of facilities, the possible IAEA role in a fissile material cutoff treaty and other elements of the arms control and disarmament agenda, the possible role in 'rollback' cases, etc. There is no doubt safeguards will need to evolve in the future, as they have over the last decades. In order for the evolutionary path to proceed, there will inter alia be a need to identify technological gaps, especially with respect to undeclared facilities, and ensure they are filled by adapting old safeguards technologies, by developing and introducing new and novel safeguards teclmologies and/or by developing new procedures and protocols. Safeguards will also need to respond to anticipated emerging threats and to future, unanticipated threats. This will require strategic planning and cooperation among Member States and with the Agency. This paper will address challenges to IAEA safeguards and the technological possibilities and R&D strategies needed to meet those challenges in the context of the forty-year evolution of safeguards, including the ongoing transformation of safeguards by the Agency.

  5. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    Written contributions from participants of the Joint 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) – 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (21st IAEA TM RUSFD). The International Advisory Committees of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and the 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD), agreed to carry out together this Joint LAWPP 2014 – 21st RUSFD in San José, Costa Rica, on 27-31 January 2014. The Joint LAWPP 2014 – 21st RUSFD meeting, organized by the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, and Ad Astra Rocket Company in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) is a series of events which has been held periodically since 1982, with the purpose of providing a forum in which the research of the Latin American plasma physics community can be displayed, as well as fostering collaborations among plasma scientists within the region and with researchers from the rest of the world. Recognized plasma scientists from developed countries are specially invited to the meeting to present the state of the art on several "hot" topics related to plasma physics. It is an open meeting, with an International Advisory Committee, in which the working language is English. It was firstly held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by workshops in Medellín, Colombia (1985), Santiago de Chile, Chile (1988), Buenos Aires, Argentina (1990), Mexico City, Mexico (1992), Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil (1994, combined with the International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP)), Caracas, Venezuela (1997), Tandil, Argentina (1998), La Serena, Chile (2000), Sao Pedro, Brazil (2003), Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Caracas, Venezuela (2007), Santiago de Chile, Chile (2010, combined with the ICPP) and Mar de Plata, Argentina (2011). The 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices is an ideal forum for small laboratory size fusion experiments, as compared to those of the larger laboratories, to report about their latest achievements working with medium size and small scale tokamaks, stellarators, compact tori, dense plasma focus, reversed field pinches, helical devices, linear machines, and other small plasma devices. The Technical Meeting aims at stimulating new synergies which can contribute to better streamline the research outputs to the mainstream fusion research. Previous meetings in the series were held in Budapest, Hungary (1985), Nagoya, Japan (1986), Nice, France (1988), Washington DC, USA (1990), Hefei, China (1991), Wuerzburg, Germany (1992), Campinas, Brazil (1993), Madrid, Spain (1994), Ahmedabad, India (1995), Prague, Czech Republic (1996), Cairo, Egypt (1997), Tokyo, Japan (1998) in Chengdu, China (1999), São Paulo, Brazil (2002), Vienna, Austria (2003) in Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Lisbon, Portugal (2007), in Alushta, Ukraine (2008), Kurchatov, Kazakhstan (2009) and Vienna, Austria (2011). The 1st Costa Rican Summer School on Plasma Physics was held a week before the Joint LAWPP 2014 – 21st IAEA TM RUSFD, and the 2nd Latin American Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) was organized in parallel with the it. The objective of the AITP Workshop is to enhance the regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. The Joint LAWPP 2014 – 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held at the Crowne Plaza Corobici Hotel in San José from 27 to 31 January 2014. The LAWPP scientific programme, which was spread along the whole week, had 15 invited speakers, 126 participants from 20 countries around the world. It included 7 plenary talks, 8 invited talks and 12 oral contributed papers were chosen out of 92 submissions. 82 contributions in 25 topics were presented in poster sessions on Monday 27, Tuesday 28 and Thursday 30 January 2014. The 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held along the LAWPP 2014 from 27 to 29 January 2014 and was attended by 37 participants formally registered with the I

  6. Four Years of Practical Arrangements between IAEA and Moscow SIA 'Radon': Preliminary Results - 13061

    SciTech Connect

    Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveikin, P.P. [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries- IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) was signed between SIA 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

  7. The IAEA neutron coincidence counting (INCC) and the DEMING least-squares fitting programs

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.; Rinard, P.M.; Wenz, T.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lewis, W.; Pham, P.; Ridder, P. de [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-12-01

    Two computer programs are described: (1) the INCC (IAEA or International Neutron Coincidence Counting) program and (2) the DEMING curve-fitting program. The INCC program is an IAEA version of the Los Alamos NCC (Neutron Coincidence Counting) code. The DEMING program is an upgrade of earlier Windows{reg_sign} and DOS codes with the same name. The versions described are INCC 3.00 and DEMING 1.11. The INCC and DEMING codes provide inspectors with the software support needed to perform calibration and verification measurements with all of the neutron coincidence counting systems used in IAEA inspections for the nondestructive assay of plutonium and uranium.

  8. New Organic Stable Isotope Reference Materials for Distribution through the USGS and the IAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping

    2014-05-01

    The widespread adoption of relative stable isotope-ratio measurements in organic matter by diverse scientific disciplines is at odds with the dearth of international organic stable isotopic reference materials (RMs). Only two of the few carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) organic RMs, namely L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 [1], both available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), provide an isotopically contrasting pair of organic RMs to enable essential 2-point calibrations for ?-scale normalization [2, 3]. The supply of hydrogen (H) organic RMs is even more limited. Numerous stable isotope laboratories have resorted to questionable practices, for example by using 'CO2, N2, and H2 reference gas pulses' for isotopic calibrations, which violates the principle of identical treatment of sample and standard (i.e., organic unknowns should be calibrated directly against chemically similar organic RMs) [4], or by using only 1 anchor instead of 2 for scale calibration. The absence of international organic RMs frequently serves as an excuse for indefensible calibrations. In 2011, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded an initiative of 10 laboratories from 7 countries to jointly develop much needed new organic RMs for future distribution by the USGS and the IAEA. The selection of targeted RMs attempts to cover various common compound classes of broad technical and scientific interest. We had to accept compromises to approach the ideal of high chemical stability, lack of toxicity, and low price of raw materials. Hazardous gases and flammable liquids were avoided in order to facilitate international shipping of future RMs. With the exception of polyethylene and vacuum pump oil, all organic RMs are individual, chemically-pure substances, which can be used for compound-specific isotopic measurements in conjunction with liquid and gas chromatographic interfaces. The compounds listed below are under isotopic calibration by the 10 laboratories. Successfully calibrated organic RMs could become available as early as 2015. - n-Hexadecane (C16 n-alkane), three H, C-isotopic varieties; - Glycine (amino acid), three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - L-valine (amino acid), three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - Methyl n-heptadecanoate (methyl ester of C17 n-alkanoic fatty acid); - Methyl icosanoate (methyl ester of C20 n-alkanoic fatty acid), three H, C-isotopic varieties; - Caffeine, three H, C, N-isotopic varieties; - Hydrocarbon vacuum pump oils, two H-isotopic varieties; - Polyethylene powder, and possibly a 2H and 13C-enriched polyethylene string. [1] Qi H., Coplen T.B., Geilmann H., Brand W.A., Böhlke J.K. (2003) Two new organic reference materials for ?13C and ?15N measurements and a new value for the ?13C of NBS 22 oil. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 17, 2483-2487. [2] Coplen T.B. (1996) New guidelines for reporting stable hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope-ratio data. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 60, 3359-3360. [3] Coplen T.B., Brand W.A., Gehre M., Gröning M., Meijer H.A.J., Toman B., Verkouteren R.M. (2006) New guidelines for ?13C measurements. Analytical Chemistry 78 (7), 2439-2441. [4] Werner R.A., Brand W.A. (2001) Referencing strategies and techniques in stable isotope ratio analysis. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 15, 501-519.

  9. The IAEA Assistance Training Programme for Transport Security

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  10. The IAEA Assistance and Training Programme for Transport Security

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Mark B [ORNL] [ORNL; Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge] [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  11. The IAEA handbook on radionuclide transfer to wildlife.

    PubMed

    Howard, B J; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Telleria, D; Proehl, G; Fesenko, S; Jeffree, R A; Yankovich, T L; Brown, J E; Higley, K; Johansen, M P; Mulye, H; Vandenhove, H; Gashchak, S; Wood, M D; Takata, H; Andersson, P; Dale, P; Ryan, J; Bollhöfer, A; Doering, C; Barnett, C L; Wells, C

    2013-07-01

    An IAEA handbook presenting transfer parameter values for wildlife has recently been produced. Concentration ratios (CRwo-media) between the whole organism (fresh weight) and either soil (dry weight) or water were collated for a range of wildlife groups (classified taxonomically and by feeding strategy) in terrestrial, freshwater, marine and brackish generic ecosystems. The data have been compiled in an on line database, which will continue to be updated in the future providing the basis for subsequent revision of the Wildlife TRS values. An overview of the compilation and analysis, and discussion of the extent and limitations of the data is presented. Example comparisons of the CRwo-media values are given for polonium across all wildlife groups and ecosystems and for molluscs for all radionuclides. The CRwo-media values have also been compared with those currently used in the ERICA Tool which represented the most complete published database for wildlife transfer values prior to this work. The use of CRwo-media values is a pragmatic approach to predicting radionuclide activity concentrations in wildlife and is similar to that used for screening assessments for the human food chain. The CRwo-media values are most suitable for a screening application where there are several conservative assumptions built into the models which will, to varying extents, compensate for the variable data quality and quantity, and associated uncertainty. PMID:22513215

  12. Radiation processing of natural polymers: The IAEA contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Safrany, Agnes; Sampa, Maria Helena de O.; Ramamoorthy, Natesan

    2010-03-01

    Radiation processing offers a clean and additive-free method for preparation of value-added novel materials based on renewable, non-toxic, and biodegradable natural polymers. Crosslinked natural polymers can be used as hydrogel wound dressings, face cleaning cosmetic masks, adsorbents of toxins, and non-bedsore mats; while low molecular weight products show antibiotic, antioxidant, and plant-growth promoting properties. Recognizing the potential benefits that radiation technology can offer for processing of natural polymers into useful products, the IAEA implemented a coordinated research project (CRP) on "Development of Radiation-processed products of Natural Polymers for application in Agriculture, Healthcare, Industry and Environment". This CRP was launched at the end of 2007 with participation of 16 MS to help connecting radiation technology and end-users to derive enhanced benefits from these new value-added products of radiation-processed natural materials. In this paper the results of activities in participating MS related to this work will be presented.

  13. Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

  14. The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Containment and Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz,R.A.

    2008-06-13

    The United States Support Program (USSP) priority for containment and surveillance (US) focuses on maintaining or improving the reliability and cost-effectiveness of C/S systems for IAEA safeguards, expanding the number of systems that are unattended and remotely monitored, and developing verification methods that help streamline the on-site inspection process. Existing IAEA C/S systems have evolved to become complex, integrated systems, which may include active seals, nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments, video cameras, and other sensors. These systems operate autonomously. They send analytical data to IAEA headquarters where it can be reviewed. These systems present challenges to the goals of improved system performance, standardization, reliability, maintainability, documentation, and cost effectiveness. One critical lesson from past experiences is the need for cooperation and common objectives among the IAEA, the developer, and the facility operator, to create a successful, cost effective system. Recent USSP C/S activities include Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant safeguard systems, production of a new shift register, numerous vulnerability assessments of C/S systems, a conduit monitoring system which identifies tampering of IAEA conduit deployed in the field, fiber optic seal upgrades, unattended monitoring system software upgrades, next generation surveillance system which will upgrade existing camera systems, and support of the IAEA's development of the universal nondestructive assay data acquisition platform.

  15. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Peru.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Emma Castro; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    The tissue bank "Rosa Guerzoni Chambergo" (RGCTB) located at the Child's Health Institute was inaugurated in 1996, with the financial and technical support of the IAEA program on radiation and tissue banking. Since 1998, the biological bandage of fresh and lyophilised pigskin, amnion and bone tissue is processed routinely in this bank. In all cases, the tissue is sterilised with the use of Cobalt-60 radiation, process carried out at the Laboratories of Irradiation of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). The tissue bank in the Child's Health Institute helped to save lives in an accident occurred in Lima, when a New Year's fireworks celebration ran out of control in January 2002. Nearly 300 people died in the tragic blaze and hundreds more were seriously burned and injured. Eight Lima hospitals and clinics suddenly were faced with saving the lives of severely burned men, women and children. Fortunately, authorities were ready to respond to the emergency. More than 1,600 dressings were sterilised and supplied to Lima surgeons. The efforts helped save the lives of patients who otherwise might not have survived the Lima fire. Between 1998 and September 2007, 35,012 tissue grafts were produced and irradiated. Radiation sterilised tissues are used by 20 national medical institutions as well as 17 private health institutions. The tissue bank established in Peru with the support of the IAEA is now producing the following tissues: pigskin dressings, fresh and freeze-dried; bone allografts, chips, wedges and powdered, and amnion dressings air-dried. It is also now leading the elaboration of national standards, assignment being entrusted by ONDT (Organización Nacional de Donación y Transplantes; National Organisation on Donation and Transplant). This among other will permit the accreditation of the tissue bank. In this task is also participating IPEN. PMID:18612849

  16. IAEA programs in empowering the nuclear medicine profession through online educational resources.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Thomas Nb; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Kashyap, Ravi; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme in human health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases through the application of nuclear techniques. It has the specific mission of fostering the application of nuclear medicine techniques as part of the clinical management of certain types of diseases. Attuned to the continuous evolution of this specialty as well as to the advancement and diversity of methods in delivering capacity building efforts in this digital age, the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA has enhanced its program by incorporating online educational resources for nuclear medicine professionals into its repertoire of projects to further its commitment in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Through online educational resources such as the Human Health Campus website, e-learning modules, and scheduled interactive webinars, a validation of the commitment by the IAEA in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine is strengthened while utilizing the advanced internet and communications technology which is progressively becoming available worldwide. The Human Health Campus (www.humanhealth.iaea.org) is the online educational resources initiative of the Division of Human Health of the IAEA geared toward enhancing professional knowledge of health professionals in radiation medicine (nuclear medicine and diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical radiation physics), and nutrition. E-learning modules provide an interactive learning environment to its users while providing immediate feedback for each task accomplished. Webinars, unlike webcasts, offer the opportunity of enhanced interaction with the learners facilitated through slide shows where the presenter guides and engages the audience using video and live streaming. This paper explores the IAEA's available online educational resources programs geared toward the enhancement of the nuclear medicine profession as delivered by the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA. PMID:23561452

  17. A suggested approach to applying IAEA safeguards to plutonium in weapons components

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, M.S.; Allentuck, J.

    1998-08-01

    It is the announced policy of the United States to make fissile material removed from its nuclear weapons stockpile subject to the US-IAEA voluntary safeguards agreement. Much of this material is plutonium in the form of pits. The application of traditional IAEA safeguards would reveal Restricted Data to unauthorized persons which is prohibited by US law and international treaties. Prior to the availability of a facility for the conversion of the plutonium in the pits to a non-sensitive form this obvious long-term solution to the problem is foreclosed. An alternative near-term approach to applying IAEA safeguards while preserving the necessary degree of confidentiality is required. This paper identifies such an approach. It presents in detail the form of the US declaration; the safeguards objectives which are met; inspection techniques which are utilized and the conclusion which the IAEA could reach concerning the contents of each item and the aggregate of all items. The approach would reveal the number of containers and the aggregate mass of plutonium in a set of n containers presented to the IAEA for verification while protecting data of the isotopic composition and plutonium mass of individual components. The suggested approach provides for traceability from the time the containers are sealed until the conversion of the plutonium to a non-sensitive form.

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    E-print Network

    , Los Alamos, United States of America 2) U of Nevada, Reno, United States of America 3) Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, United States of America 4) NumerEx, Albuquerque, NM, United States of America 5) U of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States of America e-mail contact of main author: wurden

  19. Testing the validity of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety culture model.

    PubMed

    López de Castro, Borja; Gracia, Francisco J; Peiró, José M; Pietrantoni, Luca; Hernández, Ana

    2013-11-01

    This paper takes the first steps to empirically validate the widely used model of safety culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), composed of five dimensions, further specified by 37 attributes. To do so, three independent and complementary studies are presented. First, 290 students serve to collect evidence about the face validity of the model. Second, 48 experts in organizational behavior judge its content validity. And third, 468 workers in a Spanish nuclear power plant help to reveal how closely the theoretical five-dimensional model can be replicated. Our findings suggest that several attributes of the model may not be related to their corresponding dimensions. According to our results, a one-dimensional structure fits the data better than the five dimensions proposed by the IAEA. Moreover, the IAEA model, as it stands, seems to have rather moderate content validity and low face validity. Practical implications for researchers and practitioners are included. PMID:24076304

  20. JOINT UNITED STATES/IAEA PROPOSED APPROACH FOR SAFEGUARDS DURING PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND SHIPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    L. KWEI; B. SMITH; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    For safety reasons, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to stabilize and package plutonium oxide currently subject to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) beginning in the year 2001. The Hanford Site will also stabilize and package plutonium materials under IAEA safeguards. The U.S. and the IAEA began consultations in late 1996 to develop an approach to the application of safeguards during stabilization and packaging. With the plans to ship RFETS plutonium to Savannah River for interim storage prior to final disposition, this work has been extended to include safeguards during shipment. This paper will discuss the elements of a joint U.S./IAEA proposal for this task.

  1. Overview of Members States' and Iaea Activities in the Field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ads)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Plutonium recycle in fast reactors, as well as utilization/transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products in hybrid reactor systems (e.g. accelerator driven systems, ADS) offer promising nuclear fuel backend management options. Several R&D programs in various IAEA Member States are actively pursuing these options, along with the energy production and breeding mission of fast reactor systems. The paper presents an overview of the major national and international R&D programs in the area of ADS for transmutation of spent nuclear fuel. It also describes IAEA's ongoing and planned activities in this field.

  2. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters.

  3. The IAEA system and experience as a model for Information Management under the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Kempf, C.R.

    1992-09-01

    Similarities in the verification aims of the monitoring regimes of the future Organization for the Prohibition of chemical Weapons (OPCW) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), make their general data requirements similar: data are needed for planning inspections, for evaluating inspections, and for preparation of reports on compliance with the relevant treaty In this paper we discuss the legal, procedural and administrative structure behind the data system associated with IAEA safeguards, and, after comparing this to the CWC regime, suggest possible improvements for consideration during the development of national implementation programs and of the declaration and inspection data management system for the OPCW.

  4. The IAEA system and experience as a model for Information Management under the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Kempf, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Similarities in the verification aims of the monitoring regimes of the future Organization for the Prohibition of chemical Weapons (OPCW) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), make their general data requirements similar: data are needed for planning inspections, for evaluating inspections, and for preparation of reports on compliance with the relevant treaty In this paper we discuss the legal, procedural and administrative structure behind the data system associated with IAEA safeguards, and, after comparing this to the CWC regime, suggest possible improvements for consideration during the development of national implementation programs and of the declaration and inspection data management system for the OPCW.

  5. Special from encapsulation for radioactive material shipments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Special Form encapsulation has been used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to ship radioactive solids for the past fifteen years. A family of inexpensive stainless steel containers has been developed and tested to meet the USA Department of Transportation (DOT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations concerning radioactive material shipments as Special Form.

  6. IAEA Inspections for Undeclared and Declared Activities: Is a More Robust Approach Needed?

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    The United States has long supported a strong international safeguards system and for many years has served as the foremost supplier of technology, equipment, and training to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In doing so, it drew in many instances on DOE sponsored R&D and training that was directed towards domestic safeguards and then adapted for IAEA purposes. This was relatively straightforward because of the strong overlap between the development of nuclear material accountancy measures needed for both domestic and international purposes. Two factors have emerged that have made this strong reliance on domestic measures less and less able to be a source of support for the IAEA. One is the shift by the IAEA safeguards system towards detecting undeclared activities. The second is the shift of domestic attention away from nuclear material accountancy and towards physical protection. As a result, a gap in US sponsored R&D and training relevant to international safeguards has developed. The NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and the DOE NA-22 Safeguards R&D program are intended to help fill this gap and, thereby, permit the U.S. to remain as the pre-eminent supplier of technology for international safeguards purposes. In this context, IAEA challenges have been examined from the perspective of detecting the diversion of nuclear material from declared stocks; detecting undeclared production of nuclear material and activities at locations declared under INFCIRC/153; and detecting undeclared nuclear material and activities elsewhere in a state. Of these, the detection of undeclared nuclear material and activities is, perhaps, the IAEA’s most significant challenge. It is a challenge that even the international community finds difficult to meet because of the scope and the geographic scale of the problem, the technical constraints, the knowledge required, and the significant resources needed to deploy effective systems world-wide (e.g., satellite surveillance systems). The IAEA’s success in carrying out this mission hinges on its capability to evaluate the declarations made by the state for completeness, correctness, and consistency in order to detect possible indications of undeclared nuclear material and activities. Three elements go into this evaluation: (1) evaluating the internal consistency of a State’s declaration and comparing it to information gathered by IAEA inspectors on the basis of their access to the locations, facilities, sites, personnel, and documents disclosed in the state’s declarations; (2) comparison of States’ declarations with other information available to the IAEA, including the information it gathers from its review of open sources, including scientific and technical literature and data bases, trade journals, and media reports; and (3) its ability to archive, retrieve, organize, and analyze all available information for indications of potential undeclared nuclear material and activities, and, when warranted, to request states to provide further information and access in order to investigate and clarify any questions or inconsistencies.

  7. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Friederike Bostelmann

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference results. The status on the Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental VHTRC facility is also discussed. Reference results were obtained for the neutronics stand-alone cases (Ex. I-1 and Ex. I-2) using the (relatively new) Monte Carlo code Serpent, and comparisons were performed with the more established Monte Carlo codes MCNP and KENO-VI. For the thermal-fluids stand-alone cases (Ex. I-3 and I-4) the commercial CFD code CFX was utilized to obtain reference results that can be compared with lower fidelity tools.

  8. Safeguards Implementation: Establishment of Indonesian Safeguards Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Steven E [ORNL] [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL] [ORNL; Suharyanta, Suharyanta [ORNL] [ORNL; Sunaryadi, Dedi [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Under the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), U.S. National Laboratories support the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ''collaborate with international partners to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development.'' This engagement in safeguards implementation cooperation is the basis for the security and safeguards arrangement with the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BAPETEN) and includes strengthening of the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC). There are many components in a robust SSAC. While INSEP carries on its program in a holistic approach, it is more effective and efficient to address individual components, rather than the entire system at one time, with the objective of strengthening the system as a whole. Nuclear material accountancy is one of these components. Nuclear material accountancy necessitates that a State periodically take an inventory of its material and record changes. To better perform these activities, BAPETEN requested assistance with establishing a safeguards laboratory where its staff could perform independent material characterization, maintain nondestructive assay equipment, and facilitate hands-on training of BAPETEN safeguards inspectors. In compliance with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidelines and safety series documents, INSEP and BAPETEN opened the BAPETEN Safeguards Laboratory in February 2010 to provide these competencies. BAPETEN showcased these new capabilities in July 2010 at the IAEA-sponsored Regional Workshop on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Facilities where hands-on activities were held at BAPETEN's Headquarters in Jakarta using the equipment supplied by INSEP. Discussions have begun on the establishment of a security and safeguards laboratory at the BAPETEN Training Center located in Cisarua. This paper describes the many steps involved with the Safeguards Laboratory Implementation Plan from its drafting in August 2007 to the completion of the laboratory in February 2010.

  9. Synopsis : 2008 IAEA Temperature gradients are supported by cantori in chaotic fields

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    Synopsis : 2008 IAEA Temperature gradients are supported by cantori in chaotic fields S, this paper will show that chaotic fields can sup- port significant temperature gradients, despite the fact of magnetic coordinates to chaotic fields, and show that the temperature, generally a function of three

  10. 10 CFR 150.17a - Compliance with requirements of US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...with requirements of US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. 150.17a Section 150.17a Energy...AND CONTINUED REGULATORY AUTHORITY IN AGREEMENT STATES AND IN OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION...274 Continued Commission Authority in Agreement States § 150.17a Compliance...

  11. USGS Scientist Susan Hall at a 2009 IAEA Uranium Group Meeting

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Susan Hall, seen here at an IAEA Uranium Group Meeting as a co-representative of the United States, is a lead Uranium resource scientist at USGS, who specializes in identification and genesis of uranium deposits; estimation of uranium resources in the United States; and issues related to extraction,...

  12. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Hawryluk

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  13. Safety of evolutionary and innovative nuclear reactors: IAEA activities and world efforts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Saito; M. Gasparini

    2004-01-01

    'Defence in Depth' approach constitutes the basis of the IAEA safety standards for nuclear power plants. Lessons learned from the current generation of reactors suggest that, for the next generation of reactor designs, the Defence in Depth philosophy should be retained, and that its implementation should be guided by the probabilistic insights. Recent developments in the area of general safety

  14. The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Training and Human Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Queirolo,A.

    2008-06-13

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) priority of training and human resources is aimed at providing the Department of Safeguards with an appropriate mixture of regular staff and extrabudgetary experts who are qualified to meet the IAEA's technical needs and to provide personnel with appropriate instruction to improve the technical basis and specific skills needed to perform their job functions. The equipment and methods used in inspection activities are unique, complex, and evolving. New and experienced safeguards inspectors need timely and effective training to perform required tasks and to learn new skills prescribed by new safeguards policies or agreements. The role of the inspector has changed from that of strictly an accountant to include that of a detective. New safeguards procedures are being instituted, and therefore, experienced inspectors must be educated on these new procedures. The USSP also recognizes the need for training safeguards support staff, particularly those who maintain and service safeguards equipment (SGTS), and those who perform information collection and analysis (SGIM). The USSP is committed to supporting the IAEA with training to ensure the effectiveness of all staff members and will continue to offer its assistance in the development and delivery of basic, refresher, and advanced training courses. This paper will discuss the USSP ongoing support in the area of training and IAEA staffing.

  15. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaks to the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation

    ScienceCinema

    Secretary Chu

    2010-09-01

    On Sept. 14, 2009, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu addressed the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation. Chu is the first Cabinet official to discuss President Obama's nuclear security and nonproliferation agenda outside the United States since the President delivered his landmark speech in Prague in April 2009.

  16. The 1998 Australian external beam radiotherapy survey and IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audit.

    PubMed

    Huntley, R; Izewska, J

    2000-03-01

    The results of an updated Australian survey of external beam radiotherapy centres are presented. Most of the centres provided most of the requested information. The relative caseloads of various linear accelerator photon and electron beams have not changed significantly since the previous survey in 1995. The mean age of Australian LINACs is 7.1 years and that of other radiotherapy machines is 14.7 years. Every Australian radiotherapy centre participated in a special run of the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audit program, which was provided for Australian centres by the IAEA and WHO in May 1998. The dose quoted by the centres was in nearly every case within 1.5% of the dose assessed by the IAEA. This is within the combined standard uncertainty of the IAEA TLD service (1.8%). The results confirm the accuracy and precision of radiotherapy dosimetry in Australia and the adequate dissemination of the Australian standards from ARL (now ARPANSA) to the centres. The Australian standards have recently been shown to agree with those of other countries to within 0.25% by comparison with the BIPM. PMID:10921198

  17. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu speaks to the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation

    SciTech Connect

    Secretary Chu

    2009-09-15

    On Sept. 14, 2009, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu addressed the 2009 IAEA General Conference delegation. Chu is the first Cabinet official to discuss President Obama's nuclear security and nonproliferation agenda outside the United States since the President delivered his landmark speech in Prague in April 2009.

  18. IAEA-CN-80/29 EXCESS AIR IN GROUNDWATER AS A POTENTIAL INDICATOR

    E-print Network

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    IAEA-CN-80/29 EXCESS AIR IN GROUNDWATER AS A POTENTIAL INDICATOR OF PAST ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES W of Technology (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland Abstract. Dissolved noble gases in groundwater are used to reconstruct quantities can be derived from groundwater noble gas data sets: The initial air/water ratio and the pressure

  19. G. Vlad et al. 10th IAEA TM on Energetic Particles -Kloster Seeon, Germany, 8-10/10/2007 1 Particle Simulations of Alfvn Modes

    E-print Network

    Vlad, Gregorio

    G. Vlad et al. 10th IAEA TM on Energetic Particles - Kloster Seeon, Germany, 8-10/10/2007 1 General Atomics, San Diego, California, USA #12;G. Vlad et al. 10th IAEA TM on Energetic Particles sensitivity) · Conclusions #12;G. Vlad et al. 10th IAEA TM on Energetic Particles - Kloster Seeon, Germany, 8

  20. Report on intermediate results of the IAEA CRP on ‘Studies of advanced reactor technology options for effective incineration of radioactive waste’

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Maschek; A. Stanculescu; B. Arien; Y. Bai; Ch. Chabert; A. A. Chebeskov; X. Chen; D. F. da Cruz; V. Dekoussar; K. Devan; S. Dulla; V. Gopalakrishnan; O. Feynberg; R. Harish; V. Ignatiev; J. Kópházi; J. Li; E. Malambu; P. Mohanakrishnan; K. Morita; G. Pandikumar; Y. Peneliau; P. Ravetto; A. Rineiski; M. Schikorr; R. Srivenkatesan; V. Subbotin; A. Surenkov; M. Szieberth; S. Taczanowski; K. Tu?ek; P. Vertes; M. Vorotyntsev; J. Uhlí?; H. Wider; Y. Wu; R. Zakirov; S. Zheng

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 the IAEA has initiated a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste”. Major intermediate results have been obtained and will be reported here. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of IAEA’s Nuclear Energy’s Department Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, is to increase the

  1. Turning Laboratory \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Brent Jenkins

    Sometimes, a student laboratory exercise will fail. Our normal approach to such an event is to work to prevent its occurrence. Students frequently get frustrated when laboratory results differ from their expectations, and instructors may be embarrassed, disappointed, or even panic-stricken by the outcomes. Laboratory failures can provide excellent learning opportunities for students, however, if they are handled properly. Unexpected

  2. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors can affect test results, including: sex age race medical history general health specific foods drugs you are taking how closely your follow preparatory instructions variations in laboratory ...

  4. A review of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) international standards for tissue banks.

    PubMed

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Lobo Gajiwala, Astrid; Martinez Pardo, María Esther

    2012-03-01

    The IAEA International Standards for Tissue Banks published in 2003 were based on the Standards then currently in use in the USA and the European Union, among others, and reflect the best practices associated with the operation of a tissue bank. They cover legal, ethical and regulatory controls as well as requirements and procedures from donor selection and tissue retrieval to processing and distribution of finished tissue for clinical use. The application of these standards allows tissue banks to operate with the current good tissue practice, thereby providing grafts of high quality that satisfy the national and international demand for safe and biologically useful grafts. The objective of this article is to review the IAEA Standards and recommend new topics that could improve the current version. PMID:20714807

  5. NOTE: Monte Carlo simulation of correction factors for IAEA TLD holders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultqvist, Martha; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Izewska, Joanna

    2010-03-01

    The IAEA standard thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holder has been developed for the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose program for audits of high-energy photon beams, and it is also employed by the ESTRO-QUALity assurance network (EQUAL) and several national TLD audit networks. Factors correcting for the influence of the holder on the TL signal under reference conditions have been calculated in the present work from Monte Carlo simulations with the PENELOPE code for 60Co ?-rays and 4, 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV photon beams. The simulation results are around 0.2% smaller than measured factors reported in the literature, but well within the combined standard uncertainties. The present study supports the use of the experimentally obtained holder correction factors in the determination of the absorbed dose to water from the TL readings; the factors calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations may be adopted for the cases where there are no measured data.

  6. The US Support Program Assistance to the IAEA Safeguards Information Technology, Collection, and Analysis 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Tackentien,J.

    2008-06-12

    One of the United States Support Program's (USSP) priorities for 2008 is to support the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) development of an integrated and efficient safeguards information infrastructure, including reliable and maintainable information systems, and effective tools and resources to collect and analyze safeguards-relevant information. The USSP has provided funding in support of this priority for the ISIS Re-engineering Project (IRP), and for human resources support to the design and definition of the enhanced information analysis architecture project (nVision). Assistance for several other information technology efforts is provided. This paper will report on the various ongoing support measures undertaken by the USSP to support the IAEA's information technology enhancements and will provide some insights into activities that the USSP may support in the future.

  7. Enhancing tsetse fly refractoriness to trypanosome infection--a new IAEA coordinated research project.

    PubMed

    Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Bourtzis, Kostas; Weiss, Brian; Cordón-Rosales, Celia; Miller, Wolfgang; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Parker, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    To date, IAEA-supported Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) projects for tsetse and trypanosomiasis control have been in areas without human sleeping sickness, but future projects could include areas of actual or potential human disease transmission. In this context it would be imperative that released sterile tsetse flies are incompetent to transmit the disease-causing trypanosome parasite. Therefore, development of tsetse fly strains refractory to trypanosome infection is highly desirable as a simple and effective method of ensuring vector incompetence of the released flies. This new IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) focuses on gaining a deeper knowledge of the tripartite interactions between the tsetse fly vectors, their symbionts and trypanosome parasites. The objective of this CRP is to acquire a better understanding of mechanisms that limit the development of trypanosome infections in tsetse and how these may be enhanced. PMID:22841950

  8. IAEA coordinated research project on 'analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    SciTech Connect

    Ait-Abderrahim, H. [SCKCEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides the general background and the main specifications of the benchmark exercises performed within the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Dept., is to contribute to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e. heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. (authors)

  9. Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

  10. Private sector involvement in the US program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, S.E. [International Safeguards Project Office Vienna, (Austira); Epel, L.; Maise, G.; Reisman, A.; Skalyo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) relies on technical expertise found in the U. S private and public sectors. Since 1993, the international Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) has sought to increase the role of the private sector in POTAS. ISPO maintains and continues to develop a database of US companies interested in providing technical expertise to the IAEA. This database is used by ISPO to find appropriate contractors to respond to IAEA requests for technical assistance when the assistance can be provided by the private sector. The private sector is currently providing support in the development of equipment, training, and procedure preparation. POTAS also supports the work of private consultants. This paper discusses ISPO`s efforts to identify suitable vendors and discusses conditions that hinder more substantial involvement by the private sector. In addition, the paper will discuss selected projects that are currently in progress and identify common problems that impede the progress and success of tasks performed by the private sector.

  11. Fostering applications of neutron scattering techniques in developing countries: IAEA's role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjpe, Shriniwas K.; Mank, G.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2006-11-01

    Over the last 60 years research reactors have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind. Neutron scattering has been the workhorse for research and development in materials science. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactors have also been involved in using this technique. The reactors and the facilities around them have a large potential for applications, while their under-utilization has been a concern for many member states. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been supporting its member states in the enhancement of utilization of their research reactors. Technical meetings focussing on the area of current interests with potential applications are organized under the project on “effective utilization of research reactors,” e.g. on residual stress measurement, neutron reflectometry. Coordinated research projects (CRPs) bring together scientists from developed and developing countries, build collaborations, and exchange expertise and technology. The CRPs on research reactor utilization include topics like development of small-angle neutron scattering applications and development of sources and imaging systems for neutron radiography. New CRPs on the measurement of residual stress and accelerator-driven neutron sources will be initiated soon. The results from these meetings of CRPs are published as technical documents of the IAEA that would act as guidelines for capacity building for research reactor managers. This paper will present some of the salient features of IAEA activities in promoting research reactor utilization.

  12. Laboratory formularies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories face increasing costs along with increased expectation to ensure appropriate use of diagnostic tests by physicians. One administrative mechanism that has been used successfully for this purpose is the laboratory formulary. Modeled after drug formularies, this is simply a list of diagnostic tests approved for use in a particular setting, possibly including additional restrictions regarding who may order a particular test and under what circumstances. This brief review summarizes the principles underlying laboratory formularies and suggests strategies for using them effectively. PMID:24091098

  13. Rethinking Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark J. Volkmann

    2003-09-01

    Although research demonstrates the value of inquiry-based science, many curriculum materials are still based on traditional approaches that fail to engage students in inquiry. Using an example of a typical cookbook laboratory--the "rusty nail," this article describes an inquiry analysis tool and adaptation principles that were created to help teachers evaluate and adapt laboratory instructional materials to be more inquiry-oriented.

  14. International contributions to IAEA-NEA heat transfer databases for supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. K. H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Yamada, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    An IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Heat Transfer Behaviour and Thermohydraulics Code Testing for SCWRs' is being conducted to facilitate collaboration and interaction among participants from 15 organizations. While the project covers several key technology areas relevant to the development of SCWR concepts, it focuses mainly on the heat transfer aspect, which has been identified as the most challenging. Through the collaborating effort, large heat-transfer databases have been compiled for supercritical water and surrogate fluids in tubes, annuli, and bundle subassemblies of various orientations over a wide range of flow conditions. Assessments of several supercritical heat-transfer correlations were performed using the complied databases. The assessment results are presented. (authors)

  15. Department of Energy Efforts to Promote Universal Adherence to the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Kovacic, Don N.; VanSickle, Matthew; Apt, Kenneth E.

    2009-10-06

    Entry-into-force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP) in January 2009 continues to demonstrate the ongoing commitment by the United States to promote universal adherence to the AP. The AP is a critical tool for improving the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) capabilities to detect undeclared activities that indicate a clandestine nuclear weapons program. This is because States Parties are required to provide information about, and access to, nuclear fuel cycle activities beyond their traditional safeguards reporting requirements. As part of the U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification, the Administration is required to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states, as well as assistance to the IAEA to promote the effective implementation of APs in those states. A key U.S. effort in this area is being managed by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through new and existing bilateral cooperation agreements, INSEP has initiated technical assistance projects for AP implementation with selected non-weapon states. States with which INSEP is currently cooperating include Vietnam and Thailand, with Indonesia, Algeria, Morocco, and other countries as possible future collaborators in the area of AP implementation. The INSEP collaborative model begins with a joint assessment with our partners to identify specific needs they may have regarding entering the AP into force and any impediments to successful implementation. An action plan is then developed detailing and prioritizing the necessary joint activities. Such assistance may include: advice on developing legal frameworks and regulatory documents; workshops to promote understanding of AP requirements; training to determine possible declarable activities; assistance in developing a system to collect and submit declarations; performing industry outreach to raise awareness; guidance for reporting export and manufacturing of “especially designed or prepared” equipment listed in AP Annex I/Annex II; and lastly, developing indigenous capabilities to sustain AP implementation. INSEP also coordinates with the IAEA to ensure the harmonization of the assistance provided by DOE and the IAEA. This paper describes current efforts and future plans for AP international implementation support.

  16. Laboratory diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the first major goals of the microbiology laboratory is to isolate or detect clinically significant microorganisms from an affected site and, if more than one type of microorganism is present, to isolate them in approximately the same ratio as occurs in vivo. Whether an isolate is “clinically...

  17. Laboratory Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Jonathan

    The need for flexibility in science research facilities is discussed, with emphasis on the effect of that need on the design of laboratories. The relationship of office space, bench space, and special equipment areas, and the location and distribution of piping and air conditioning, are considered particularly important. This building type study…

  18. Appalachian Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

  19. Recent Data Generation Activities at the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the IAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E. H.; Humbert, D.

    2005-05-01

    The main data generation mechanism of the Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the IAEA is the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). The International Fusion Research Council Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion recommends topics for new CRPs to be initiated by the A+M Unit. A typical CRP has a lifetime of three to five years. At the start of the CRP a Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) is held with the purpose of formulating a detailed work plan. At later RCMs progress on these work plans is reported and the studies debated and expanded. At the conclusion of the CRP the results are compiled in a volume of the journal Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Numerical results are also added to the electronic database as appropriate. Normally the Unit has three to four active CRPs, and also holds Technical Meetings and invites individual Consultants to IAEA Headquarters, Vienna for specific tasks. Such activities can result in providing advice on a particular topic, on data for a particular process, or a new capability to be made widely available. Recently, consultants to the Unit have provided extensive additions to the Unit databases, as well as interfaces to run several calculational tools through the Internet. Specific examples will be presented.

  20. IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K. [Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Aksan, S. N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

  2. The IAEA CRP on Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Maschek, W.; Chen, X.; Rineiski, A.; Schikorr, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O.Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, Post Office Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Arien, B.; Malambu, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Bai, Y.; Li, J.; Wu, Y.; Zheng, S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, ASIPP, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chabert, C.; Peneliau, Y. [CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Chebeskov, A.; Dekoussar, V.; Vorotyntsev, M. [SSC-IPPE, Bondarenko Square 1, Obninsk 249033, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); da Cruz, D.F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Harish, R.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Pandikumar, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 2, 10129 Torino (Italy); Feynberg, O.; Ignatiev, V.; Subbotin, V.; Surenkov, A.; Zakirov, R. [RRC - Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kophazi, J.; Szieberth, M. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem rkp. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Morita, K. [Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Srivenkatesan, R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Taczanowski, S. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Tucek, K.; Wider, H. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Vertes, P. [Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Uhlir, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc., CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 13 (Czech Republic)

    2007-07-01

    In 2003, the IAEA has initiated the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors, is to increase the capability of Member States in developing and applying advanced technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. Twenty institutions from 15 Member States and one international organization participated in this CRP. The CRP concentrated on the assessment of the dynamic behavior of various transmutation systems. The reactor systems investigated comprise critical reactors, sub-critical accelerator driven systems with heavy liquid metal and gas cooling, critical molten salt systems, and hybrid fusion/fission systems. Both fertile and fertile-free fuel options have been investigated. Apart from the benchmarking of steady state core configurations (including the investigation of transmutation potential, burn-up behavior and decay heat of minor actinide (MA) bearing fuels), the CRP participants determined the safety coefficients for the individual systems and, in a second stage, performed transient analyses which reflected the generic safety related behavior of the various reactors types. (authors)

  3. Assay of scrap plutonium oxide by thermal neutron multiplicity counting for IAEA verification of excess materials from nuclear weapons production

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Krick, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Xiao, J.; LeMaire, R.J.; Fotin, V. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); McRae, L.; Scott, D.; Westsik, G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The US Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy commits the US to placing under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards excess nuclear materials no longer needed for the US nuclear deterrent. As of January 1,1996, the IAEA has completed Initial Physical Inventory Verification (IPIV) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant, and a plutonium storage vault at Rock Flats. Two IPIVs were performed at Hanford . This paper reports the results of thermal neutron multiplicity assay of plutonium residues during the second IPIV at Hanford. Using the Three Ring Multiplicity Counter (3RMC), measurements were performed on 69 individual cans of plutonium residues, each containing approximately 1 kg of material. Of the 69 items, 67 passed the IAEA acceptance criteria and two were selected for destructive analysis.

  4. Measurement of ²²?Ra in soil from oil field: advantages of ?-ray spectrometry and application to the IAEA-448 CRM.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, A; Katona, R; Kis-Benedek, G; Pitois, A

    2014-05-01

    The analytical performance of gamma-ray spectrometry for the measurement of (226)Ra in TENORM (Technically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) soil was investigated by the IAEA. Fast results were obtained for characterization and certification of a new TENORM Certified Reference Material (CRM), identified as IAEA-448 (soil from oil field). The combined standard uncertainty of the gamma-ray spectrometry results is of the order of 2-3% for massic activity measurement values ranging from 16500 Bq kg(-1) to 21500 Bq kg(-1). Methodologies used for the production and certification of the IAEA-448 CRM are presented. Analytical results were confirmed by alpha spectrometry. The "t" test showed agreement between alpha and gamma results at 95% confidence level. PMID:24332337

  5. Analysis of IAEA Environmental Samples for Plutonium and Uranium by ICP/MS in Support Of International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Orville T.; Olsen, Khris B.; Thomas, May-Lin P.; Garofoli, Stephanie J.

    2008-05-01

    A method for the separation and determination of total and isotopic uranium and plutonium by ICP-MS was developed for IAEA samples on cellulose-based media. Preparation of the IAEA samples involved a series of redox chemistries and separations using TRU® resin (Eichrom). The sample introduction system, an APEX nebulizer (Elemental Scientific, Inc), provided enhanced nebulization for a several-fold increase in sensitivity and reduction in background. Application of mass bias (ALPHA) correction factors greatly improved the precision of the data. By combining the enhancements of chemical separation, instrumentation and data processing, detection levels for uranium and plutonium approached high attogram levels.

  6. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  7. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY COULOMETER FOR PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Reeves, G.; Nichols, S.; Kruzner, A.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the analytical measurement capability to perform high-precision plutonium concentration measurements by controlled-potential coulometry. State-of-the-art controlled-potential coulometers were designed and fabricated by the Savannah River National Laboratory and installed in the Analytical Laboratories process control laboratory. The Analytical Laboratories uses coulometry for routine accountability measurements of and for verification of standard preparations used to calibrate other plutonium measurement systems routinely applied to process control, nuclear safety, and other accountability applications. The SRNL Coulometer has a demonstrated measurement reliability of {approx}0.05% for 10 mg samples. The system has also been applied to the characterization of neptunium standard solutions with a comparable reliability. The SRNL coulometer features: a patented current integration system; continuous electrical calibration versus Faraday's Constants and Ohm's Law; the control-potential adjustment technique for enhanced application of the Nernst Equation; a wide operating room temperature range; and a fully automated instrument control and data acquisition capability. Systems have been supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Russia, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL). The most recent vintage of electronics was based on early 1990's integrated circuits. Many of the components are no longer available. At the request of the IAEA and the Department of State, SRNL has completed an electronics upgrade of their controlled-potential coulometer design. Three systems have built with the new design, one for the IAEA which was installed at SAL in May 2011, one system for Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL) and one for the SRS Analytical Laboratory. The LANL and SRS systems are undergoing startup testing with installation scheduled for this summer.

  8. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  9. G. Vlad et al. 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, 16 -21 October 2006 -Chengdu, China -paper TH/P6-4 1 Particle Simulation Analysis of

    E-print Network

    Vlad, Gregorio

    G. Vlad et al. 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, 16 - 21 October 2006 - Chengdu, China - paper TH Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193, Japan #12;G. Vlad et al. 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, 16 - 21 an interpretation of the observed phenomenology based on nonlinear particle simulations. #12;G. Vlad et al. 21st

  10. Using Process Load Cell Information for IAEA Safeguards at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Howell, John [University of Glasgow

    2010-01-01

    Uranium enrichment service providers are expanding existing enrichment plants and constructing new facilities to meet demands resulting from the shutdown of gaseous diffusion plants, the completion of the U.S.-Russia highly enriched uranium downblending program, and the projected global renaissance in nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts verification inspections at safeguarded facilities to provide assurance that signatory States comply with their treaty obligations to use nuclear materials only for peaceful purposes. Continuous, unattended monitoring of load cells in UF{sub 6} feed/withdrawal stations can provide safeguards-relevant process information to make existing safeguards approaches more efficient and effective and enable novel safeguards concepts such as information-driven inspections. The IAEA has indicated that process load cell monitoring will play a central role in future safeguards approaches for large-scale gas centrifuge enrichment plants. This presentation will discuss previous work and future plans related to continuous load cell monitoring, including: (1) algorithms for automated analysis of load cell data, including filtering methods to determine significant weights and eliminate irrelevant impulses; (2) development of metrics for declaration verification and off-normal operation detection ('cylinder counting,' near-real-time mass balancing, F/P/T ratios, etc.); (3) requirements to specify what potentially sensitive data is safeguards relevant, at what point the IAEA gains on-site custody of the data, and what portion of that data can be transmitted off-site; (4) authentication, secure on-site storage, and secure transmission of load cell data; (5) data processing and remote monitoring schemes to control access to sensitive and proprietary information; (6) integration of process load cell data in a layered safeguards approach with cross-check verification; (7) process mock-ups constructed to provide simulated load cell data; (8) hardware and software implementation for process load cell data collection; (9) costs associated with unattended monitoring of load cells (for both operator and inspector) weighed against the potential benefits of having access to such data; (10) results from field tests of load cell data collection systems in operating facilities; and (11) use of unattended load cell data to increase efficiency of on-site inspection schedules and activities.

  11. Archimedes Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

  12. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  13. Activities of the IAEA in the area of radioactive waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenkov, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) organizational structure and activities in the field of predisposal radioactive waste managemen are described. The present activities undertaken by the Agency’s Waste Technology Section and Waste Safety Section are outlined, with the emphasis to the technical assistance to the Member States and the technology development for safe waste management practices. The three main types of documents produced by the Agency for disseminating safety requirements and rules and the technical information to the Member States are listed. The Agency’s involvement in organizing/sponsoring conferences, coordinating research programmes, providing assistance on technical projects and training of staff on waste management subjects is detailed.

  14. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung [Nuclear Data Section, NAPC Division, International Atomic Energy Agency P. O. Box 100, Vienna International Centre, AT-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-25

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  15. IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

    E-print Network

    fraction of the heating power can be removed by impurity radiation without deleterious effects on plasma] into supershot [7,8] and high internal inductance [9] plasmas. At the high electron temperatures in reactors1 IAEA-CN-69/EXP2/12 Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle

  16. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Saeid, M.; Sampa, M. H.; Ramamoorthy, N.; Güven, O.; Chmielewski, A. G.

    2007-12-01

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information.

  17. IAEA FEC Saint Petersburg, Russia, 13-18 October 2014, O. Motojima The ITER Project Construction Status

    E-print Network

    Project Construction Status IAEA FEC 13 to 18 October, 2014 Saint Petersburg, Russia Osamu Motojima Project entered into full construction Visible progress is seen at the site construction/m² The development of Remote Maintenance A large step compared to fission industry The development of the DT fuel

  18. Preliminary fact finding mission following the accident at the nuclear fuel processing facility in Tokaimura, Japan (Vienna: IAEA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kath Bhanot

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the accident on 30 September 1999 at Tokaimura, Japan the IAEA were asked from numerous sources for information regarding the accident. Thus a preliminary report has now been issued which looks at the technical information available at that time. It does not provide conclusions on the cause or the overall consequences. The report is based on

  19. International law problems for realisation of the IAEA conventions on notification and assistance in the case of a nuclear accident

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petrov

    1993-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident underscored the need for an early warning system and international assistance plan in case of a nuclear accident. Shortly after Chernobyl, two conventions were adopted under the auspices of the IAEA. The convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, in force since 1986, establishes an early warning system for all nuclear accidents whose effects might cross

  20. Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA-UNESCO intercomparison exercise at Mauritius Island

    E-print Network

    1 Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA ABSTRACT Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into a shallow lagoon on the west coast of Mauritius Island of submarine waters was characterized by significant variability and heavy isotope enrichment and was used

  1. Proceedings for IAEA 2002 CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EMPIRICAL AESTHETICS, 4-8 AUGUST 2002 TAKARAZUKA ,JAPAN

    E-print Network

    Lyons, Michael J.

    Proceedings for IAEA 2002 17th CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EMPIRICAL AESTHETICS, 4 how principles of visual psychology can be used to gain insight into these aesthetic phenomena AESTHETICS, 4-8 AUGUST 2002 TAKARAZUKA ,JAPAN VISUAL EFFECTS AND GARDEN DESIGN PRINCIPLES Below, we introduce

  2. MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES ASSOCIATED WITH RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL: TASK GROUP 4 OF THE IAEA PRISM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2011-03-02

    It is widely recognized that the results of safety assessment calculations provide an important contribution to the safety arguments for a disposal facility, but cannot in themselves adequately demonstrate the safety of the disposal system. The safety assessment and a broader range of arguments and activities need to be considered holistically to justify radioactive waste disposal at any particular site. Many programs are therefore moving towards the production of what has become known as a Safety Case, which includes all of the different activities that are conducted to demonstrate the safety of a disposal concept. Recognizing the growing interest in the concept of a Safety Case, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is undertaking an intercomparison and harmonization project called PRISM (Practical Illustration and use of the Safety Case Concept in the Management of Near-surface Disposal). The PRISM project is organized into four Task Groups that address key aspects of the Safety Case concept: Task Group 1 - Understanding the Safety Case; Task Group 2 - Disposal facility design; Task Group 3 - Managing waste acceptance; and Task Group 4 - Managing uncertainty. This paper addresses the work of Task Group 4, which is investigating approaches for managing the uncertainties associated with near-surface disposal of radioactive waste and their consideration in the context of the Safety Case. Emphasis is placed on identifying a wide variety of approaches that can and have been used to manage different types of uncertainties, especially non-quantitative approaches that have not received as much attention in previous IAEA projects. This paper includes discussions of the current results of work on the task on managing uncertainty, including: the different circumstances being considered, the sources/types of uncertainties being addressed and some initial proposals for approaches that can be used to manage different types of uncertainties.

  3. Numerical modeling of the radionuclide water pathway with HYDRUS and comparison with the IAEA model of SR 44.

    PubMed

    Merk, Rainer

    2012-02-01

    This study depicts a theoretical experiment in which the radionuclide transport through the porous material of a landfill consisting of concrete rubble (e.g., from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants) and the subsequent migration through the vadose zone and aquifer to a model well is calculated by means of the software HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2008). The radionuclides originally contained within the rubble become dissolved due to leaching caused by infiltrated rainwater. The resulting well-water contamination (in Bq/L) is calculated numerically as a function of time and location and compared with the outcome of a simplified analytic model for the groundwater pathway published by the IAEA (2005). Identical model parameters are considered. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the predictive capacity of the more simple IAEA model using HYDRUS-1D as a reference. For most of the radionuclides considered (e.g., ¹²?I, and ²³?Pu), results from applying the IAEA model were found to be comparable to results from the more elaborate HYDRUS modeling, provided the underlying parameter values are comparable. However, the IAEA model appears to underestimate the effects resulting from, for example, high nuclide mobility, short half-life, or short-term variations in the water infiltration. The present results indicate that the IAEA model is suited for screening calculations and general recommendation purposes. However, the analysis of a specific site should be accompanied by detailed HYDRUS computer simulations. In all models considered, the calculation outcome largely depends on the choice of the sorption parameter K(d). PMID:22230022

  4. Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL modified IAEA method. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, D.G.; Mensing, R.W.; Rego, J.; Weed, H.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-10-04

    A long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test was conducted on the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu and various stable elements were measured at 25 and 75/sup 0/C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The SPCF leaching results were compared with results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). Elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition were established. The LLNL and PNL leach test results appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10/sup -5/ grams of glass/cm/sup 2/ geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements. 23 figures, 12 tables.

  5. Virtual Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-04-27

    The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

  6. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  7. The Prospective Role of JAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ojima, Hisao; Dojiri, Shigeru; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Seiichiro; Nomura, Shigeo [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    JAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories was established in 2005 to take over the activities of the JNC Tokai Works. Many kinds of development activities have been carried out since 1959. Among these, the results on the centrifuge for U enrichment, LWR spent fuel reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication have already provided the foundation of the fuel cycle industry in Japan. R and D on the treatment and disposal of high-level waste and FBR fuel reprocessing has also been carried out. Through such activities, radioactive material release to the environment has been appropriately controlled and all nuclear materials have been placed under IAEA safeguards. The Laboratories has sufficient experience and ability to establish the next generation closed cycle and strives to become a world-class Center Of Excellence (COE). (authors)

  8. Strengthened IAEA Safeguards-Imagery Analysis: Geospatial Tools for Nonproliferation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pabian, Frank V [Los Alamos National Laboratory] [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    This slide presentation focuses on the growing role and importance of imagery analysis for IAEA safeguards applications and how commercial satellite imagery, together with the newly available geospatial tools, can be used to promote 'all-source synergy.' As additional sources of openly available information, satellite imagery in conjunction with the geospatial tools can be used to significantly augment and enhance existing information gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection and assessment of nonproliferation relevant activities, facilities, and programs. Foremost of the geospatial tools are the 'Digital Virtual Globes' (i.e., GoogleEarth, Virtual Earth, etc.) that are far better than previously used simple 2-D plan-view line drawings for visualization of known and suspected facilities of interest which can be critical to: (1) Site familiarization and true geospatial context awareness; (2) Pre-inspection planning; (3) Onsite orientation and navigation; (4) Post-inspection reporting; (5) Site monitoring over time for changes; (6) Verification of states site declarations and for input to State Evaluation reports; and (7) A common basis for discussions among all interested parties (Member States). Additionally, as an 'open-source', such virtual globes can also provide a new, essentially free, means to conduct broad area search for undeclared nuclear sites and activities - either alleged through open source leads; identified on internet BLOGS and WIKI Layers, with input from a 'free' cadre of global browsers and/or by knowledgeable local citizens (a.k.a.: 'crowdsourcing'), that can include ground photos and maps; or by other initiatives based on existing information and in-house country knowledge. They also provide a means to acquire ground photography taken by locals, hobbyists, and tourists of the surrounding locales that can be useful in identifying and discriminating between relevant and non-relevant facilities and their associated infrastructure. The digital globes also provide highly accurate terrain mapping for better geospatial context and allow detailed 3-D perspectives of all sites or areas of interest. 3-D modeling software (i.e., Google's SketchUp6 newly available in 2007) when used in conjunction with these digital globes can significantly enhance individual building characterization and visualization (including interiors), allowing for better assessments including walk-arounds or fly-arounds and perhaps better decision making on multiple levels (e.g., the best placement for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) video monitoring cameras).

  9. Inter-comparison of absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 therapy beam using IAEA and HPA protocols.

    PubMed

    Farai, I P; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    The absorbed dose water in a Co-60 teletherapy beam has been measured with four different standard ionisation chambers applying two codes of practice and also, with a Fricke dosimeter. Measured values agree generally within 2.3%. There is a remarkable agreement of less than 0.3% variation, between ionisation chambers NE 2561 and NE 2481 when the IAEA protocol is applied. The HPA protocol is applicable to only NE 2561 and a variation of about 1.4% was observed between measurements made with this ionisation chamber applying the two protocols. The IAEA protocol shows very accurate results. With a deviation of about 2.2%, the Frickle dosimeter appears to be the least accurate for therapy dose measurement despite its simplicity of application. PMID:11713993

  10. IAEA-CN-50/G-II-1 COMPACT IGNITION TOKAMAK PHYSICS AND

    E-print Network

    , Oak Ridge, TN, USA. ' Max-Planck-Institut ftir Plasmaphysik, Garching bci Miinchen, Federal Republic Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. ' Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. 3 Grmman Aerospace Corporation, Princeton, NJ, USA. ' Fusion Engineering Design Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  11. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [comps.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  12. Market Research Survey of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Portable MS Systems for IAEA Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Garret L.; Hager, George J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes the results for the market research survey of mass spectrometers that are deemed pertinent to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needs and strategic objectives. The focus of the report is on MS instruments that represent currently available (or soon to be) commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technology and weigh less than 400 pounds. A compilation of all available MS instruments (36 COTS and 2 R&D) is presented, along with pertinent information regarding each instrument.

  13. US technical assistance to the IAEA and the chemical weapons convection (CWC) - a review and look to the future

    SciTech Connect

    Indusi, J.; Parsick, R.J.; Reisman, A.W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper reviews the Safeguards mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and describes U.S. technical support programs. We also review the mandate of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and speculate on the technical areas where U.S. assistance may prove useful. The IAEA was organized in 1957 in response to President Eisenhower`s {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace{close_quotes} initiative presented to the UN General Assembly on December 8, 1953. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) has been organized by a Preparatory Commission (PREPCOM) to prepare for the entry-into-force of this new convention which prohibits the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons and on their destruction. The safeguards mandate of the IAEA is to carry out verifications of nuclear material pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other voluntary but legally binding agreements. U.S. technical support programs have provided and continue to provide assistance in the form of Cost-Free Experts (CFE`s), systems studies on new safeguards approaches, training, computerized information systems, and equipment for nuclear materials measurements and containment and surveillance systems. Because the CWC just recently entered into force (April 29, 1997), verification procedures of the OPCW are not yet fully developed. However, it is expected, and can already be seen for many aspects of the technical task, that there are many similarities between the verification activities of the OPCW and those carried out by the IAEA. This paper will discuss potential technical support areas that can help strengthen the OPCW. 9 refs.

  14. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Astrid Lobo Gajiwala; Jorge Morales Pedraza

    2009-01-01

    The banking of tissues such bone and skin began in India in the 1980s and 1990s. Although eye banking started in 1945 there\\u000a was little progress in this field for the next five decades. As part of the IAEA\\/RCA program to use ionising radiation for\\u000a the sterilisation of biological tissues in Asia and the Pacific Region, the Tata Memorial Hospital

  15. Certified reference material for radionuclides in fish flesh sample IAEA414 (mixed fish from the Irish Sea and North Sea)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Pham; J. A. Sanchez-Cabeza; P. P. Povinec; D. Arnold; M. Benmansour; R. Bojanowski; F. P. Carvalho; C. K. Kim; M. Esposito; J. Gastaud; C. L. Gascó; G. J. Ham; A. G. Hegde; E. Holm; D. Jaskierowicz; G. Kanisch; M. Llaurado; J. La Rosa; S.-H. Lee; L. Liong Wee Kwong; G. Le Petit; Y. Maruo; S. P. Nielsen; J.-S. Oh; B. Oregioni; J. Palomares; H. B. L. Pettersson; P. Rulik; T. P. Ryan; K. Sato; J. Schikowski; B. Skwarzec; P. A. Smedley; S. Tarján; N. Vajda; E. Wyse

    2006-01-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) for radionuclides in fish sample IAEA-414 (mixed fish from the Irish Sea and North Seas) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Nine radionuclides (40K, 137Cs, 232Th, 234U, 235U, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am) were certified for this material. Information on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals is given for six

  16. Summary report on new regulatory codes and criteria and guidelines: IAEA guidelines for WWER reactor coolant system integrity assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radim Havel

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the nuclear safety programme to assist the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the IAEA identified and ranked in total 263 safety issues for WWER-440\\/230, WWER-440\\/213 and WWER-1000\\/320 nuclear power plants, related to both design and operation. In the area of reactor coolant system integrity, 24 safety issues were identified and 15 of them ranked as

  17. Implementation of neutron counting techniques at US facilities for IAEA verification of excess materials from nuclear weapons production

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Reilly, T.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Theis, W.; Lemaire, R.J.; Xiao, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy, announced by President Clinton before the United Nations General Assembly on September 27, 1993, commits the U.S. to placing under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards excess nuclear materials no longer needed for the U.S. nuclear deterrent. As of July 1, 1995, the IAEA had completed Initial Physical Inventory Verification (IPIV) at two facilities: a storage vault in the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant containing highly enriched uranium (HOW) metal and another storage vault in the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) containing plutonium oxide and plutonium-bearing residues. Another plutonium- storage vault, located at Rocky Flats, is scheduled for the IPIV in the fall of 1995. Conventional neutron coincidence counting is one of the routinely applied IAEA nondestructive assay (ND) methods for verification of uranium and plutonium. However, at all three facilities mentioned above, neutron ND equipment had to be modified or developed for specific facility needs such as the type and configuration of material placed under safeguards. This document describes those modifications and developments.

  18. Radiation processing techniques in remediation of pollutants, and the role of the IAEA in supporting capacity building in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Saeid, S. Mohammad.; Sampa, M. H.; Safrany, A.; Sabharwal, S.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2012-08-01

    Radiation treatment, or a combination of radiation with conventional biological-chemical-physical processes, can help in the remediation of contaminated surfaces and in combating industrial chemical effluents and air pollution. The use of ionizing radiation as a powerful tool for inactivation of microbes is a valuable option to address likely threats from biohazard contamination that could be introduced either deliberately or inadvertently into areas where the public are exposed to, as well as for treatment of volatile organic compounds and similar hazardous chemical agents is an emerging development in tackling harmful pollutants. The role of the IAEA has been crucial both in supporting the development of local capabilities as well as in fostering international cooperation due to the multidisciplinary expertise required for achieving sustainable benefits. The IAEA is implementing Coordinated Research Projects, (CRP) thematic topical reviews of issues and challenges involved, and Technical Cooperation (TC) assistance in establishing and maintaining infrastructure in the MS. This paper will give an insight into the above mentioned IAEA activities, with examples of successes achieved through CRPs, as well as challenges on the road for broader dissemination of radiation processing technology for environmental remediation.

  19. Instrumental neutron activation analysis based on k 0 -standardization method as compared with other methods in the analysis of the IAEA inter-comparison test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. O. Abugassa; S. Sarmani; U. El-Ghawi

    2004-01-01

    Results of inter-comparison test organized by the IAEA are analyzed according to the contribution and performance of INAA\\u000a as non-destructive method for trace elements analysis as compared to other techniques. Several methods were employed for certifying\\u000a the biological sample (IAEA-0140) and were also compared. It is shown that NAA is the method of a good accuracy and precision.\\u000a The biological

  20. 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Herbert L.; Breizman, Boris N.

    2014-02-21

    The 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems took place in Austin, Texas (7–11 September 2011). This meeting was organized jointly with the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Theory of Plasma Instabilities (5–7 September 2011). The two meetings shared one day (7 September 2011) with presentations relevant to both groups. Some of the work reported at these meetings was then published in a special issue of Nuclear Fusion [Nucl. Fusion 52 (2012)]. Summaries of the Energetic Particle Conference presentations were given by Kazuo Toi and Boris Breizman. They respectively discussed the experimental and theoretical progress presented at the meeting. Highlights of this meeting include the tremendous progress that has been achieved in the development of diagnostics that enables the ‘viewing’ of internal fluctuations and allows comparison with theoretical predictions, as demonstrated, for example, in the talks of P. Lauber and M. Osakabe. The need and development of hardened diagnostics in the severe radiation environment, such as those that will exist in ITER, was discussed in the talks of V. Kiptily and V.A. Kazakhov. In theoretical studies, much of the effort is focused on nonlinear phenomena. For example, detailed comparison of theory and experiment on D-III-D on the n = 0 geodesic mode was reported in separate papers by R. Nazikian and G. Fu. A large number of theoretical papers were presented on wave chirping including a paper by B.N. Breizman, which notes that wave chirping from a single frequency may emanate continuously once marginal stability conditions have been established. Another area of wide interest was the detailed study of alpha orbits in a burning plasma, where losses can come from symmetry breaking due to finite coil number or magnetic field imperfections introduced by diagnostic or test modules. An important area of development, covered by M.A. Hole and D.A. Spong, is concerned with the self-consistent treatment of the induced fields that accounts for toroidally asymmetric MHD response. In addition, a significant number of studies focused on understanding nonlinear behavior by means of computer simulation of energetic particle driven instability. An under-represented area of investigation was the study of electron runaway formation during major tokamak disruptions. It was noted in an overview by S. Putvinski that electron energies in the 10–20 MeV range is to be expected during projected major disruptions in ITER and that reliable methods for mitigation of the runaway process needs to be developed. Significant recent work in the field of the disruption induced electron runaway, which was reported by J. Riemann, had been submitted to Physics of Plasmas [3]. Overall it is clear that reliable mitigation of electron runaway is an extremely important topic that is in need of better understanding and solutions.

  1. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in physics understanding of dynamics, mitigation and control of ELMs J Rice (MIT, USA): Spontaneous rotation and momentum transport in tokamak plasmas K Ida (NIFS, Japan): Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields F Jenko (IPP, Germany): Transport barriers: Recent progress in theory and simulation T Hoang (CEA, France): Internal transport barriers: Projection to ITER Every talk satisfied the objective of the meeting. A discussion period followed each invited talk in order to expand physics understandings, projection capabilities, and the direction of research around the topic. Short talks were presented by contributing speakers in addition to questions, answers, comments and discussion among the participants. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, and lively discussion took place in front of every poster. Through the meeting six invited papers and 77 contributed papers were presented in total. The final session of the meeting was devoted to summaries; R Groebner, T S Hahm and K Ida of the IAC summarized the fruits of topics 1 and 2, 3 and 5, and 4 and 6, respectively. I would like to thank Dr A Malaquias, the IAEA Scientific Secretary, for his continuous support and useful suggestions on the arrangements of the meeting. I am very grateful to the IAC members for their cooperation in selecting topics and invited speakers, and for their important advices on the meeting strategy and proceedings publication. I also wish to express my gratitude to LOC colleagues for their hard work organizing the meeting. Young students of the University of Tsukuba helped us during the meeting. Financial and personel support from JAEA and the University of Tsukuba were essential. Finally I would like to acknowledge the participants of the meeting and the referees for the present proceedings. All of the above contributions contributed to the success of the meeting. Tomonori Takizuka Editor Group photograph International Advisory Committee T Takizuka (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan: Chair) R J Groebner (General Atomics, USA) T S Hahm (Pr

  2. Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS “Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle”, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: “Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy” for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

  3. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 LASP: A Brief History of work undertaken by the Laboratory, it has been clear for some time that more office and laboratory

  4. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON Technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum: Comparison CCRI(II)-S5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhashiro, A.; Sansone, U.; Wershofen, H.; Bollhöfer, A.; Kim, C. K.; Kim, C. S.; Korun, M.; Moune, M.; Lee, S. H.; Tarjan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of mutual cooperation between the IAEA and the BIPM, the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation Section II—Measurement of Radionuclides accepted an IAEA-organized interlaboratory comparison in 2008 on the determination of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum. The study was piloted by the Chemistry Unit at the IAEA's Laboratories in Seibersdorf (Austria). This report presents the methodology applied in conducting this comparison and the results. Activity results for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234, U-235 and U-238 were reported by three national metrology institutes (NMI) and five other expert laboratories or designated institutes. Four different approaches were used to calculate the nominal value of the reported results and associated uncertainties, and the results from each individual participant were evaluated and compared with this nominal reference value. The reported evaluation of the measurement results demonstrated agreement amongst the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section II, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  5. Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations.

    PubMed

    Hochmann, R; Eisenwagner, H; Benesch, T; Hunt, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Bulyha, S; Schmitzer, C

    2011-03-01

    On 3 August 2008, five glass vials containing around 7 GBq of (240)Pu in nitric acid solution burst in a laboratory operated by the IAEA in Seibersdorf, Austria. The vials were located in a fire-proof safe in the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, and the release of the (240)Pu caused an air contamination in the room and in adjoining rooms. Immediate emergency work was carried out, which was then followed by a long period of clean-up operations. A large number of conventional individual and workplace monitoring measurements were carried out immediately after the incident and during the clean-up work. In addition, due to the fact that (240)Pu has a very low background presence in the environment, and that the IAEA laboratories operate an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry system capable of very low levels of detection of this radionuclide, a number of non-conventional measurements were made to detect (240)Pu on, for example, the photographic camera used to document the incident, on nasal swabs from the first responders, etc. Plastic beakers were left in the corridor of the controlled area to accumulate (240)Pu from precipitation to see whether it was possible to detect traces of the radionuclide. This paper presents the measurements obtained, and discusses their relevance to occupational radiation protection. PMID:21450704

  6. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-print Network

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  7. Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

    2009-03-01

    Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

  8. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular for materials selection which will have a large impact on waste disposal and recycling and in the real limits of radiation releases if indexed to the real impact on individuals and the environment given the differences in the types of radiation emitted by tritium when compared with the fission products. Round table sessions resulted in some common recommendations. The discussions also created the awareness of the need for a larger involvement of the IAEA in support of fusion safety standards development.

  9. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  10. Independent verification of a material balance at a LEU fuel fabrication plant. Program for technical assistance to IAEA safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; McSweeney, T.I.; Hartman, M.G.; Brouns, R.J.; Stewart, K.B.; Granquist, D.P.

    1977-11-01

    This report describes the application of methodology for planning an inspection according to the procedures of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and an example evaluation of data representative of low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication facilities. Included are the inspection plan test criteria, the inspection sampling plans, the sample data collected during the inspection, acceptance testing of physical inventories with test equipment, material unaccounted for (MUF) evaluation, and quantitative statements of the results and conclusions that could be derived from the inspection. The analysis in this report demonstrates the application of inspection strategies which produce quantitative results. A facility model was used that is representative of large low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication plants with material flows, inventory sizes, and compositions of material representative of operating commercial facilities. The principal objective was to determine and illustrate the degree of assurance against a diversion of special nuclear materials (SNM) that can be achieved by an inspection and the verification of material flows and inventories. This work was performed as part of the USA program for technical assistance to the IAEA. 10 figs, 14 tables.

  11. Considerations Related To Human Intrusion In The Context Of Disposal Of Radioactive Waste-The IAEA HIDRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger; Kumano, Yumiko; Bailey, Lucy; Markley, Chris; Andersson, Eva; Beuth, Thomas

    2014-01-09

    The principal approaches for management of radioactive waste are commonly termed ‘delay and decay’, ‘concentrate and contain’ and ‘dilute and disperse’. Containing the waste and isolating it from the human environment, by burying it, is considered to increase safety and is generally accepted as the preferred approach for managing radioactive waste. However, this approach results in concentrated sources of radioactive waste contained in one location, which can pose hazards should the facility be disrupted by human action in the future. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) agree that some form of inadvertent human intrusion (HI) needs to be considered to address the potential consequences in the case of loss of institutional control and loss of memory of the disposal facility. Requirements are reflected in national regulations governing radioactive waste disposal. However, in practice, these requirements are often different from country to country, which is then reflected in the actual implementation of HI as part of a safety case. The IAEA project on HI in the context of Disposal of RadioActive waste (HIDRA) has been started to identify potential areas for improved consistency in consideration of HI. The expected outcome is to provide recommendations on how to address human actions in the safety case in the future, and how the safety case may be used to demonstrate robustness and optimize siting, design and waste acceptance criteria within the context of a safety case.

  12. An Overview of IAEA Activities to Support Pre-disposal Management of Radioactive Wastes in Member States - 12334

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Samanta, Susanta; Drace, Zoran; Ojovan, Michael [Waste Technology Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, Wagramerstasse, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promotes safe and effective management of radioactive waste and has suitable programmes in place to serve the needs of Member States in this area. These programmes cover the development and use of safety standards, planning, technologies and approaches needed for the management of different types of radioactive waste, resulting both from the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications. In the pre-disposal area, the assistance to Members States covers a wide range of topics, including policy and strategy, inventory assessment, technologies and approaches for waste minimization, selection of technical options for waste processing and storage, improvement in operating practices at nuclear facilities, optimization of waste management capacity, etc. and is delivered through the publication of technical guidance documents, coordinated research projects, networks, technical cooperation projects and organization of training and technical review services. This report presents an overview of recent IAEA accomplishments aiming to support activities in pre-disposal management of radioactive waste with focus on technological aspects. (authors)

  13. PREFACE: 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebner, Richard

    2004-05-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains invited and contributed papers presented at the 9th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego, California, on 24-26 September, 2003, and it was organized by General Atomics. As has been the tradition at the last four meetings of this series, the programme was sub-divided into six topics. For each topic there was an invited talk whose purpose was to give an overview of the topic, based on contributed papers presented at the meeting and on external results. These talks were followed by discussion periods, which were used for extended question and answer sessions for the invited speakers or for additional short presentations by contributing speakers. For each topic there was an associated poster session for contributed papers, of which there were about 70. The topics were: Structure and dynamics of internal transport barriers Structure and dynamics of the H-mode pedestal Understanding transport barriers through modelling Control of transport barriers Transport within transport barriers: theorist's view of the future Diagnostic and analysis issues for transport barriers The topics were focused on the physics of edge and core transport barriers. Similar to the previous meeting, held in Toki, Japan, the universality of this physics in axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric machines was featured. In addition, the physics of transport barriers in relation to burning plasma experiments was emphasized. In particular, one of the hopes and goals of the participants is that the physics of transport barriers can be used to enhance the prospects for burning plasmas. Because this meeting occurred approximately 21 years after the discovery of the H-mode in 1982, a special session was held to commemorate more than 20 years of research on transport barriers. In this session, Dr R Stambaugh and Professor K Itoh presented personal views on the implications of the discovery and memories of the early days of H-mode research. In addition, Dr F Wagner, the leader of the team that published the seminal paper announcing the discovery of the H-mode, prepared remarks that were presented by Dr Stambaugh. The discovery of the H-mode provided great hope that a fusion reactor could be developed and opened the door to the field of transport barriers, a field that was beyond the dreams of most researchers in 1982. The selection of topics and invited speakers and general organization of the scientific programme were carried out by the International Programme Committee, consisting of: S Lebedev (Ioffe, Russia) K Ida (NIFS, Japan) T Takizuka (JAERI, Japan) G Saibene (EFDA, Germany) W Suttrop (IPP, Germany) M Greenwald (MIT, USA) E Synakowski (PPPL, USA) R Groebner (GA, USA) I am very grateful to the committee members for their work and advice on the preparation of the meeting. In addition, I express deep thanks to Dr Punit Gohil, the Chair of the Local Organizing Committee, and to Lupe Cerda, the Conference Coordinator, who very ably took care of numerous details related to the organization of the meeting.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: the Fusion Laboratories facilities and mission, including the recent tokamak experiments which resulted in the production of more than 9 million watts of thermonuclear energy.

  15. Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    CH369T Biotechnology Laboratory Spring 2012 Instructor: Dr. Gene McDonald Office: WEL 3.270C Phone, and at the same time to introduce you to issues associated with various biotechnology laboratory operations. After

  16. An Electronics "Unit Laboratory"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, E. R.; Penton, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a laboratory teaching technique in which a single topic (in this case, bipolar junction transistors) is studied over a period of weeks under the supervision of one staff member, who also designs the laboratory work. (MLH)

  17. The Microscale Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipp, Arden P.

    1990-01-01

    The materials needed and the procedures used in three microscale chemical laboratory experiments are detailed. Included are a microscale organic synthesis, a two-step synthetic sequence for the microscale organic laboratory, and a small-scale equilibrium experiment. (CW)

  18. Determination of environemtal radioactivity at two different concentration levels. Results of two recent IAEA intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suschny, O.

    1984-06-01

    In two recent intercomparisons, the performance of laboratories in the determination of radionuclides in environmental materials and in food was again investigated. The first dealt with stroniium isotopes and 137Cs in liquid milk at levels of nanocuries per litre, the second with the same radionuclides and others in fresh water, at levels of picocuries per litre. In both intercomparisons the results could be compared with known input values. Thirty-two laboratories from 14 countries participated in the milk intercomparison. Except for 137Cs, the number of outlying results was small (6%). The standard deviation was highest for 89Sr (54%). The differences of the overall means from the input values were not significant. In the second intercomparison, 32 laboratories from 19 countries returned 108 results. The lower concentration level led to a wider scatter of the data, 20% had to be rejected, the average standard deviation was 32% and the average difference of the overall means from the input values 28%. The positive bias found for all the radionuclides was probably due to incomplete separations. In conclusion 90Sr and 137Cs were adequately determined in the first intercomparisons (higher concentration), 89Sr was not. At the lower concentration level used in the second intercomparison, all the radionuclides investigated, except tritium, were found to present analytical problems.

  19. Employment at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

    2007-04-01

    Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

  20. FORMULARY FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    FORMULARY FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS SECOND EDITION Compiled by C. TERRANCE HAWK PhD, DVM, Dipl. ACLAM STEVEN L. LEARY DVM, Dipl. ACLAM In association with the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and safety. In many clinical situations, laboratory animal veterinarians do not have available approved drugs

  1. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  2. The Canfranc Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; García, E.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortíz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the forthcoming enlargement of the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) which will allow to host new international Astroparticle Physics experiments and therefore to broaden the European underground research area. The new Canfranc Underground Laboratory will operate in coordination (through the ILIAS Project) with the Gran Sasso (Italy), Modane (France) and Boulby (UK) underground laboratories.

  3. The Canfranc Underground Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Amaré; B. Beltrán; J. M. Carmona; S. Cebrián; E. García; I. G. Irastorza; H. Gómez; G. Luzón; M. Martínez; J. Morales; A. Ortíz de Solórzano; C. Pobes; J. Puimedón; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; M. L. Sarsa; L. Torres; J. A. Villar

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the forthcoming enlargement of the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) which will allow to host new international Astroparticle Physics experiments and therefore to broaden the European underground research area. The new Canfranc Underground Laboratory will operate in coordination (through the ILIAS Project) with the Gran Sasso (Italy), Modane (France) and Boulby (UK) underground laboratories.

  4. Theme: Laboratory Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Thomas H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A series of theme articles discuss setting up laboratory hydroponics units, the school farm at the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico, laboratory experiences in natural resources management and urban horticulture, the development of teaching labs at Derry (PA) High School, management of instructional laboratories, and industry involvement in agricultural…

  5. Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Sentis, Luis

    Oussama Khatib Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305, USA khatib@cs.stanford.edu Oliver Brock Laboratory for Perceptual Robotics Department of Computer Luis Sentis Sriram Viji Robotics Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Stanford

  6. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  8. Laboratory Equipment Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    Requirements for planning, designing, constructing and installing laboratory furniture are given in conjunction with establishing facility criteria for housing laboratory equipment. Furniture and equipment described include--(1) center tables, (2) reagent racks, (3) laboratory benches and their mechanical fixtures, (4) sink and work counters, (5)…

  9. New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL`s interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL`s status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL`s small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide.

  10. A laboratory perspective on environmental laboratory certification

    SciTech Connect

    Herdlick, M.J. [Aqua Tech Environmental Labs., Inc., Marion, OH (United States)

    1996-11-01

    With the approach of the end of the millennium, one issue stands at the forefront in the minds of politicians, scholars, and the world in general: The constant need and desire to protect, to beautify, and to heal the environment and the earth`s resources. A crucial and integral part of this plan is the environmental testing laboratory which, for the most part, bursted into existence with the formation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the 1970`s. The need for good quality labs is an on-going concern since the federal and state regulations are constantly in a state of flux. Just like any other business sector, the laboratory is monitored by its peer groups including its respective clients, state authorities, and regional EPA personnel through the process of accreditation and certification. Unfortunately, the laboratory certification program for environmental laboratories is a complicated process since no true national program exists that blankets the entire regulatory dilemma. It is the purpose of my poster session to discuss the current state of the formal laboratory certification process for a typical testing laboratory that operates in many states for a wide variety of clients.

  11. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them DG (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start optimisation processes in Latin America (LA); several countries or even particular institutions have values much higher than the 3 mGy. The main issues to address are lack of well-established quality assurance programmes for mammography, not enough medical physicists with training in mammography, an increase in patient doses with the introduction of digital equipment and to create awareness on radiation risk and optimisation strategies. PMID:24993012

  12. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  13. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Development and validation of a model for tritium accumulation by a freshwater bivalve using the IAEA EMRAS scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Inoue, Y.; Takeda, H.; Yanagisawa, K.; Fuma, S.; Ishii, N.; Kuroda, N. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Yankovich, T.; Kim, S. B.; Davis, P. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2008-07-15

    A six-compartment metabolic model for tritium accumulation by bivalves was developed and validated using two observed data sets supplied in an international IAEA program for validation of environmental models, EMRAS (Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety, 2003-2007). The data observed were presented in scenarios for model prediction of temporal change of HTO and OBT concentrations in Barnes mussels (Elliptio complanata). In the Uptake Scenario, mussels were transplanted from a site with background tritium concentrations into a lake, which has historically received tritium inputs over time from up-gradient waste management areas. Another data set was presented in the Depuration Scenario for model prediction of the temporal decrease in HTO and OBT concentrations in the mussels following transplantation from the lake into another lake with significantly lower tritium levels. The model simulation was able to reproduce the observation that the amount of hydrogen taken from sediment was very small compared with that taken from lake water. (authors)

  15. Use of IAEA's phase-space files for the implementation of a clinical accelerator virtual source model.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Alexis; Carletti, Claudia; Cravero, Walter; Strbac, Bojan

    2014-03-01

    In the present work, phase-space data files (phsp) provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for different accelerators were used in order to develop a Virtual Source Model (VSM) for clinical photon beams. Spectral energy distributions extracted from supplied phsp files were used to define the radiation pattern of a virtual extended source in a hybrid model which is completed with a virtual diaphragm used to simulate both electron contamination and the shape of the penumbra region. This simple virtual model was used as the radiation source for dosimetry calculations in a water phantom. The proposed model proved easy to build and test, and good agreement with clinical accelerators dosimetry measurements were obtained for different field sizes. Our results suggest this simple method could be useful for treatment planning systems (TPS) verification purposes. PMID:23932845

  16. MEETING REPORT: IAEA Meeting: International Conference of National Regulatory Authorities with Competence in the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Englefield

    2001-01-01

    Buenos Aires, 11-15 December 2000 The meeting was the outcome of one of the actions arising from an IAEA sponsored meeting held in Dijon in 1998 on these issues. The action plan included inter alia the production of a `Code of Conduct' (published December 2000), the production of a scheme for the `Categorisation of Sources' (published December 2000) and a

  17. Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to IAEA and Director General The Nobel Peace Prize for 2005 has been awarded to the International Atomic

    E-print Network

    Pesic, Batric

    Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to IAEA and Director General The Nobel Peace Prize for 2005 has beenBaradei, for their work for a safer and more peaceful world. The Prize was announced on October 7 and will be presented at a ceremony in Oslo, Norway, on December 10. "The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace

  18. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

    2009-03-23

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

  19. 3. Blackwell et al., Proc. 9th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Contr. Nucl. Fusion (Balti-more), IAEA, Vienna, ~, 227 (1983).

    E-print Network

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    1983-01-01

    3. Blackwell et al., Proc. 9th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Contr. Nucl. Fusion (Balti- more. Pogutse, in: Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, IAEA, Vienna, Vol. 2, 69 (1985). 6. Contr. Fusion and Plasma Physics, Budapest, Vol. I (!985), p. 38. 8~ M. Murakami et al., Plasma Physics

  20. Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  1. SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ................................................................................................................................7 Other TAMU and SIEM Offshore Policies and Programs

  2. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------3 LASP: A Brief History clear for some time that more office and laboratory space has been (and certainly will be) necessary. We

  3. National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    E-print Network

    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University 2008 Graduate Studies, sometimes within fractions of seconds. Experimental groups use the world leading capabilities of cyclotrons at

  4. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for medical laboratory assistant is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each…

  5. Etiquette in the laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Ogborn

    1976-01-01

    The author offers, for those newly entering laboratory society, a simple guide to the proprieties and niceties of conduct therein. Customs dealt with include: making an entry to the laboratory; its arrangement and the nature of the tasks it provides; the proper manner of discovering the nature of those tasks; the fashion after which it is appropriate to regard the

  6. Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream processing-bioseparations.…

  7. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  8. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  9. Laboratory for Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A review is made of the activities of the Laboratory for Oceans. The staff and the research activities are nearly evenly divided between engineering and scientific endeavors. The Laboratory contributes engineering design skills to aircraft and ground based experiments in terrestrial and atmospheric sciences in cooperation with scientists from labs in Earth sciences.

  10. TARDEC's robotics laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Gorsich; Grant R. Gerhart; Paul L. Muench

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) recently opened a 5000 square foot robotics laboratory known as the TARDEC Robotics Laboratory. The focus of the lab is on robotics research, both basic and applied, in the area of robot mobility. Mobility is the key problem for light weight robotic systems, and the TARDEC Robotics Lab will develop

  11. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Technical Report Number 692 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-692 ISSN 1476-2986 Toward Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely available via This technical report describes an experimental syllabus proposal that was developed for the Cambridge Computer

  12. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  13. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-print Network

    and a photographic laboratory; four Yt-acre ex- perimental ponds and a salt-water pumping system for the ponds; a greenhouse for growing algae; a combina- tion shop and pumphouse; a guesthouse and laboratory for visiting as a basis for maximum possible yields; (2) to develop techniques of shellfish cultivation that will lead

  14. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  15. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  16. LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBERTS, HERMESE E.

    THE LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY WAS ESTABLISHED TO IMPROVE READING ABILITY AND OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS AS AN AID IN THE PREVENTION OF DROPOUTS. THE LABORATORY WAS OPERATED ON A SUMMER SCHEDULE WITH A FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF FROM 45 MINUTES TO 2 1/2 HOURS DAILY. ALL PUPILS WERE 14 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, AND EXPRESSED A DESIRE TO IMPROVE THEIR READING…

  17. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Sewell, Peter

    Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/TechReports/ Series editor: Markus, and to reduce device time-to- market it will be important to make code development relatively straightforward. The AutoHAN project in the Cambridge Computer Laboratory [SGG01, BH01] is investigating various aspects

  18. Robotics laboratory exercises

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Krotkov

    1996-01-01

    The authors report new laboratory exercises in robotic manipulation, computer vision, artificial intelligence, and mechatronics, four areas that are central to any robotics curriculum. The laboratory exercises supply the student with hands-on experience that complements classroom lectures and software development. Through this experience, the student confronts the hard realities of robot systems and learns to deal with them. Such hands-on

  19. Practical Laboratory Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. R.

    This book is intended as a guide for people who are planning chemistry and physics research laboratories. It deals with the importance of effective communication between client and architect, the value of preliminary planning, and the role of the project officer. It also discusses the size and layout of individual laboratories, the design of…

  20. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  1. MATERIALS FOR ISOTOPE LABORATORIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Von Erichsen

    1960-01-01

    Isotope laboratories are more fastidious than conventional chemical ; laboratories with respect to the choice of suitable working materials. There ; are, however, materials with outstanding properties available. Numerous ; materials such as wood, steel, tiles, plastics (PVC, polyethylene, polypropylene, ; PTFE) and many others are compared with respect to their existing propenties as ; construction materials; in particular with

  2. Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    and extensive track record of success in nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT/ NDE) of critical componentsArgonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies NDE #12;Over45yearsexperienceinNondestructiveEvaluation... Argonne National Laboratory's world-renowned researchers have a proven

  3. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  4. Total skin electron therapy (TSET): A reimplementation using radiochromic films and IAEA TRS-398 code of practice

    SciTech Connect

    Schiapparelli, P.; Zefiro, D.; Massone, F.; Taccini, G. [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, via A. Volta 8, 16128 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to present an updated implementation of total skin electron therapy (TSET) using IAEA TRS-398 code of practice for absolute dosimetry and taking advantage of the use of radiochromic films. The optimization of quality control tests is also included. Methods: A Varian 2100 C/D linear accelerator equipped with the special procedure HDTSe{sup -} (high dose rate total skin electron mode, E=6 MeV) was employed to perform TSET irradiations using the modified Stanford technique. The commissioning was performed following the AAPM report 23 recommendations. In particular, for dual-field beams irradiation, the optimal tilt angle was investigated and the dose distribution in the treatment plane was measured. For a complete six dual-field beams irradiation, the treatment skin dose on the surface of a cylindrical phantom was evaluated by radiochromic films and the B factor which relates the single dual-field skin dose to the six dual-field skin dose was assessed. Since the TRS-398 reference conditions do not meet the requirements of TSET absolute dosimetry, GafChromic EBT films were also employed to check and validate the application of the protocol. Simplified procedures were studied to verify beam constancy in PMMA phantoms without the more difficult setup of total skin irradiation. Results: The optimized geometrical setup for dual-field beams was: Tilt angle={+-}19 deg., SSD=353 cm, and the beam degrader (200x100x1 cm{sup 3}) placed at 320 cm from the source. As regards to dose homogeneity in the treatment plane, for dual-field beams irradiation, the mean relative dose value was 97%{+-}5% (normalizing to 100% at the calibration point level). For six dual-field beams irradiation, the multiplication factor B was 2.63. In addition, beam quality, dose rate, and bremsstrahlung contribution were also suitable for TSET treatments. The TRS-398 code of practice was used for TSET dosimetry, as dose measurements performed by ionization chamber and radiochromic film agreed within 2.5%. Simplified quality control tests and baseline values were presented in order to check flatness, symmetry, and field size with radiochromic films and output and beam quality constancy with ionization chamber. Short-term reproducibility and MU linearity tests were also included. Conclusions: Commissioning parameters met the requirements of TSET treatments and the matching of AAPM guidelines with the IAEA code of practice was successful. Frequent beam performance controls can be easily performed through the presented quality assurance tests. Radiochromic dosimetry facilitated the TSET commissioning and played a major role to validate the application of TRS-398.

  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

  6. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOEpatents

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  7. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

  8. Bilateral comparison COOMET.RI(I)-S2 of the air-kerma standards of the IAEA and the VNIIM, Russian Federation in medium energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czap, L.; Gomola, I.; Oborin, A. V.; Villevalde, A. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A bilateral comparison has been made between the air-kerma standards of the IAEA and the VNIIM in the medium-energy x-ray range. The results show the standards to be in agreement at the level of the stated standard uncertainty for the comparison of 4.1 parts in 103. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer chamber, is expressed as a ratio of the IAEA and the VNIIM standards for air kerma, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Ecosystems in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madders, M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the materials and laboratory techniques for the study of food chains and food webs, pyramids of numbers and biomass, energy pyramids, and oxygen gradients. Presents a procedure for investigating the effects of various pollutants on an entire ecosystem. (GS)

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - CORVALLIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Research Laboratory - Corvallis is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's - national research center for terrestrial and watershed ecology, aquatic ecoregions, and for the ecological effects of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric p...

  11. Laboratory Heat Recovery System

    E-print Network

    Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    . This facility consists of offices, laboratories and pilot plant areas dedicated to research and develop ment of new methods to be utilized in the explora tion, production and processing of oil and petro chemicals. Gross floor areas in square feet...

  12. Microcontrollers in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ron

    1989-01-01

    Described is the use of automated control using microcomputers. Covers the development of the microcontroller and describes advantages and characteristics of several brands of chips. Provides several recent applications of microcontrollers in laboratory automation. (MVL)

  13. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    E-print Network

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  14. Physics Laboratory in UEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Tohru; Nakamura, Jin; Suzuki, Masaru

    All the first-year students in the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) take "Basic Physics I", "Basic Physics II" and "Physics Laboratory" as required subjects; Basic Physics I and Basic Physics II are calculus-based physics of mechanics, wave and oscillation, thermal physics and electromagnetics. Physics Laboratory is designed mainly aiming at learning the skill of basic experimental technique and technical writing. Although 95% students have taken physics in the senior high school, they poorly understand it by connecting with experience, and it is difficult to learn Physics Laboratory in the university. For this reason, we introduced two ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems of Physics Laboratory to support students'learning and staff's teaching. By using quantitative data obtained from the ICT systems, we can easily check understanding of physics contents in students, and can improve physics education.

  15. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  16. Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    E-print Network

    facilities, such as the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant for the vitrification of Hanford is a critical facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supporting environmental, nuclear, national and development. Capabilities include comprehensive nuclear counting instrumentation radionuclide separations

  17. Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-02

    This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

  18. Safer Science: Laboratory Relocation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ken Roy

    2008-10-01

    The movement of hazardous chemicals found in high school science laboratories and chemical storerooms can be risky business due to the increased likelihood of an accidental spill, contamination, or other type of mishap. Prudent safety planning and practice need to be addressed in order to eliminate or minimize the potential for chemical incidents. Giving thought to the guidelines outlined in this article will help initiate the process of moving chemical inventories within and between school laboratories and storerooms.

  19. Laboratory of Population Genetics

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Population Genetics (LPG) utilizes genetic analysis to gain insight into human biologic processes. Until recently, genetic dissection of phenotypes had been largely limited to investigations in experimental organisms. The dawn of the post-genome era presents the opportunity to extend these investigations to humans. It is the major goal of this laboratory to exploit emerging resources and technology in order to understand the genetic basis of the complex phenotypes related to human cancer.

  20. Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    CGR’s high throughput laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and automation systems for a large number of applications. CGR supports DCEG in all stages of cancer research from planning to publishing, including experimental design and project management, sample handling, genotyping and sequencing assay design and execution, development and implementation of bioinformatic pipelines, and downstream scientific research and analytical support.

  1. Theory and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Alcock, Charles; Allamandola, Lou; Chevalier, Roger A.; Cline, David B.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Fall, S. Michael; Ferland, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    Science opportunities in the 1990's are discussed. Topics covered include the large scale structure of the universe, galaxies, stars, star formation and the interstellar medium, high energy astrophysics, and the solar system. Laboratory astrophysics in the 1990's is briefly surveyed, covering such topics as molecular, atomic, optical, nuclear and optical physics. Funding recommendations are given for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Department of Energy. Recommendations for laboratory astrophysics research are given.

  2. Estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis: factors for use with the UK, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R; Young, K C; van Engen, R E

    2011-01-21

    A formalism is proposed for the estimation of mean glandular dose for breast tomosynthesis, which is a simple extension of the UK, European and IAEA protocols for dosimetry in conventional projection mammography. The formalism introduces t-factors for the calculation of breast dose from a single projection and T-factors for a complete exposure series. Monte Carlo calculations of t-factors have been made for an imaging geometry with full-field irradiation of the breast for a wide range of x-ray spectra, breast sizes and glandularities. The t-factors show little dependence on breast glandularity and tables are provided as a function of projection angle and breast thickness, which may be used for all x-ray spectra simulated. The T-factors for this geometry depend upon the choice of projection angles and weights per projection, but various example calculations gave values in the range 0.93-1.00. T-factors are also provided for the Sectra tomosynthesis system, which employs a scanned narrow-beam imaging geometry. In this quite different configuration, the factor (denoted T(S)) shows an important dependence on breast thickness, varying between 0.98 and 0.76 for 20 and 110 mm thick breasts, respectively. Additional data are given to extend the current tabulations of g-, c- and s-factors used for dosimetry of conventional 2D mammography. PMID:21191150

  3. Comparisons of the Codes of Practice IAEA TRS 277 and TRS 398: High Energy Photons and Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Castillo, J. G.; Torres-Calderón, A.; Fragoso-Valdéz, F. R.; Álvarez-Romero, J. T.

    2004-09-01

    This work presents the calibration for: 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15 and 18 MeV electron beams, also to 6 and 15 MV photons beams. Beams that are generated by an accelerator Elekta Linac SL 18. The calibration is performed in terms of absorbed dose to water Dw. It is determined by two different protocols: the code of practice of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) TRS 277 for ionization chambers calibrated on air kerma NK, and the code of practice TRS 398 for ionization chambers calibrated on absorbed dose to water ND,W. Two independent dosimeters were used with two ionization chambers each one, respectively. The first one, a dosimeter PTW model UNIDOS with Markus type chamber (plane parallel) for electrons, and Farmer type chamber (cylindrical) for photons, both chambers calibrated in NK. The second dosimeter Scanditronix model DOSE 1 with plane parallel chamber (electrons) and cylindrical chamber (photons), both chambers calibrated in terms of ND,W. In the case of photon beams, the TPR was measured for 6 and 15 MV, also the profiles were determined in order to verify the flatness and symmetry of the beam: ±3%. The quality for electrons beams were estimated by means of the Dmax, R80, R50 and Rp. The results obtained for the absorbed dose quotients DW,Q(dmax)277398 are: Electrons, 0.976? DW,Q(dmax)277398? 1.001; Photons: 1.001 ? DW,Q(dmax)277398 ? 1.003.

  4. Joint IDF-IUPAC-IAEA(FAO) interlaboratory validation for determining aflatoxin M1 in milk by using immunoaffinity clean-up before thin-layer chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Grosso; J. M. Fremy; S. Bevis; S. Dragacci

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted under the auspices of the International Dairy Federation (IDF), the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a collaborative Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) body fully to validate a method combining immunoaffinity clean-up to thin-layer chromatography for the determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk. Work was done

  5. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the NK- and NX- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  6. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the N(K)- and N(X)- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  7. Program of technical assistance to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons - lessons learned from the U.S. program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency is sponsoring a technical study of the requirements of a vehicle to meet the OPCW`s future needs for enhanced chemical weapons verification capabilities. This report provides information about the proven mechanisms by which the U.S. provided both short- and long-term assistance to the IAEA to enhance its verification capabilities. Much of the technical assistance has generic application to international organizations verifying compliance with disarmament treaties or conventions. In addition, some of the equipment developed by the U.S. under the existing arrangements can be applied in the verification of other disarmament treaties or conventions. U.S. technical assistance to IAEA safeguards outside of the IAEA`s regular budget proved to be necessary. The U.S. technical assistance was successful in improving the effectiveness of IAEA safeguards for its most urgent responsibilities and in providing the technical elements for increased IAEA {open_quotes}readiness{close_quotes} for the postponed responsibilities deemed important for U.S. policy objectives. Much of the technical assistance was directed to generic subjects and helped to achieve a system of international verification. It is expected that the capabilities of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to verify a state`s compliance with the {open_quotes}Chemical Weapons Convention{close_quotes} will require improvements. This report presents 18 important lessons learned from the experience of the IAEA and the U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), organized into three tiers. Each lesson is presented in the report in the context of the difficulty, need and history in which the lesson was learned. Only the most important points are recapitulated in this executive summary.

  8. Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Biology Laboratory Cellular Informatics Laboratory Cellular Memory Laboratory Associate Chief Scientist Chemistry Laboratory Synthetic Cellular Chemistry Laboratory Antibiotics Laboratory Cellular Dynamics Research Unit Special Research Units Viral Infectious Diseases Unit Cellular & Molecular Biology Unit Chief

  9. Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Biology Laboratory Cellular Informatics Laboratory Cellular Memory Laboratory Associate Chief Scientist Chemistry Laboratory Synthetic Cellular Chemistry Laboratory Antibiotics Laboratory Cellular Dynamics Initiative Research Unit Special Research Units Viral Infectious Diseases Unit Cellular & Molecular Biology

  10. Chief Scientist Labs Computational Astrophysics Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Biology Laboratory Cellular Informatics Laboratory Cellular Memory Laboratory Associate Chief Scientist Chemistry Laboratory Synthetic Cellular Chemistry Laboratory Antibiotics Laboratory Cellular Dynamics Research Units Viral Infectious Diseases Unit Cellular & Molecular Biology Unit Research Groups

  11. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John U [BNL; Jo, Jae H [BNL; Sellen, Joana [U.S. DOE/NNSA; Wonder, Edward [QINETIQ-NORTH AMERICA

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to cover the situations that these labs, which respectively represent nuclear weapons labs, nuclear energy labs, and science labs and environmental management sites, would encounter during a complementary access. Each of the three labs hosted a mock complementary access activity, which included mock inspectors from the BNL-LANL team. In addition to reviewing the draft declarations from each of the host labs, the BNL-LANL team conducted open source research in a manner similar to what IAEA inspectors would do to research the activities at a location and prepare questions for the location to answer and that would be the focus of a complementary access. The host labs and other labs attending the training found the training to be extremely useful and helpful in making sure that each lab's Additional Protocol team had made correct declarations of nuclear activities, had properly trained staff ready to host and answer IAEA inquiries, and would implement managed access during a complementary access that would provide access by the IAEA team to resolve questions or inconsistencies about a particular declaration and still protect the information addressed by Articles 1 and 7 of the U.S. AP.

  12. Laboratory safety handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, E.L.; Watterson, C.A.; Chemerys, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Safety, defined as 'freedom from danger, risk, or injury,' is difficult to achieve in a laboratory environment. Inherent dangers, associated with water analysis and research laboratories where hazardous samples, materials, and equipment are used, must be minimized to protect workers, buildings, and equipment. Managers, supervisors, analysts, and laboratory support personnel each have specific responsibilities to reduce hazards by maintaining a safe work environment. General rules of conduct and safety practices that involve personal protection, laboratory practices, chemical handling, compressed gases handling, use of equipment, and overall security must be practiced by everyone at all levels. Routine and extensive inspections of all laboratories must be made regularly by qualified people. Personnel should be trained thoroughly and repetitively. Special hazards that may involve exposure to carcinogens, cryogenics, or radiation must be given special attention, and specific rules and operational procedures must be established to deal with them. Safety data, reference materials, and texts must be kept available if prudent safety is to be practiced and accidents prevented or minimized.

  13. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory...

  14. Safety in Laboratories: Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ajaz; Farooq, A. Jan; Qadri, GJ; S. A., Tabish

    2008-01-01

    Health and safety in clinical laboratories is becoming an increasingly important subject as a result of emergence of highly infectious diseases such as Hepatitis and HIV. A cross sectional study was carried out to study the safety measures being adopted in clinical laboratories of India. Heads of laboratories of teaching hospitals of India were subjected to a standardized, pretested questionnaire. Response rate was 44.8%. only 60% of laboratories had person in-charge of safety in laboratory. Seventy three percent of laboratories had safety education program regarding hazards. In 91% of laboratories staff is using protective clothing while working in laboratories. Hazardous material regulations are followed in 78% of laboratories. Regular health check ups are carried among laboratory staff in 43.4% of laboratories. Safety manual is available in 56.5% of laboratories. 73.9% of laboratories are equipped with fire extinguishers. Fume cupboards are provided in 34.7% of laboratories and they are regularly checked in 87.5% of these laboratories. In 78.26% of laboratories suitable measures are taken to minimize formation of aerosols. In 95.6% of laboratories waste is disposed off as per bio-medical waste management handling rules. Laboratory of one private medical college was accredited with NABL and safety parameters were better in that laboratory. Installing safety engineered devices apparently contributes to significant decrease in injuries in laboratories; laboratory safety has to be a part of overall quality assurance programme in hospitals. Accreditation has to be made necessary for all laboratories. PMID:21475492

  15. Requirements for Reference (Calibration) Laboratories in Laboratory Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Siekmann, Lothar

    2007-01-01

    In addition to reference measurement procedures and reference materials, reference or calibration laboratories play an integral role in the implementation of measurement traceability in routine laboratories. They provide results of measurements using higher-order methods, e.g. isotope dilution mass spectrometry and may assign values to materials to be used for external quality assessment programs and to secondary reference materials. The requirements for listing of laboratories that provide reference measurement services include a statement of the metrological level or principle of measurement, accreditation as a calibration laboratory according to ISO 15195 and the participation in a proficiency testing system (regular inter-laboratory comparisons) for reference laboratories. Ring trials are currently conducted for thirty well-defined measurands and the results are made available to all laboratories. Through the use of reference laboratory services that are listed by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine there is the opportunity to further promote traceability and standardisation of laboratory measurements. PMID:18392129

  16. Laboratory testing in neurorheumatology.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Meghan K; Murali, Mandakolathur

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory testing in cases of neuro-rheumatologic disease can be daunting, and the results can be difficult to interpret if not placed in the correct clinical context. To best help our patients and also to practice in a cost-effective environment, laboratory testing must be performed in a logical manner, guided by symptoms and clinical judgment. The authors discuss the different laboratory tests used in the diagnosis and evaluation of rheumatologic diseases often encountered in the practice of neurology. It is important to understand how the tests are performed and which methods are used at your own institution. Testing should be ordered with a specific diagnosis in mind so as not to confuse the clinical picture with possible false-positive results. Through discussion of the various testing options, the authors advocate a step-wise approach to investigation. PMID:25369433

  17. Mars Analytical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagati, M. Gawad; Ale-Ibrahaim, Kordi; Bins, Llonda; Davis, Michael; Gamalo, Johnny; Johnson, Matt; May, Neal; Seneviratne, Waruna; Yurko, Aric; Yurko, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    As mankind continues to explore the solar system, planetary colonization may become an important goal. Permanently manned space stations, bases on the moon, and colonization of Mars will be important steps in this exploration. The colonization and exploration of Mars will be a particular challenge. As mankind one day attempts this colonization, knowledge of the Martian environment and human capacity to live there will become vitally important. The first scientific outposts on Mars will need research laboratories to make discoveries about how we can better live there and use the natural resources of the planet to sustain human life. The design of a laboratory for an existing Martian base is the purpose of this project. A laboratory on Mars would be very useful to the scientists we send.

  18. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  19. Mote Marine Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents the Mote Marine Laboratory (MML), "an independent, nonprofit research organization dedicated to excellence in marine science and education." The MML website links to information about the laboratory's various research centers including the Center for Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Research, Center for Shark Research, Center for Eco-Toxicology, and Center for Fisheries Enhancement. The MML Center for Coastal Ecology links to information on its three research programs -- Coastal Resources, Benthic Ecology, and Chemical Ecology. The MML research efforts are focused on the Southwest Florida coastal region, and they have academic connections with Florida State University, the University of South Florida, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The MML website also contains information about the lab's staff, Tropical Research Laboratory, and Arthur Vining Davis Library which offers online journals, and links to bibliographic databases.

  20. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  1. The Development of a Contextual Information Framework Model as a Potential IAEA Strategy to Maintain Radioactive Waste Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Upshall, I.R. [United Kingdom Nirex Limited, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX (United Kingdom); McCarthy, G.J. [Melbourne Univ., Australian Science and Technology Heritage Centre (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    A contextual framework comprises 'entities' that exhibit one or more definable relationships with a particular 'event'. People, organisations, concepts, ideas, places, natural phenomena, events themselves, cultural artefacts including records, books, works of art can all be conceptualised as entities. If these entities are registered in an information management system where the relationships between them can be defined and systematically managed then it is possible to create a contextual information framework that represents a particular view of what occurs in real life. The careful identifying and mapping of the relationships between these entities and the selected event can lead rapidly to the creation of an information network that closely reflects the human approach to knowledge acquisition and application. The 'event' referred to in this paper is the safe management of radioactive waste. It is widely accepted that society will expect that knowledge about the waste will be maintained for many decades, if not centuries. Delivering on this expectation will demand the application of management approaches that are both innovative and sustainable. Effective inter-generational transfer of information using many 'conventional' techniques will be highly dependent on societal stability - something that cannot be guaranteed over such long periods of time. Consequently, alternative approaches should be explored and, where appropriate, implemented to give reasonable assurance that future generations of waste custodians will not be unduly burdened by the need to recreate information about the waste long after its disposal. In actual fact, the contextual information framework model is not 'new technology' but simply a means for rationalising and representing the way humans naturally tend to use information in the pursuit of knowledge enhancement. By making use of multiple information entities and their relationships, it is often possible to convert otherwise impossibly complex socio-technical environments into information architectures or networks with remarkable and useful properties. The International Atomic Energy Agency, in its ongoing work to encourage the application of systems to manage radioactive waste information over the long term, has embraced the contextual information framework as a potentially viable approach to this particular challenge. To this end, it invited Member States to contribute to the production of a Safety Report that used the contextual information framework model, building on the wealth of existing IAEA guidance. The report focuses, not on the important area of records management, but on the benefits that can arise from the development of an information management approach that increases the likelihood that future generations will recognise the significance and value of the information contained in these records. Our understanding of 'inter-generational transfer' should extend beyond the simple physical transfer of records into an archival repository towards the establishment of a working culture that places sufficient contemporary information into a form that ensures it remains accessible, and ultimately enhances, the knowledge of future generations. Making information accessible is therefore the key and whilst the use of stable records media, storage environments and quality assurance are important elements, they cannot be considered solutions in themselves. This paper articulates some of the lessons that have been learned about using the contextual information framework model when applied to the long term management of radioactive waste. The draft IAEA Safety Report entitled 'Preservation and Transfer to Future Generations of Information Important to the Safety of Waste Disposal Facilities', on which this paper is based, is expected to be published in 2007. (authors)

  2. The gastrointestinal motility laboratory.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Orr, William C

    2007-09-01

    Abnormalities of gastrointestinal (GI) motor function contribute directly or indirectly to a number of common clinical problems and account for significant health care-related expenditure. Proper evaluation of patients who have suspected GI motility disorders is important to ensure a correct diagnosis and to embark on an appropriate plan of treatment. The GI motility laboratory serves as an important area for patient evaluation in gastroenterology and is an essential element in any comprehensive digestive disease program. This article addresses important concepts in setting up and running an efficient and practical GI motility laboratory. PMID:17950436

  3. Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory (MEL) is a division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Its function is to work with companies and perform research to improve manufacturing performance. Because of its broad scope, MEL has five divisions -- Precision Engineering, Manufacturing Metrology, Intelligent Systems, Manufacturing Systems Integration, and Fabrication Technology. The laboratory's homepage offers descriptions, research project information, conference and workshop times, and photo and movie galleries from various projects. There is also a link to an Engineering Metrology Toolbox used to "solve real problems in dimensional measurement."

  4. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Lab is the U.S. Department of Energy's premier laboratory for renewable energy research and development and a leading laboratory for energy efficiency research and development. The web site provides access to a large array of information that targets many different audiences. There are educational links and classroom activities and projects suited for audiences from primary education through college-level. Other features include information about different forms of energy, databases on renewable energy production, an extensive photo gallery, and information on current research and applications in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  5. Managing laboratory automation

    PubMed Central

    Saboe, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of managing automated systems through their life cycles within the quality-control (QC) laboratory environment. The focus is on the process of directing and managing the evolving automation of a laboratory; system examples are given. The author shows how both task and data systems have evolved, and how they interrelate. A BIG picture, or continuum view, is presented and some of the reasons for success or failure of the various examples cited are explored. Finally, some comments on future automation need are discussed. PMID:18925018

  6. Laboratory Notebook for Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Barbara Schulz N:Schulz; Barbara REV:2005-04-13 END:VCARD

    1994-07-30

    All students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook. The notebook is to be either a bound notebook or a spiral notebook. All of your work in class is to be recorded in your notebook. Your laboratory notebook is: --a place to record what you see and do (including mistakes) --a place to record what you THINK about what you see and do --a place to ask QUESTIONS and draw conclusions about the experiences and results --a place to track your feelings and attitudes about your experiences --a seedbed of ideas for experiments and creativity --a record of your accomplishments during your time in this class

  7. Laboratory Math for Biotechnology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This "Course-in-a-Box" from Bio-Link is a good starting point for instructors to develop a course on basic laboratory math. New biotechnology students "often need a 'refresher' of basic algebra, scientific notation, logarithms and graphing." This course provides an opportunity to focus on math skills alone without also studying laboratory techniques. This course includes a detailed schedule with learning outcomes, classroom activities, PowerPoint lectures, and instructors' notes. A free login is required to access the materials.

  8. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fogler, H. Scott

    The University of Michigan Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRL) at the College of Engineering explores innovative applications of immersive and non-immersive virtual environments in a variety of areas. For industrial applications, research is focused on virtual prototyping of engineering designs - especially in the automotive and marine industry - the simulation of manufacturing processes, and related engineering tasks. Additional activities include the use of virtual reality in accident simulations, medicine, architecture, archeology, education, and other areas. As an interdisciplinary facility, the VRL collaborates with many disciplines within the university and serves the outside community. Through a combined directorship, the Laboratory cooperates closely with the University of Michigan 3D Lab.

  9. Further factors for the estimation of mean glandular dose using the United Kingdom, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.; van Engen, R. E.

    2009-07-01

    The United Kingdom, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography make use of s-factors which allow for the use of different target/filter combinations. To supplement the existing protocols, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate s-factors for mammography using a tungsten target with silver filters of thicknesses 50-75 µm and for the same target filtered with 0.5 mm aluminium. The dosimetry protocols use slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) of specified thicknesses to simulate the exposure of typical breasts. The equivalent thickness of PMMA has been calculated using a simplified approach for a wider range of x-ray spectra and for breast thicknesses of 2-11 cm. The results show that for the tungsten/silver target/filter combination, a single s-factor of 1.042 can be used with the protocols, but when the tungsten target is filtered with 0.5 mm of aluminium, it is necessary to select from a tabulation of s-factors against breast thickness. The equivalent thicknesses of PMMA for a given breast thickness show some dependence on beam quality and the values obtained differ from those presently used in the dosimetry protocols by an amount which depends upon breast thickness and half value layer (HVL). For the extreme case of an 11 cm breast and an HVL of 0.62 mm Al, the use of the protocol thickness would give rise to an error of 10%, but for breast thicknesses of 6 cm or less, the error is typically 2-3%.

  10. Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

  11. Further factors for the estimation of mean glandular dose using the United Kingdom, European and IAEA breast dosimetry protocols.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R; Young, K C; van Engen, R E

    2009-07-21

    The United Kingdom, European and IAEA protocols for breast dosimetry in mammography make use of s-factors which allow for the use of different target/filter combinations. To supplement the existing protocols, a Monte Carlo computer program has been used to calculate s-factors for mammography using a tungsten target with silver filters of thicknesses 50-75 microm and for the same target filtered with 0.5 mm aluminium. The dosimetry protocols use slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) of specified thicknesses to simulate the exposure of typical breasts. The equivalent thickness of PMMA has been calculated using a simplified approach for a wider range of x-ray spectra and for breast thicknesses of 2-11 cm. The results show that for the tungsten/silver target/filter combination, a single s-factor of 1.042 can be used with the protocols, but when the tungsten target is filtered with 0.5 mm of aluminium, it is necessary to select from a tabulation of s-factors against breast thickness. The equivalent thicknesses of PMMA for a given breast thickness show some dependence on beam quality and the values obtained differ from those presently used in the dosimetry protocols by an amount which depends upon breast thickness and half value layer (HVL). For the extreme case of an 11 cm breast and an HVL of 0.62 mm Al, the use of the protocol thickness would give rise to an error of 10%, but for breast thicknesses of 6 cm or less, the error is typically 2-3%. PMID:19550001

  12. Laboratory Waste Management. A Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    A primary goal of the American Chemical Society Task Force on Laboratory Waste Management is to provide laboratories with the information necessary to develop effective strategies and training programs for managing laboratory wastes. This book is intended to present a fresh look at waste management from the laboratory perspective, considering both…

  13. Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

  14. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-print Network

    by the schedule and requested by management. Such audits shall be carried out by trained and qualified personnel and Management Reviews #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory's management review

  15. ChemPages Laboratory Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

  16. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  17. Instrumental Analysis Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz de la Pena, Arsenio; Gonzalez-Gomez, David; Munoz de la Pena, David; Gomez-Estern, Fabio; Sequedo, Manuel Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    designed for automating the collection and assessment of laboratory exercises is presented. This Web-based system has been extensively used in engineering courses such as control systems, mechanics, and computer programming. Goodle GMS allows the students to submit their results to a…

  18. Structural Vibrations Laboratory Demonstrator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reen E Foley

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a laboratory demonstrator of structural vibrations. When the ground moves under a structure the effect on that structure is dependent upon the relationship between the frequency of the ground motion and the natural frequency of the structure. As this relationship, the frequency ratio, approaches one (1) the effect is at its

  19. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    , in the lower-right corner of a standard topographic map sheet, below the actual map, is an index map Laboratory Topic Page 1 Introduction to Topographic Maps 1 2 Topographic Contour Maps, Profiles - Introduction to Topographic Maps I: Location, Direction, and Distance PURPOSE The objective of this lab

  20. Clinical Laboratory Helper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szucs, Susan C.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides competencies and tasks for the position of clinical laboratory helper; it serves as both a career exploration experience and/or entry-level employment training. A list of 25 validated competencies and tasks covers careers from entry level to those that must be mastered to earn an associate degree in clinical…

  1. Russell Furr Laboratory Safety &

    E-print Network

    Safety Culture Survey Fire Marshal Inspections Laboratory Plans Review New Research Safety Initiatives and the tBuLi ignited Sheri Sangji's clothing caught fire and she sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns Facilities Management Risk Mitigation Matching Fund (proposed/beta) Spill clean-up assistance (4

  2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-print Network

    institutions. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency materials at con- centration factors of up to 100 ultraviolet (UV) suns while greatly reducing the heat start at NREL and each has the potential to transform its industry. The 2009 R&D 100 Award recipients

  3. PENNSYLVANIA APPALACHIAN LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    PENNSYLVANIA VIRGINIA WEST VIRGINIA DELAWARE NEW JERSEY APPALACHIAN LABORATORY HORN POINT in a comprehensive understanding of our environment and natural resources, helping to guide the State and world and natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay region; leading the System's nationally ranked

  4. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    ScienceCinema

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

    2013-05-28

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Dental Assisting Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Sandra J.

    Compiled to introduce the dental assisting student to various techniques used in the dental office and to present theoretical information essential for the student's professional development, this laboratory guide consists of three units of instruction. The first unit is an introduction to dental assisting and contains five topics of study. The…

  6. RAS Laboratory Groups

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative is using multiple technologies to attack RAS-driven cancers. Accordingly, the resources of the FNLCR allocated to the RAS Hub have been organized into seven laboratory groups, with each group contributing the most advanced technology available to the collaborative effort.

  7. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  8. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

  9. Telecommunications network management laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Raad; P. Vial

    2004-01-01

    This work discusses network management laboratory design and implementation at the University of Wollongong in the School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering in years of 2002 and 2003 for a final year specialisation subject called telecommunication network management for telecommunications engineering students. The design and implementation included that of a network management GUI incorporating the fundamental aspects and functionality

  10. National Laboratory Dorene Price

    E-print Network

    : price@bnl.gov SOIL REMEDIATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINANTS Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi, the ISMS process can treat localized or widespread areas of mercury contamination in a cost-Exclusive · Exclusive Patent Status ApplicationFiled 11/021401 PROCESS Describes an in-situ process of mercury

  11. Caltech Micromachining Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Entirely different and exotic machining techniques are required for creating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other extremely small devices. The Caltech Micromachining Laboratory maintains this archive of research highlights and papers on its homepage, including a paper on a MEMS-driven flapping wing for a palm-sized aerial vehicle.

  12. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Brief History, Jet Propulsion Laboratory) LASP: A Brief History In 1946-47, a handful of American universities joined of a new U.S. president and the beginning of a very fresh federal administration. This exciting time

  13. ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Page 1 ECOLOGY LABORATORY BIOLOGY 341 Fall Semester 2008 Bighorn Sheep Rams at Bison Range National ecological data; and 3) oral and written communication skills. Thus, these ecology labs, and statistical analyses appropriate for ecological data. A major goal of this class will be for you to gain

  14. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space by a group of logistics companies, research organisations, universities, and IT providers that includes NICTA

  15. Marine Biological Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Marine Biological Laboratory is an international center for research, education, and training in biology, biomedicine, and ecology. Site features the latest news and research developments from MBL. Explore all the latest research, education information, including graduate admissions and teacher workshops, and a glimpse at MBL history, facilities, and more. Current news and links to all kinds of additional MBL resources are also available.

  16. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  18. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Homepage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) homepage provides links to spacecraft and mission information, imagery, news articles, events, features, and public services. Users can access articles and imagery from the Mars Rover and Cassini missions, images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and an El Nino/La Nina Watch.

  19. Writing the Laboratory Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanare, Howard M.

    The purpose of this book is to teach the principles of proper scientific notekeeping. The principles presented in this book are goals for which working scientists must strive. Chapter 1, "The Reasons for Notekeeping," is an overview of the process of keeping a laboratory notebook. Chapter 2, "The Hardware of Notekeeping," is intended especially…

  20. RUNNING A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REES, ALUN L.W.

    THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY AT THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF TRUJILLO AS IT IS USED IN THE FIVE-YEAR ENGLISH TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM. THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF THIS COURSE ARE INTENSIVE, BASED ON A STUDY OF ENGLISH USING LADO-FRIES MATERIALS (FOR LATIN AMERICAN LEARNERS) WHICH REQUIRE FIVE HOURS OF CLASSWORK A WEEK SUPPLEMENTED BY…

  1. TD-700 Laboratory Fluorometer

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    range of sample volumes. v Automatic Range Optimization: range, gain, and resolutionaresetautomatically: CE, TUV, UL, and CUL. TD-700 Laboratory Fluorometer About Fluorescence Certain compounds absorb light at one wavelength and re-emit, or fluoresce, light at another wavelength. Using the proper optical filter

  2. EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    Polly, David

    EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

  3. Laboratory Animal Science Program

    Cancer.gov

    The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System" and Accessions System. These web-based systems enable investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of these processes, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work.

  4. The Laboratory Notebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-03-25

    This site provides well-organized instructions for keeping a laboratory notebook. In addition to the providing an overview of general rules and organization, the site also discusses organization of conclusions around three central types of outlines for measurement experiments, synthesis experiments and reporting of physical phenomena.

  5. The Indiana Laboratory System: Focus on Environmental Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Kara R.; Matheson, Shelley R.; Lovchik, Judith C.

    2013-01-01

    The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

  6. Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    Sustainable Energy Systems · Modeling Regional Energy Infrastructure and Energy Security · National Nuclear trained in the U.S. Topics covered have included: · Sustainable Energy Development · Power Reactors ­ Sustainable Nuclear Energy for the 21st Century IAEA/Argonne Workshop on Developing the Safety Infrastructure

  7. RIS-M-2249 RIS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    of the Behaviour of Advanced Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Neutron Irradiation. IAEA Co-Ordinated Research) 22 pp. Robutti, G., E. Ronzori, and N-S. Ottosen, Failure Strength and Elastic Limit for Concrete of Concrete. J. Eng. Mech. Div. ASCE JL05 (1979) 127-141. Wurtz, J., An Experimental and Theoretical

  8. Meeting the challenges of global nuclear medicine technologist training in the 21st century: the IAEA Distance Assisted Training (DAT) program.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heather E; Nunez, Margarita; Philotheou, Geraldine M; Hutton, Brian F

    2013-05-01

    Many countries have made significant investments in nuclear medicine (NM) technology with the acquisition of modern equipment and establishment of facilities, however, often appropriate training is not considered as part of these investments. Training for NM professionals is continually evolving, with a need to meet changing requirements in the workforce. Even places where established higher education courses are available, these do not necessarily cater to the practical component of training and the ever-changing technology that is central to medical imaging. The continuing advances in NM technology and growth of applications in quantitative clinical assessment place increases the pressure on technologists to learn and practice new techniques. Not only is training to understand new concepts limited but often there is inadequate training in the basics of NM and this can be a major constraint to the effective use of the evolving technology. Developing appropriate training programs for the broader international NM community is one of the goals of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A particularly successful and relevant development has been the program on 'distance assisted training (DAT) for NM professionals'. The development of DAT was initiated in the 1990s through Australian Government funding, administered under auspices of the IAEA through its Regional Cooperative Agreement, involving most countries in Asia that are Member States of the IAEA. The project has resulted in the development of a set of training modules which are designed for use under direct supervision in the workplace, delivered through means of distance-learning. The program has undergone several revisions and peer reviews with the current version providing a comprehensive training package that is now available online. DAT has been utilized widely in Asia or the Pacific region, Latin America, and parts of Africa and Europe. Currently there are approximately 1000 registered participants, including persons providing student support, in the program. PMID:23561457

  9. Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL), operated at Stanford University, focuses its research "on improving robotic performance through the application of feedback control, integrated sensing systems, and task-level autonomy." The systems designed at ARL allow the human operator to have varying levels of control over the robot. Specifically, the robot performs given tasks until it reaches a point that it can not perform on its own. The human can then intervene and direct the robot manually. A comprehensive list of all ARL publications is available on the Web site, ranging from the 1960's to 2002 (many of the publications after 1990 are available for download). There are even movies of laboratory experiments and demonstrations that can be downloaded and viewed. The Projects section explains the various research projects currently underway.

  10. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site depicts the work of the University of Oxford's Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory in the experimental and theoretical aspects of catalytic systems, bioinorganic, co-ordination, organometallic, structural, surface, and solid state chemistry. The site provides a brief summary of the early professors of the department including Oddling who formulated the periodic table, and two noble prize winners, Soddy and Hinshelwood. Students and educators can discover the exciting research endeavors taken on by the twenty academic staff and over one hundred postdoctoral workers, graduate students, Part II chemists, and other academic visitors. The site also describes the instrumentation used at the laboratory including NMR, CMX, and CI/FI spectrometers and various diffractometers.

  11. TARDEC's robotics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorsich, David J.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Muench, Paul L.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) recently opened a 5000 square foot robotics laboratory known as the TARDEC Robotics Laboratory. The focus of the lab is on robotics research, both basic and applied, in the area of robot mobility. Mobility is the key problem for light weight robotic systems, and the TARDEC Robotics Lab will develop innovative ways to deal with the mobility issues. The lab will also test and evaluate robotic systems in all aspects of mobility and control. The lab has the highest concentration of senior researchers at TARDEC, and is committed to maintaining in- house research talent so that new combat concepts using robots can be evaluated effectively by the Army. This paper serves as an introduction to the lab, its missions, goals, capabilities and programs.

  12. MIT: Space Nanotechnology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Space Nanotechnology Laboratory (SNL) at MIT conducts research on nanofabrication, nanometer-accuracy x-ray optics fabrication, assembly and metrology, ultra-high resolution lithography, nanometrology, and nano-accuracy diffraction grating fabrication. SNL's pride and joy is the world's most advanced grating patterning tool, the Nanoruler -- a ruler with "ticks" only a few hundred billionths of a meter apart. Applications for the Nanoruler (patent pending) might include the manufacture of computer chips and space physics. More information, including images and a White Paper describing the Nanoruler, are available from this website. The website also provides a history of the Laboratory, a description of other projects, and an extensive list of papers, many of which are short and available online.

  13. Microcontrollers in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R. (Clemson Univ., SC (USA))

    1989-03-15

    The personal computer is now ubiquitous in modern chemical laboratories and has produced a small revolution in data handling and acquisition. Because there are many more people interested in word processing than in computer interfacing, however, the few software and hardware packages designed specifically for data acquisition are expensive and made for skilled users. A separate class of computers known as microcontrollers has been created specifically to ease the problem of interfacing. Just as the operational amplifier intergrates many discrete components into an easy-to-use amplifier, the microcontroller integrates many common interfacing peripherals into a usable data acquisition system. The microcontrolled, just like the operational amplifier, is inexpensive and designed to be used by people with little training in electronics. This A/C Interface will describe how microcontrollers work and how they can be used in the analytical laboratory.

  14. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  15. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2014-11-06

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  16. Thermodynamics Research Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mansoori, G. A. (G. Ali)

    The Thermodynamics Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago developed this Web site to exhibit its research in the "molecular based study of fluids, solids and phase transitions, statistical mechanics of complex systems: equations of state, asymmetric mixtures characterization, surface and interfacial properties," and "solubilities in Liquids and Supercritical Gases." The site provides descriptions and images of the laboratory and equipment including the Atomic Force Microscopes and the Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Screening System. Scientists can learn about the group's research in supercritical fluids and supercritical extractions. The site has a new publications section where reprints of many of the group's papers are available. Researchers can also learn about The 4th International Conference on Fluid and Thermal Energy Conversion, which will be held in Bali Island, Indonesia December 7 - 11, 2003.

  17. Quaternary GIS Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the home page of the Quaternary Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado. The laboratory supports quantitative spatial analysis of glacier, climate, coastal, and other environmental relationships at high latitudes. Users can access a collection of climate animations for the State of Alaska which show seasonal variation in monthly temperature and precipitation. There is also a set of high-resolution imagery and terrain models for Barrow, Alaska, an animation of the land bridge between Asia and North America, an atlas of paleoglaciation for the state, and links to a variety of other projects involving climatology, paleoclimatology, and glacial geomorphology in the Sate of Alaska.

  18. Surgical Planning Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

  19. Keeping a Laboratory Notebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The HURI SURI project is developing a regional biotechnology workforce pipeline by expanding and supporting biotechnology research experiences for Jamestown Community College (JCC) undergraduates and disseminating these research experiences and materials to area high school teachers and students. This Microsoft Word document details how to keep a laboratory notebook in a high school or undergraduate science class. This is important because "a laboratory notebook is really required by law for investigators that either work in an industry (e.g. pharmaceutical industry) that is federally regulated or for investigators who have federal grant funding for research (e.g. from the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation)." The document explains how the notebook needs a table of contents, experiment details, and conclusion.

  20. Laboratory monitoring of haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, A; Perry, D J

    2015-01-01

    Peri-operative coagulation monitoring should begin with the assessment of individual bleeding risk using a standardised bleeding history before the surgical procedure. Laboratory testing should be performed if this history is abnormal or peri-operative bleeding is anticipated. This process sensitively identifies those at risk of peri-operative bleeding and therefore minimises their peri-operative risk, without costly and time-consuming population testing. There are multiple potential causes of haemostatic derangement within the peri-operative period, and an understanding of both normal haemostasis and the coagulation tests available to detect coagulopathy is required to optimise patient management. In bleeding patients, routine coagulation tests should be requested, but one should be aware of the major limitations that exist. Delay whilst waiting for these laboratory results, which, in turn, aggravates coagulopathy, bleeding, blood product requirements, length of surgery and overall morbidity and mortality. PMID:25440398

  1. Flight Dynamics Laboratory overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Thaddeus

    1986-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Laboratory (FDL) is one of four Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) and part of the Aeronautical Systems Division located at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The FDL is responsible for the planning and execution of research and development programs in the areas of structures and dynamics, flight controls, vehicle equipment/subsystems, and aeromechanics. Some of the areas being researched in the four FDL divisions are as follows: large space structures (LSS) materials and controls; advanced cockpit designs; bird-strike-tolerant windshields; and hypersonic interceptor system studies. Two of the FDL divisions are actively involved in programs that deal directly with LSS control/structures interaction: the Flight Controls Division and the Structures and Dynamics Division.

  2. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

  3. Space Radiation Effects Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

  4. Coastal Research Laboratory USF

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is the home page of the laboratory. Users may click to find descriptions of the Coastal Research Program which focuses on two key areas of coastal geology: the process-response systems of beaches, inlets, and tidal sand bodies; and the Holocene history and development of coastal barrier systems. Research projects are primarily concentrated on the west coast of Florida, with some projects encompassing areas of Florida's east coast, the Florida Keys, the southwest Florida shallow shelf, and Puerto Rico. Under Projects, users may see brief descriptions of thesis research. The Geolinks on this site are extensive- over six hundred at the time of review- to: Coastal and Oceanographic Sites, Data and Software, General Geology, Geological Surveys in the United States and International, Government Agencies, Institutes, Issues, Journals and Magazines, Professional Organizations, References, Indexes, and Catalogs, University Geology Departments and Laboratories in the United States and International, and Weather. Users are invited to add sites.

  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    E-print Network

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument of Energy (DoE). Objectives · Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations · Develop a Solar Energy Resources · Offer Unique Training Methods for Solar Monitoring Network Design, Operation

  6. CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER base that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, pathology, and obstetrical services that are provided services. This arrangement permits the possibility of participation in other components of genetic services

  7. CCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review

    E-print Network

    Heller, Eric

    /blood-borne pathogens, radiation safety, laser safety, liquid pyrophoric, etc...). ReviewCCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review Attend CCB's Lab 300 in-class safety training. All personnel working within CCB

  8. Sedimentary System Laboratory Photomicrographs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yong Lee II

    This site contains numerous images of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including images photographed at the Laboratory of Sedimentary System at the Seoul National University and photographs from textbooks. Original photographs include photomicrographs of both clastic and carbonate rocks along with back-scattered electron images and photographs of sedimentary rocks and structures in outcrops. Photographs from texts include terrigenous clastic rocks, carbonate rocks and sedimentary structures.

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  10. Image Communications Laboratory (ICL)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The UCLA Image Communications Laboratory focuses their research on the image coding and transmission of communications and archiving systems. While the emphasis is on applied research, they are also studying a number of issues of theoretical importance. Areas of research include wireless communications, medical imaging, FPGA implementations, channel/source coding, data compression, image enhancement, and networking. There is also a research paper library where papers can be downloaded.

  11. Pygmalion in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R Allen; Scheel, Matthew H; Shaw, Heidi L

    2011-01-01

    Testers and bystanders can inadvertently lead subjects to answers in laboratories and in classrooms, in face-to-face tests of human beings and other animals. Many modern investigators avoid leading by using blind tests scrupulously. This article shows how to design blind tests and illustrates common methodological errors that allow leading to confound experimental results. The object is to help experimenters, editors, and readers detect and avoid a common experimental error that often has profound theoretical implications. PMID:22324284

  12. NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) presents its weather, climate, and air quality investigations. Visitors can discover ETL's theoretical and field observations and sensor and model developments to address complex environmental issues. The website provides detailed descriptions of the Study of Environmental Artic Change (SEARCH), the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) project, and other 2005 programs. Teachers can find educational resources for elementary, middle, and high school.

  13. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  14. Laboratory Animal Science Program

    Cancer.gov

    The services of LASP laboratories and facilities may be accessed using the "Yellow Task Request System". This web-based system enables investigators to request services and obtain cost and time estimates for each project. NCI approval is an integral function of this process, which ensures that adequate funding and other resources are available to perform the work. Click on the link from this page or any of the pages within this site to be directed to the request system.

  15. PHYSIOLAB: A cardiovascular laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquil, D.; Laffaye, C.; Camus, A. L.; Weerts, G.; Gratchev, V.; Alferova, I.; Kotovskaya, A.

    PHYSIOLAB is a cardio-vascular laboratory designed by CNES in cooperation with IMBP, with double scientific and medical goals: • a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in blood pressure and heart rate regulation, in order to predict and control the phenomenon of cardio-vascular deconditionning. • a real-time monitoring of cosmonauts during functionnal tests. Launched to the MIR station in 1996, this laboratory was set up and used for the first time by Claudie André-Deshays during the French mission ? Cassiopeia ?. The scientific program is performed pre, post and in-flight to study phenomena related to the transition to microgravity as well as the return to the earth conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on the development of the real-time telemetry to monitor LBNP test. This function was successfull during the Cassiopeia mission, providing the medical team at TSOUP (MIR Control Center in Moscow) with efficient means to control the physiological state of the cosmonaut. Based on the results of this first mission, IMBP and CNES will go on using Physiolab with Russian crews. CNES will take advantage of the upcoming French missions on MIR to improve the system, and intends to develop a new laboratory for the International Space Station.

  16. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1890, the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is one of the best-known and most respected private research institutions in the United States. Over the past century, the Laboratory has supported the careers of seven Nobel Prize recipients and it is particularly well-regarded for its work in the field of genetics research. Today, there are over 400 scientists who work at the facility in Long Island, and their work ranges across the areas of cancer, neuroscience, genomics, and bioinformatics. Their website is a cornucopia of information on their activities, and first-time visitors should start by reading over the "CSHL Headlines" scrolling updates on the homepage. After that, they can look at the "Research" section. Here they will find overviews of their primary research groups and links to some of their specialized facilities, like the Dolan DNA Learning Center. Most visitors will want to visit the "Library and Archives" section. Here they can learn about CSHL authors' publications and look through the digital collections. The digital collections include tributes to Barbara McClintock, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1983, and who worked at the Laboratory for four decades.

  17. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  18. EPA LABORATORIES IMPLEMENT EMS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper highlights the breadth and magnitude of carrying out an effective Environmental Management System (EMS) program at the U.S. EPA's research and development laboratories. Federal research laboratories have unique operating challenges compared to more centralized industr...

  19. 37 Keys to Laboratory Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruys, Theodorus

    1969-01-01

    Flexibility, adaptability, and expandability are requirements for good laboratory design. This report contains suggestions for improving laboratory planning, construction, and utilization in certain key areas. Special attention is given to incorporating safety equipment and special nonreactive materials. (RA)

  20. DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)

    Cancer.gov

    As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

  1. Spreadsheets in the Physics Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Michael E.; Stith, James H.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer spreadsheet programs in the physics laboratory is discussed. An example of this application with a conservation of energy laboratory is presented including the cases of a rolling sphere and a sliding sphere. (CW)

  2. Nanophotonics at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert

    2008-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is leveraging the extensive CMOS, MEMS, compound semiconductor, and nanotechnology fabrication and test resources at Sandia National Laboratories to explore new science and technology in photonic crystals, plasmonics, metamaterials, and silicon photonics.

  3. Georgia Institute of Laboratory Safety

    E-print Network

    )........................................................................................................ 13 Laser Safety Committee (LSCGeorgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual April 29, 2013 #12;Georgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual 2 Contents 1. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION................ 9

  4. Georgia Institute of Laboratory Safety

    E-print Network

    ).........................................................................................................13 Laser Safety Committee (LSCGeorgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual May 15, 2013 #12;Georgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual 2 Contents 1. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION ............... 9

  5. ChemTeacher: Laboratory Methods

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-19

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Laboratory Methods page includes resources for teaching students about basic laboratory equipment.

  6. RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences Laboratory for Cell Signaling

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Immunity Laboratory for Gut Homeostasis Laboratory for Immune Homeostasis Laboratory for Skin Homeostasis Laboratory for Metabolic Homeostasis Laboratory for Immune Crosstalk Laboratory for Inflammatory Regulation

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    The history of fusion research resembles the way in which one builds skyscrapers: laying the first foundation stone, one thinks about the top of the skyscraper. At the early stages of fusion, when it became clear that the thermonuclear reactor would operate with DT plasma confined by the magnetic field, the study of the `top item'—the physics of 3.5 MeV alpha particles produced by the DT fusion reaction—was initiated. The first publications on this topic appeared as long ago as the 1960s. At that time, because the physics of alpha particles was far from the experimental demand, investigations were carried out by small groups of theoreticians who hoped to discover important and interesting phenomena in this new research area. Soon after the beginning of the work, theoreticians discovered that alpha particles could excite various instabilities in fusion plasmas. In particular, at the end of the 1960s an Alfvén instability driven by alpha particles was predicted. Later it turned out that a variety of Alfvén instabilities with very different features does exist. Instabilities with perturbations of the Alfvénic type play an important role in current experiments; it is likely that they will affect plasma performance in ITER and future reactors. The first experimental manifestation of instabilities excited by superthermal particles in fusion devices was observed in the PDX tokamak in 1983. In this device a large-scale instability—the so called `fishbone instability'—associated with ions produced by the neutral beam injection resulted in a loss of a large fraction of the injected energy. Since then, the study of energetic-ion-driven instabilities and the effects produced by energetic ions in fusion plasmas has attracted the growing attention of both experimentalists and theorists. Recognizing the importance of this topic, the first conference on fusion alpha particles was held in 1989 in Kyiv under the auspices of the IAEA. The meeting in Kyiv and several subsequent meetings (Aspenäs (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), and JET/Abingdon (1997)) were entitled `Alpha Particles in Fusion Research'. During the JET/Abingdon meeting in 1997 it was decided to extend the topic by including other suprathermal particles, in particular accelerated electrons, and rename the meetings accordingly. The subsequent meetings with the current name `Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems' were held in Naka (1999), Gothenburg (2001), San Diego (2003), Takayama (2005) and Kloster Seeon (2007). The most recent meeting in this series was held in Kyiv, Ukraine, in September 2009. This was an anniversary meeting, 20 years after the first meeting. Like the first meeting, it was hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. It was attended by about 80 researchers from 18 countries, ITER, and EC. The program of the meeting consisted of 78 presentations, including 12 invited talks, 16 oral contributed talks, and 50 posters, which were selected by the International Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC consisted of 11 people representing EC (L.-G. Eriksson), Germany (S. Günter), Italy (F. Zonca), Japan (K. Shinohara and K. Toi), Switzerland (A. Fasoli), UK (S. Sharapov), Ukraine (Ya. Kolesnichenko—IAC Chair), USA (H. Berk, W. Heidbrink, and R. Nazikian). The meeting program covered a wide range of physics issues concerning energetic ions in toroidal fusion facilities—tokamaks, stellarators, and spherical tori. Many new interesting and practically important results of both experimental and theoretical studies were reported. The research presented covered topics such as instabilities driven by energetic ions, transport of energetic ions caused by plasma microturbulence and destabilized eigenmodes, non-linear phenomena induced by the instabilities, classical transport processes, effects of runaway electrons, diagnostics of energetic ions and plasmas, and aspects of ITER physics. In addition to these topics, which were also covered at previous conferences in this series and have become conven

  8. Chemistry laboratory safety manual available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsbrock, R. G.

    1968-01-01

    Chemistry laboratory safety manual outlines safe practices for handling hazardous chemicals and chemistry laboratory equipment. Included are discussions of chemical hazards relating to fire, health, explosion, safety equipment and procedures for certain laboratory techniques and manipulations involving glassware, vacuum equipment, acids, bases, and volatile solvents.

  9. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY COVER: FROM

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Laboratory Cahforrua Instltute ofTechnology Pasadena,~orrua .-. III #12;IINTRODUCTION Propulsion Laboratory4-00 -4-11 5/q'd.... JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 1991 Annual Report #12;COVER: FROM ~IODEST BEGIN TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS ADVA N CED TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS PROJECTS INSTITUTIONAL ACTIVITIES #12;A descnptlon

  10. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    #12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1985 December 1985 Eugene J and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 .........................Contracts and Grants 48 Front Cover: Water levels on the Great Lakes have been in a high regimefor the past

  11. Introductory Archaeology: The Inexpensive Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Patricia C.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a number of student-focused laboratory exercises that are inexpensive, yet show the scientific character of archaeology. Describes the environmental laboratory exercise which includes the following analysis topics: (1) pollen; (2) earth core; (3) microfaunal; and (4) microwear. Describes the ceramic laboratory which involves…

  12. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory

  13. Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study the interplanetary medium, asteroids, comets, and planets. Suborbital sounding rockets and groundbased observing platforms form an integral part of these research activities. This report covers the period from approximately October 1999 through September 2000.

  14. Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

  15. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  17. Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory (WBL) at the University of Florida "promotes teaching, research and outreach activities on biogeochemical processes regulating the fate and transport of nutrients, metals, and toxic organics in wetland and aquatic ecosystems." Current research projects range from the use of biogeochemical markers to assess phosphorus loading in the Everglades to a spatial analysis of physico-chemical properties of Lake Okeechobee sediments; teaching materials, publications, and current events are also posted at the Website. For additional online resources in this field, see the collection of related links.

  18. Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

  19. Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NOAA

    The Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory (PFEL) examines the role of environmental variability on marine ecosystems and commercially important fish stocks. Research areas include comparative fisheries oceanography, physical oceanography, and climate and marine fisheries. This extensive site features both model-derived environmental index products as well as time series data, including sea surface temperature, salinity, isotherm depth, surface winds and pressure maps, and upwelling indices. A live access server also allows users to download and visualize data using a simple graphical user interface. PFEL is also the west coast regional site for the NOAA CoastWatch program, which provides dissemination of oceanographic satellite observation data.

  20. Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  1. The Reston Chloroflurocarbon Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Reston Chlorofluorocarbon Laboratory of the US Geological Survey provides "provides analytical services for CFCs, sulfur hexafluoride, dissolved gases including nitrogen, argon, methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and helium, and administers the USGS contract for tritium/helium-3 dating." Scientists can learn about the USGS's research activities related to these services in Chesapeake Bay, Mirror Lake, Shenandoah National Park, and many other locations around the United States. Students and educators can find tips for sampling CFCs, SF6, dissolved gas, and tritium / Helium-3. The website, which is viewed best using Microsoft Internet Explorer, also offers a model for calculating and presenting environmental tracer data.

  2. Write Effective Laboratory Reports

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kraus, Mary Ellen

    The ability to write a good laboratory report is an essential skill for all scientists. For many students, however, producing a well-written lab report is a laborious task. This document presents some useful pointers on lab report writing, and a discussion of lab report content so that students will have a better idea of expectations for their work. Checklists are included so that students can insure that they have met the requirements. The file is available in both pdf and doc versions.

  3. The Virtual Chemistry Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Yaron

    1999-01-01

    This networked laboratory simulation provides an environment in which students can select from hundreds of standard chemical reagants and combine them in any way they see fit. Instructors may use this environment in a variety of settings including student homework, group projects, computer lab activities and pre- and post-lab exercises to support varied approaches to chemical education. Activities are stored in our online homework repository which currently includes: acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, molarity, redox chemistry, solubility, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and quantitative analysis.

  4. Mercenaria Laboratory Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Fox

    This Invertebrate Anatomy Online exercise, featuring the hard-shell clam Mercenaria mercenaria (quahog), is part of an Internet laboratory manual for courses in Invertebrate Zoology. This exercise features an introduction to Mollusca and a step-by-step dissection guide, including hand-drawn figures, defined terms, and detailed explanations of form and function. Students will learn about the external anatomy (shell), muscles, mantle skirts, mantle cavity, mantle folds, siphons, gills, labial palps, hemal system, exhalant chamber, excretory system, digestive system, nervous system, and reproductive system.

  5. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  6. A Useful Laboratory Tool

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Samuel A. Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Recently, a high school Science Club generated a large number of questions involving temperature. Therefore, they decided to construct a thermal gradient apparatus in order to conduct a wide range of experiments beyond the standard "cookbook" labs. They felt that this apparatus could be especially useful in future ninth-grade biology classes, in which students must design and conduct individual, inquiry-based experiments as part of their training in scientific methodology. This article describes their experience building and testing a thermal gradient for laboratory use.

  7. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  8. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  9. The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

  10. Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology and Laboratory Science: The Basics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brandner, Diana

    Laboratory Manual for Biotechnology provides students with the basic laboratory skills and knowledge to pursue a career in biotechnology. The manual, written by four biotechnology instructors with over 20 years of teaching experience, incorporates instruction, exercises, and laboratory activities that the authors have been using and perfecting for years. These exercises and activities serve to engage students and help them understand the fundamentals of working in a biotechnology laboratory. Building students' skills through an organized and systematic presentation of materials, procedures, and tasks, the manual will help students explore overarching themes that relate to all biotechnology workplaces. The fundamentals in this manual are critical to the success of research scientists, scientists who develop ideas into practical products, laboratory analysts who analyze samples in forensic, clinical, quality control, environmental, and other testing laboratories.

  11. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  12. Laboratory Technique Videos

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Students of organic chemistry will find this website from the University of Alberta to be a most welcome find. Created by a team of educational experts at the University, the videos here demonstrate a variety of techniques that are commonly used in laboratory settings. There are a dozen videos here, and they include "Filtration", "Reflux", "Distillation", and "Using a Separatory Funnel". The films here are available in a number of different formats, including Quick Time and Windows Media. The site also includes an "Interactive Tutorials" section. Here visitors will find tutorials that will introduce them to spectroscopy, separation and isolation, and the rather amusing world of "Detective O-Chem", which asks the user to take on a fictional avian flu outbreak.

  13. Chemistry Laboratory Techniques

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Learning to navigate the treacherous shoals of the chemistry laboratory is tricky business. Fortunately, interested parties can use this fine online course from MIT's OpenCourseWare to become more familiar with such matters. The course consists of "intensive practical training in basic chemistry lab techniques" and the site includes a host of instructional videos. The manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franze and Dr. Kevin M. Shea in collaboration with a number of their colleagues. Visitors can make their way through the syllabus, course calendar, labs, and the study materials. In the Study Materials area, visitors will find ten videos, including "Using a Balance," "Melting Point Determination," and "Thin-Layer Chromatography." Students of chemistry and educators will find this site most useful and will wish to share it widely with others.

  14. Laboratory studies of interleaving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddick, B.

    2003-03-01

    This is a review of laboratory experiments on double-diffusive interleaving. Several configurations are discussed and compared, including thermohaline fronts, heated sidewalls, melting ice-blocks, point heat sources, and double-diffusive plumes, using both the heat-salt and sugar-salt systems to generate property anomalies. Two parallels emerge. The vertical scale of intrusions in most configurations is proportional to the ‘natural’ scale given by the property anomaly divided by the density gradient. The speed of advance of intrusions into undisturbed water is proportional to the product of the buoyancy frequency and intrusion thickness, with a constant of proportionality of order 0.005, but which depends on the vertical gradient density ratio and on the experimental configuration. We end with a long list of questions. Further progress will require new or more complex experimental configurations, more quantitative observations, and close comparisons with intrusion theories, both linear and finite-amplitude.

  15. MIT: Microsystems Technology Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interdepartmental lab, working under the umbrella of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering, supports research on "solid state devices, integrated circuits and systems, materials for electronic applications, novel process technologies, MicroElectroMechanical devices (sensors and actuators), biomedical applications, and computer-aided fabrication." The Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) Homepage (in frames) provides detailed coverage of a variety of research. Within MTL, the Intelligent Transportation Research Center offers overviews of projects and the Integrated Circuits and Systems includes selected downloadable recent conference papers and tutorials. Also available for download are '98 and '99 annual reports containing in-depth descriptions of research. A seminars page with a list of seminar series abstracts, and an outreach and links page with useful connections to related work round out the site. Note, the link to the MEMS Center appears to be faulty.

  16. Basic Nanotechnology Processes Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. These twelve labs focus on basic processes in Nanotechnology. Some of the labs are titled Gold Nucleation Analysis, Introduction to LPCVD and PECVD, Introduction to Plasma-based Processing, Liftoff and Surface Modification, and Intro to Scanning Electron Microscopy. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials.

  17. Materials in Nanotechnology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This laboratory course is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. The six labs available here focus on materials in Nanotechnology. The labs are titled Block Copolymers, Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles, Solar Cells, Ni Nanowires, Silicon Nanowires, and Statistical Process Control. These labs can be used in conjunction in a course, or individually as needed by the teacher. Each lab should include an objective, background information, detailed procedure, charts and tables, and follow-up questions. This resource, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access their materials

  18. First International Microgravity Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

    This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

  19. First International Microgravity Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Tracy; Shea, Charlotte; Wiginton, Margaret; Neal, Valerie; Gately, Michele; Hunt, Lila; Graben, Jean; Tiderman, Julie; Accardi, Denise

    1990-01-01

    This colorful booklet presents capsule information on every aspect of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML). As part of Spacelab, IML is divided into Life Science Experiments and Materials Science Experiments. Because the life and materials sciences use different Spacelab resources, they are logically paired on the IML missions. Life science investigations generally require significant crew involvement, and crew members often participate as test subjects or operators. Materials missions capitalize on these complementary experiments. International cooperation consists in participation by the European Space Agency, Canada, France, Germany, and Japan who are all partners in developing hardware and experiments of IML missions. IML experiments are crucial to future space ventures, like the development of Space Station Freedom, the establishment of lunar colonies, and the exploration of other planets. Principal investigators are identified for each experiment.

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.

    2010-01-01

    The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

  1. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This rich and extensive site from the California Institutes of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory leads users to a vast array of images, videos and resources related to aerospace exploration and technology. Of especial interest to educators will be the Images and Multimedia sections of the site. The images tab takes users to the Planetary Photojournal section which provides access to thousands of photographs of planets (as well as their satellites), asteroids, and comets. In the multimedia section users can view slideshows, listen to podcasts and watch videos which explore a range of topics from the rainbow colors of Saturn to NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Resources on the site are free to use and could be integrated into a variety of curriculum.

  2. The autonomic laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  3. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Bern, and International Atomic Energy Agency. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method, not a mass spectrometry method. A magneto-optical trap is used to capture neutral atoms (rather than ions) of the desired isotope using laser beams. A photo-sensor detects the laser induced fluorescence emitted by the individual trapped atoms. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. In an experiment demonstrating that ATTA-3 can analyze 39Ar/Ar ratios in environmental samples, no interference from other atomic or molecular species was observed at the 1x10^-16 level (Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 103001; 2011). This work proved the feasibility of performing 39Ar dating using the ATTA method. We are supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, and by Argonne National Laboratory.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  5. Laboratory Dipole Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jay

    2011-11-01

    Modern laboratory studies of plasma confined by a strong dipole magnet originated twenty years ago when it was learned that planetary magnetospheres have centrally-peaked plasma pressure profiles that form naturally when solar wind drives plasma circulation and heating. Unlike other internal rings devices, like spherators and octupoles, the magnetic flux tubes of the dipole field expand rapidly with radius. Unlike plasma confinement devices that obtain stability from magnetic shear and average good curvature, like tokamaks and levitrons, the dipole-confined plasma obtains stability from plasma compressibility. These two geometric characteristics of the dipole field have profound consequences: (i) plasma can be stable with local beta exceeding unity, (ii) fluctuations can drive either heat or particles inward to create stationary profiles that are strongly peaked, and (iii) the confinement of particles and energy can decouple. During the past decade, several laboratory dipole experiments and modeling efforts have lead to new understanding of interchange, centrifugal and entropy modes, nonlinear gyrokinetics, and plasma transport. Two devices, the LDX experiment at MIT and RT-1 at the University of Tokyo, operate with levitated superconducting dipole magnets. With a levitated dipole, not only is very high-beta plasma confined in steady state but, also, levitation produces high-temperature at low input power and demonstrates that toroidal magnetic confinement of plasma does not require a toroidal field. Modeling has explained many of the processes operative in these experiments, including the observation of a strong inward particle pinch. Turbulent low-frequency fluctuations in dipole confined plasma cause adiabatic transport and form a fundamental linkage between the radial variation of flux-tube volume and the centrally peaked density and pressure profiles.

  6. 40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

  7. 40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

  8. 40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

  9. 40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

  10. 40 CFR 141.705 - Approved laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...laboratory certification program. (b) E. coli. Any laboratory certified by...analysis under § 141.74 is approved for E. coli analysis under this subpart when the laboratory uses the same technique for E. coli that the laboratory uses for §...

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Buddemeier

    1999-01-01

    Gross alpha\\/beta\\/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed

  12. 75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ...applications for research or marketing permits for products...article has any potential utility or to determine physical...standards governing the ethical and humane use of laboratory...laboratory studies. This issue is not specifically...interested persons on these issues and any other...

  13. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and…

  14. Laboratory Three Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description Pendulum

    E-print Network

    Larson, Craig E.

    Laboratory Three ­ Pendulum A. Student Laboratory Description ­ Pendulum I. Background When a pendulum swings back and forth its horizontal motion can be described by a periodic function. In this lab will call the spot where the pendulum hangs at rest the "center". The CBL will take measurements every tenth

  15. Discussion of possible content of an IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) handbook/computer file for ''Data for Medical Radioisotope Production''

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1987-04-01

    Several possible approaches will be put forward in order to stimulate discussion and seek consensus on the relative emphasis and format of a proposed IAEA handbook and computer file for ''Data for Medical Radioisotope Production.'' An outline for possible chapters for non-nuclear physicists will be presented describing low, medium, and high energy reactions induced by light projectiles (e.g., n,p,..cap alpha..), by photons, and by heavy ions. Qualitative features would be described, typical experimental examples would be presented to illustrate each type of reaction, and examples would be presented of how well various computer codes would permit the calculation/prediction of the experimental results. We next solicit discussion of the desirability of the above, and of the format and means of compilation of a computer data file for isotope production. This should include format of experimental data, and also, whether a calculated file should be presented for production of particular isotopes from a ''most wanted'' list.

  16. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. Teaching Laboratory Neuroscience at Bowdoin: The Laboratory Instructor Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Stephen; Curtis, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Bowdoin College is a small liberal arts college that offers a comprehensive Neuroscience major. The laboratory experience is an integral part of the major, and many students progress through three stages. A core course offers a survey of concepts and techniques. Four upper-level courses function to give students more intensive laboratory research experience in neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology, social behavior, and learning and memory. Finally, many majors choose to work in the individual research labs of the Neuroscience faculty. We, as laboratory instructors, are vital to the process, and are actively involved in all aspects of the lab-based courses. We provide student instruction in state of the art techniques in neuroscience research. By sharing laboratory teaching responsibilities with course professors, we help to prepare students for careers in laboratory neuroscience and also support and facilitate faculty research programs. PMID:23493807

  18. Teaching laboratory neuroscience at bowdoin: the laboratory instructor perspective.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, Stephen; Curtis, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Bowdoin College is a small liberal arts college that offers a comprehensive Neuroscience major. The laboratory experience is an integral part of the major, and many students progress through three stages. A core course offers a survey of concepts and techniques. Four upper-level courses function to give students more intensive laboratory research experience in neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology, social behavior, and learning and memory. Finally, many majors choose to work in the individual research labs of the Neuroscience faculty. We, as laboratory instructors, are vital to the process, and are actively involved in all aspects of the lab-based courses. We provide student instruction in state of the art techniques in neuroscience research. By sharing laboratory teaching responsibilities with course professors, we help to prepare students for careers in laboratory neuroscience and also support and facilitate faculty research programs. PMID:23493807

  19. Laboratory testing the Anaconda.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, J R; Heller, V; Farley, F J M; Hearn, G E; Rainey, R C T

    2012-01-28

    Laboratory measurements of the performance of the Anaconda are presented, a wave energy converter comprising a submerged water-filled distensible tube aligned with the incident waves. Experiments were carried out at a scale of around 1:25 with a 250 mm diameter and 7 m long tube, constructed of rubber and fabric, terminating in a linear power take-off of adjustable impedance. The paper presents some basic theory that leads to predictions of distensibility and bulge wave speed in a pressurized compound rubber and fabric tube, including the effects of inelastic sectors in the circumference, longitudinal tension and the surrounding fluid. Results are shown to agree closely with measurements in still water. The theory is developed further to provide a model for the propagation of bulges and power conversion in the Anaconda. In the presence of external water waves, the theory identifies three distinct internal wave components and provides theoretical estimates of power capture. For the first time, these and other predictions of the behaviour of the Anaconda, a device unlike almost all other marine systems, are shown to be in remarkably close agreement with measurements. PMID:22184668

  20. [Laboratory diagnosis of toxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Ondriska, F; Jalili, N A; Catar, G

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a world-wide spread parasitosis. The disease potentially highly affects two groups of patients: foetus and immunosuppressed patients. The determination of diagnosis and therapy on the basis of a single serum examination is very important; possible on the basis of a single serum sample. In most cases, it is possible to differentiate between recent and latent infections using a combination of suitable methods, which permit us to confirm particular antibody classes. In the presented paper the authors suggest diagnostic procedures for 4 groups of patients: pregnant, neonates with suspected congenital toxoplasmosis, immunodeficient patients and immunocompetent patients. The diagnostic methods consist of a combination of basic and supplemented diagnostic methods. Each patient's serum should be tested by basic tests which include the detection of total antibodies with CFT or IFT and specific classes of IgM and IgG antibodies by ELISA. The potential activity of toxoplasma infection can be determined by supplementary methods of e.g. IgG avidity antibodies, establishment of IgA antibodies, western blotting method and monitoring of antibodies production. For each situation the authors present interpretations of suspected cases including proposals for clinicians. These procedures are suggested for practical use in laboratories of various diagnostic levels in order to help to the diagnostic procedures in a particular situation as well as for clinical evaluation of established results. (Fig. 4, Ref. 65). PMID:11039196

  1. Knowledge Media Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How do students learn in the classroom? How can teachers best utilize new and emerging technologies in the classroom? What can teachers do to seamlessly incorporate technology into the learning experience? These are all questions that are asked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Knowledge Media Laboratory. On their website, users can learn about their work with communities of teachers, faculty, programs, and institutions over the past several years, and also look over some of their informative case studies. The Gallery of Teaching and Learning is a good place to start one’s exploration of the site, as it contains a number of exhibitions that look at how web-based tools can be used in teaching and how scholarship may change as a result of an increasingly networked milieu. One seminal resource on the site is the KEEP Toolkit. With the Toolkit, teachers and others can create engaging knowledge representations on the web for their own use. For visitors who might feel a bit overwhelmed by this, there is also a nice tutorial that explains how the Toolkit can be used.

  2. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory (AMML) 1971-1972 program involved the investigation of three separate life detection schemes. The first was a continued further development of the labeled release experiment. The possibility of chamber reuse without inbetween sterilization, to provide comparative biochemical information was tested. Findings show that individual substrates or concentrations of antimetabolites may be sequentially added to a single test chamber. The second detection system which was investigated for possible inclusion in the AMML package of assays, was nitrogen fixation as detected by acetylene reduction. Thirdly, a series of preliminary steps were taken to investigate the feasibility of detecting biopolymers in soil. A strategy for the safe return to Earth of a Mars sample prior to manned landings on Mars is outlined. The program assumes that the probability of indigenous life on Mars is unity and then broadly presents the procedures for acquisition and analysis of the Mars sample in a manner to satisfy the scientific community and the public that adequate safeguards are being taken.

  3. Ocean Climate Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A division of the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) described in the March 31, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/sci-engr/current/index.html#1), the Ocean Climate Laboratory performs scientific analyses of oceanographic data, develops ocean climatologies, investigates "interannual to decadal-scale ocean climate variability using historical ocean data," builds global ocean databases, and facilitates the international exchange of oceanographic data. The Homepage provides access to summarized data via the What's New section; recent releases include the CD-ROM World Ocean Database for 1998 (WOD98, described on site), and data files on "High resolution (1/4 degree) temperature and salinity analyses of the world's oceans" (.pts format) or "seasonal analyses of phosphate" (.pts format), among others. Additionally, users may browse the Products section for detailed descriptions of data quality control methods (including statistical analyses). An impressive list of publications provides an overview of the Lab's research activities in the Publications section, and researcher lists are provided in the People section.

  4. Exposure assessment of laboratory students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y M; DiBerardinis, L; Smith, T

    1999-08-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has two kinds of laboratories, teaching for undergraduate students and research laboratories for graduate students and research staff. The objective of this study is to determine chemical exposures during teaching and research activities. There are three hypotheses in this study: (1) Exposures in academic laboratories are well below health standards; (2) Students in undergraduate teaching laboratories have less chemical exposure compared to students in graduate research laboratories; and (3) Students in different disciplines are expected to have different exposures. From September 1996 to December 1996, 132 air samples were collected from both teaching and research laboratories in the departments of Material Sciences and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Biology. The most frequently sampled chemicals in these three departments were cobalt, styrene, and formaldehyde, respectively. A total of 23 different agents were measured. In this study, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV)-short-term exposure limit (STEL) is used as the health-effect standard for exposure time less than four hours. The ACGIH TLV-TWA (time-weighted average) is used as the standard for exposure times equal to or greater than four hours. The ratio of measured concentrations to the appropriate ACGIH standard was then calculated. The geometric mean of the ratio for the total samples was 0.34 percent of the standards. There were 70 samples from teaching laboratories (geometric mean = 0.38% of the standards), and 62 samples from research laboratories (geometric mean = 0.08% of the standards). The chemical exposures relative to the standards in teaching laboratories were statistically higher than in research laboratories (p-value < 0.001). Information about personal protective equipment and the use of laboratory chemical hoods was also collected. The differences in use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among these departments was not statistically significant. From the air sampling results, we concluded that (1) Chemical exposures in the academic laboratories in this study were all well below the health standards; (2) Undergraduate students in teaching laboratories had higher chemical exposures than graduate students in research laboratories; (3) Chemical exposures among departments were not significantly different; and (4) Hazard communication, safety training, and laboratory rules enforcement are important for protection and may be the reason that the results from this study indicate that chemical exposures in this academic institution are well below the health standards under normal operations. PMID:10462848

  5. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Sara

    This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

  6. Laboratory Air Handling Unit System

    E-print Network

    Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative AHU system is presented in this paper. The proposed AHU system is called a Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) system since it is most suitable for the buildings where one section (laboratory) has 100% exhaust while the other section...

  7. Laboratory Manual, Electrical Engineering 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. Dept. of Electrical Engineering.

    Developed as part of a series of materials in the electrical engineering sequence developed under contract with the United States Office of Education, this laboratory manual provides nine laboratory projects suitable for a second course in electrical engineering. Dealing with resonant circuits, electrostatic fields, magnetic devices, and…

  8. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Introduction 1

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    for the period January 1 through December 31, 1989. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY California Institute of TechnologyJPL Annual Report 1989 Jet Propulsion Laboratory #12;#12;CONTENTS Introduction 1 Director's Message 2 Flight Projects 5 Space and Earth Science 15 Advanced Technology 22 Telecommunications Systems 31

  9. Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head

    E-print Network

    Kazama, Hokto

    Kazuhiko Yamaguchi Deputy Laboratory Head Laboratory for Motor Learning Control RIKEN Brain Science.yamaguchi@riken.jp Education 1975 BSc in Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo 1980 PhD in Biology, School of Science, University of Tokyo 1987 PhD in Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Tokyo Research

  10. A Collaborative Electronic Laboratory Notebook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Myers; Elena S. Mendoza; Bonnie L. Hoopes; MH Hamza

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a secure, collaborative, web-based electronic notebook (EN) designed to provide researchers and students with a means to record and share their primary research notes and data. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Electronic Laboratory Notebook (ELN) supports a variety of common multimedia formats and can easily be extended to allow entry and display of custom data types.

  11. Mission Overview Mars Science Laboratory

    E-print Network

    by the Ca- The Mars Science Laboratory Mast Camera, mounted at about human-eye height, will image the rover for approaching to examine with other instru- human exploration of Mars and is relevant to assessing the planetMission Overview Mars Science Laboratory National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA's Mars

  12. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  13. Simulated Laboratory in Digital Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Thomas G.

    Design of computer circuits used to be a pencil and paper task followed by laboratory tests, but logic circuit design can now be done in half the time as the engineer accesses a program which simulates the behavior of real digital circuits, and does all the wiring and testing on his computer screen. A simulated laboratory in digital logic has been…

  14. Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics

    E-print Network

    Lucny, Andrej

    Joined Laboratory of Mobile Robotics Joined Laboratory of mobile robotics has been foun- ded is dedicated to provide achievement of following goals: 1. research and development activities in robotics (Robotna£ka robot, telepresentation lab, and furt- her projects), 2. promotion and popularization

  15. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    1.D.1 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES housing area in one of the University's animal facilities to research laboratories or other specialized.2 Transport of animals that require ground transportation to facilities off campus. A. If a research animal

  16. Biodegradable Polymer Characterization Laboratory Unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith A. Schimmel; Jianzhong Lou; Arvind Vyas Harinath; Leonard Uitenham

    A current research area of significant environmental, economic, and scientific importance is biodegradable polymers. 1-4 Biodegradable polymers is also an area that has great promise for being used to integrate life science into the chemical engineering curriculum. To this point, however, high quality laboratory manuals on biodegradable polymers have not been developed. Therefore, a laboratory unit titled \\

  17. Trial of Integrated Laboratory Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuo, Osamu; Takahashi, Yuzo; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakashima, Akira; Morita, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    In most laboratory practices for students in medical schools, a laboratory guidebook is given to the students, in which the procedures are precisely described. The students merely follow the guidebook without thinking deeply, which spoils the students and does not entice them to think creatively. Problem-based learning (PBL) could be one means for…

  18. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

  19. Determining laboratory value: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-04-01

    This article describes how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one defined fair market value, addressed how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two addresses how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516270

  20. Determining laboratory value: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Stein, P

    1996-03-01

    This article will describe how to determine a fair market value for a dental laboratory. Part one addresses how to define fair market value, how value is perceived and how to prepare for laboratory evaluation. Part two, to be printed in April, will address how to apply an appropriate valuation methodology to determine worth. PMID:9516267

  1. The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The Jackson Laboratory was founded in 1929 and in 1983 earned an NCI Cancer Center designation. The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center (JAXCC) comprises three campuses. The approximately 50 JAXCC members have complementary expertise and are united in research aimed at understanding and targeting the genomic complexity of cancer.

  2. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    3.E.4 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES for PROPER procedures conducted in animal laboratories. Exposure to these allergens can trigger allergic symptoms to using NIOSH N95 dust-mist respirator, all employees must have respiratory fit-testing performed through

  3. Decommissioning of NUKEM's tritium laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Christ; E. L. Wehner

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a NUKEM tritium laboratory, operated for tritium target production and different types of research work since 1981, which was shut down in 1989. After removal of all contaminated components and accompanying ventilation system, remaining building structures were decontaminated yielding the former laboratory free for unrestricted use. Cold dismantle techniques and dry decontamination methods were applied to

  4. RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    RIKEN Brain Science Institute Laboratory for Developmental Gene Regulation Laboratory Neurophysiology Laboratory for Circuit Mechanisms of Sensory Perception Laboratory for Local Neuronal Circuits Laboratory for Synaptic Plasticity and Connectivity Laboratory for Neuron-Glia Circuitry Laboratory

  5. Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

  6. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Magma transport in volcanic plumbing systems induces surface deformation, which can be monitored by geodetic techniques, such as GPS and InSAR. These geodetic signals are commonly analyzed through geodetic models in order to constrain the shape of, and the pressure in, magma plumbing systems. These models, however, suffer critical limitations: (1) the modelled magma conduit shapes cannot be compared with the real conduits, so the geodetic models cannot be tested nor validated; (2) the modelled conduits only exhibit shapes that are too simplistic; (3) most geodetic models only account for elasticity of the host rock, whereas substantial plastic deformation is known to occur. To overcome these limitations, one needs to use a physical system, in which (1) both surface deformation and the shape of, and pressure in, the underlying conduit are known, and (2) the mechanical properties of the host material are controlled and well known. In this contribution, we present novel quantitative laboratory results of shallow magma emplacement. Fine-grained silica flour represents the brittle crust, and low viscosity vegetable oil is an analogue for the magma. The melting temperature of the oil is 31°C; the oil solidifies in the models after the end of the experiments. At the time of injection the oil temperature is 50°C. The oil is pumped from a reservoir using a volumetric pump into the silica flour through a circular inlet at the bottom of a 40x40 cm square box. The silica flour is cohesive, such that oil intrudes it by fracturing it, and produces typical sheet intrusions (dykes, cone sheets, etc.). During oil intrusion, the model surface deforms, mostly by doming. These movements are measured by an advanced photogrammetry method, which uses 4 synchronized fixed cameras that periodically image the surface of the model from different angles. We apply particle tracking method to compute the 3D ground deformation pattern through time. After solidification of the oil, the intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  7. Australia's marine virtual laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and d) run the assembled configuration in a cloud computing environment, or download the assembled configuration and packaged data to run on any other system of the user's choice. MARVL is now being applied in a number of case studies around Australia ranging in scale from locally confined estuaries to the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand. In time we expect the range of models offered will include biogeochemical models.

  8. Schistosomiasis: collaboration in laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Girgis, S; Anis, M H; Shafeek, H A; Moody, H A

    1994-09-01

    Harpur Memorial Hospital in Menouf and the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London have shared a development program through the laboratories for eight years to develop laboratory facilities and organize a diploma course in medical laboratory technical training, in Egypt, with the help of an annual visit by a senior laboratory medical scientist from London. The laboratory in Egypt has been upgraded while the Hospital for Tropical Diseases has benefitted by obtaining valuable teaching material for its training programs in the UK and worldwide. Schistosomiasis is a major health problem in Egypt, with both S. haematobium and S. mansoni common in the Menoufaya district of the Nile delta, requiring significant laboratory time for diagnosis. This article describes the diagnostic procedures used in Harpur Memorial Hospital serving an area of acute schistosomiasis infection with consideration of whether diagnostic tests used in Egypt require further development. The laboratory in London sees mainly expatriate patients with a range of schistosomiasis conditions and has a wider range of diagnostic procedures available. In Menouf, stool and urine samples of all outpatients are routinely examined, with rectal biopsies performed on a proportion of patients with good clinical indication of schistosomiasis. Serodiagnosis for Schistosoma is not currently available at the hospital. Rectal biopsy has, however, proved to be a reliable method of diagnosing schistosomiasis in the difficult cases when urine and stool examinations were negative, with the introduction of the formol ether technique for concentration of faeces having greatly improved the initial detection of ova. PMID:12345655

  9. Laboratory Request Terminal for an Automated Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Borkat, Franklin R.; Kataoka, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    The Clinical Laboratory at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), Bethesda, MD, has an automated Laboratory Information System which accepts requests for tests, performs certain tests and reports the results back to the requester. This system, which has been in operation for 7 years, is now being upgraded to integrate some of the recent advances in computer technology in medical care. This paper describes the design and development of an on-line order entry device, called a Laboratory Request Terminal (LRT), to interface with the laboratory system. It also describes the tasks of the software in the terminal which support the terminal functions and relieve both the central computer and the interconnecting lines of significant workload. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  10. Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases. Methods An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education. Results A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation. Conclusions Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system. PMID:24164781

  11. Introduction to Biotechnology: Laboratory Manual

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wheeler, Angela

    By Linnea Fletcher, Evelyn Goss, Patricia Phelps, and Angela Wheeler, this is the laboratory manual for an introductory biotechnology course. This 134-page Word document describes the basic skills necessary for the biotechnology laboratory, such as safety, mathematics, documentation, calibration, and equipment. Each chapter contains objectives for students to accomplish, some practice lessons and questions, and laboratory activities. Students will also learn some basic processes, such as Restriction Enzyme Mapping of DNA, DNA Fingerprinting, and Southern Blot Analysis. There is also a section on bioinformatics.

  12. University of Idaho: Pedology Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website discusses the University of Idaho's pedology laboratory's work primarily focused on the environmental factors and processes that form soils and influence their use and management. Researchers and students can learn about the volcanic ash-influenced soils in the Pacific Northwest, the hydrology of Northern Idaho, and the ability of soils in the Palouse Basin to accommodate ground water recharge. The website provides information on laboratory analysis procedures and data on andisols and andic properties. Users will also find descriptions of graduate theses and dissertations, information on the Maynard A. Fosberg Monolith Collection, and many of the laboratory's abstracts.

  13. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  14. Microwave remote sensing laboratory design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.

    1979-01-01

    Application of active and passive microwave remote sensing to the study of ocean pollution is discussed. Previous research efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory were surveyed to derive guidance for the design of a laboratory program of research. The essential issues include: choice of radar or radiometry as the observational technique; choice of laboratory or field as the research site; choice of operating frequency; tank sizes and material; techniques for wave generation and appropriate wavelength spectrum; methods for controlling and disposing of pollutants used in the research; and pollutants other than oil which could or should be studied.

  15. Association for Biology Laboratory Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1979, the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) promotes "information exchange among university and college educators actively concerned with teaching biology in a laboratory setting." The ABLE website contains information about grants, past and future annual conferences, and membership. ABLE also posts employment opportunities, and an extensive array of links organized into categories for General Biology, Online Journals, Biological Animations, Suppliers of Biological Materials, Comprehensive Links Pages, and more. In addition, ABLE makes available current and past newsletters and a collection of abstracts and full-text articles from _Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching_, a publication based on the proceedings of the ABLE annual conference.

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

    2012-01-01

    This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the bit is a thick-walled maraging steel collection tube allowing the powdered sample to be augured up the hole into the sample chamber. For robustness, the wall thickness of the DBA was maximized while still ensuring effective sample collection. There are four recesses in the bit tube that are used to retain the fresh bits in their bit box. The rotating bit is supported by a back-to-back duplex bearing pair within a housing that is connected to the outer DBA housing by two titanium diaphragms. The only bearings on the drill in the sample flow are protected by a spring-energized seal, and an integrated shield that diverts the ingested powdered sample from the moving interface. The DBA diaphragms provide radial constraint of the rotating bit and form the sample chambers. Between the diaphragms there is a sample exit tube from which the sample is transferred to the CHIMRA. To ensure that the entire collected sample is retained, no matter the orientation of the drill with respect to gravity during sampling, the pass-through from the forward to the aft chamber resides opposite to the exit tube.

  17. Intelligent software for laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Ken E; King, Ross D

    2004-09-01

    The automation of laboratory techniques has greatly increased the number of experiments that can be carried out in the chemical and biological sciences. Until recently, this automation has focused primarily on improving hardware. Here we argue that future advances will concentrate on intelligent software to integrate physical experimentation and results analysis with hypothesis formulation and experiment planning. To illustrate our thesis, we describe the 'Robot Scientist' - the first physically implemented example of such a closed loop system. In the Robot Scientist, experimentation is performed by a laboratory robot, hypotheses concerning the results are generated by machine learning and experiments are allocated and selected by a combination of techniques derived from artificial intelligence research. The performance of the Robot Scientist has been evaluated by a rediscovery task based on yeast functional genomics. The Robot Scientist is proof that the integration of programmable laboratory hardware and intelligent software can be used to develop increasingly automated laboratories. PMID:15331223

  18. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  19. VMSL: Virtual Mass Spectrometry Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-07-05

    This site presents a series of case studies that can be explored using modern mass spectrometry methods. The problem-solving nature of the site provides students a virtual laboratory experience that can supplement access to mass spectrometry instrumentation.

  20. Strategic Technology JET PROPULSION LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Strategic Technology Directions JET PROPULSION LABORATORY National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 0 9 #12;© 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged. #12;Strategic Technology Directions 2009 offers a distillation of technologies, their links to space missions

  1. IMPROVED LABORATORY DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a program to evaluate an Improved Laboratory Dispersant Effectiveness Test (ILDET) which was developed to replace EPA's Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test (RSDET). The report summarizes the development of the IL...

  2. Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2004-01-01

    The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

  3. Commissioning a materials research laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    SAVAGE,GERALD A.

    2000-03-28

    This presentation covers the process of commissioning a new 150,000 sq. ft. research facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The laboratory being constructed is a showcase of modern design methods being built at a construction cost of less than $180 per sq. ft. This is possible in part because of the total commissioning activities that are being utilized for this project. The laboratory's unique approach to commissioning will be presented in this paper. The process will be followed through from the conceptual stage on into the actual construction portion of the laboratory. Lessons learned and cost effectiveness will be presented in a manner that will be usable for others making commissioning related decisions. Commissioning activities at every stage of the design will be presented along with the attributed benefits. Attendees will hear answers to the what, when, who, and why questions associated with commissioning of this exciting project.

  4. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  5. University of Maryland: Geochemistry Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This extensive website features the University of Maryland's Geochemistry Laboratories' efforts to "produce the highest quality elemental and isotopic data, to teach students and visitors the techniques involved with gathering such data," and to develop new methods and instrumentation in the field of elemental and isotope measurements." Users can discover the Thermal Ionization, Plasma, and Gas Source laboratories; as well as the Chemical Processing Lab and the Mineral Separation and Rock Preparation Laboratories. Through the links to the staff members and three of the laboratories, researchers can learn about the department's studies of the Earth's core, mantle, and crust; the atmosphere and hydrosphere; and the isotopic evolution of the solar system. Throughout the website, students and educators can find educational materials on topics including ablation spot characteristics and environmental safety.

  6. PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014)

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    - 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2014) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Chiang 235 Physics chiang@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 Tony Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Joe Mitchell 512

  7. PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015)

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    - 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 Xiangdong Zhu 235 Physics zhu@physics.ucdavis.edu 402-7113 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Andrew Bradshaw 518

  8. Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  9. Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  10. Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From D.B. McWhorterand D. K. Sunda's 1977 Ground-Water Hydrology and Hydraulics, this two page excerpt outlines and details Laboratory Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. Here, visitors will find illustrations and formula to understand the concept.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Mary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-02

    Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  12. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    3.E.10 COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for DISPOSAL applies to all Research staff and LAF staff disposing of glass waste in the LAF. 3. PROCEDURE: a. Glass

  13. Safety and Health Topics: Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    A website created by the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OSHA) highlighting standards, standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories.

  14. Extending the Marine Microcosm Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryswyk, Hal Van; Hall, Eric W.; Petesch, Steven J.; Wiedeman, Alice E.

    2007-01-01

    The traditional range of marine microcosm laboratory experiments is presented as an ideal environment to teach the entire analysis process. The microcosm lab provides student-centered approach with opportunities for collaborative learning and to develop critical communication skills.

  15. LABCON - Laboratory Job Control program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reams, L. T.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program LABCON controls the budget system in a component test laboratory whose workload is made up from many individual budget allocations. A common denominator is applied to an incoming job, to which all effort is charged and accounted for.

  16. A Combustion Laboratory for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a combustion laboratory facility and experiments for a senior-level (undergraduate) course in mechanical engineering. The experiment reinforces basic thermodynamic concepts and provides many students with their first opportunity to work with a combustion system. (DH)

  17. Laboratory Techniques for the Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tombaugh, Dorothy

    1972-01-01

    Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

  18. USGS: National Water Quality Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The USGS's "National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) offers environmental analytical services, including inorganic, organic, and radiochemical constituents, and provides high-quality, reproducible data." Researchers can find a summary of the Laboratory's capabilities, facilities, technology, areas of expertise, and accreditations and certificates. The website offers a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation of its mission. Users can find technical memoranda, a list of NWQL reports and journal articles, and factsheets.

  19. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2003-06-01

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  20. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  1. Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratories, Inc.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This non-profit laboratory in Panacea, Florida offers guided field trips, touch tanks, and a glimpse of their in-house research, in addition to being a supplier of guaranteed-live marine specimens to some 1500 laboratories and classrooms in the US and Canada. Also involved in conservation, GSML third oldest sea turtle research and conservation program in the United States. Information on membership and volunteer opportunities are also available.

  2. Epidemiology of laboratory animal allergy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayley L. Jeal; Meinir G. Jones; Paul Cullinan

    \\u000a Laboratory animal allergy is common and an important occupational health issue for the research, pharmaceutical and toxicological\\u000a sectors. In most settings where there is regular contact with laboratory animals — chiefly small mammals — the prevalence\\u000a of specific sensitisation is around 15% and the prevalence of clinical allergy around 10%. These figures probably underestimate\\u000a the true risk of disease since

  3. [Errors in laboratory daily practice].

    PubMed

    Larrose, C; Le Carrer, D

    2007-01-01

    Legislation set by GBEA (Guide de bonne exécution des analyses) requires that, before performing analysis, the laboratory directors have to check both the nature of the samples and the patients identity. The data processing of requisition forms, which identifies key errors, was established in 2000 and in 2002 by the specialized biochemistry laboratory, also with the contribution of the reception centre for biological samples. The laboratories follow a strict criteria of defining acceptability as a starting point for the reception to then check requisition forms and biological samples. All errors are logged into the laboratory database and analysis report are sent to the care unit specifying the problems and the consequences they have on the analysis. The data is then assessed by the laboratory directors to produce monthly or annual statistical reports. This indicates the number of errors, which are then indexed to patient files to reveal the specific problem areas, therefore allowing the laboratory directors to teach the nurses and enable corrective action. PMID:17264047

  4. Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation

    E-print Network

    Queitsch, Christine

    Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 LABORATORY VENTILATION Contents A. Scope .................................................................................................................3-2 B. General Laboratory Ventilation

  5. Laborlandschaft : redesigning the industrial laboratory module

    E-print Network

    Farley, Alexander H. (Alexander Hamilton)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis proposes to redesign the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory typology by rethinking the composition of the laboratory module; the smallest functional sub-unit of the laboratory type. The design for this thesis ...

  6. Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

  7. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Computa­ tional Learning, and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute for the laboratory's artificial intelligence research is provided in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency

  8. 21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

  9. 21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

  10. 21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

  11. 21 CFR 211.173 - Laboratory animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory animals. 211.173 Section 211.173 Food and Drugs... Laboratory Controls § 211.173 Laboratory animals. Animals used in testing components, in-process materials, or drug...

  12. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities

    E-print Network

    to market viable alternative energy solutions. NREL's world-leading energy decisionNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Capabilities Overview The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's primary laboratory

  13. AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman

    E-print Network

    Greer, Julia R.

    AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Karman Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Jet Propulsion, and the Firestone Flight Sciences Laboratory form the Graduate Aeronautical disciplines making up the broad field known as aeronautics. Areas of Research Aeronautics has evolved

  14. In situ object counting system (ISOCSi3T{sup M}) technique: A cost-effective tool for NDA verification in IAEA Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Nizhnik, V.; Belian, A.; Shephard, A.; Lebrun, A. [Dept. of Safeguards, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, A1400 (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear material measurements using the ISOCS technique are playing an increasing role in IAEA verification activities. The ISOCS capabilities include: a high sensitivity to the presence of U and Pu; the ability to detect very small amounts of material; and the ability to measure items of different shapes and sizes. In addition, the numerical absolute efficiency calibration of a germanium detector used in the technique does not require any calibration standards or reference materials. The ISOCS modelling software performs an absolute efficiency calibration for items with various container shapes, container wall materials, material compositions, material fill-heights, U/Pu weight fractions and even heterogeneously distributed emitting materials. In a number of cases, some key parameters, such as the matrix density and U/Pu weight fraction, can be determined in addition to the emitting material mass and isotopic composition. These capabilities provide a verification solution suitable for a majority of cases where quantitative and isotopic analysis should be performed. Taking into account these advantages, the technique becomes a cost-effective solution for nuclear material non-destructive assay (NDA) verification. At present, the IAEA uses the ISOCS for a wide range of applications including the quantitative analysis of U scrap materials, U/Pu contaminated solid wastes, U fuel elements, U hold-up materials. Additionally, the ISOCS is also applied to some specific verification cases such as the measurement of PuBe neutron sources and the quantification of fission products in solid wastes. In reprocessing facilities with U/Pu waste compaction or facilities with item re-batching, the continuity-of-knowledge can be assured by applying either video surveillance systems together with seals (requiring attaching/detaching and verification activities for each seal) or verification of operator declarations using quantitative measurements for items selected on a random basis. In some cases, the first option is too expensive and places a high demand on inspector and operator time. Quantitative NDA based on the ISOCS technique verifies these materials and significantly decreases the resources required for assuring the continuity-of-knowledge. (authors)

  15. Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Laboratory Ventilation SafetyLaboratory Ventilation Safety J. Scott WardJ. Scott Ward #12;In 1925. Labconco CorporationLabconco Corporation #12;Laboratory VentilationLaboratory Ventilation #12;Laboratory Ventilation ProductsLaboratory Ventilation Products #12;History of Fume HoodsHistory of Fume Hoods Thomas

  16. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts

  17. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within the Center for Biological and Computational Learning

  18. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Koch, Christof

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL of Technology within the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Center for Biological Information Processing

  19. DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--

    • Description: Opportunities to participate in research in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy, and the environment.
    • Discipline(s): Computer Science; Earth, Environmental, and Marine Sciences; Engineering; Life Sciences; Mathematics; Physical Sciences
    • Eligibility: U.S. Citizens and Legal Permanent Residents. Undergraduate Students
    • Location(s): Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee)
    • Duration: Summer Term 10 Weeks; Fall/Spring Term 16 weeks
    • Frequency: Spring, Summer, and Fall
    • How to apply: http://www.scied.science.doe.gov
    • Deadline(s): http://www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/erulf/dates.html

  20. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

  1. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.

    PubMed

    Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

    2010-04-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable. PMID:20097923

  2. Guidelines for Australian mycobacteriology laboratories.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Guidelines for Australian laboratories performing tuberculosis (TB) microscopy and culture have been developed through extensive consultation with expert groups. The aims of these guidelines are: 1. To provide consensus recommendations on the infrastructure, equipment and work practices required by mycobacteriology laboratories; 2. To inform laboratory administrations and governments of the necessary level of investment required to maintain modern mycobacteriology facilities; and 3. To provide informal measures for reviewers inspecting mycobacteriology facilities. These guidelines include safety recommendations based largely on the Australian/New Zealand Standard 2243.3 Safety in laboratories--Microbiological aspects and containment facilities. However, these standards have been rationalised and PC2 facilities with additional processes and precautions in place are recommended for the majority of TB investigations. Guidelines are also provided on staff training, education, health screening and vaccination. Certain procedures and work practices are recommended for mycobacteriology laboratories to guarantee safety, high-quality results, and prompt turnaround times. These guidelines will be reviewed each 1-2 years and feedback from expert groups and individuals is welcomed. PMID:16637240

  3. A regular round of talks with atomic energy ministry representatives of Russia, the U.S., Japan, South Korea and China will be held Saturday in the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) HQ in Vienna. The sides will try to reach a compromise on the pro

    E-print Network

    , South Korea and China will be held Saturday in the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) HQ on French territory, while the U.S., Japan and South Korea prefer Japan. To achieve progress in ITER talks

  4. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  5. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performs applied research in a variety of fields, and one of its main laboratories happens to be the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Scientists at the laboratory "conduct research and development that leads to improved methods, measurements and models to assess and predict exposures of humans and ecosystems to harmful pollutants and other conditions in air, water, soil, and food." Visitors will appreciate such features as the summaries of the lab's current research projects (which include studies of upland coastal areas and biological indicators of pollution). Additionally, visitors can search an interactive map of the US to find out what such projects might be going on in their own state or locale. For fellow scientists and researchers that might have need of such information, the site also contains a number of databases, including the Human Exposure Database System and the Water Resources Database.

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships -- The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosts 300 to 400 undergraduate and graduate students and some faculty every summer in support of its world-class scientific facilities and staff and in an effort to help train the nation's next generation of scientists and engineers.

    Involvement in world-class research provides participants with a set of experiences that support their education and career goals. Typically, participants gain hands-on experience and the opportunity to apply learned theory to real life problems. An experience of this type, and with these resources at a premier state-of-the-art research laboratory is not available in an academic research lab.

  7. Laboratory aspects of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G

    1988-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease), a common tick-borne disorder of people and domestic animals in North America and Europe, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Following the discovery and initial propagation of this agent in 1981 came revelations that other tick-associated infectious disorders are but different forms of Lyme borreliosis. A challenge for the clinician and microbiology laboratory is confirmation that a skin rash, a chronic meningitis, an episode of myocarditis, or an arthritic joint is the consequence of B. burgdorferi infection. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis may be established by (i) directly observing the spirochete in host fluid or tissue, (ii) recovering the etiologic spirochete from the patient in culture medium or indirectly through inoculation of laboratory animals, or (iii) carrying out serologic tests with the patient's serum or cerebrospinal fluid. The last method, while lacking in discriminatory power, is the most efficacious diagnostic assay for most laboratories at present. Images PMID:3069200

  8. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Materials Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical characterization of novel materials. In this laboratory unknown samples are characterized by identifying and quantifying molecular species present through the implementation of a suite of analytical instrumentation and techniques. This leads to the ability to deconvolute decomposition routes and elucidate reaction mechanisms of materials through thermal and evolved gas analysis. This aids in the synthesis of next generation materials that are tailored to optimize stability and performance. These techniques and next generation materials will have many applications. One particular focus is the stable and conductive tetherable cations for use as membrane materials in anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Another is to understand the leachant contaminants derived from balance of plant materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Once identified and quantified, these organic and ionic species are dosed as contaminants into ex/in-situ fuel cell tests, to determine the effect on durability and performance. This laboratory also acts in support of fuel cell catalysis, manufacturing, and other related projects. The Materials Characterization Laboratory will cover multiple analytical operations, with the overall goal of troubleshooting synthetic materials or process streams to improve performance. Having novel evolved gas analysis and other analytical capabilities; this laboratory provides a viable location to analyze small batch samples, whereas setting up these types of capabilities and expertise would be cost and time prohibitive for most institutions. Experiments that can be performed include: (1) Evolved gas analysis; (2) Heterogeneous catalysis; (3) Trace level contaminants analysis; (4) Catalyst characterization; (5) Kinetics and stability; (6) Hyphenated techniques; and (7) Isotopic analysis for elucidating reaction mechanisms and decoupling chemical reactions.

  10. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the competition results, a down select process will be performed in the upcoming year. Looking ahead, this unified effort has positioned each element for an in-flight lab analysis demonstration of select diagnostics measurements in the 2015 timeframe.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  12. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper: Summary of Laboratory Astrophysics Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (NASA LAW) met at NASA Ames Research Center from 1-3 May 2002 to assess the role that laboratory astrophysics plays in the optimization of NASA missions, both at the science conception level and at the science return level. Space missions provide understanding of fundamental questions regarding the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems. In all of these areas the interpretation of results from NASA's space missions relies crucially upon data obtained from the laboratory. We stress that Laboratory Astrophysics is important not only in the interpretation of data, but also in the design and planning of future missions. We recognize a symbiosis between missions to explore the universe and the underlying basic data needed to interpret the data from those missions. In the following we provide a summary of the consensus results from our Workshop, starting with general programmatic findings and followed by a list of more specific scientific areas that need attention. We stress that this is a 'living document' and that these lists are subject to change as new missions or new areas of research rise to the fore.

  13. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: A Chemical Laboratory Safety Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Arthur R.; Harris, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is an inspection form developed for use by college students to perform laboratory safety inspections. The form lists and classifies chemicals and is used to locate such physical facilities as: fume hoods, eye-wash fountains, deluge showers, and flammable storage cabinets. (BT)

  14. Modular Laboratory Courses: An Alternative to a Traditional Laboratory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprette, David R.; Armstrong, Sarah; Beason, K. Beth

    2005-01-01

    Our modular laboratory teaching program is characterized by two major features. First, each course is taught independently and not linked with a particular lecture course. Second, each course is designed to be completed within one-half semester or less. The modular organization has allowed incorporation of the latest technology, reduction of class…

  15. Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util-

    E-print Network

    to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) status and LEED Gold certification security science through the understanding of plutonium. Laboratory space is outfitted with state-of-the-art project planning and design phases. A strong commitment to en- vironmental stewardship throughout

  16. Impactof cost cuttingon laboratories:new businessstrategiesfor laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. OWEN ASH

    Cost reduction is the primary force driving healthcare reform. To survive and thrive in these twnultuous times, laboratories must adapt and implement new business strat- egies. Business paradigm shifts create opportunities for organizations with a plan; a wait-and-see attitude forecasts failure. Drawing upon an 11-year experience with the \\

  17. Laboratory Identification of Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Pritt, Bobbi S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The collection, handling, identification, and reporting of ectoparasitic arthropods in clinical and reference diagnostic laboratories are discussed in this review. Included are data on ticks, mites, lice, fleas, myiasis-causing flies, and bed bugs. The public health importance of these organisms is briefly discussed. The focus is on the morphological identification and proper handling and reporting of cases involving arthropod ectoparasites, particularly those encountered in the United States. Other arthropods and other organisms not of public health concern, but routinely submitted to laboratories for identification, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24396136

  18. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) promotes its research to "secure an energy future for the nation that is environmentally and economically sustainable." The website summaries the Laboratory's variety of research and technology including photovoltaics, wind, biomass, geothermal energy, and hydrogen and fuel cells. Visitors can find out the latest NREL news and events. Visitors can locate materials about renewable energy and energy efficiency. The Publications Database offers references to a wide range of documents about sustainable energy technologies written or edited by NREL.

  19. Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.