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Sample records for icd italian registry

  1. Detect Long-term Complications After ICD Replacement (DECODE): Rationale and Study Design of a Multicenter Italian Registry.

    PubMed

    Diemberger, Igor; Parisi, Quintino; De Filippo, Paolo; Narducci, Maria Lucia; Zanon, Francesco; Potenza, Domenico Rosario; Ciaramitaro, Gianfranco; Malacrida, Maurizio; Boriani, Giuseppe; Biffi, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The replacement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may give rise to considerable clinical consequences, the importance of which is underrated by the medical community. Replacement-related adverse events are difficult to identify and require monitoring of both short-term complications and long-term patient outcome. The aim of this study is to perform a structured evaluation of both short- and long-term adverse events and a cost analysis of consecutive ICD replacement procedures. Detect Long-term Complications After ICD Replacement (DECODE) is a prospective, single-arm, multicenter cohort study designed to estimate long-term complication rates (at 12 months and 5 years) in patients undergoing ICD generator replacement. The study will also evaluate predictors of complications, patient management before and during the replacement procedure in clinical practice, and the costs related to use of health care resources. About 800 consecutive patients with standard indications for ICD generator replacement will be enrolled in this study. The decision to undertake generator replacement/upgrade will be made according to the investigators' own judgment (which will be recorded). Patients will be followed for 60 months through periodic in-hospital examinations or remote monitoring. Detailed data on complications related to ICD replacement in current clinical practice are still lacking. The analysis of adverse events will reveal the value of new preventive strategies, thereby yielding both clinical and economic benefits. Moreover, assessment of complication rates after ICD replacement in a real-life setting will help estimate the actual long-term cost of ICD therapy and assess the real impact of increasing ICD longevity on cost-effectiveness. PMID:26282191

  2. The Italian National Rare Diseases Registry

    PubMed Central

    Taruscio, Domenica; Kodra, Yllka; Ferrari, Gianluca; Vittozzi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rare disease registries are a priority at European level and specific actions are being implemented by the European Commission to support their development. In Italy, a National Registry of rare diseases has been established in 2001 as a network of regional registries. The latter have gradually been established and the full coverage of the Italian territory was attained during 2011. Methods Here we describe the basic features of the National Registry of rare diseases; the activities carried out to promote consistent operations in the regional registries; and the overall quality and composition of the records collected. Results After a validation process, including removal of duplicate records, 110,841 records of patients with rare diseases, single and with group denominations, are stored in the National Registry of rare diseases. They correspond to the overall diagnoses communicated to national registry by regional registries up to 30 June 2012. The quality of the data collected by the the National Registry of rare diseases has been assessed with respect to completeness and consistency of procedures. Variables characterising case and diagnosis showed a very limited number of missing values. Records reported at least one case of 485 rare conditions. Discussion To date, the National Registry of rare diseases is a surveillance system with the main objective of producing epidemiologic evidence on rare diseases in Italy, and of supporting policy making and health services planning. Data quality still represents a limitation for any sound epidemiological estimate of rare diseases in Italy. However, improvements of the quality of collected data and the completeness of case notifications should be strengthened. PMID:24922301

  3. [The Italian ArthroPlasty Registry: a model to export?].

    PubMed

    Torre, Marina; Romanini, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Medical devices (MD) registries are essentials to evaluate outcomes. They represent a key tool to support market surveillance and vigilance, being critical to identify and characterize the implants, assess their performance and trace patients in case of recall. Therefore, the recent "Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on medical devices" asked both the Commission and the Member States to take all appropriate measures to encourage the establishment of registers for specific types of devices, setting common principles to collect comparable information. In Italy more than 170.000 joint replacements were performed in 2013 in over 750 hospitals. Experiences at international level and in some Italian regions show that data from registries are crucial to define the best approach to joint replacement surgery. Results from registries can lead to changes in clinical practice, adopting the best available evidence and avoiding choices associated with poorer outcomes. The Italian Arthroplasty Registry project (RIAP) started in 2006 funded by the DG of Medical Devices and Pharmaceutical Service of the Ministry of Health. Data collection uses Hospital Discharge Records integrated by additional information essential to describe the procedure and identify the implants. As soon as the new European Regulation is approved, a Unique Device Identifier will be assigned to every device. Lacking this information, device identification is currently possible by browsing the RIAP MD Library that includes about 55,000 records and is constantly updated by 60 Manufacturers. The model designed within the RIAP project is simple and might be applied for every implanted device when the additional minimum dataset is defined. PMID:27311121

  4. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Diamond Blackfan anaemia: a report from the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry.

    PubMed

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Zecca, Marco; Lanino, Edoardo; Corti, Paola; Favre, Claudio; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Locatelli, Franco; Prete, Arcangelo

    2014-06-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for patients with Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA). We report the transplantation outcome of 30 Italian DBA patients referred to the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry between 1990 and 2012. This is one of the largest national registry cohorts of transplanted DBA patients. Most patients (83%) were allografted after 2000. A matched sibling donor was employed in 16 patients (53%), the remaining 14 patients (47%) were transplanted from matched unrelated donors. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients engrafted. One patient died at day +6 due to veno-occlusive disease without achieving neutrophil recovery and another patient remained transfusion-dependent despite the presence of a full donor chimerism. The 5-year overall survival and transplant-related mortality was 74·4% and 25·6%, respectively. Patients younger than 10 years as well as those transplanted after 2000 showed a significantly higher overall survival and a significantly lower risk of transplant-related mortality. No difference between donor type was observed. Our data suggest that allogeneic HSCT from a related or unrelated donor was a reasonable alternative to transfusion therapy in young and well chelated DBA patients. PMID:24611452

  5. Validity of ICD-9-CM codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in three Italian administrative healthcare databases: a diagnostic accuracy study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Iosief; Serraino, Diego; Giovannini, Gianni; Stracci, Fabrizio; Casucci, Paola; Alessandrini, Giuliana; Bidoli, Ettore; Chiari, Rita; Cirocchi, Roberto; De Giorgi, Marcello; Franchini, David; Vitale, Maria Francesca; Fusco, Mario; Montedori, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful tools to study healthcare outcomes and to monitor the health status of a population. Patients with cancer can be identified through disease-specific codes, prescriptions and physician claims, but prior validation is required to achieve an accurate case definition. The objective of this protocol is to assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision—Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for breast, lung and colorectal cancers in identifying patients diagnosed with the relative disease in three Italian administrative databases. Methods and analysis Data from the administrative databases of Umbria Region (910 000 residents), Local Health Unit 3 of Napoli (1 170 000 residents) and Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region (1 227 000 residents) will be considered. In each administrative database, patients with the first occurrence of diagnosis of breast, lung or colorectal cancer between 2012 and 2014 will be identified using the following groups of ICD-9-CM codes in primary position: (1) 233.0 and (2) 174.x for breast cancer; (3) 162.x for lung cancer; (4) 153.x for colon cancer and (5) 154.0–154.1 and 154.8 for rectal cancer. Only incident cases will be considered, that is, excluding cases that have the same diagnosis in the 5 years (2007–2011) before the period of interest. A random sample of cases and non-cases will be selected from each administrative database and the corresponding medical charts will be assessed for validation by pairs of trained, independent reviewers. Case ascertainment within the medical charts will be based on (1) the presence of a primary nodular lesion in the breast, lung or colon–rectum, documented with imaging or endoscopy and (2) a cytological or histological documentation of cancer from a primary or metastatic site. Sensitivity and specificity with 95% CIs will be calculated. Dissemination Study results will be disseminated widely through

  6. Twenty years of the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry: where we stand and what remains to be learned

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M.; Marotta, Serena; Calzone, Rita; Grimaldi, Francesco; Zatterale, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of Fanconi anemia remains hard to establish because of its rarity and its heterogeneous clinical presentation; since 1994, the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry has collected clinical, epidemiological and genetic data of Italian Fanconi Anemia patients. This registry includes 180 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Fanconi anemia who have either been enrolled prospectively, at diagnosis, or later on. After enrollment, follow-up data were periodically collected to assess the clinical course, possible complications and long-term survival; the median follow up was 15.6 years. The main goal of the study was to describe the natural history of Fanconi anemia, focusing on the following variables: family history, disease presentation, development of hematological manifestations, development of malignancies, occurrence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and survival. Typical morphological and/or hematological abnormalities and/or growth retardation were the most common manifestations at diagnosis; the majority of patients (77%) exhibited hematological abnormalities at the initial presentation, and almost all (96%) eventually developed hematological manifestations. More than half of the patients (57%) underwent a bone-marrow transplant. The occurrence of cancer was quite rare at diagnosis, whereas the cumulative incidence of malignancies at 10, 20 and 30 years was 5%, 8% and 22%, respectively, for hematological cancers and 1%, 15% and 32%, respectively, for solid tumors. Overall survival at 10, 20 and 30 years were 88%, 56% and 37%, respectively; the main causes of death were cancer, complications of the hematological presentation and complications of transplantation. These data clearly confirm the detrimental outcome of Fanconi anemia, with no major improvement in the past decades. PMID:26635036

  7. Physician-initiated prospective Italian Registry of carotid stenting with the C-Guard mesh-stent: the IRON-Guard registry. Rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; Speziale, F; De Donato, G; Sirignano, P; Setacci, F; Capoccia, L; Galzerano, G; Mansour, W

    2015-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization, every year, 5 million peoples die for stroke and another 5 million are permanently disabled. Although there are many causes of acute stroke, a common treatable cause of acute stroke is atheromatous narrowing at the carotid bifurcation. Carotid endarterectomy is still the standard of car, even if carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become an effective, less invasive alterantive. Unfortunately, CAS procedure is not yet perfect; regardless the use of an embolic protection device (EPD), percutaneous treatment has been correlated with a risk of cerebral ischemic events related to distal embolization. The objective of the IRON-Guard Registry is to evaluate the clinical outcome of treatment by means of stenting with the C-Guard (InspireMD, Boston, MA, USA) in subjects requiring CAS due to significant extracranial carotid artery stenosis with a physician-initiated, Italian, prospective, multicenter, single-arm study. A total of 200 enrolled subjects divided over different centers are planned to be enrolled. CAS will performed by implanting of C-Guard stent. Procedure will be performed according to the physician's standard of care. Standard procedures will be followed based on the Instructions for Use, for the C-Guard device of Inspire. The primary endpoint of this study is the 30-day rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as the cumulative incidence of any periprocedural (≤30 days postprocedure) death, stroke or myocardial infarction. Secondary endpoints are rate of late ipsilateral stroke (31 through 365 days), system technical success, device malfunctions, major adverse events (MAEs), serious device-related and procedure-related adverse events, target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis rates. PMID:25996843

  8. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry

    PubMed Central

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M.; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. Objective This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. Methods From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Results Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having “sporadic” HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. Conclusion We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. PMID:26342526

  9. A breast cancer clinical registry in an Italian comprehensive cancer center: an instrument for descriptive, clinical, and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Baili, Paolo; Torresani, Michele; Agresti, Roberto; Rosito, Giuseppe; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Veneroni, Silvia; Cavallo, Ilaria; Funaro, Francesco; Giunco, Marco; Turco, Alberto; Amash, Hade; Scavo, Antonio; Minicozzi, Pamela; Bella, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Sant, Milena

    2015-01-01

    In clinical research, many potentially useful variables are available via the routine activity of cancer center-based clinical registries (CCCR). We present the experience of the breast cancer clinical registry at Fondazione IRCCS "Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori" to give an example of how a CCCR can be planned, implemented, and used. Five criteria were taken into consideration while planning our CCCR: (a) available clinical and administrative databases ought to be exploited to the maximum extent; (b) open source software should be used; (c) a Web-based interface must be designed; (d) CCCR data must be compatible with population-based cancer registry data; (e) CCCR must be an open system, able to be connected with other data repositories. The amount of work needed for the implementation of a CCCR is inversely linked with the amount of available coded data: the fewer data are available in the input databases as coded variables, the more work will be necessary, for information technology staff, text mining analysis, and registrars (for collecting data from clinical records). A cancer registry in a comprehensive cancer center can be used for several research aspects, such as estimate of the number of cases needed for clinical studies, assessment of biobank specimens with specific characteristics, evaluation of clinical practice and adhesion to clinical guidelines, comparative studies between clinical and population sets of patients, studies on cancer prognosis, and studies on cancer survivorship. PMID:25953447

  10. Management of paediatric Lyme disease in non-endemic and endemic areas: data from the Registry of the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Baggi, E; Villani, A; Norbedo, S; Pellegrini, G; Bozzola, E; Palumbo, E; Bosis, S; Nigro, G; Garazzino, S; Principi, N

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine how specialists in paediatric infectious diseases (PIDs) manage children with suspected Lyme disease (LD) by comparing their approaches in Italian endemic and non-endemic areas. A cross-sectional survey of the PID specialists participating in the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Disease (SITIP) Registry of LD was carried out between 1 January and 30 April 2012. A total of 160 children (80 living in endemic areas and 80 living in non-endemic areas) were diagnosed as having LD between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2011. The clinical manifestations were erythema migrans in 130 cases (81.3 %), arthritis in 24 (15.0 %) and neuroborreliosis in six (3.8 %). Significant differences from the recommendations concerning serology and the tests to undertake were mainly observed in the children with erythema migrans, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). The children with erythema migrans who lived in non-endemic areas were treated with antibiotics significantly less frequently than those living in endemic areas (p < 0.05), and significantly fewer children with erythema migrans or arthritis living in non-endemic areas were treated with amoxicillin in comparison with those living in endemic regions (p < 0.05). The duration of antimicrobial therapy was significantly shorter than recommended in the children with erythema migrans or arthritis, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). Paediatric LD is also present in areas of Italy in which it is not considered endemic, but knowledge concerning its management is generally poor among PID specialists and characterised by enormous gaps in non-endemic areas. PMID:23109197

  11. Converting ICD-9 to ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Stephens, James H; Ledlow, Gerald R; Fockler, Thomas V

    2016-01-01

    Implementing the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) to International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) conversion on October 1, 2015, in the United States has been a long-term goal. While most countries in the world converted more than 10 years ago, the United States was still using ICD-9. Many countries in the world have a single-payer healthcare system, while there are thousands of different healthcare organizations (providers and payers) that presently exist in the United States. With so many different software platforms for healthcare providers and payers, the conversion had become that much more complicated and capital intensive for all healthcare organizations in the country. A few of the present delay reasons to the ICD-10 conversion in past years were the concurrent timelines for meeting meaningful use requirements for the electronic health record, testing with external payers and upgrades from vendors which added complexities and extra costs. The authors examine the reasoning behind the conversion as well as the delays, before making the conversion on October 1, 2015, and review the question regarding whether the government's decision to push the date back a year would have been helpful. PMID:26980201

  12. Adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell support for high-risk primary breast cancer: results from the Italian national registry.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Rosti, Giovanni; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Aieta, Michele; Secondino, Simona; Cinieri, Saverio; Fedele, Roberta; Bengala, Carmelo; Bregni, Marco; Grasso, Donatella; De Giorgi, Ugo; Lanza, Francesco; Castagna, Luca; Bruno, Barbara; Martino, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (AHPCT) for breast cancer (BC) patients has been an area of intense controversy among the medical oncology community. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of this procedure in a large cohort of high-risk primary BC patients who underwent AHPCT in Italy. A total of 1183 patients receiving HDC for high-risk BC (HRBC) (>3 positive nodes) were identified in the Italian registry. The median age was 46 years, 62% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 60.1% had endocrine-responsive tumors, and 20.7% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumor. The median number of positive lymph nodes (LN) at surgery was 15, with 71.5% of patients having ≥ 10 positive nodes. Seventy-three percent received an alkylating agent-based HDC as a single procedure, whereas 27% received epirubicin or mitoxantrone-containing HDC, usually within a multitransplantation program. The source of stem cells was peripheral blood in the vast majority of patients. Transplantation-related mortality was .8%, whereas late cardiac and secondary tumor-related mortality were around 1%, overall. With a median follow-up of 79 months, median disease-free and overall survival (OS) in the entire population were 101 and 134 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that OS was significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors and in patients receiving multiple transplantation procedures. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. The size of the primary tumor and number of involved LN negatively affected OS. Adjuvant HDC with AHPCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk primary BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be proposed in selected HRBC patients and further investigated in clinical trials. PMID:24374214

  13. German adaptations of ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Graubner, B; Brenner, G

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of the ICD-10, published by WHO 1992-94 in English and by DIMDI 1994/95 in German, is a very slow process. Some states introduced ICD-10 for the preparation of statistics of mortality, but only few use it for morbidity. ICD-9 is in Germany only in hospitals still in use. Much effort was put into the improvement of the official ICD-10 and the development of additional aids for more simple and better encoding of diagnoses. Thus a revision especially for ambulatory health care (ICD-10-SGBV with the incorporated ICD-10-Basisschlüssel) and a collection of German terms and expressions of diagnoses that are not at all part of the official ICD-10 (ICD-10-Diagnosenthesaurus) were published. Three years ago a conversion table ICD-9/-10 was developed which can now be harmonised with WHO's Translator. The experiences with all these instruments are satisfying. The development of methods for automatic encoding of free-text phrases of diagnoses has now been started. PMID:10725032

  14. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  15. [Epidemiological surveillance of malignant mesothelioma cases in Italy: incidence and asbestos exposure figures by the Italian mesothelioma registry (ReNaM)].

    PubMed

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Binazzi, Alessandra; Cauzillo, Gabriella; Chellini, Elisabetta; De Zotti, Renata; Gennaro, Valerio; Menegozzo, Massimo; Mensi, Carolina; Merler, Enzo; Mirabelli, Dario; Musti, Marina; Pannelli, Franco; Romanelli, Antonio; Scarselli, Alberto; Tosi, Sergio; Tumino, Rosario; Nesti, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The Study describes the epidemiological surveillance of mesothelioma cases carried out by the Italian mesothelioma register (ReNaM). A Regional Operating Centre (COR) is present in nearly all Italian regions (17 out of 20) and it collects malignant mesothelioma cases and investigate the modalities of asbestos exposure by using a structured questionnaire. The register produces malignant mesothelioma incidence measures and analyses of the modalities of the asbestos exposure. The standardized incidence rate of malignant mesothelioma in 2001 was 2.98 (in 100,000 inhabitants) among men and 0.98 among women; a professional (certain, probable, possible) exposure has been detected in 67.4% of defined cases. In addition to the conventional sectors (shipbuilding, railways repair and demolition, asbestos-cement production), also textile, building, transport, chemical and glass industries, petroleum and sugar refineries, electricity production and distribution plants are getting involved. Despite the absence of some regions completing the national coverage and the non homogeneity in collecting and coding data, the epidemiological surveillance of malignant mesothelioma carried out by ReNaM is an important tool for the scientific knowledge and the prevention of asbestos-related diseases. PMID:18050854

  16. ICD-9-CM and CPT Based Medical Registry

    PubMed Central

    Milholland, Arthur V.; Greenfield, Arnie; Conn, Alasdair; Pollizzi, Joseph A.; Stega, Mark

    1980-01-01

    A system for coding medical information (injuries, procedures, external causes, demographic data) accurately and completely, and for retrieving the information efficiently, has been designed and implemented at the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems. Descriptions of the coding scheme and the analysis program are given.

  17. Ready or not! Here comes ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) is a new system that is a federally mandated change affecting all payers and providers, and is expected to exceed both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Y2K in terms of costs and risks. In 2003, HIPAA named ICD-9 as the code set for supporting diagnoses and procedures in electronic administrative transactions. However, on 16 January 2009, the Department of Health and Human Services published a regulation requiring the replacement of ICD-9 with ICD-10 as of 1 October 2013. While ICD-9 and ICD-10 have a similar type of hierarchy in their structures, ICD-10 is more complex and incorporates numerous changes. Overall, ICD-10 contains more than 141 000 codes, a whopping 712% increase over the <20 000 codes in ICD-9, creating enormous complexities, confusion and expense. Published statistics illustrate that there are instances where a single ICD-9 code can map to more than 50 distinct ICD-10 codes. Also, there are multiple instances where a single ICD-10 code can map to more than one ICD-9 code. Proponents of the new ICD-10 system argue that the granularity should lead to improvements in the quality of healthcare whereas detractors of the system see the same granularity as burdensome. The estimated cost per physician is projected to range from $25 000 to $50 000. PMID:22025181

  18. [Taxonomy and definition of clinical registries].

    PubMed

    Costa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    In order to assess the needs of knowledge about surveillance and registries in Italy and to prepare a proposal for the advancement of monitoring and recording capacity, a working group led by the Italian Association of Epidemiology and composed by the University of Turin, the Institute of Health and Agenas, carried out a survey of definitions and approaches used in public health and consulted the main Italian experts in surveillance and registries. Some of the reflections developed in this project are presented, to assess to which extent they are adaptable to the prospects the program PRIER aims to. Different aspects of the issue are analyzed: from the frame work necessary to identify information needs and how to improve the ability to measure and types of definitions and taxonomies of the registers, to the implications of the choices about what to include in registries on regulation of the instruments and investment priorities for new registries and surveillance. PMID:26418503

  19. JBEI Registry

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registriesmore » for data sharing and exchange.« less

  20. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  1. Near-Fatal ICD Lead Dysfunction with Implications for ICD Testing.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Alexander; Attanasio, Philipp; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Blaschke, Florian

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) experienced ventricular fibrillation. After resuscitation, no communication between the device and an ICD programmer was possible. The ICD was explanted, no signs of destruction were visible, and the ICD leads revealed normal values. A new ICD was implanted, interrogation values were stable. However, immediately after defibrillation testing the connection between programmer and ICD was interrupted and could not be established again. The device showed burn marks and a hole in the can. Analysis revealed an isolation defect of the ICD lead, which was not detectable with standard interrogation. PMID:26519249

  2. Hypochondriasis: considerations for ICD-11.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Odile A; Veale, David; Stein, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently revisiting the ICD. In the 10th version of the ICD, approved in 1990, hypochondriacal symptoms are described in the context of both the primary condition hypochondriacal disorder and as secondary symptoms within a range of other mental disorders. Expansion of the research base since 1990 makes a critical evaluation and revision of both the definition and classification of hypochondriacal disorder timely. This article addresses the considerations reviewed by members of the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in their proposal for the description and classification of hypochondriasis. The proposed revision emphasizes the phenomenological overlap with both anxiety disorders (e.g., fear, hypervigilance to bodily symptoms, and avoidance) and obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (e.g., preoccupation and repetitive behaviors) and the distinction from the somatoform disorders (presence of somatic symptom is not a critical characteristic). This revision aims to improve clinical utility by enabling better recognition and treatment of patients with hypochondriasis within the broad range of global health care settings. PMID:25388609

  3. Recent developments in the subcutaneous ICD.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Mark E; Prutkin, Jordan M; Bardy, Gust H

    2016-08-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was developed as a simple device to reduce the morbidity of ICD therapy while providing a comparable reduction in sudden death from ventricular fibrillation. This review highlights the differences compared to the traditional ICD. It includes recent data on safety and efficacy, as well as best practices on screening and programming, and discusses expected future developments. PMID:27079889

  4. Syndromic surveillance in an ICD-10 world.

    PubMed

    Jayatilleke, Achala; Kriseman, Jeffrey; Bastin, Lisa H; Ajani, Umed; Hicks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's BioSense program is an integrated national public health surveillance system that uses electronic medical record (EMR) data to provide situational awareness for all-hazard health-related events. Because the system leverages International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) coded data from EMRs for syndromic surveillance, the upcoming Health and Human Services-mandated transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM will have a significant impact. To translate across the two encoding systems, we developed a Mapping Reference Table (MRT) for the ICD-9/10 transition. We extracted ICD-9-CM codes binned to predefined syndromes and mapped each to its corresponding ICD-10-CM code(s). Then, we translated the output ICD-10-CM codes back to ICD-9-CM through a reverse translation validation process. Throughout the translation process, we examined outputs manually and incorporated annotated results into the MRT. The resulting MRT can be used to refine and update each existing syndromic surveillance definition in BioSense to be compatible with ICD-10-CM and consistently classify or bin any given emergency department visit into the correct syndrome regardless of coding system. PMID:25954453

  5. Indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Chinushi, Masaomi; Washizuka, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Since the first clinical use of implantable defibrillator in human, the technology and the function of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have been much improved and now, ICD can be implanted within the chest wall. ICD is the most reliable therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with documented VT/VF and the efficacy is most clear in patients with depressed heart function. It is now extended as a tool of the primary prevention of SCD in high risk patients after myocardial infarction. However, such beneficial effect is not applicable to DCM though patients might have depressed heart function. ICD is not free from procedure- or device-related problems which need to be resolved. From unknown causes, VT/VF might recur in an incessant form and an emergency admission is needed. Therefore, even during ICD therapy, patients often require antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation. PMID:15206546

  6. Statins Decrease Oxidative Stress and ICD Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Heather L.; Shukrullah, Irfan; Veledar, Emir; Gutmann, Rebecca; London, Barry; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that statins decrease ventricular arrhythmias in internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients. The mechanism is unknown, but evidence links increased inflammatory and oxidative states with increased arrhythmias. We hypothesized that statin use decreases oxidation. Methods. 304 subjects with ICDs were surveyed for ventricular arrhythmia. Blood was analyzed for derivatives of reactive oxygen species (DROMs) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Results. Subjects included 252 (83%) men, 58% on statins, 20% had ventricular arrhythmias. Average age was 63 years and ejection fraction (EF) 20%. ICD implant duration was 29 ± 27 months. Use of statins correlated with lower ICD events (r = 0.12, P = .02). Subjects on statins had lower hsCRP (5.2 versus 6.3; P = .05) and DROM levels (373 versus 397; P = .03). Other factors, including IL-6 and EF did not differ between statin and nonstatin use, nor did beta-blocker or antiarrhythmic use. Multivariate cross-correlation analysis demonstrated that DROMs, statins, IL-6 and EF were strongly associated with ICD events. Multivariate regression shows DROMs to be the dominant predictor. Conclusion. ICD event rate correlates with DROMs, a measure of lipid peroxides. Use of statins is associated with reduced DROMs and fewer ICD events, suggesting that statins exert their effect through reducing oxidation. PMID:20369058

  7. [Recurrent failed ICD therapy of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Hein, W; Ellringmann, U; Vollmann, D; Rostock, T; Schott, P

    2012-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) are used as standard therapy to prevent sudden cardiac death in heart failure patients. Today, physicians in emergency and intensive care medicine are often confronted with problems of ICD therapy in these patients. We report a case of a patient suffering from recurrent ventricular tachycardia (VT) requiring antiarrhythmia treatment with amiodarone. With an increasing drug loading, the VT cycle length was progressively prolonged resulting in a slow VT undetectable for the ICD. Subsequently, the patient was scheduled for VT ablation after which the patient became free of arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:23070331

  8. Effectiveness of remote monitoring of CIEDs in detection and treatment of clinical and device-related cardiovascular events in daily practice: the HomeGuide Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Calò, Leonardo; Vaccari, Diego; Zanotto, Gabriele; Curnis, Antonio; Buja, Gianfranco; Rovai, Nicola; Gargaro, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Aims The HomeGuide Registry was a prospective study (NCT01459874), implementing a model for remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in daily clinical practice, to estimate effectiveness in major cardiovascular event detection and management. Methods and results The workflow for remote monitoring [Biotronik Home Monitoring (HM)] was based on primary nursing: each patient was assigned to an expert nurse for management and to a responsible physician for medical decisions. In-person visits were scheduled once a year. Seventy-five Italian sites enrolled 1650 patients [27% pacemakers, 27% single-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 22% dual-chamber ICDs, 24% ICDs with cardiac resynchronization therapy]. Population resembled the expected characteristics of CIED patients. During a 20 ± 13 month follow-up, 2471 independently adjudicated events were collected in 838 patients (51%): 2033 (82%) were detected during HM sessions; 438 (18%) during in-person visits. Sixty were classified as false-positive, with generalized estimating equation-adjusted sensitivity and positive predictive value of 84.3% [confidence interval (CI), 82.5–86.0%] and 97.4% (CI, 96.5–98.2%), respectively. Overall, 95% of asymptomatic and 73% of actionable events were detected during HM sessions. Median reaction time was 3 days [interquartile range (IQR), 1–14 days]. Generalized estimating equation-adjusted incremental utility, calculated according to four properties of major clinical interest, was in favour of the HM sessions: +0.56 (CI, 0.53–0.58%), P < 0.0001. Resource consumption: 3364 HM sessions performed (76% by nurses), median committed monthly manpower of 55.5 (IQR, 22.0–107.0) min × health personnel/100 patients. Conclusion Home Monitoring was highly effective in detecting and managing clinical events in CIED patients in daily practice with remarkably low manpower and resource consumption. PMID:23362021

  9. ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

    2013-01-01

    The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

  10. ICD-9 to ICD-10: evolution, revolution, and current debates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Shafran-Topaz, Leah; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-01-01

    The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) has undergone a long evolution from its initial inception in the late 18th century. Today, ICD is the internationally recognized classification that helps clinicians, policy makers, and patients to navigate, understand, and compare healthcare systems and services. Currently in the United States, hot debates surround the transition from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM). This article presents an analysis of the views of the proponents and opponents of the upcoming change. We also briefly present and analyze the quality of the most frequently cited scientific evidence that underpins the recent debates focusing on two major issues: ICD-10-CM implementation costs and revenue gains and the projected clinical data quality improvement. We conclude with policy and research suggestions for healthcare stakeholders. PMID:23805064

  11. Non-nearest neighbour ICD in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshauer, E.

    2016-04-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is an electronic decay process of excited, ionized systems. It has been shown to occur in a multitude of small and large systems. The effects of more than one possible decay partner are discussed in detail illustrated by simulated ICD electron spectra of NeAr clusters and pure Ne clusters. Hereby, the mostly underestimated contribution of decay with non-nearest neighbours is highlighted. In the neon clusters, the lifetime of the bulk atoms is found to be in excellent agreement with experiment (Jahnke et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 173401) while the lifetimes of the surface atoms differ significantly. Hence, the experimental lifetime can not purely be explained by the effect of the number of neighbours. We propose the possibility to investigate the transition from small clusters to the solid state by using the ICD electron spectra to distinguish between icosahedral and cuboctahedral cluster structures.

  12. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future. PMID:25553603

  13. Through the looking glass: 21st century trauma registry innovations.

    PubMed

    Walters, Madonna R; Huehl, Susan; Fuller, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Trauma registries can be invaluable tools for improving quality of care and monitoring patient outcomes, but many function below their full potential. Reliance on low-tech, manual data management methods, such as the retyping of demographic information, can lead to inefficiency, increased personnel costs, and potential error. One low-cost solution is a digital interface between the medical records coding database and the trauma registry, allowing the registrar to pull demographic information and ICD-9 diagnostic and procedure codes directly from a reliable source without re-keying them. We created a batch interface for that purpose, reducing the burden of manual data entry and decreasing the time needed to complete patient records in the registry. The interface has eliminated our backlog and allowed the trauma registrar to focus on creating timely reports to track quality indicators. PMID:17052092

  14. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  15. [ICAROS (Italian survey on CardiAc RehabilitatiOn and Secondary prevention after cardiac revascularization): temporary report of the first prospective, longitudinal registry of the cardiac rehabilitation network GICR/IACPR].

    PubMed

    Griffo, Raffaele; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Fattirolli, Francesco; Ambrosetti, Marco; Tramarin, Roberto; Vestri, Anna Rita; De Feo, Stefania; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    The Italian survey on CardiAc RehabilitatiOn and Secondary prevention after cardiac revascularization (ICAROS) was a multicenter, prospective, longitudinal survey carried out by the Italian Association on Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (GICR/IACPR) in patients on completion of a CR program after coronary artery by pass grafting (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim was to evaluate in the short and medium-term: i) the cardioprotective drug prescription, modification and adherence; ii) the achievement and maintenance of recommended lifestyle targets and risk factor control and their association with cardiovascular events; iii) the predictors of non-adherence to therapy and lifestyle recommendations. The ICAROS results offers a portrait of the "real world" of clinical practice concerning patients after CABG and PCI, and stresses the need to improve secondary prevention care after the index event: many patients after revascularization leave the acute wards without an optimal prescription of preventive medication but the prescription of cardiopreventive drugs and risk factors control is excellent after completion of a CR program. Following CR, the maintenance of evidence-based drugs and lifestyle adherence at one year is fairly good as far as the target goals of secondary prevention are concerned, but to investigate the influence of CR on long-term outcome longer-term studies are required. Last, but not least, ICAROS shows that some characteristics (PCI as index event, living alone, poor eating habits or smoking in young age, and old age, in particular with comorbidities) may identify patients with poor behavioral modification in the medium-term follow-up and in these patients further support may be warranted. In conclusion, participation in CR results in excellent treatment after revascularization, as well as a good lifestyle and medication adherence at 1 year and provides further confirmation of the the benefit of secondary

  16. Second generation registry framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. Results This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. Conclusions We introduce the

  17. Overcoming electromagnetic interference by LVADs on ICD function by shielding the ICD programmer wand and extension cable.

    PubMed

    Biviano, Angelo; Mancini, Donna; Naka, Yoshifumi; Arellano, Jerry; Garan, Hasan

    2009-07-01

    Patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are increasingly undergoing implantation with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). In addition, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy has been proven to be an important part of the treatment for cardiomyopathy/congestive heart failure. Previous reports have noted a potential and dramatic electromagnetic interference from LVADs on ICDs that cause impaired telemetry communication between the ICD and ICD programmer. Such interference has necessitated explantation and generator replacement in order to resume communication between the ICD and programmer. We report two patients with advanced congestive heart failure and ICD programming impairment caused by a HeartMate II LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) that was overcome by placing aluminum shielding around the ICD programmer wand and steel shielding around the extension cable during ICD interrogation. PMID:19572875

  18. Recent advances in the entirely subcutaneous ICD System.

    PubMed

    Bettin, Markus; Reinke, Florian; Rath, Benjamin; Köbe, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD(®)) is emerging as a widely accepted therapeutic alternative to a conventional implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for prevention of sudden cardiac death. Essentially, the S-ICD(®) is promising in terms of reduction of electrode-related complications such as lead failure and infections. The conventional transvenous ICD has proven efficacy in various randomized clinical trials. The first results of S-ICD(®) studies confirm efficacy and safety in primary and secondary prevention as well. Owing to basic differences between S-ICD(®) and transvenous ICD-such as limited programming options and lack of pacing-not all patients are eligible for the S-ICD(®). Concerns exist regarding inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing, dimensions of the device, and shorter battery longevity. However, the S-ICD(®) should be considered a useful supplementation of ICD therapy in those patients at risk for sudden cardiac death who are not expected to require pacing due to bradycardia or antitachycardic pacing. PMID:26097719

  19. Chapter 43: Registry Clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Plante, R.

    The registry is a central component for the development of astronomical tools and applications requiring search and discovery. It contains standard descriptions for a variety of astronomical resources and services, including methods for remote invocation. Using web service technology, programmatic interfaces to the registry offer a powerful and robust mechanism for extracting specific sets of services and also a framework for combining a variety of astronomical resources into complex applications, for example, Datascope, Open SkyQuery, and WESIX. While the legacy of the NVO does not extend far back into history, we present here the current state of interfaces that client applications and tools have been built on, yet also extend the concepts to the new standard Registry Interface which will provide a uniform client interface protocol throughout the IVOA registry network. We explore this technology and discuss several implementations that exist in the current VO framework using JAVA, C#, Python, and IDL.

  20. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2011 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  1. Trauma registry reengineered.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Bolig, Nicole; Hixson, Heather; McWilliams, Nate; Rummerfield, Heather; Stratton, Elaine; Woodruff, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A successful trauma registry balances accuracy of abstraction and timeliness of case submissions to achieve quality performance. Staffing to achieve quality performance is a challenge at times based on competitive institutional need. The aim of this performance improvement timing study was to identify trauma registry job responsibilities and redesign the responsibilities to create increased abstraction time and maintain accuracy of data abstraction. The outcome is measured by case submission rates with existing staffing and interrater reliability outcomes. PMID:25397337

  2. PTSD in ICD-10 and proposed ICD-11 in elderly with childhood trauma: prevalence, factor structure, and symptom profiles

    PubMed Central

    Glück, Tobias M.; Knefel, Matthias; Tran, Ulrich S.; Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background The proposal for ICD-11 postulates major changes for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, which needs investigation in different samples. Aims To investigate differences of PTSD prevalence and diagnostic agreement between ICD-10 and ICD-11, factor structure of proposed ICD-11 PTSD, and diagnostic value of PTSD symptom severity classes. Method Confirmatory factor analysis and latent profile analysis were used on data of elderly survivors of childhood trauma (>60 years, N=399). Results PTSD rates differed significantly between ICD-10 (15.0%) and ICD-11 (10.3%, z=2.02, p=0.04). Unlike previous research, a one-factor solution of ICD-11 PTSD had the best fit in this sample. High symptom profiles were associated with PTSD in ICD-11. Conclusions ICD-11 concentrates on PTSD's core symptoms and furthers clinical utility. Questions remain regarding the tendency of ICD-11 to diagnose mainly cases with severe symptoms and the influence of trauma type and participant age on the factor structure. PMID:26800660

  3. Cancer prevalence in the city of Naples: Contribution of the GP database analyses to the cancer registries network

    PubMed Central

    PIZZI, CLAUDIA; ARPINO, GRAZIA; ACAMPORA, GIUSEPPE; AIELLO, NADIA; DE ROSA, AUGUSTO; DIAFERIA, IMMACOLATA; DI NUNZIO, ALESSANDRO; FRAGNA, GIUSEPPE; FRANCO, AMEDEO; RUSSO, MARIA; SANSONE, FULVIA; SCARPATI, CARMELA; SPINUSO, ANTONIO; ARPINO, GIOVANNI; LUCE, AMALIA; TOMMASIELLI, GIUSEPPINA; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; DE PLACIDO, SABINO

    2013-01-01

    The Italian cancer registries network has not been sufficiently developed in the Southern regions. General practitioners (GPs) are knowledgeable about the prevalence, incidence and mortality for different types of cancer in their patient populations. The aim of this pilot study was to verify the feasibility and reliability of the characterization of cancer populations using GP databases in order to evaluate the impact of cancer in the general population of Naples. The characteristics of the cases studied have been collected by interview or electronic health record and recorded on paper or magnetic supports, appropriately conforming to the current privacy law. Databases are centralized, stored and codified on electronic data-sheets and periodically elaborated by the ‘Consorzio Nazionale delle Cooperative Mediche’ and ‘Federico II’ University. The present study was initiated on September 15, 2004. The analysed geographical area included the suburbs of ‘Stella’ and ‘San Carlo all’Arena’, situated in the historical center of Naples and corresponding to Health Care District 29 of the local health service. The analysis included 16,927 men and women (age range, 6–97 years) from the outpatient offices of 12 GPs who agreed to participate in the study. Results showed that the analysed population represents 16.3% of the general population residing in the area under study. We identified 342 (2%) patients with cancer, 143 (0.8%) of whom were men and 199 (1.2%) women (M/F ratio of 0.7). Of the 342 patients, 10 (5 men and 5 women) had a double cancer; thus, a total of 352 malignancies was characterized. Cancer prevalence was 2,020/100,000 inhabitants. This estimate is lower compared to the national prevalence (2,683/100,000 inhabitants) but higher compared to that in other southern Italian areas. Results, stratified by International Classification of Disease, ninth revision (ICD-IX), based on factors including gender and age, demonstrated that breast cancer

  4. ICDS database: interrupted CoDing sequences in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Perrodou, Emmanuel; Deshayes, Caroline; Muller, Jean; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Ripp, Raymond; Poch, Olivier; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Odile

    2006-01-01

    Unrecognized frameshifts, in-frame stop codons and sequencing errors lead to Interrupted CoDing Sequence (ICDS) that can seriously affect all subsequent steps of functional characterization, from in silico analysis to high-throughput proteomic projects. Here, we describe the Interrupted CoDing Sequence database containing ICDS detected by a similarity-based approach in 80 complete prokaryotic genomes. ICDS can be retrieved by species browsing or similarity searches via a web interface (http://www-bio3d-igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/ICDS/). The definition of each interrupted gene is provided as well as the ICDS genomic localization with the surrounding sequence. Furthermore, to facilitate the experimental characterization of ICDS, we propose optimized primers for re-sequencing purposes. The database will be regularly updated with additional data from ongoing sequenced genomes. Our strategy has been validated by three independent tests: (i) ICDS prediction on a benchmark of artificially created frameshifts, (ii) comparison of predicted ICDS and results obtained from the comparison of the two genomic sequences of Bacillus licheniformis strain ATCC 14580 and (iii) re-sequencing of 25 predicted ICDS of the recently sequenced genome of Mycobacterium smegmatis. This allows us to estimate the specificity and sensitivity (95 and 82%, respectively) of our program and the efficiency of primer determination. PMID:16381882

  5. Dollars and sense: Mitigating budget risk for ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Newell, Lucy Mancini; DeSilva, Joseph J

    2013-02-01

    The extended deadline for ICD-10 implementation is time that should not be wasted. Healthcare leaders should keep three things in mind: CFOs should approach the effort knowing the costs of ICD-10 implementation will be high and spread over multiple budget years. Training, productivity, and contractual issues are among key areas that will be challenged by ICD-10 implementation. Healthcare finance leaders should work to improve cash-on-hand and cash reserves prior to the ICD-10 deadline to ensure liquidity post-compliance. PMID:23413673

  6. Neurodevelopmental Disorders (ASD and ADHD): DSM-5, ICD-10, and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Doernberg, Ellen; Hollander, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, specifically autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have undergone considerable diagnostic evolution in the past decade. In the United States, the current system in place is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), whereas worldwide, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) serves as a general medical system. This review will examine the differences in neurodevelopmental disorders between these two systems. First, we will review the important revisions made from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) to the DSM-5, with respect to ASD and ADHD. Next, we will cover the similarities and differences between ASD and ADHD classification in the DSM-5 and the ICD-10, and how these differences may have an effect on neurodevelopmental disorder diagnostics and classification. By examining the changes made for the DSM-5 in 2013, and critiquing the current ICD-10 system, we can help to anticipate and advise on the upcoming ICD-11, due to come online in 2017. Overall, this review serves to highlight the importance of progress towards complementary diagnostic classification systems, keeping in mind the difference in tradition and purpose of the DSM and the ICD, and that these systems are dynamic and changing as more is learned about neurodevelopmental disorders and their underlying etiology. Finally this review will discuss alternative diagnostic approaches, such as the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative, which links symptom domains to underlying biological and neurological mechanisms. The incorporation of new diagnostic directions could have a great effect on treatment development and insurance coverage for neurodevelopmental disorders worldwide. PMID:27364515

  7. Clinical Effectiveness of CRT and ICD Therapy in Heart Failure Patients by Racial/Ethnic Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeian, Boback; Zhang, Yan; Albert, Nancy M.; Curtis, Anne B.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Heywood, J. Thomas; Mehra, Mandeep R.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Reynolds, Dwight; Walsh, Mary Norine; Yancy, Clyde W.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical trials have demonstrated benefit for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF); yet, questions have been raised with regard to the benefit of device therapy for minorities. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of CRT and ICD therapies as a function of race/ethnicity in outpatients with HFrEF (ejection fraction ≤35%). METHODS Data from IMPROVE HF (Registry to Improve the Use of Evidence-Based Heart Failure Therapies in the Outpatient Setting) were analyzed by device status and race/ethnicity among guideline-eligible patients for mortality at 24 months. Multivariate Generalized Estimating Equations analyses were conducted, adjusting for patient and practice characteristics. RESULTS The ICD/cardiac resynchronization defibrillator (CRT-D)–eligible cohort (n = 7,748) included 3,391 (44%) non-Hispanic white, 719 (9%) non-Hispanic black, and 3,638 (47%) other racial/ethnic minorities or race-not-documented patients. The cardiac resynchronization pacemaker (CRT-P)/CRT-D–eligible cohort (n = 1,188) included 596 (50%) non-Hispanic white, 99 (8%) non-Hispanic black, and 493 (41%) other/not-documented patients. There was clinical benefit associated with ICD/CRT-D therapy (adjusted odds ratio: 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.52 to 0.79, p = 0.0002 for 24-month mortality), which was of similar proportion in white, black, and other minority/not-documented patients (device–race/ethnicity interaction p = 0.7861). For CRT-P/CRT-D therapy, there were also associated mortality benefits (adjusted odds ratio: 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.33 to 0.91, p = 0.0222), and the device–race/ethnicity interaction was not significant (p = 0.5413). CONCLUSIONS The use of guideline-directed CRT and ICD therapy was associated with reduced 24-month mortality without significant interaction by racial

  8. A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Patients With an Entirely Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator System Versus a Transvenous System (from the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Quality of Life Substudy).

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Carter, Nathan; Barr, Craig; Neuzil, Petr; Scholten, Marcoen; Lambiase, Pier D; Boersma, Lucas; Johansen, Jens B; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2016-08-15

    The first clinical results from the Evaluation of Factors Impacting Clinical Outcome and Cost Effectiveness of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (EFFORTLESS S-ICD) Registry on the entirely S-ICD system are promising, but the impact of the S-ICD system on patients' quality of life (QoL) is not known. We evaluated the QoL of patients with an S-ICD against an unrelated cohort with a transvenous (TV)-ICD system during 6 months of follow-up. Consecutively implanted patients with an S-ICD system were matched with patients with a TV-ICD system on a priori selected variables including baseline QoL. QoL was measured with the Short-Form Health Survey at baseline, 3, and 6 months after implant and compared using multivariable modeling with repeated measures. Patients with an S-ICD (n = 167) versus a TV-ICD system (n = 167) did not differ significantly on physical (p = 0.8157) and mental QoL scores (p = 0.9080) across baseline, 3, and 6 months after implantation in adjusted analyses. The evolution in physical (p = 0.0503) and mental scores (p = 0.3772) during follow-up was similar for both cohorts, as indicated by the nonsignificant interaction effect for ICD system by time. Both patients with an S-ICD system and a TV-ICD system experienced significant improvements in physical and mental QoL between time of implant and 3 months (both p's <0.0001) and between time of implant and 6 months (both p's <0.0001) but not between 3 and 6 months (both p's >0.05). In conclusion, these first results show that the QoL of patients with an S-ICD versus TV-ICD system is similar and that patients with either system experience improvements in QoL on the short term. PMID:27353211

  9. Scarf inlet aeroacoustics study/scarf inlet with Boeing ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Photographs shows the Langley 12 inch ADP fan equipped with an inflow control device (ICD) borrowed from the Boeing company. The fan and ICD are inside the anechoic chamber of the ANRF. Photographed in building 1218A, the Anechoic Noise Research Facility.

  10. Scarf inlet aeroacoustics study/scarf inlet with Boeing ICD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Photographs shows the Langley 12 inch ADP fan equipped with an inflow control device (ICD) borrowed from the Boeing company. The fan and ICD are inside the anechoic chamber of the ANRF. Lorenzo R. Clark is in the photograph. Photographed in building 1218A, the Anechoic Noise Research Facility.

  11. Identification of ICD Codes Suggestive of Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Patricia G.; Slusher, Paula L.; Kruse, Robin L.; Tarleton, Molly M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In order to be reimbursed for the care they provide, hospitals in the United States are required to use a standard system to code all discharge diagnoses: the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9). Although ICD-9 codes specific for child maltreatment exist, they do not identify all…

  12. The ICD diagnoses of fetishism and sadomasochism.

    PubMed

    Reiersøl, Odd; Skeid, Svein

    2006-01-01

    In this article we discuss psychiatric diagnoses of sexual deviation as they appear in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), the internationally accepted classification and diagnostic system of the World Health Organization (WHO). Namely, we discuss the background of three diagnostic categories: Fetishism (F65.0), Fetishistic Transvestism (F65.1), and Sadomasochism (F65.5). Pertinent background issues regarding the above categories are followed by a critique of the usefulness of diagnosing these phenomena today. Specifically, we argue that Fetishism, Fetishistic Transvestism, and Sadomasochism, also labeled Paraphilia or perversion, should not be considered illnesses. Finally, we present the efforts of an initiative known as ReviseF65, which was established in 1997, to abolish these diagnoses. PMID:16803767

  13. Semantic Alignment between ICD-11 and SNOMED CT.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Campbell, James; Rector, Alan; Schulz, Stefan; Brear, Hazel; Üstün, Bedirhan; Spackman, Kent; Chute, Christopher G; Millar, Jane; Solbrig, Harold; Brand Persson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Due to fundamental differences in design and editorial policies, semantic interoperability between two de facto standard terminologies in the healthcare domain--the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and SNOMED CT (SCT), requires combining two different approaches: (i) axiom-based, which states logically what is universally true, using an ontology language such as OWL; (ii) rule-based, expressed as queries on the axiom-based knowledge. We present the ICD-SCT harmonization process including: a) a new architecture for ICD-11, b) a protocol for the semantic alignment of ICD and SCT, and c) preliminary results of the alignment applied to more than half the domain currently covered by the draft ICD-11. PMID:26262160

  14. Comparing ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 classification systems in a primary health care setting: some initial observations.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Wood, M; Wilks, J; Nicol, J

    1995-01-01

    The ICD-10 is due to be introduced into Australia during the late 1990s, superseding the current and widely used ICD-9-CM. Improvements in areas such as number of codes, an expanded external cause framework, and more context to injuries are expected to make the ICD-10 a more streamlined system for practitioners. The present study examined both classification formats using data from 1183 presentations to primary health clinics at island tourist resorts. Some initial observations are made about differences in the two systems, highlighting the greater coding detail provided by the ICD-10, particularly in the area of injuries. It is recommended that further empirical testing be undertaken using the ICD-10 in a variety of settings so as to identify benefits in the coding of both medical conditions and injuries. PMID:10163113

  15. Necessity and implications of ICD-10: facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2011-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10 is a new system that is expected to be implemented effective on October 1, 2013. This new system is a federally mandated change affecting all payers and providers, and is expected to exceed both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Y2K in terms of costs and risks. However, the Administration is poised to implement these changes at a rapid pace which could be problematic for health care in the United States. In 2003, HIPAA named ICD-9 as the code set for supporting diagnoses and procedures in electronic administrative transactions. However, on January 16, 2009, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a regulation requiring the replacement of ICD-9 with ICD-10 as of October 1, 2013. While ICD-9 and 10 have a similar type of hierarchy in their structures, the ICD-10 is more complex and incorporates numerous changes. Overall, ICD-10 contains over 141,000 codes, a whopping 712% increase over the less than 20,000 codes in ICD-9, creating enormous complexities, confusion, and expense. Multiple published statistics illustrate that there are approximately 119 instances where a single ICD-9 code can map to more than 100 distinct ICD-10 codes, whereas there are 255 instances where a single ICD-9 code can map to more than 50 ICD-10 codes. To add to the confusion, there are 3,684 instances in the mapping for diseases where a single ICD-10 code can map to more than one ICD-9 code. Proponents of the new ICD-10 system argue that the granularity should lead to improvements in the quality of health care, since more precise coding that more accurately reflects actual patient conditions will permit smarter and more effective disease management in pay-for-performance programs.  This, in essence, encapsulates the benefits that supporters of this new system believe will be realized, even though many of these experts may not be involved in actual day-to-day medical practices

  16. The Complexity and Challenges of the ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM Transition in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Krive, Jacob; Patel, Mahatkumar; Gehm, Lisa; Mackey, Mark; Kulstad, Erik; Li, Jianrong ‘John’; Lussier, Yves A.; Boyd, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning October 2015, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will require medical providers to utilize the vastly expanded ICD-10-CM system. Despite wide availability of information and mapping tools for the next generation of the ICD classification system, some of the challenges associated with transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM are not well understood. To quantify the challenges faced by emergency physicians, we analyzed a subset of a 2010 Illinois Medicaid database of emergency department ICD-9-CM codes, seeking to determine the accuracy of existing mapping tools in order to better prepare emergency physicians for the change to the expanded ICD-10-CM system. We found that 27% of 1,830 codes represented convoluted multidirectional mappings. We then analyzed the convoluted transitions and found 8% of total visit encounters (23% of the convoluted transitions) were clinically incorrect. The ambiguity and inaccuracy of these mappings may impact the work flow associated with the translation process and affect the potential mapping between ICD codes and CPT (Current Procedural Codes) codes, which determine physician reimbursement. PMID:25863652

  17. ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM mapping of the AAST Emergency General Surgery disease severity grading systems: Conceptual approach, limitations, and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Utter, Garth H; Miller, Preston R; Mowery, Nathan T; Tominaga, Gail T; Gunter, Oliver; Osler, Turner M; Ciesla, David J; Agarwal, Suresh K; Inaba, Kenji; Aboutanos, Michel B; Brown, Carlos V R; Ross, Steven E; Crandall, Marie L; Shafi, Shahid

    2015-05-01

    The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) recently established a grading system for uniform reporting of anatomic severity of several emergency general surgery (EGS) diseases. There are five grades of severity for each disease, ranging from I (lowest severity) to V (highest severity). However, the grading process requires manual chart review. We sought to evaluate whether International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th Revisions, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM, ICD-10-CM) codes might allow estimation of AAST grades for EGS diseases. The Patient Assessment and Outcomes Committee of the AAST reviewed all available ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes relevant to 16 EGS diseases with available AAST grades. We then matched grades for each EGS disease with one or more ICD codes. We used the Official Coding Guidelines for ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM and the American Hospital Association's "Coding Clinic for ICD-9-CM" for coding guidance. The ICD codes did not allow for matching all five AAST grades of severity for each of the 16 diseases. With ICD-9-CM, six diseases mapped into four categories of severity (instead of five), another six diseases into three categories of severity, and four diseases into only two categories of severity. With ICD-10-CM, five diseases mapped into four categories of severity, seven diseases into three categories, and four diseases into two categories. Two diseases mapped into discontinuous categories of grades (two in ICD-9-CM and one in ICD-10-CM). Although resolution is limited, ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes might have some utility in roughly approximating the severity of the AAST grades in the absence of more precise information. These ICD mappings should be validated and refined before widespread use to characterize EGS disease severity. In the long-term, it may be desirable to develop alternatives to ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes for routine collection of disease severity characteristics. PMID:25909431

  18. ICD and DSM: neuroplasticity and staging are still missing.

    PubMed

    Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The two main diagnostic systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), have undergone a number of revisions since their first editions: whereas the fifth edition of the DSM has been published in 2013, the eleventh revision of the ICD is expected by 2018. Although the process of harmonization between the 2 systems is still a debated topic, the forthcoming revision of the ICD is seemingly converging toward the DSM approach in regard to the reclassification of a number of disorders. Nevertheless, the 2 systems still exhibit considerable differences, partly due to their different purposes, development and revision processes, and target audiences. Furthermore, while alternative and innovative classification approaches are emerging with the aim of integrating the latest findings from neuroscience and genomics, both the DSM and ICD still fail to incorporate core concepts such as the clinical staging of psychiatric disorders and "neuroprogression," as well as an adequate consideration of endophenotypes. PMID:27503571

  19. National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology 2007 and 2008.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel Nogueira; Bonhorst, Daniel; de Sousa, João

    2009-11-01

    Clinical electrophysiology remains one of the most dynamic areas of cardiology, with continuing developments in equipping centers with more modern mapping and navigation systems. This has enabled an increase in the number and variety of interventions, resulting in significant improvements in results of therapeutic ablation of arrhythmias and prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this phase of transition towards implementation of a computerized national registry with nationwide data transmitted via the internet, publication of the registry in its previous form, although requiring more work, still seems justified, in order to appraise and disseminate qualitative and quantitative developments in this activity and enable comparisons with what is being done internationally, assess the centers' training capacity and inform national and European health authorities of the activities and real needs in this sector. The authors analyze the number and type of procedures performed during 2007 and 2008 based on a survey sent to centers performing diagnostic and interventional electrophysiology (16 centers in 2007 and 2008) and/or implanting cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) (19 centers in 2007 and 21 in 2008). Compared to 2006, one more center began interventional electrophysiology in 2007 and two centers began implanting ICDs in 2008. In the years under review, 2060 electrophysiological studies were performed in 2007 and 2007 were performed in 2008, of which 74 and 79.5% respectively were followed by therapeutic ablation, making totals of 1523 and 1596 ablations (increases of 10.7 and 4.6% from previous years). Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was the main indication for ablation (28.4 and 28.7%), followed by accessory pathways (26.8 and 25.4%), atrial flutter (20.8 and 19.7%), atrial fibrillation (13.9 and 14.6%), ventricular tachycardia (4.7 and 5.1%), atrial tachycardia (2.8 and 2.6%) and atrioventricular junction ablation (2.7 and 3.9%). Regarding ICDs, a

  20. Social network integration of the ICD11 revision platform.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Vuattolo, Omar; Celik, Can; Ustun, Bedirhan

    2013-01-01

    Classification revision and update can be defined as a social experience, with the participating community of experts behaving like a social network. ICD11 is being revised using an innovative web based process, for which we envisioned also tools for social platforms integration. The present poster preliminarily describes the Facebook tools developed for soliciting expert and participation in the ICD11 revision process. PMID:23920884

  1. The hot can: ICD failure presenting as severe shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Joglar, J A; Kowal, R C; Brown, T; Van Horn, B; Page, R L

    2001-03-01

    We describe a patient whose presentation of ICD generator failure was excruciating shoulder pain lasting 3 hours. This painful episode prompted evaluation and subsequent generator replacement. Destructive analysis of the explanted device revealed a short circuit of three battery filter capacitors, which resulted in the battery "dumping" its full energy very rapidly, since the impedance across the battery terminal was < 1 ohm. The duration of the painful episode was equal to the estimated ICD battery life under this low impedance condition. PMID:11310315

  2. ICD-10 FIELD TRIALS IN INDIA - A REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, R.; Shamasundar, C.

    1992-01-01

    The draft of the tenth revision of the International Classification Of Diseases, Chapter V (ICD-10) was subjected to extensive field trials throughout the world. In India, Nine Field Trial Centres (PTCs) conducted the field trials. The results showed that the ICD-10 was quite adequate in its face-validity, reliability, applicability and ease of use. A brief account of the field trials and the result are reported. PMID:21776123

  3. Emergency department coding of bicycle and pedestrian injuries during the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10

    PubMed Central

    Karkhaneh, M; Hagel, B E; Couperthwaite, A; Saunders, L D; Voaklander, D C

    2011-01-01

    Background The international classification of diseases version 10 (ICD-10) uses alphanumeric expanded codes and external cause of injury codes (E-codes). Objective To examine the reliability and validity of emergency department (ED) coders in applying E-codes in ICD-9 and -10. Methods Bicycle and pedestrian injuries were identified from the ED information system from one period before and two periods after transition from ICD-9 to -10 coding. Overall, 180 randomly selected bicycle and pedestrian injury charts were reviewed as the reference standard (RS). Original E-codes assigned by ED coders (ICD-9 in 2001 and ICD-10 in 2004 and 2007) were compared with charts (validity) and also to ICD-9 and -10 codes assigned from RS chart review, to each case by an independent (IND) coder (reliability). Sensitivity, specificity, simple, and chance-corrected agreements (κ statistics) were calculated. Results Sensitivity of E-coding bicycle injuries by the IND coder in comparison with the RS ranged from 95.1% (95% CI 86.3 to 99.0) to 100% (95% CI 94.0 to 100.0) for both ICD-9 and -10. Sensitivity of ED coders in E-coding bicycle injuries ranged from 90.2% (95% CI 79.8 to 96.3) to 96.7% (95% CI 88.5 to 99.6). The sensitivity estimates for the IND coder ranged from 25.0% (95% CI 14.7 to 37.9) to 45.0% (95% CI 32.1 to 58.4) for pedestrian injuries for both ICD-9 and -10. Conclusion Bicycle injuries are coded in a reliable and valid manner; however, pedestrian injuries are often miscoded as falls. These results have important implications for injury surveillance research. PMID:21705466

  4. Are Cancer Registries Unconstitutional?

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Robert H; Clarke, Christina A; Crawley, LaVera M; Glaser, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    Population-based cancer registration, mandated throughout the United States, is central to quantifying the breadth and impact of cancer. It facilitates research to learn what causes cancer to develop and, in many cases, lead to death. However, as concerns about privacy increase, cancer registration has come under question. Recently, its constitutionality was challenged on the basis of 1) the vagueness of statutory aims to pursue public health versus the individual privacy interests of cancer patients, and 2) the alleged indignity of one's individual medical information being transmitted to government authorities. Examining cancer registry statutes in states covered by the US National Cancer Institute's SEER Program and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries, we found that cancer registration laws do state specific public health benefits, and offer reasonable limits and safeguards on the government's possession of private medical information. Thus, we argue that cancer registration would survive constitutional review, is compatible with the civil liberties protected by privacy rights in the U.S., satisfies the conditions that justify public health expenditures, and serves human rights to enjoy the highest attainable standards of health, the advances of science, and the benefits of government efforts to prevent and control disease. PMID:20199835

  5. Why Study Italian?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Charles

    1978-01-01

    One studies Italian for the same reason one studies any language--to become educated. Even more than for art and music, Italian is necessary for literature. Dante must be read, and in the original. Further, we study Italian to know our cultural roots and heritage. (AMH)

  6. Teaching Business Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivelli, Remo J.

    The University of Rhode Island's business Italian course is an advanced language course whose focus is the Italian business world and its reflection of values, customs, and traditions. The course begins with presentations on salient features of contemporary Italian, such as syntactical simplification and nominalization, and how the social,…

  7. Implementation and impact of ICD-10 (Part II)

    PubMed Central

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Deen, H. Gordon; Dokken, Judith A.; Pirris, Stephen M.; Pichelmann, Mark A.; Nottmeier, Eric W.; Reimer, Ronald; Wharen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The transition from the International Classification of Disease-9th clinical modification to the new ICD-10 was all set to occur on 1 October 2015. The American Medical Association has previously been successful in delaying the transition by over 10 years and has been able to further postpone its introduction to 2015. The new system will overcome many of the limitations present in the older version, thus paving the way to more accurate capture of clinical information. Methods: The benefits of the new ICD-10 system include improved quality of care, potential cost savings, reduction of unpaid claims, and improved tracking of healthcare data. The areas where challenges will be evident include planning and implementation, the cost to transition, a shortage of qualified coders, training and education of the healthcare workforce, and a loss of productivity when this occurs. The impacts include substantial costs to the healthcare system, but the projected long-term savings and benefits will be significant. Improved fraud detection, accurate data entry, ability to analyze cost benefits with procedures, and enhanced quality outcome measures are the most significant beneficial factors with this change. Results: The present Current Procedural Terminology and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System code sets will be used for reporting ambulatory procedures in the same manner as they have been. ICD-10-PCS will replace ICD-9 procedure codes for inpatient hospital services. The ICD-10-CM will replace the clinical code sets. Our article will focus on the challenges to execution of an ICD change and strategies to minimize risk while transitioning to the new system. Conclusion: With the implementation deadline gradually approaching, spine surgery practices that include multidisciplinary health specialists have to anticipate and prepare for the ICD change in order to mitigate risk. Education and communication is the key to this process in spine practices. PMID:25184098

  8. Preparing for the ICD-10-CM Transition: Automated Methods for Translating ICD Codes in Clinical Phenotype Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Kin Wah; Richesson, Rachel; Smerek, Michelle; Pereira, Katherine C.; Green, Beverly B.; Patkar, Ashwin; Clowse, Megan; Bauck, Alan; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background: The national mandate for health systems to transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM in October 2015 has an impact on research activities. Clinical phenotypes defined by ICD-9-CM codes need to be converted to ICD-10-CM, which has nearly four times more codes and a very different structure than ICD-9-CM. Methods: We used the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) General Equivalent Maps (GEMs) to translate, using four different methods, condition-specific ICD-9-CM code sets used for pragmatic trials (n=32) into ICD-10-CM. We calculated the recall, precision, and F score of each method. We also used the ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM value sets defined for electronic quality measure as an additional evaluation of the mapping methods. Results: The forward-backward mapping (FBM) method had higher precision, recall and F-score metrics than simple forward mapping (SFM). The more aggressive secondary (SM) and tertiary mapping (TM) methods resulted in higher recall but lower precision. For clinical phenotype definition, FBM was the best (F=0.67), but was close to SM (F=0.62) and TM (F=0.60), judging on the F-scores alone. The overall difference between the four methods was statistically significant (one-way ANOVA, F=5.749, p=0.001). However, pairwise comparisons between FBM, SM, and TM did not reach statistical significance. A similar trend was found for the quality measure value sets. Discussion: The optimal method for using the GEMs depends on the relative importance of recall versus precision for a given use case. It appears that for clinically distinct and homogenous conditions, the recall of FBM is sufficient. The performance of all mapping methods was lower for heterogeneous conditions. Since code sets used for phenotype definition and quality measurement can be very similar, there is a possibility of cross-fertilization between the two activities. Conclusion: Different mapping approaches yield different collections of ICD-10-CM codes. All methods require

  9. The PLDD registry.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R A; Botsford, J A; Fanelli, E

    1995-06-01

    The rapid acceptance of minimally invasive surgery in the United States has largely occurred without statistical proof of its superiority over traditional methods. All players in the healthcare field now see the need for valid outcome studies supporting the efficacy of new treatment techniques. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) will gain wide acceptance only if it is statistically shown to be a safe and effective alternative treatment of a lumbar disc herniation. To that end, a central PLDD registry has been developed and implemented into clinical practice at several centers. This article reviews healthcare trends that motivated the creation of this data repository and discusses the history of its development. The currently used PLDD evaluation form is outlined and its utility is discussed. Most importantly, preliminary PLDD results and complications based on the data received are presented and analyzed. PMID:10150649

  10. ICD-11 (JLMMS) and SCT Inter-Operation.

    PubMed

    Mamou, Marzouk; Rector, Alan; Schulz, Stefan; Campbell, James; Solbrig, Harold; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to contribute to a smooth and semantically sound inter-operability between the ICD-11 (International Classification of Diseases-11th revision Joint Linearization for Mortality, Morbidity and Statistics) and SNOMED CT (SCT). To guarantee such inter-operation between a classification, characterized by a single hierarchy of mutually exclusive and exhaustive classes, as is the JLMMS successor of ICD-10 on the one hand, and the multi-hierarchical, ontology-based clinical terminology SCT on the other hand, we use ontology axioms that logically express generalizable truths. This is expressed by the compositional grammar of SCT, together with queries on axiomsof SCT. We test the feasibility of the method on the circulatory chapter of ICD-11 JLMMS and present limitations and results. PMID:27139413

  11. The current state of ICD-10 & preparing for it.

    PubMed

    Barbe, David O; Savickis, Mari; Spector, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The AMA continues to harbor serious concerns and reservations with the significant burden of the ICD-10 mandate and continues to convey these points to policymakers in Washington. The AMA is well aware of the concerns of physicians related to the growing number of burdens being placed on their practices, of which ICD-10 is a large one, and continues to advocate for overall regulatory relief. While the AMA has been working for many years to hold back the implementation of ICD-10, at this time, it does remain a regulatory mandate. Because of this, it is important that physicians prepare for its implementation in order to avoid the rejection of claims and cash flow interruptions. PMID:24563988

  12. Representing ICD-11 JLMMS Using IHTSDO Representation Formalisms.

    PubMed

    Mamou, Marzouk; Rector, Alan; Schulz, Stefan; Campbell, James; Solbrig, Harold; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    It is investigated whether the content of the Joint Linearization for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics of the 11th ICD revision can be semantically represented by formalisms acting on the clinical terminology SNOMED CT, viz. the IHTSDO Compositional Grammar (CG) and the Expression Constraint Language (ECL). Whereas CG provides a composition syntax for building coordinated SNOMED CT expressions, ECL provides a powerful query mechanism. Both formalisms can be leveraged to guarantee inter-operation between an ontology-based terminology like SNOMED CT and a statistical classification like ICD, characterized by single hierarchies and exhaustive, mutually exclusive classes. We test the feasibility of the method on the circulatory chapter of ICD-11 JLMMS. PMID:27577419

  13. Getting Ready for ICD-10 and Meaningful Use Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Bert, Jack M; Beach, William R; McIntyre, Louis F; Sachdev, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    For the past 24 years, most developed countries have used the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) to report physician services. In the United States, physicians have continued to use the American Medical Association Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition and the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System. The ICD-10-Clinical Modification (CM) has approximately 4.9 times more codes than the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. ICD-10-CM allows for more specific descriptors of a procedure and is broken down by category, etiology, anatomic site, severity, and extension. ICD-10-CM is scheduled to be implemented by Medicare and commercial payers on October 1, 2015. In addition to ICD-10 implementation, physicians have to meet the requirements of the Meaningful Use Electronic Health Record Incentive Program. The Meaningful Use program is designed to promote the use of certified electronic health technology by providing eligible professionals with incentive payments if they meet the defined core and menu objectives of each stage of the program. All core measures must be met; however, providers can choose to meet a preset number of menu measures. Meaningful Use Stage 1 required eligible professionals to meet core and menu objectives that focused on data capture and sharing. Meaningful Use Stage 2 requires eligible professionals to meet core and menu objects that focus on advanced clinical processes for a full year in 2015. Stage 3 has been delayed until 2017, and core and menu measures that will focus on improving outcomes have not yet been defined. It is important for orthopaedic surgeons to understand the history of and techniques for the use of ICD-10-CM in clinical practice. Orthopaedic surgeons also should understand the requirements for Meaningful Use Stages 1 and 2, including the core objectives that must be met to achieve satisfactory attestation. PMID:27049227

  14. Outer insulation failure in a multilumen ICD lead.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxing; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Geng

    2013-08-01

    Insulation defects in the leads are a common complication in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Although the new multilumen leads have significantly reduced the incidence of insulation defects, they have introduced the new and rare problem of outer-insulation abrasions. In this report, we present the case of a 53-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy who was found to have an outer-insulation abrasion on fluoroscopy 3 years after the implantation of an ICD. Several electrical storms experienced by the patient were considered to be responsible for the abrasions; results of routine evaluations were normal. A CRT-D device was finally implanted. PMID:24187774

  15. The ICD-10 system: a gift that keeps on taking.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Joshua A; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Nicola, Gregory N; Oklu, Rahmi; Schoppe, Kurt A; Silva, Ezequiel; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2015-08-01

    The Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 was signed into law on April Fool's Day. Indeed, 2014 saw unprecedented enthusiasm for the possibility of a permanent solution to the sustainable growth rate formula. Congress failed to come together on methods to pay for that fix. Instead, Congress provided another temporary patch on April 1. As part of that law, International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) adoption was pushed back by at least 1 year until, at the earliest, October 1, 2015. While many physicians support the delay in ICD-10 implementation, there are those that disagree. PMID:24951285

  16. Pulmonary embolism: Epidemiology and registries.

    PubMed

    Monreal, Manuel; Mahé, Isabelle; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Prandoni, Paolo; Verhamme, Peter; Brenner, Benjamin; Wells, Phil S; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Bertoletti, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Real-life data is important in understanding the needs of patients in routine clinical practice, particularly owing to the fact that almost a quarter of patients with venous thromoboembolism (VTE) have at least one exclusion criterion preventing their recruitment into randomized clinical trials. The Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad Trombo Embólica (RIETE) registry is an ongoing, international, multicentre, prospective registry of consecutive patients presenting with acute VTE. In this chapter, we summarized some of the most relevant data concerning the epidemiology of VTE in the RIETE registry. PMID:26547675

  17. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  18. Defining and validating comorbidities and procedures in ICD-10 health data in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients

    PubMed Central

    Youngson, Erik; Welsh, Robert C.; Kaul, Padma; McAlister, Finlay; Quan, Hude; Bakal, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Administrative health databases are used in research to define comorbid conditions, diagnosis, and procedures. Our objectives were to validate a diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and invasive cardiac procedure coding against a comprehensive registry of STEMI patients and determine an optimal algorithm for defining comorbidities using administrative hospitalization and ambulatory databases, but without using a physician claims database, which is unavailable for use in many jurisdictions. A registry of consecutive STEMI patients was used to define a reference cohort and linked to the hospitalization and ambulatory databases. Four administrative case definitions for defining comorbidities, as well as STEMI diagnosis and in-hospital procedures using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) and the Canadian Classification of Health Interventions (CCI) were evaluated. Metrics were used to evaluate algorithm performance and compare discriminative ability using the C statistic. The 3236 patients had median age of 60 years (interquartile range 52–71) and 75.7% were male. A diagnosis of STEMI was correctly identified in the administrative records for 3043 (94.0%) patients. In-hospital procedures (coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention, and angiogram) were well identified using administrative definitions (Kappa statistic 0.83–1.00). Validation of comorbidities varied by condition but an algorithm using 2 inpatient/ambulatory visits in the previous 2 years maximized PPV, ranging from 28.6% for previous heart failure to 95.7% for previous MI. The c statistic was similar for each of the methods, ranging from 0.76 to 0.80. ICD-10 and CCI codes can identify hospitalized STEMI patients with high sensitivity and accurately define in-hospital cardiac procedures. Comorbidities can be defined with high PPV using a definition of 2 inpatient/ambulatory visits in the previous 2 years. PMID:27512881

  19. ICDE Librarians' Roundtable (Hong Kong, October 11-12, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai-man, Wong; Schafer, Steve; Watson, Elizabeth F.; Tai-loon, Fong

    The International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) Librarians' Roundtable is the first of its kind for librarians of international distance and open education institutions to exchange their views on how to cope with the development of their institutions in the use of new technology, and in the provision of library services to…

  20. Psychotic disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Falko; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 2013, and the Work Group on the Classification of Psychotic disorders (WGPD), installed by the World Health Organization (WHO), is expected to publish the new chapter about schizophrenia and other primary psychotic disorders in 2017. We reviewed the available literature to summarize the major changes, innovations, and developments of both manuals. If available and possible, we outline the theoretical background behind these changes. Due to the fact that the development of ICD-11 has not yet been completed, the details about ICD-11 are still proposals under ongoing revision. In this ongoing process, they may be revised and therefore have to be seen as proposals. DSM-5 has eliminated schizophrenia subtypes and replaced them with a dimensional approach based on symptom assessments. ICD-11 will most likely go in a similar direction, as both manuals are planned to be more harmonized, although some differences will remain in details and the conceptual orientation. Next to these modifications, ICD-11 will provide a transsectional diagnostic criterion for schizoaffective disorders and a reorganization of acute and transient psychotic and delusional disorders. In this manuscript, we will compare the 2 classification systems. PMID:27418328

  1. Clashing Diagnostic Approaches: DSM-ICD Versus RDoC.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Treadway, Michael T

    2016-03-28

    Since at least the middle of the past century, one overarching model of psychiatric classification has reigned supreme, namely, that of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (herein referred to as DSM-ICD). This DSM-ICD approach embraces an Aristotelian view of mental disorders as largely discrete entities that are characterized by distinctive signs, symptoms, and natural histories. Over the past several years, however, a competing vision, namely, the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative launched by the National Institute of Mental Health, has emerged in response to accumulating anomalies within the DSM-ICD system. In contrast to DSM-ICD, RDoC embraces a Galilean view of psychopathology as the product of dysfunctions in neural circuitry. RDoC appears to be a valuable endeavor that holds out the long-term promise of an alternative system of mental illness classification. We delineate three sets of pressing challenges-conceptual, methodological, and logistical/pragmatic-that must be addressed for RDoC to realize its scientific potential. We conclude with a call for further research, including investigation of a rapprochement between Aristotelian and Galilean approaches to psychiatric classification. PMID:26845519

  2. An ICD lead with failure of outer insulation goes undetected by regular measurements.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi-Woh; Chiang, Chung-Seung

    2012-09-01

    We report a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy status post implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation in June 2009. Outer insulation failure of her Riata ST ventricular ICD lead goes undetected by routine interrogation and provocative tests as recommended from its manufacturer.(1) Another domain of assessment, fluoroscopy, to facilitate early detection of structural abnormality in this family of ICD lead is discussed. PMID:21745226

  3. 77 FR 8877 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... Standards Staff, announces the following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... attend the ICD- 9-CM C&M meeting on March 5, 2012, must submit their name and organization by February...

  4. 77 FR 48985 - Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination... Health Data Standards Staff announces the following meeting: Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance.... Purpose: The ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee is a public forum for the...

  5. Italienischunterricht (Italian Instruction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moine, Virgile; And Others

    1965-01-01

    This issue of "Schulpraxis," a Swiss journal for language teaching, is devoted to Italian instruction in Switzerland. It includes: (1) an interpretation of the poem "Le morte chitarre" by Salvatore Quasimodo, conducted in a girls' school in German Switzerland, (2) a presentation of principles for an Italian textbook to be based on modern…

  6. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (<40%). These proportions can be even lower when only affirmative decisions are considered. One nation provides priority status on the transplant waiting list as an incentive to affirmative registration, while another nation makes registering a donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (<0.5%). The variation in organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  7. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-08-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (<40%). These proportions can be even lower when only affirmative decisions are considered. One nation provides priority status on the transplant waiting list as an incentive to affirmative registration, while another nation makes registering a donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (<0.5%). The variation in organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  8. A Strategic Plan for Integrating ICD-10 in Your Practice and Workflow.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Sue; Cleland, Risë Marie; Staggs, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of the International Classification of Disease (ICD) 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis code set in the United States has been legislatively delayed several times with the most recent date for implementation set for October 1, 2015. The transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10 will be a major undertaking that will require a substantial amount of planning. In the following article, we outline the steps to develop and implement a strategic plan for the transition to the new code set, identify training needs throughout the practice, and review the challenges and opportunities associated with the transition to ICD-10. PMID:25993244

  9. ICD-11 and SNOMED CT Common Ontology: circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Rector, Alan; Spackman, Kent; Millar, Jane; Campbell, James; Ustün, Bedirhan; Chute, Christopher G; Solbrig, Harold; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Persson, Kristina Brand

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of semantic interoperability between data in electronic health records and aggregated data for health statistics requires efforts to carefully align the two domain terminologies ICD and SNOMED CT. Both represent a new generation of ontology-based terminologies and classifications. The proposed alignment of these two systems and, in consequence, the validity of their cross-utilisation, requires a specific resource, named Common Ontology. We present the ICD-11 SNOMED CT Common Ontology building process including: a) the principles proposed for aligning the two systems with the help of a common model of meaning, b) the design of this common ontology, and c) preliminary results of the application to the diseases of the circulatory system. PMID:25160347

  10. ICD-10 mortality coding and the NCIS: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Daking, Leanne; Dodds, Leonie

    2007-01-01

    The collection and utilisation of mortality data are often hindered by limited access to contextual details of the circumstances surrounding fatal incidents. The National Coroners Information System (NCIS) can provide researchers with access to such information. The NCIS search capabilities have been enhanced by the inclusion of data supplied by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), specifically the ICD-10 Cause of Death code set. A comparative study was conducted to identify consistencies and differences between ABS ICD-10 codes and those that could be generated by utilising the full NCIS record. Discrepancies between the two sets of codes were detected in over 50% of cases, which highlighted the importance of access to complete and timely documentation in the assignment of accurate and detailed cause of death codes. PMID:18195402

  11. The DRG shift: a new twist for ICD-10 preparation.

    PubMed

    Long, Peri L

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of your specific business is a key component of ICD-10 implementation. An understanding of your organization's current reimbursement trends will go a long way to assessing and preparing for the impact of ICD-10 in your environment. If you cannot be prepared for each detailed scenario, remember that much of the analysis and resolution requires familiar coding, DRG analysis, and claims processing best practices. Now, they simply have the new twist of researching new codes and some new concepts. The news of a delay in the implementation compliance date, along with the release of grouper Version 29, should encourage your educational and business analysis efforts. This is a great opportunity to maintain open communication with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Department of Health and Human Services, and Centers for Disease Control. This is also a key time to report any unusual or discrepant findings in order to provide input to the final rule. PMID:22741518

  12. The Tragedy of the Implementation of ICD-10-CM as ICD-10: Is the Cart Before the Horse or Is There a Tragic Paradox of Misinformation and Ignorance?

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Singh, Vijay; Boswell, Mark V

    2015-01-01

    The forced implementation of ICD-10-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification) codes that are specific to the United States, scheduled for implementation October 1, 2015, which is vastly different from ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision), implemented worldwide, which has 14,400 codes, compared to ICD-10-CM with 144,000 codes to be implemented in the United States is a major concern to practicing U.S. physicians and a bonanza for health IT and hospital industry. This implementation is based on a liberal interpretation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which requires an update to ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification) and says nothing about ICD-10 or beyond. On June 29, 2015, the Supreme Court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency unreasonably interpreted the Clean Air Act when it decided to set limits on the emissions of toxic pollutants from power plants, without first considering the costs on the industry. Thus, to do so is applicable to the medical industry with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) unreasonably interpreting HIPAA and imposing existent extensive regulations without considering the cost. In the United States, ICD-10-CM with a 10-fold increase in the number of codes has resulted in a system which has become so complicated that it no longer compares with any other country. Moreover, most WHO members use the ICD-10 system (not ICD-10-CM) only to record mortality in 138 countries or morbidity in 99 countries. Currently, only 10 countries employ ICD-10 (not ICD-10-CM) in the reimbursement process, 6 of which have a single payer health care system. Development of ICD-10-CM is managed by 4 non-physician groups, known as cooperating parties. They include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), CMS, the American Hospital Association (AHA), and the American Health

  13. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  14. Registries Help Moms Measure Medication Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the case of the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry, which studies the effects of drugs for ... is taking. For example, the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry website lists more than 30 medications being ...

  15. The Italian activist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Michele

    2012-02-01

    Italian theoretical physicist Giorgio Parisi has been an outspoken critic of Silvio Berlusconi's lack of support for science. He talks about how physics may fare under the new administration led by the economist Mario Monti.

  16. The Italian energy sector

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The energy sector in Italy, as in Europe and in many other areas of the world, is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The 1986 ratification of the European Single Act was intended to create a European internal market, where circulation of people, capital, goods, and services would reach the highest possible liberalization. In 1988, in the document The Energy Internal Market, the European Union (EU) commission stressed the need for creation of an internal energy market--free of obstacles--to increase security of supply, to reduce costs, and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European economic system. In 1990, the Community Council adopted directives to implement the EU energy sector. This article describes Italy`s role as part of the EU energy sector. It covers the following topics: the Italian energy sector; electricity vs gas transportation; project finance; recent developments advance Italian power industry; specifying powerplant components -- Italian stype; buyers` guide to Italian equipment, services.

  17. Italian protesters win concessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2008-12-01

    Thousands of researchers and students who have taken to the streets in protest at reforms of Italian universities and public research institutes have won some limited concessions from the government. The protesters had argued that the reforms, which include significant budget cuts, would further weaken a research base that is already short of resources. The Italian government maintains that its reforms are necessary to modernize a university system that is corrupt and inefficient, but has reversed some of the cuts.

  18. Evaluation and implementation of public health registries.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D J; Henry, R C; Hogan, J G; Van Amburg, G H; Taylor, J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid proliferation of registries has occurred during the last 20 years. Given the long-term commitment of resources associated with registries and limited public health funding, proposals for new registries should be carefully considered before being funded. A registry is defined as a data base of identifiable persons containing a clearly defined set of health and demographic data collected for a specific public health purpose. Criteria for evaluating whether a registry is needed, feasible, or the most effective and efficient means of collecting a specific set of health data are presented. They include an evaluation of the stated purpose; a review of the function, duration, and scope of the registry; consideration of existing alternative data sources; an assessment of the practical feasibility of the registry; the likelihood of sufficient start-up and long-term funding; and an evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the registry. Creating a public health registry is a complex process. A range of technical and organizational skills is required for a registry to be successfully implemented. Eight requirements are identified as crucial for the successful development of a new registry. They include an implementation plan, adequate documentation, quality control procedures, case definition and case-finding (ascertainment) procedures, determination of data elements, data collection and processing procedures, data access policy, and a framework for dissemination of registry data and findings. PMID:1902306

  19. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  20. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  1. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  2. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  3. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  4. Incidence of primary breast cancer in Iran: Ten-year national cancer registry data report.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Ramezani, Rashid; Kaviani, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The screening programs and advances in the treatment of patients with breast cancer have led to an increase in overall survival. Cancer registry systems play an important role in providing basic data for research and the monitoring of the cancer status. In this study, the results of the 10-year national cancer registry (NCR) of Iran in breast cancer are reviewed. NCR database records were searched for primary breast cancer records according to ICD-O-3 coding and the cases were reviewed. A total of 52,068 cases were found with the coding of primary breast cancer. Females constituted 97.1% of the cases. Breast cancer was the leading type of cancer in Iranian females, accounting for 24.6% of all cancers. The mean age of the women with breast cancer was 49.6 years (95%CI 49.5-49.6). Most of the cases (95.7%) were registered as having invasive pathologies (behavior code 3). The most common morphology of primary breast cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma (ICD-O 8500/3) followed by invasive lobular carcinoma (ICD-O 8520/3) with relative frequencies of 77.8% and 5.2%, respectively. The average annual crude incidence of primary breast cancer in females was 22.6 (95%CI 22.1-23.1) per 100,000 females, with an age-standardized rate (ASR) of 27.4 (95%CI 22.5-35.9). There were no data on survival, staging or immunohistochemical marker(s) of the breast-cancer-registered cases. The incidence of breast cancer in Iran is lower than in low-middle-income neighboring countries. The NCR data registry of breast cancer is not accurate in monitoring the effect of screening programs or determining the current status of breast cancer in Iran. Screening programs of breast cancer in Iran have failed to enhance the detection of the patients with in situ lesion detection. A quality breast cancer registry and a screening program for breast cancer are both needed. PMID:26070507

  5. Nuclear EpICD expression and its role in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Young; Bae, Jun Sang; Cha, Eun Jung; Chu, Hyun Hee; Sohn, Jang Sihn; Moon, Woo Sung

    2016-07-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) results in shedding of the extracellular domain (EpEX) and release of the intra-cellular domain (EpICD) into the cytoplasm. Released EpICD associates with FHL2, β-catenin and Lef-1 to form a nuclear complex and triggers oncogenic signaling. This study was conducted to examine the nuclear expression of EpICD in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to assess the role of EpICD in HCC. EpICD immunoexpression was examined in 100 cases of HCC using tissue microarrays and correlated with clinicopathological parameters. We also examined the role of EpICD in HCC using EpICD cDNA transfected HCC cell line and EpCAM silenced HCC cell line by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Nuclear expression of EpICD was observed in 19 of 100 (19%) cases. Nuclear expression of EpICD significantly correlated with nuclear expression of β-catenin, and Ki-67 labeling index. In addition, nuclear expression of EpICD was associated with higher histologic grade and advanced T category. Forced overexpression of EpICD in the HCC cell significantly increased the cell proliferation, migration and invasion. The overexpression of EpICD also increased the expression levels of the active form of β-catenin and c-myc and cyclin D1. In contrast, downregulation of EpCAM by siRNA decreased the cell proliferation, migration, invasion and the expression of active form of β-catenin, c-myc and cyclin D1. Our present data suggest that EpICD plays important roles in HCC progression by modulating expression of target genes of EpCAM. PMID:27176150

  6. A renal registry for Africa: first steps

    PubMed Central

    Davids, M. Razeen; Eastwood, John B.; Selwood, Neville H.; Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A.M.; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries. PMID:26798479

  7. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  8. Validity of the coding for herpes simplex encephalitis in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Laura Krogh; Dalgaard, Lars Skov; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup; Nørgaard, Mette; Mogensen, Trine Hyrup

    2016-01-01

    Background Large health care databases are a valuable source of infectious disease epidemiology if diagnoses are valid. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the recorded diagnosis coding of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR). Methods The DNPR was used to identify all hospitalized patients, aged ≥15 years, with a first-time diagnosis of HSE according to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD-10), from 2004 to 2014. To validate the coding of HSE, we collected data from the Danish Microbiology Database, from departments of clinical microbiology, and from patient medical records. Cases were classified as confirmed, probable, or no evidence of HSE. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of the HSE diagnosis coding stratified by diagnosis type, study period, and department type. Furthermore, we estimated the proportion of HSE cases coded with nonspecific ICD-10 codes of viral encephalitis and also the sensitivity of the HSE diagnosis coding. Results We were able to validate 398 (94.3%) of the 422 HSE diagnoses identified via the DNPR. Hereof, 202 (50.8%) were classified as confirmed cases and 29 (7.3%) as probable cases providing an overall PPV of 58.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 53.0–62.9). For “Encephalitis due to herpes simplex virus” (ICD-10 code B00.4), the PPV was 56.6% (95% CI: 51.1–62.0). Similarly, the PPV for “Meningoencephalitis due to herpes simplex virus” (ICD-10 code B00.4A) was 56.8% (95% CI: 39.5–72.9). “Herpes viral encephalitis” (ICD-10 code G05.1E) had a PPV of 75.9% (95% CI: 56.5–89.7), thereby representing the highest PPV. The estimated sensitivity was 95.5%. Conclusion The PPVs of the ICD-10 diagnosis coding for adult HSE in the DNPR were relatively low. Hence, the DNPR should be used with caution when studying patients with encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus. PMID:27330328

  9. Migrating existing clinical content from ICD-9 to SNOMED

    PubMed Central

    Darer, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify challenges in mapping internal International Classification of Disease, 9th edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) encoded legacy data to Systematic Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), using SNOMED-prescribed compositional approaches where appropriate, and to explore the mapping coverage provided by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM)'s SNOMED clinical core subset. Design This study selected ICD-CM codes that occurred at least 100 times in the organization's problem list or diagnosis data in 2008. After eliminating codes whose exact mappings were already available in UMLS, the remainder were mapped manually with software assistance. Results Of the 2194 codes, 784 (35.7%) required manual mapping. 435 of these represented concept types documented in SNOMED as deprecated: these included the qualifying phrases such as ‘not elsewhere classified’. A third of the codes were composite, requiring multiple SNOMED code to map. Representing 45 composite concepts required introducing disjunction (‘or’) or set-difference (‘without’) operators, which are not currently defined in SNOMED. Only 47% of the concepts required for composition were present in the clinical core subset. Search of SNOMED for the correct concepts often required extensive application of knowledge of both English and medical synonymy. Conclusion Strategies to deal with legacy ICD data must address the issue of codes created by non-taxonomist users. The NLM core subset possibly needs augmentation with concepts from certain SNOMED hierarchies, notably qualifiers, body structures, substances/products and organisms. Concept-matching software needs to utilize query expansion strategies, but these may be effective in production settings only if a large but non-redundant SNOMED subset that minimizes the proportion of extensively pre-coordinated concepts is also available. PMID:20819871

  10. Inappropriate shock for myopotential over-sensing in a patient with subcutaneous ICD.

    PubMed

    Corzani, Alessandro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Diemberger, Igor; Martignani, Cristian; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate ICD shocks are common adverse events; they are mainly due to supraventricular arrhythmias and secondly are related to noise, undersensing, oversensing, device malfunctions. We present a case of inappropriate device therapy due to myopotential oversensing in a patient with a subcutaneous ICD (s-ICD). A 58 years old male with an s-ICD during the device interrogation showed a previous episode of suspected sustained ventricular tachycardia at 210 bpm, which was effectively treated with ICD shock. The patient experienced the electrical shock while holding a big gas-cylinder in his arms. The EGM analysis revealed many irregular ventricular signals of low amplitude lasting for 24 s and interrupted by the shock. The device showed no malfunctions. This is the first case report of inappropriate S-ICD shock related to myopotential over-sensing. By recording intracardiac EGM, we demonstrated that the noise was created by the activity of the pectorals muscles. PMID:25820052

  11. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  12. Data Standards in Diabetes Patient Registries

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel L

    2011-01-01

    Widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and expansion of patient registries present opportunities to improve patient care and population health and advance translational research. However, optimal integration of patient registries with EHR functions and aggregation of regional registries to support national or global analyses will require the use of standards. Currently, there are no standards for patient registries and no content standards for health care data collection or clinical research, including diabetes research. Data standards can facilitate new registry development by supporting reuse of well-defined data elements and data collection systems, and they can enable data aggregation for future research and discovery. This article introduces standardization topics relevant to diabetes patient registries, addresses issues related to the quality and use of registries and their integration with primary EHR data collection systems, and proposes strategies for implementation of data standards in diabetes research and management. PMID:21722563

  13. Iranian Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, Fanak; Sharif-Kashani, Babak; Malek Mohammad, Majid; Saliminejad, Leila; Monjazebi, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a fatal disorder with a prevalence of 8.6 per million. We introduce a registry website for IPAH and PAH patients ( www.IPAH.ir) for access and efficient delivery of government-aided and subsidized antihypertensive medications. Materials and Methods: The IPAH registry was opened in November 2009. Information of IPAH and PAH patients with a username and password were uploaded in the site. Data entry was possible only via the physicians and healthcare organizations via internet that were given a personalized username and password for entry. Following the patients’ profile submission, a scientific committee composed of a cardiologist and a pulmonologist who were selected by the Ministry of Health of Iran (MOH), evaluated the data. The eligibility of the patient to receive the medications was confirmed after evaluation. If the patient was eligible, 82% of the Bosentan cost was paid by MOH. Results: To date, one hundred and sixteen patients (82 females, 34 males) have been registered. The mean pulmonary artery pressure by right heart catheterization was 69.24±17 mmHg (ranging from 35 to 110 mmHg). Conclusion: The first online Iranian registry program for IPAH and PAH patients is believed to supply essential information for health care providers in the field. PMID:26528365

  14. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  15. Anatomy of the ICDS series: A bibliometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel; Marxa, Werner

    2007-12-01

    In this article, the proceedings of the International Conferences on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS) have been analyzed by bibliometric methods. The papers of these conferences have been published as articles in regular journals or special proceedings journals and in books with diverse publishers. The conference name/title changed several times. Many of the proceedings did not appear in the so-called “source journals” covered by the Thomson/ISI citation databases, in particular by the Science Citation Index (SCI). But the number of citations within these source journals can be determined using the Cited Reference Search mode under the Web of Science (WoS) and the SCI offered by the host STN International. The search functions of both systems were needed to select the papers published as different document types and to cover the full time span of the series. The most cited ICDS papers were identified, and the overall numbers of citations as well as the time-dependent impact of these papers, of single conferences, and of the complete series, was established. The complete of citing papers was analyzed with respect to the countries of the citing authors, the citing journals, and the ISI subject categories.

  16. World apheresis association--world apheresis registry.

    PubMed

    Stegmayr, B G; Ivanovich, P; Korach, J M; Rock, G; Norda, R; Ramlow, W

    2005-04-01

    In 2002 WAA decided to start a world-wide apheresis registry to gain insight into the extent of treatment, adverse events, and to facilitate contacts among centers when treatment indications are rare and experience limited. Stem cell and other blood products collections intended for therapeutic application can also be entered. The WAA planned to use the French Registry. Its translation into English has not been accomplished and the fiscal obligations for that registry has not, as yet, been determined or considered and approved by the WAA Board. From Dec 2002 the proposed registry (a merged version of the French, Canadian and Swedish registries) can be immediately implemented. We now cordially invite all centers to join that registry. Please, also inform colleagues at other centers in your country to join. E-mail and address lists of colleagues in your country who have not registered will be welcomed. The site is at: Go to World Apheresis Registry; Login code to test the Registry is: al61tms. Then apply for a specific login code for your center. We welcome you to this registry for your input of data. You will not be charged any registration fee. The registry includes a randomization system that can be used for local or multi center studies (randomization by in-center basis allows you to make your own studies). It includes a formula that increases the chance to get a more even distribution between groups also for smaller sample sizes. PMID:15784455

  17. Italian in the Modern World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adorno, Elvira, Ed.

    This booklet of 15 reprinted letters sent in response to a query concerning the actual use of Italian in the United States designates various areas of professional application. Some reference to current Italian publications is included. It is hoped that these letters will help promote the study of Italian in American schools. (RL)

  18. Preparing for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation: impact on productivity and quality.

    PubMed

    Stanfill, Mary H; Hsieh, Kang Lin; Beal, Kathleen; Fenton, Susan H

    2014-01-01

    Coding productivity is expected to drop significantly during the lead-up to and in the initial stages of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation, now expected to be delayed until October 1, 2015. This study examined the differences in coding productivity between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS for hospital inpatient cases matched for complexity and severity. Additionally, interrater reliability was calculated to determine the quality of the coding. On average, coding of an inpatient record took 17.71 minutes (69 percent) longer with ICD-10-CM/PCS than with ICD-9-CM. A two-tailed T-test for statistical validity for independent samples was significant (p = .001). No coder characteristics such as years of experience or educational level were found to be a significant factor in coder productivity. Coders who had received more extensive training were faster than coders who had received only basic training. Though this difference was not statistically significant, it provides a strong indication of significant return on investment for staff training time. Coder interrater reliability was substantial for ICD-9-CM but only moderate for ICD-10-CM/PCS, though some ICD-10-CM/PCS cases had complete interrater (coder) agreement. Time spent coding a case was negatively correlated with interrater reliability (-0.425 for ICD-10-CM and -0.349 for ICD-10-PCS). This finding signals that increased time per case does not necessarily translate to higher quality. Adequate training for coders, as well as guidance regarding time invested per record, is important. Additionally, these findings indicate that previous estimates of initial coder productivity loss with ICD-10-CM/PCS may have been understated. PMID:25214823

  19. The National Cardiovascular Data Registry Voluntary Public Reporting Program: An Interim Report From the NCDR Public Reporting Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Gregory J; Jennings, Jonathan; Madden, Ruth A; Malenka, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; McKay, Charles R; Ness, Debra L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Ring, Michael E; Rumsfeld, John S; Shelton, Marc E; Simanowith, Michael C; Slattery, Lara E; Weintraub, William S; Lovett, Ann; Normand, Sharon-Lise

    2016-01-19

    Public reporting of health care data continues to proliferate as consumers and other stakeholders seek information on the quality and outcomes of care. Medicare's Hospital Compare website, the U.S. News & World Report hospital rankings, and several state-level programs are well known. Many rely heavily on administrative data as a surrogate to reflect clinical reality. Clinical data are traditionally more difficult and costly to collect, but more accurately reflect patients' clinical status, thus enhancing the validity of quality metrics. We describe the public reporting effort being launched by the American College of Cardiology and partnering professional organizations using clinical data from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) programs. This hospital-level voluntary effort will initially report process of care measures from the percutaneous coronary intervention (CathPCI) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) registries of the NCDR. Over time, additional process, outcomes, and composite performance metrics will be reported. PMID:26603176

  20. Trends in Gastroenteritis-associated Mortality in the United States 1985-2005: Variations by ICD-9 and ICD-10 Codes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BackgroundTrends in gastroenteritis-associated mortality are changing over time with development of antibiotic resistant strains of certain pathogens, improved diagnostic methods, and changing healthcare. In 1999, ICD-10 coding was introduced for mortality records which can also ...

  1. eXtended MetaData Registry

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  2. Thematic Issue: Italian Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    In 1964, when the "living" theatre appeared to be dying in New York, theater in Italy began changing from an author-oriented to a performance-oriented, nonliterary form. The articles in this document trace the historical development of Italian theatre and analyze current dramas which demonstrate the diversity of approaches and the energy and…

  3. Predictors of Appropriate ICD Therapy in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy: Long Term Experience of a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Saguner, Ardan M.; Wolber, Thomas; Tanner, Felix C.; Jenni, Rolf; Corti, Natascia; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a rare genetically transmitted disease prone to ventricular arrhythmias. We therefore investigated the clinical, echocardiographical and electrophysiological predictors of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with ARVC. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 26 patients (median age of 40 years at diagnosis, 21 males and 5 females) with ARVC who underwent ICD implantation. Results Over a median (range) follow-up period of 10 (2.7, 37) years, appropriate ICD therapy for ventricular arrhythmias was documented in 12 (46%) out of 26 patients. In all patients with appropriate ICD therapy the ICD was originally inserted for secondary prevention. Median time from ICD implantation to ICD therapy was 9 months (range 3.6, 54 months). History of heart failure was a significant predictor of appropriate ICD therapy (p = 0.033). Left ventricular disease involvement (p = 0.059) and age at implantation (p = 0.063) were borderline significant predictors. Patients with syncope at time of diagnosis were significantly less likely to receive ICD therapy (p = 0.02). Invasive electrophysiological testing was not significantly associated with appropriate ICD therapy. Conclusion In our cohort of patients with ARVC, history of heart failure was a significant predictor of appropriate ICD therapy, whereas left ventricular involvement and age at time of ICD implantation were of borderline significance. These predictors should be tested in larger prospective cohorts to optimize ICD therapy in this rare cardiomyopathy. PMID:23028419

  4. 76 FR 51985 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance... Standards Staff, announces the following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee... Maintenance (C&M) Committee is a public forum for the presentation of proposed modifications to...

  5. Patient versus informant reporting of ICD symptoms in Parkinson's disease using the QUIP: validity and variability.

    PubMed

    Papay, Kimberly; Mamikonyan, Eugenia; Siderowf, Andrew D; Duda, John E; Lyons, Kelly E; Pahwa, Rajesh; Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H; Weintraub, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Questions exist regarding the validity of patient-reporting of psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed observer variability and validity in reporting of impulse control disorder (ICD) symptoms in PD by using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease (QUIP). PD patients and their informants (71 pairs) completed the QUIP to assess four ICDs (compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating) in patients. Trained raters then administered a diagnostic interview. Sensitivity of the QUIP for a diagnosed ICD was 100% for both patient- and informant-completed instruments, and specificity was 75% for both raters. Approximately 40% of patients without an ICD diagnosis had a positive QUIP, suggesting that many PD patients experience subsyndromal ICD symptoms that require ongoing monitoring. Agreement between patient- and informant-reporting of any ICD behaviors on the QUIP was moderate (kappa=0.408), and for individual ICDs was highest for gambling (kappa=0.550). Overall, a negative QUIP from either the patient or informant rules out the possibility of an ICD, while a positive QUIP requires a follow-up diagnostic interview and ongoing monitoring to determine if symptoms currently are, or in the future become, clinically significant. PMID:21186135

  6. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907-0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding. PMID:26656501

  7. Comparison of ICD-10 and DC: 0-3R Diagnoses in Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equit, Monika; Paulus, Frank; Fuhrmann, Pia; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare diagnoses of patients from a special outpatient department for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Specifically, overlap, age and gender differences according to the two classification systems DC: 0-3R and ICD-10 were examined. 299 consecutive children aged 0-5;11 years received both ICD-10 and…

  8. Live Virtual Constructive (LVC): Interface Control Document (ICD) for the LVC Gateway. [Flight Test 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srba

    2015-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) documents and tracks the necessary information required for the Live Virtual and Constructive (LVC) systems components as well as protocols for communicating with them in order to achieve all research objectives captured by the experiment requirements. The purpose of this ICD is to clearly communicate all inputs and outputs from the subsystem components.

  9. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10

    PubMed Central

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907–0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding. PMID:26656501

  10. Bipolar and related disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Alexander; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders with profound negative impact on affected patients. Even if their symptomatology has long been recognized, diagnostic criteria have changed over time and diagnosis often remains difficult. The Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), issued in May 2013, comprises several changes regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorders compared to the previous edition. Diagnostic categories and criteria for bipolar disorders show some concordance with the internationally also widely used Tenth Edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). However, there are also major differences that are worth highlighting. The aim of the following text is to depict and discuss those. PMID:27378177

  11. Expanding the definition of addiction: DSM-5 vs. ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-08-01

    While considerable efforts have been made to understand the neurobiological basis of substance addiction, the potentially "addictive" qualities of repetitive behaviors, and whether such behaviors constitute "behavioral addictions," is relatively neglected. It has been suggested that some conditions, such as gambling disorder, compulsive stealing, compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, and problem Internet use, have phenomenological and neurobiological parallels with substance use disorders. This review considers how the issue of "behavioral addictions" has been handled by latest revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), leading to somewhat divergent approaches. We also consider key areas for future research in order to address optimal diagnostic classification and treatments for such repetitive, debilitating behaviors. PMID:27151528

  12. Parental alienation, DSM-5, and ICD-11: response to critics.

    PubMed

    Bernet, William; Baker, Amy J L

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest among forensic practitioners in the proposals that parental alienation be included in the next editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases (DSM) and The International Classification of Diseases (ICD). However, there has also been a great deal of misunderstanding about the proposals, and misinformation has been expressed in professional meetings, on websites, and in journal articles. In this article we address four common misunderstandings regarding parental alienation: that there is a lack of research to support it as a diagnosis; that adopting parental alienation as a diagnosis will lead to serious adverse consequences; that the advocates of parental alienation are driven by self-serving or malevolent motives; and that Richard Gardner should be criticized for self-publishing his description of parental alienation syndrome. PMID:23503183

  13. Will mania survive DSM-5 and ICD-11?

    PubMed

    Angst, Jules

    2015-12-01

    As a natural phenomenon, mania without major depression will of course survive DSM-5 and ICD-11, but following its integration as a diagnosis into bipolar-I disorder (BP-I) in those manuals, BP-I will be more heterogeneous and, paradoxically, will include a unipolar disorder. Furthermore, unipolar mania will no longer be adequately identified and coded as an independent disorder in public health statistics. Mania without major depression, with prevalence rates of 1.7-1.8 %, is even more common than schizophrenia. This brief review of our current, still insufficient, knowledge suggests strongly that pure unipolar mania, as well as mania with minor depressive disorders, should remain important elements of the three-dimensional mood spectrum. Research should focus on dimensional and not on simplified categorical models, which entail a considerable loss of information. PMID:26650389

  14. Systematic review of validated case definitions for diabetes in ICD-9-coded and ICD-10-coded data in adult populations

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Bushra; Jette, Nathalie; Metcalfe, Amy; Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Butalia, Sonia; Rabi, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With steady increases in ‘big data’ and data analytics over the past two decades, administrative health databases have become more accessible and are now used regularly for diabetes surveillance. The objective of this study is to systematically review validated International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-based case definitions for diabetes in the adult population. Setting, participants and outcome measures Electronic databases, MEDLINE and Embase, were searched for validation studies where an administrative case definition (using ICD codes) for diabetes in adults was validated against a reference and statistical measures of the performance reported. Results The search yielded 2895 abstracts, and of the 193 potentially relevant studies, 16 met criteria. Diabetes definition for adults varied by data source, including physician claims (sensitivity ranged from 26.9% to 97%, specificity ranged from 94.3% to 99.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) ranged from 71.4% to 96.2%, negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 95% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.8 to 0.9), hospital discharge data (sensitivity ranged from 59.1% to 92.6%, specificity ranged from 95.5% to 99%, PPV ranged from 62.5% to 96%, NPV ranged from 90.8% to 99% and κ ranged from 0.6 to 0.9) and a combination of both (sensitivity ranged from 57% to 95.6%, specificity ranged from 88% to 98.5%, PPV ranged from 54% to 80%, NPV ranged from 98% to 99.6% and κ ranged from 0.7 to 0.8). Conclusions Overall, administrative health databases are useful for undertaking diabetes surveillance, but an awareness of the variation in performance being affected by case definition is essential. The performance characteristics of these case definitions depend on the variations in the definition of primary diagnosis in ICD-coded discharge data and/or the methodology adopted by the healthcare facility to extract information from patient records. PMID:27496226

  15. Validation of ICD-9 Codes for Stable Miscarriage in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Quinley, Kelly E.; Falck, Ailsa; Kallan, Michael J.; Datner, Elizabeth M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Schreiber, Courtney A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes have not been validated for identifying cases of missed abortion where a pregnancy is no longer viable but the cervical os remains closed. Our goal was to assess whether ICD-9 code “632” for missed abortion has high sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) in identifying patients in the emergency department (ED) with cases of stable early pregnancy failure (EPF). Methods We studied females ages 13–50 years presenting to the ED of an urban academic medical center. We approached our analysis from two perspectives, evaluating both the sensitivity and PPV of ICD-9 code “632” in identifying patients with stable EPF. All patients with chief complaints “pregnant and bleeding” or “pregnant and cramping” over a 12-month period were identified. We randomly reviewed two months of patient visits and calculated the sensitivity of ICD-9 code “632” for true cases of stable miscarriage. To establish the PPV of ICD-9 code “632” for capturing missed abortions, we identified patients whose visits from the same time period were assigned ICD-9 code “632,” and identified those with actual cases of stable EPF. Results We reviewed 310 patient records (17.6% of 1,762 sampled). Thirteen of 31 patient records assigned ICD-9 code for missed abortion correctly identified cases of stable EPF (sensitivity=41.9%), and 140 of the 142 patients without EPF were not assigned the ICD-9 code “632”(specificity=98.6%). Of the 52 eligible patients identified by ICD-9 code “632,” 39 cases met the criteria for stable EPF (PPV=75.0%). Conclusion ICD-9 code “632” has low sensitivity for identifying stable EPF, but its high specificity and moderately high PPV are valuable for studying cases of stable EPF in epidemiologic studies using administrative data. PMID:26265967

  16. Results from the Veterans Health Administration ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Weems, Shelley; Heller, Pamela; Fenton, Susan H

    2015-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the US Department of Veterans Affairs has been preparing for the October 1, 2015, conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification and Procedural Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) for more than four years. The VHA's Office of Informatics and Analytics ICD-10 Program Management Office established an ICD-10 Learning Lab to explore expected operational challenges. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the classification system conversion on coding productivity. ICD codes are integral to VHA business processes and are used for purposes such as clinical studies, performance measurement, workload capture, cost determination, Veterans Equitable Resource Allocation (VERA) determination, morbidity and mortality classification, indexing of hospital records by disease and operations, data storage and retrieval, research purposes, and reimbursement. The data collection for this study occurred in multiple VHA sites across several months using standardized methods. It is commonly accepted that coding productivity will decrease with the implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. The findings of this study suggest that the decrease will be more significant for inpatient coding productivity (64.5 percent productivity decrease) than for ambulatory care coding productivity (6.7 percent productivity decrease). This study reveals the following important points regarding ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity: 1. Ambulatory care ICD-10-CM coding productivity is not expected to decrease as significantly as inpatient ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity. 2. Coder training and type of record (inpatient versus outpatient) affect coding productivity. 3. Inpatient coding productivity is decreased when a procedure requiring ICD-10-PCS coding is present. It is highly recommended that organizations perform their own analyses to determine the effects of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation on coding productivity. PMID

  17. Results from the Veterans Health Administration ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Shelley; Heller, Pamela; Fenton, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) of the US Department of Veterans Affairs has been preparing for the October 1, 2015, conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification and Procedural Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) for more than four years. The VHA's Office of Informatics and Analytics ICD-10 Program Management Office established an ICD-10 Learning Lab to explore expected operational challenges. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the classification system conversion on coding productivity. ICD codes are integral to VHA business processes and are used for purposes such as clinical studies, performance measurement, workload capture, cost determination, Veterans Equitable Resource Allocation (VERA) determination, morbidity and mortality classification, indexing of hospital records by disease and operations, data storage and retrieval, research purposes, and reimbursement. The data collection for this study occurred in multiple VHA sites across several months using standardized methods. It is commonly accepted that coding productivity will decrease with the implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. The findings of this study suggest that the decrease will be more significant for inpatient coding productivity (64.5 percent productivity decrease) than for ambulatory care coding productivity (6.7 percent productivity decrease). This study reveals the following important points regarding ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity: Ambulatory care ICD-10-CM coding productivity is not expected to decrease as significantly as inpatient ICD-10-CM/PCS coding productivity.Coder training and type of record (inpatient versus outpatient) affect coding productivity.Inpatient coding productivity is decreased when a procedure requiring ICD-10-PCS coding is present. It is highly recommended that organizations perform their own analyses to determine the effects of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation on coding productivity. PMID:26396553

  18. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  19. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  20. White paper of Italian Gastroenterology: delivery of services for digestive diseases in Italy: weaknesses and strengths.

    PubMed

    Buscarini, Elisabetta; Conte, Dario; Cannizzaro, Renato; Bazzoli, Franco; De Boni, Michele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Farinati, Fabio; Ravelli, Paolo; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Lisiero, Manola; Spolaore, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    In 2011 the three major Italian gastroenterological scientific societies (AIGO, the Italian Society of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists; SIED, the Italian Society of Endoscopy; SIGE, the Italian Society of Gastroenterology) prepared their official document aimed at analysing medical care for digestive diseases in Italy, on the basis of national and regional data (Health Ministry and Lombardia, Veneto, Emilia-Romagna databases) and to make proposals for planning of care. Digestive diseases were the first or second cause of hospitalizations in Italy in 1999-2009, with more than 1,500,000 admissions/year; however only 5-9% of these admissions was in specialized Gastroenterology units. Reported data show a better outcome in Gastroenterology Units than in non-specialized units: shorter average length of stay, in particular for admissions with ICD-9-CM codes proxying for emergency conditions (6.7 days versus 8.4 days); better case mix (higher average diagnosis-related groups weight in Gastroenterology Units: 1 vs 0.97 in Internal Medicine units and 0.76 in Surgery units); lower inappropriateness of admissions (16-25% versus 29-87%); lower in-hospital mortality in urgent admissions (2.2% versus 5.1%); for patients with urgent admissions due to gastrointestinnal haemorrhage, in-hospital mortality was 2.3% in Gastroenterology units versus 4.0% in others. The present document summarizes the scientific societies' official report, which constitutes the "White paper of Italian Gastroenterology". PMID:24913902

  1. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the...

  2. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  3. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  4. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.

    1993-02-28

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are unique human tissue research programs studying the distribution, dose, and possible biological effects of the actinide elements in man, with the primary goal of assuring the adequacy of radiation protection standards for these radionuclides. The Registries research is based on radiochemical analysis of tissues collected at autopsy from voluntary donors who have documented occupational exposure to the actinides. To date, tissues, or in some cases radioanalytical results only, have been obtained from approximately 300 individuals; another 464 living individuals have volunteered to participate in the Registries research programs and have signed premortem informed consent and autopsy permissions. The Registries originated at the National Plutonium Registry which was started in 1968 as a then Atomic Energy Commission project under the aegis of a prime contractor at the Hanford site. In 1970, the name was changed to the United States Transuranium Registry to reflect a broader involvement with the higher actinides. In 1978, an administratively separate parallel registry, the United States Uranium Registry, was formed to carry out similar studies among uranium fuel cycle workers.

  5. The Utility and Challenges of Using ICD Codes in Child Maltreatment Research: A Review of Existing Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Debbie; Tonmyr, Lil; Fraser, Jenny; Walker, Sue; McKenzie, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this article are to explore the extent to which the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) has been used in child abuse research, to describe how the ICD system has been applied, and to assess factors affecting the reliability of ICD coded data in child abuse research.…

  6. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 81 - Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer.... 81, App. A Appendix A to Part 81—Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1 ICD-9 code Cancer description 140 Malignant neoplasm of lip. 141 Malignant neoplasm of tongue. 142...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 81 - Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer.... 81, App. A Appendix A to Part 81—Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1 ICD-9 code Cancer description 140 Malignant neoplasm of lip. 141 Malignant neoplasm of tongue. 142...

  8. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 81 - Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer.... 81, App. A Appendix A to Part 81—Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1 ICD-9 code Cancer description 140 Malignant neoplasm of lip. 141 Malignant neoplasm of tongue. 142...

  9. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 81 - Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer.... 81, App. A Appendix A to Part 81—Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1 ICD-9 code Cancer description 140 Malignant neoplasm of lip. 141 Malignant neoplasm of tongue. 142...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 81 - Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer.... 81, App. A Appendix A to Part 81—Glossary of ICD-9 Codes and Their Cancer Descriptions 1 ICD-9 code Cancer description 140 Malignant neoplasm of lip. 141 Malignant neoplasm of tongue. 142...

  11. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Ramakrishnan, TS; Das, R. C.; Srivastava, K.; Mehta, Suresh; Shashikumar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry. PMID:25535438

  12. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  13. The importance of registries in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Leal, Yelda A; Fernández-Garrote, Leticia M; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, with 14.1 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths annually. A marked disparity exists between developed countries and developing countries, with 57% of new cases and 65% of deaths in 2012 occurring in developing countries. This global picture can only be obtained because of data obtained from population-based cancer registries, which allow cancer estimations for different geographic areas. Our objective is to perform a review of different types of registries and their role in the control of cancer. These types of registries are lacking in developing countries. In Central and South America, only 6% of the population is included in cancer registries versus 83% in North America. It is necessary to increase the coverage of cancer registries to obtain more reliable data that will more appropriately guide control programs. PMID:27557391

  14. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-01-01

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials. PMID:24976913

  15. Comorbidity profile in dementia with Lewy bodies versus Alzheimer’s disease: a linkage study between the Swedish Dementia Registry and the Swedish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Compared to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is usually associated with a more complex clinical picture and higher burden of care. Yet, few investigations have been performed on comorbidities and risk factors of DLB. Therefore, we aimed to compare clinical risk factors and comorbidity profile in DLB and AD patients using two nationwide registries. Methods This is a linkage study between the Swedish dementia registry (SveDem) and the Swedish National Patient Registry conducted on 634 subjects with DLB and 9161 individuals with AD registered during the years 2007–2012. Comorbidity profile has been coded according to the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD 10) in addition to the date of each event. The main chapters of the ICD-10, the Charlson score of comorbidities and a selected number of neuropsychiatric diseases were compared between the DLB and AD groups. Comorbidity was registered before and after the dementia diagnosis. Results “Mental and behavioral disorders”, “diseases of the nervous system”, “diseases of the eye and adnexa”, diseases of the “circulatory”, “respiratory”, and “genitourinary” systems, “diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue” and “diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue” occurred more frequently in the DLB group after multivariate adjustment. Depression [adjusted OR = 2.12 (95%CI 1.49 to 3.03)] and migraine [adjusted OR = 3.65 (95%CI 1.48 to 9.0)] were more commonly recorded before the diagnosis of dementia in the DLB group. Following dementia diagnosis, ischemic stroke [adjusted OR = 1.89 (95%CI 1.21 to 2.96)] was more likely to happen among the DLB patients compared to the AD population. Conclusions Our study indicated a worse comorbidity profile in DLB patients with higher occurrence of depression, stroke and migraine compared with the AD group. Deeper knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of these

  16. The impact of proposed changes to ICD-11 on estimates of PTSD prevalence and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wisco, Blair E; Miller, Mark W; Wolf, Erika J; Kilpatrick, Dean; Resnick, Heidi S; Badour, Christal L; Marx, Brian P; Keane, Terence M; Rosen, Raymond C; Friedman, Matthew J

    2016-06-30

    The World Health Organization's posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) work group has published a proposal for the forthcoming edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that would yield a very different diagnosis relative to DSM-5. This study examined the impact of the proposed ICD-11 changes on PTSD prevalence relative to the ICD-10 and DSM-5 definitions and also evaluated the extent to which these changes would accomplish the stated aim of reducing the comorbidity associated with PTSD. Diagnostic prevalence estimates were compared using a U.S. national community sample and two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clinical samples. The ICD-11 definition yielded prevalence estimates 10-30% lower than DSM-5 and 25% and 50% lower than ICD-10 with no reduction in the prevalence of common comorbidities. Findings suggest that by constraining the diagnosis to a narrower set of symptoms, the proposed ICD-11 criteria set would substantially reduce the number of individuals with the disorder. These findings raise doubt about the extent to which the ICD-11 proposal would achieve the aim of reducing comorbidity associated with PTSD and highlight the public health and policy implications of such a redefinition. PMID:27124207

  17. The development of the ICD-11 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines for Mental and Behavioural Disorders

    PubMed Central

    First, Michael B; Reed, Geoffrey M; Hyman, Steven E; Saxena, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization is in the process of preparing the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), scheduled for presentation to the World Health Assembly for approval in 2017. The International Advisory Group for the Revision of the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders made improvement in clinical utility an organizing priority for the revision. The uneven nature of the diagnostic information included in the ICD-10 Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (CDDG), especially with respect to differential diagnosis, is a major shortcoming in terms of its usefulness to clinicians. Consequently, ICD-11 Working Groups were asked to collate diagnostic information about the disorders under their purview using a standardized template (referred to as a “Content Form”). Using the information provided in the Content Forms as source material, the ICD-11 CDDG are being developed with a uniform structure. The effectiveness of this format in producing more consistent clinical judgments in ICD-11 as compared to ICD-10 is currently being tested in a series of Internet-based field studies using standardized case material, and will also be tested in clinical settings. PMID:25655162

  18. Reliability of ICD-10 external cause of death codes in the National Coroners Information System.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Lyndal; Clapperton, Angela J; Killian, Jessica J; Stephan, Karen L; Ozanne-Smith, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Availability of ICD-10 cause of death codes in the National Coroners Information System (NCIS) strengthens its value as a public health surveillance tool. This study quantified the completeness of external cause ICD-10 codes in the NCIS for Victorian deaths (as assigned by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in the yearly Cause of Death data). It also examined the concordance between external cause ICD-10 codes contained in the NCIS and a re-code of the same deaths conducted by an independent coder. Of 7,400 NCIS external cause deaths included in this study, 961 (13.0%) did not contain an ABS assigned ICD-10 code and 225 (3.0%) contained only a natural cause code. Where an ABS assigned external cause ICD-10 code was present (n=6,214), 4,397 (70.8%) matched exactly with the independently assigned ICD-10 code. Coding disparity primarily related to differences in assignment of intent and specificity. However, in a small number of deaths (n=49, 0.8%) there was coding disparity for both intent and external cause category. NCIS users should be aware of the limitations of relying only on ICD-10 codes contained within the NCIS for deaths prior to 2007 and consider using these in combination with the other NCIS data fields and code sets to ensure optimum case identification. PMID:21041843

  19. Updating Allergy and/or Hypersensitivity Diagnostic Procedures in the WHO ICD-11 Revision.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Calderon, Moises A; Li, James; Casale, Thomas; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The classification of allergy and/or hypersensitivity conditions for the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 provides the appropriate corresponding codes for allergic diseases, assuming that the final diagnosis is correct. This classification should be linked to in vitro and in vivo diagnostic procedures. Considering the impact for our specialty, we decided to review the codification of these procedures into the ICD aiming to have a baseline and to suggest changes and/or submit new proposals. For that, we prepared a list of the relevant allergy and/or hypersensitivity diagnostic procedures that health care professionals are dealing with on a daily basis. This was based on the main current guidelines and selected all possible and relevant corresponding terms from the ICD-10 (2015 version) and the ICD-11 β phase foundation (June 2015 version). More than 90% of very specific and important diagnostic procedures currently used by the allergists' community on a daily basis are missing. We observed that some concepts usually used by the allergist community on a daily basis are not fully recognized by other specialties. The whole scheme and the correspondence in the ICD-10 (2015 version) and ICD-11 foundation (June 2015 version) provided us a big picture of the missing or imprecise terms and how they are scattered in the current ICD-11 framework, allowing us to submit new proposals to increase the visibility of the allergy and/or hypersensitivity conditions and diagnostic procedures. PMID:27107691

  20. Southern Saskatchewan Ticagrelor Registry experience

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Payam; Chopra, Varun; Bell, Ali; Kelly, Sheila; Zulyniak, Lori; Booker, Jeff; Zimmermann, Rodney; Semchuk, William; Cheema, Asim N; Lavoie, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    Background As ticagrelor enters into clinical use for acute coronary syndrome, it is important to understand patient/physician behavior in terms of appropriate use, adherence, and event rates. Methods The Southern Saskatchewan Ticagrelor Registry is a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study that identifies consecutive patients started on ticagrelor. We aimed to evaluate both on- and off-label use, identify characteristics of patients who prematurely stop ticagrelor, and describe patient/physician behavior contributing to inappropriate stoppage of this medication. Results From April 2012 to September 2013, 227 patients were initiated on ticagrelor, with a mean age of 62.2±12.1 years. The participants were 66% men and had a mean follow up of 157.4±111.7 days. Seventy-four patients (32.4%) had off-label indications. Forty-seven patients (20.7%) prematurely stopped ticagrelor and were more likely to be older, women, nonwhite, present with shock, and complain of dyspnea. Twenty-six of the 47 patients stopped ticagrelor inappropriately because of patient nonadherence (18 patients) and physician advice (eight patients). A composite outcome event of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 8.8% of the entire cohort and was more likely to occur in those older then 65 years, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and those who prematurely stopped ticagrelor. Conclusion In this real-world registry of patients started on ticagrelor, a third have off-label indications and a fifth prematurely stop the medication. Premature discontinuation was an independent predictor of major life-threatening bleeding and increased composite event rate of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke. PMID:25342889

  1. Intracellular fragment of NLRR3 (NLRR3-ICD) stimulates ATRA-dependent neuroblastoma differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Jesmin; Takatori, Atsushi; Islam, Md. Sazzadul; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Nagase, Hiroki; Nakagawara, Akira

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • NLRR3 is a membrane protein highly expressed in favorable neuroblastoma. • NLRR3-ICD was produced through proteolytic processing by secretases. • NLRR3-ICD was induced to be translocated into cell nucleus following ATRA exposure. • NLRR3-ICD plays a pivotal role in ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. - Abstract: We have previously identified neuronal leucine-rich repeat protein-3 (NLRR3) gene which is preferentially expressed in favorable human neuroblastomas as compared with unfavorable ones. In this study, we have found for the first time that NLRR3 is proteolytically processed by secretases and its intracellular domain (NLRR3-ICD) is then released to translocate into cell nucleus during ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. According to our present observations, NLRR3-ICD was induced to accumulate in cell nucleus of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells following ATRA treatment. Since the proteolytic cleavage of NLRR3 was blocked by α- or γ-secretase inhibitor, it is likely that NLRR3-ICD is produced through the secretase-mediated processing of NLRR3. Intriguingly, forced expression of NLRR3-ICD in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells significantly suppressed their proliferation as examined by a live-cell imaging system and colony formation assay. Similar results were also obtained in neuroblastoma TGW cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRR3-ICD stimulated ATRA-dependent neurite elongation in SK-N-BE cells. Together, our present results strongly suggest that NLRR3-ICD produced by the secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of NLRR3 plays a crucial role in ATRA-mediated neuronal differentiation, and provide a clue to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against aggressive neuroblastomas.

  2. Challenges and remediation for Patient Safety Indicators in the transition to ICD-10-CM

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Andrew D; Yang, Young Min; Li, Jianrong; Kenost, Colleen; Burton, Mike D; Becker, Bryan; Lussier, Yves A

    2015-01-01

    Reporting of hospital adverse events relies on Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. The US transition to ICD-10-CM in 2015 could result in erroneous comparisons of PSIs. Using the General Equivalent Mappings (GEMs), we compared the accuracy of ICD-9-CM coded PSIs against recommended ICD-10-CM codes from the Centers for Medicaid/Medicare Services (CMS). We further predict their impact in a cohort of 38 644 patients (1 446 581 visits and 399 hospitals). We compared the predicted results to the published PSI related ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes. We provide the first report of substantial hospital safety reporting errors with five direct comparisons from the 23 types of PSIs (transfusion and anesthesia related PSIs). One PSI was excluded from the comparison between code sets due to reorganization, while 15 additional PSIs were inaccurate to a lesser degree due to the complexity of the coding translation. The ICD-10-CM translations proposed by CMS pose impending risks for (1) comparing safety incidents, (2) inflating the number of PSIs, and (3) increasing the variability of calculations attributable to the abundance of coding system translations. Ethical organizations addressing ‘data-, process-, and system-focused’ improvements could be penalized using the new ICD-10-CM Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality PSIs because of apparent increases in PSIs bearing the same PSI identifier and label, yet calculated differently. Here we investigate which PSIs would reliably transition between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM, and those at risk of under-reporting and over-reporting adverse events while the frequency of these adverse events remain unchanged. PMID:25186492

  3. Incidence Patterns and Temporal Trends of Invasive Nonmelanotic Vulvar Tumors in Germany 1999-2011. A Population-Based Cancer Registry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buttmann-Schweiger, Nina; Klug, Stefanie J.; Luyten, Alexander; Holleczek, Bernd; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Kraywinkel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Time trends on the incidence and characteristics of invasive vulvar cancer in Germany have so far been studied in few local population- and hospital based tumor registries. We aimed to provide an overview on recent developments of vulvar cancer in Germany, using population-based cancer registry data. Methods We analyzed the data on vulvar cancer of eight population-based German cancer registries for the period 1999-2011. ICD-10 codes and ICD-O-3 morphology codes were used to select site and histologic types. The annual percentage change was calculated on age-adjusted incidence rates with a joinpoint regression model. Results A total of 12,711 registered cases of invasive carcinoma of the vulva were included in the analyses, hereof were 12,205 of squamous cell origin. Age-standardized incidence rates of vulvar cancer annually increased by 6.7% (95% confidence limits: 5.6-7.9) from 1.7 per 100,000 women in 1999 to 3.6 per 100,000 women in 2011. An increase was observed among women of all ages, and especially between 30 and 69 years of age. Conclusion The annual incidence of invasive carcinoma of the vulva nearly doubled in the past decade in Germany, considerably exceeding the rates observed in other Western European countries. A combination of changes in risk factors, and documentation practice might have contributed to the observed substantial increase in vulvar cancer incidence. PMID:26020540

  4. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  5. Rationale and design of the health economics evaluation registry for remote follow-up: TARIFF

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Renato P.; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Sagone, Antonio; Vicentini, Alfredo; Vincenti, Antonio; Morichelli, Loredana; Cavallaro, Ciro; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Leonida; Fusco, Antonio; Rovaris, Giovanni; Silvestri, Paolo; Guidotto, Tiziana; Pollastrelli, Annalisa; Santini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study are to develop a cost-minimization analysis from the hospital perspective and a cost-effectiveness analysis from the third payer standpoint, based on direct estimates of costs and QOL associated with remote follow-ups, using Merlin@home and Merlin.net, compared with standard ambulatory follow-ups, in the management of ICD and CRT-D recipients. Methods and results Remote monitoring systems can replace ambulatory follow-ups, sparing human and economic resources, and increasing patient safety. TARIFF is a prospective, controlled, observational study aimed at measuring the direct and indirect costs and quality of life (QOL) of all participants by a 1-year economic evaluation. A detailed set of hospitalized and ambulatory healthcare costs and losses of productivity that could be directly influenced by the different means of follow-ups will be collected. The study consists of two phases, each including 100 patients, to measure the economic resources consumed during the first phase, associated with standard ambulatory follow-ups, vs. the second phase, associated with remote follow-ups. Conclusion Remote monitoring systems enable caregivers to better ensure patient safety and the healthcare to limit costs. TARIFF will allow defining the economic value of remote ICD follow-ups for Italian hospitals, third payers, and patients. The TARIFF study, based on a cost-minimization analysis, directly comparing remote follow-up with standard ambulatory visits, will validate the cost effectiveness of the Merlin.net technology, and define a proper reimbursement schedule applicable for the Italian healthcare system. Trial registration: NCT01075516. PMID:22544910

  6. Automatic annotation of ICD-to-MedDRA mappings with SKOS predicates.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Gunnar; Souvignet, Julien; Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Robust alignments between ICD and MedDRA are essential to enable the secondary use of clinical data for pharmacovigilance research. UMLS makes available ICD-to-MedDRA mappings, but they are only poorly specified, which introduces difficulties when exploited in an automatic way. SKOS vocabulary can help achieve quality and machine-processable mappings. We have developed an algorithm based on several simple rules which annotates automatically ICD-to-MedDRA mappings with SKOS predicates. The method was tested and evaluated on a sample of ICD-10-to MedDRA mappings extracted from UMLS. The algorithm demonstrated satisfying performances, especially for skos:exactMatch properties, which suggests that automatic methods can be used to improve the quality of terminology mappings. PMID:25160341

  7. [Contributions from two Latin American psychiatric classifications to the development of ICD-11].

    PubMed

    Rivas Rodríguez, Mar; Reed, Geoffrey M; First, Michael B; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis

    2011-02-01

    In the context of the updating of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), this study conducted a code-by-code comparison between the ICD-10 chapter "Mental and Behavioural Disorders" and the diagnostic categories of two Latin American classification schemes: the Third Cuban Psychiatric Glossary (GC-3) and the Latin American Guide to Psychiatric Diagnosis (GLADP). The objective was to help define what categories in the current classification should be broadened and what new categories might be added to the future ICD-11 to make it more applicable in local sociocultural and clinical contexts that differ from those found in regions whose perspectives have historically dominated the ICD, namely, the United States and Europe. It is hoped that the results will contribute to the efforts under way to develop a genuinely international classification system. PMID:21437371

  8. Intrinsic HER4/4ICD transcriptional activation domains are required for STAT5A activated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen; Sfondouris, Mary E; Semmes, Eleanor C; Meyer, Alicia M; Jones, Frank E

    2016-10-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor family member HER4 undergoes proteolytic processing at the cell surface to release the HER4 intracellular domain (4ICD) nuclear protein. Interestingly, 4ICD directly interacts with STAT5 and functions as an obligate STAT5 nuclear chaperone. Once in the nucleus 4ICD binds with STAT5 at STAT5 target genes, dramatically potentiating STAT5 transcriptional activation. These observations raise the possibility that 4ICD directly coactivates STAT5 gene expression. Using both yeast and mammalian transactivation reporter assays, we performed truncations of 4ICD fused to a GAL4 DNA binding domain and identified two independent 4ICD transactivation domains located between residues 1022 and 1090 (TAD1) and 1192 and 1225 (TAD2). The ability of the 4ICD DNA binding domain fusions to transactivate reporter gene expression required deletion of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain. In addition, we identified the 4ICD carboxyl terminal TVV residues, a PDZ domain binding motif (PDZ-DBM), as a potent transcriptional repressor. The transactivation activity of the HER4 carboxyl terminal domain lacking the tyrosine kinase (CTD) was significantly lower than similar EGFR or HER2 CTD. However, deletion of the HER4 CTD PDZ-DBM enhanced HER4 CTD transactivation to levels equivalent to the EGFR and HER2 CTDs. To determine if 4ICD TAD1 and TAD2 have a physiologically relevant role in STAT5 transactivation, we coexpressed 4ICD or 4ICD lacking TAD2 or both TAD1 and TAD2 with STAT5 in a luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrate that each 4ICD TAD contributes additively to STAT5A transactivation and the ability of STAT5A to transactivate the β-casein promoter requires the 4ICD TADs. Taken together, published data and our current results demonstrate that both 4ICD nuclear chaperone and intrinsic coactivation activities are essential for STAT5 regulated gene expression. PMID:27502417

  9. Italian Polar Metadata System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Nativi, S.; Leone, C.; Migliorini, S.; Mazari Villanova, L.

    2012-04-01

    Italian Polar Metadata System C.Leone, S.Longo, S.Migliorini, L.Mazari Villanova, S. Nativi The Italian Antarctic Research Programme (PNRA) is a government initiative funding and coordinating scientific research activities in polar regions. PNRA manages two scientific Stations in Antarctica - Concordia (Dome C), jointly operated with the French Polar Institute "Paul Emile Victor", and Mario Zucchelli (Terra Nova Bay, Southern Victoria Land). In addition National Research Council of Italy (CNR) manages one scientific Station in the Arctic Circle (Ny-Alesund-Svalbard Islands), named Dirigibile Italia. PNRA started in 1985 with the first Italian Expedition in Antarctica. Since then each research group has collected data regarding biology and medicine, geodetic observatory, geophysics, geology, glaciology, physics and atmospheric chemistry, earth-sun relationships and astrophysics, oceanography and marine environment, chemistry contamination, law and geographic science, technology, multi and inter disciplinary researches, autonomously with different formats. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Research assigned the scientific coordination of the Programme to CNR, which is in charge of the management and sharing of the scientific results carried out in the framework of the PNRA. Therefore, CNR is establishing a new distributed cyber(e)-infrastructure to collect, manage, publish and share polar research results. This is a service-based infrastructure building on Web technologies to implement resources (i.e. data, services and documents) discovery, access and visualization; in addition, semantic-enabled functionalities will be provided. The architecture applies the "System of Systems" principles to build incrementally on the existing systems by supplementing but not supplanting their mandates and governance arrangements. This allows to keep the existing capacities as autonomous as possible. This cyber(e)-infrastructure implements multi-disciplinary interoperability following

  10. [Implantation of a biventricular ICD in a patient with dextrocardia with situs inversus].

    PubMed

    Vurgun, Veysel Kutay; Gerede, Menekşe; Altın, Ali Timuçin; Candemir, Başar; Akyürek, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce sudden cardiac death and heart failure symptoms, biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is a treatment method commonly used in selected patients with cardiomyopathy. The frequency of dextrocardia in congenital heart defects is approximately 0.4/10000. In this group, the frequency of cardiomyopathy development is rare. In this case report we present a patient with dextrocardia undergoing implantation of biventricular ICD. PMID:25655858

  11. [Hoogendoorn and the medical registry].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Dirk Hoogendoorn (1914-1990) was a solo general practitioner in the village of Wijhe (eastern part of the Netherlands) from 1941, during the time of the German occupation, until 1971. From the very beginning, he combined his practice with the recording of disease patterns. He first concentrated on infectious diseases, especially whooping cough, which was the subject of his doctoral thesis. He later set up registries in two regional hospitals. When his initiative expanded to a national organisation, he became its advisor. He nonetheless continued to produce statistics on a variety of disorders as well as on surgical procedures, even more so after his retirement. The subjects ranged from traffic accidents and tonsillectomies to the discrepancy between increased body height and the unchanging height of the tennis net, but he had the most affinity with the practice of obstetrics. He stirred up much emotion by showing that a decrease in perinatal mortality was proceeding slower in the Netherlands than in other European countries, especially by suggesting a causal relationship between this lag and the high rate of Dutch home deliveries. This debate has continued to this day. PMID:23075774

  12. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mandate Congressional Testimony Board of Scientific Counselors Regional Offices Program Overview ATSDR en Español A-Z Index Multimedia Tools Special Initiatives Publications Sites Toxic Substances Health Registries ...

  13. Physicians’ Outlook on ICD-10-CM/PCS and Its Effect on Their Practice

    PubMed Central

    Watzlaf, Valerie; Alkarwi, Zahraa; Meyers, Sandy; Sheridan, Patty

    2015-01-01

    Background The United States is one of the last countries to change from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. The compliance date for implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS is expected to fall on October 1, 2015. Objectives Evaluate physicians’ perceptions on the change from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS and its effect on their practice, determine how HIM professionals can assist in this transition, and assess what resources are needed to aid in the transition. Results Twenty physicians were asked to participate in one of three focus groups. Twelve physicians (60 percent) agreed to participate. Top concerns included electronic health record software readiness, increase in documentation specificity and time, ability of healthcare professionals to learn a new language, and inadequacy of current training methods and content. Conclusion Physicians expressed that advantages of ICD-10-CM/PCS were effective data analytics and complexity of patient cases with more specific codes. Health information management professionals were touted as needed during the transition to create simple, clear specialty guides and crosswalks as well as education and training tools specific for physicians. PMID:26807074

  14. Optimal tachycardia programming in ICDs : Recommendations in the post-MADIT-RIT era.

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Burmistrava, Tatsiana

    2016-09-01

    Optimal implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) programming can reduce the incidence of inappropriate shock therapy and improve prognosis in patients with an ICD. Only after results from randomized trials became available was the "safety first" feeling overcome that mandated early shock therapy, waived the use of antitachycardia pacing and forced shock therapy after a time of 30 s expired, even if tachycardia discriminators would have withheld the therapy. The strong evidence to limit ICD therapy to longer ventricular tachycardia (VT) should not result in individually dangerous ICD programming, particularly in patients with a high risk of slow VT (known monomorphic VT, post VT ablation, during treatment with amiodarone, very dilated left ventricle). Monitoring zones may aid to detect unexpected slow VT and to explain symptoms such as presyncope without exposing the patient to an unnecessary risk of inappropriate therapy. This review summarizes our current knowledge on optimal ICD programming and explains exactly how we should program device parameters in practice in single- or dual-chamber ICDs by different manufacturers and in different groups of patients. PMID:27624808

  15. 75 FR 65629 - Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee AGENCY: Appraisal... the annual National Registry fee to $40. SUMMARY: Under authority in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform... Registry fee (Registry fee) to $40 from the current $25 amount at its meeting on October 13, 2010. The...

  16. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  17. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  18. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  19. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  20. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  1. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  2. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization. PMID:26438630

  3. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cell Line (HL60) by Animal’s Venom Derived Peptides (ICD-85)

    PubMed Central

    Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas; Shahramyar, Zahra; Morovvati, Hasan; Lotfi, Mohsen; Nouri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed an inhibitory effect of ICD-85 (Venom derived peptides) on breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231. ICD-85 was also confirmed by in-vivo studies to suppress the breast tumor in mice. However, the exact mechanism of ICD-85 was unknown. Hence, the present study was undertaken to assess the mechanism of ICD-85 effect as an anti-proliferative agent of cancer cells. The effect of ICD-85 on proliferation of HL-60 cancer cells was determined by using the MTT assay. The morphological changes of ICD-85 treated HL-60 cells were observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). DNA fragmentation analysis was also carried out using gel electrophoresis. ICD-85 induced the marked inhibition of HL60 cell proliferation with an IC50-value of 0.04 μg/mL following 24 h of incubation. ICD-85 treated cells when compared with untreated cells, showed nuclear material condensation, endoplasmic reticulum dilation, mitochondria swelling or degradation, increased cytoplasmic vacuoles, reduction or disappearance in cytoplasmic process and decreased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio was observed. The characteristic DNA ladder formation of ICD-85-treated cells in agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed the results obtained through the electron microscopy. The results of the present study indicated that ICD-85 inhibited the cancer cell proliferation by inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:24250521

  4. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  5. Non-Standard Italian Dialect Heritage Speakers' Acquisition of Clitic Placement in Standard Italian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the acquisition of object clitic placement in Standard Italian by heritage speakers (HSs) of non-standard Italian dialects. It compares two different groups of Standard Italian learners--Northern Italian dialect HSs and Southern Italian dialect HSs--whose heritage dialects contrast with each other in clitic word order.…

  6. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR): De-identified Case Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) is a research program studying actinide elements deposited within the human body û in persons with measurable, documented exposures to those elements. The Registries are operated by the Washington State University (WSU) College of Pharmacy, with administrative offices and laboratory facilities in Richland, Washington. The Registries are funded by a grant from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health Studies. The mission of the USTUR is to study the uptake, translocation and retention (biokinetics) and tissue dosimetry of uranium, plutonium, americium, and other actinides in occupationally exposed humans (workers), over their whole lifetime (from exposure through full lifespan), and to serve as a national and international resource for testing and improving the application of excreta monitoring and other contemporary bioassay data to predict tissue dose rates measured at autopsy. These studies are fundamental to evaluating and improving the reliability of, and confidence in, both prospective and retrospective assessments of tissue doses and risks from intakes of actinide materials through inhalation, ingestion, or contaminated wounds. Narrative, de-identified case summaries can be viewed by case number for whole body donations, partial body donations, and special studies. Possible intakes, health physics data, autopsy and pathology findings, and tissue analysis data are described. Radiochemistry data such as wet weight, ashed weight, and measured activity are reported, along with health physics data such as urine and fecal analysis results. USTUR autopsy cases are coded using the International Classisfication of Diseases (ICD) versions 9 and 10. Pathology data can be searched by these codes and viewed by relation to death and severity. [Taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/AboutUs/overview.html and from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/Mission/index.html and from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/DeidentifiedData/database.html

  7. Coding the circumstances of injury: ICD-10 a step forward or backwards?

    PubMed

    Langley, J D; Chalmers, D J

    1999-12-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) E codes are the most widely used coding frame for categorising the circumstances of injury and poisoning. In 1992 major revisions to the E codes were released. The aim of this paper was to consider whether the changes made are a step forward or backwards in terms of facilitating injury prevention. The approach taken was to reflect on some former injury prevention research needs and the challenges they presented using data coded according to ICD-9, and then to consider how, if at all, ICD-10 has addressed these difficulties. As with ICD-9, there are essentially two axes associated with each cause: intent and mechanism of injury, and these are captured by one code. This approach can have the unintended effect of hiding the significance of some mechanisms of injury. While there have been significant improvements in some areas, such as falls, in others, such as injuries due to firearms, ICD-10 has taken a step backward. In addition the failure to produce mutually exclusive codes presents problems for determining the incidence of downing events. A welcome addition are "optional" activity codes which enable the identification of work related and sport related injury for the first time. Nevertheless, the limited range of codes and absence of coding guides limits their utility. The revised place of occurrence codes do not represent a significant improvement on ICD-9 in that they are limited to 10, they are not mutually exclusive, and they do not adequately cover a range of specific places of occurrence. In summary, relative to its predecessor, ICD-10 represents a significant improvement in many areas. Unfortunately, it still falls far short of the mark for many injury prevention needs. PMID:10628910

  8. Survival Strategies for Tsunami of ICD-10-CM for Interventionalists: Pursue or Perish!

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hammer, Marvel J; Boswell, Mark V; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    The unfunded mandate for the implementation of International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) is scheduled October 1, 2015. The development of ICD-10-CM has been a complicated process. We have endeavored to keep Interventional Pain Management doctors apprised via a variety of related topical manuscripts. The major issues relate to the lack of formal physician participation in its preparation. While the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and American Hospital Association (AHA) as active partners in its preparation. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are major players; 3M and Blue Cross Blue Shield Association are also involved. The cost of ICD-10-CM implementation is high, similar to the implementation of electronic health records (EHRs), likely consuming substantial resources. While ICD-10, utilized worldwide, includes 14,400 different codes, ICD-10-CM, specific for the United States, has expanded to 144,000 codes, which also includes procedural coding system. It is imperative for physicians to prepare for the mandatory implementation. Conversion from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM coding in interventional pain management is not a conversion of one to one that can be easily obtained from software packages. It is a both a difficult and time-consuming task with each physician, early on, expected to spend on estimation at least 10 minutes per visit on extra coding for established and new patients. For interventional pain physicians, there have been a multitude of changes, including creation of new codes and confusing conversion of existing codes. This manuscript describes a variety of codes that are relevant to interventional pain physicians and often utilized in daily practices. It is our objective that this manuscript will provide coding assistance to interventional pain physicians. PMID:26431128

  9. Pediatric ICD Utilization in the United States from 1997-2006

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kristin M.; Evans, Frank; Kaltman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Background Indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation in children have expanded, yet pediatric population based data on ICD implantation are lacking. Objective We characterized trends in pediatric ICD use in the United States from 1997-2006. Methods We examined national hospital administrative data from the 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) for new ICD implants in patients younger than 18 years of age and characterized patients, hospitals, and hospitalization-related outcomes. Results The number of pediatric ICD implants per year increased three-fold (from 130 in 1997 to 396 in 2006, p= 0.003). Implants with a concomitant diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmia decreased from 77% to 45% (p=0.001). The average age decreased from 13.6 to 12.2 years (p=0.01), and the percentage of patients younger than 5 years of age tended to increase (up to 10%, p=0.09). In 2006, the number of implants per center ranged from 1 to 24 (median= 3). Over time, the complication rate tended to decrease (from 16 to 10%, p=0.07). Complication rate was not related to a diagnosis of congenital heart disease, age, or implant volume. Conclusions ICD use increased dramatically in children from 1997 to 2006, although implantation declined in patients with a concomitant diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmia (those likely to be implanted for secondary prevention). The complication rate tended to decrease overall. Each center implants relatively few ICDs per year, which may have implications for competency and training. PMID:20887811

  10. The Egyptian clinical trials’ registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov)

    PubMed Central

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Taha, Fatma M.

    2015-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended. PMID:26843968

  11. An Xrootd Italian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccali, T.; Donvito, G.; Diacono, D.; Marzulli, G.; Pompili, A.; Della Ricca, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Argiro, S.; Gregori, D.; Grandi, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Lista, L.; Fabozzi, F.; Barone, L. M.; Santocchia, A.; Riahi, H.; Tricomi, A.; Sgaravatto, M.; Maron, G.

    2014-06-01

    The Italian community in CMS has built a geographically distributed network in which all the data stored in the Italian region are available to all the users for their everyday work. This activity involves at different level all the CMS centers: the Tier1 at CNAF, all the four Tier2s (Bari, Rome, Legnaro and Pisa), and few Tier3s (Trieste, Perugia, Torino, Catania, Napoli, ...). The federation uses the new network connections as provided by GARR, our NREN (National Research and Education Network), which provides a minimum of 10 Gbit/s to all the sites via the GARR-X[2] project. The federation is currently based on Xrootd[1] technology, and on a Redirector aimed to seamlessly connect all the sites, giving the logical view of a single entity. A special configuration has been put in place for the Tier1, CNAF, where ad-hoc Xrootd changes have been implemented in order to protect the tape system from excessive stress, by not allowing WAN connections to access tape only files, on a file-by-file basis. In order to improve the overall performance while reading files, both in terms of bandwidth and latency, a hierarchy of xrootd redirectors has been implemented. The solution implemented provides a dedicated Redirector where all the INFN sites are registered, without considering their status (T1, T2, or T3 sites). An interesting use case were able to cover via the federation are disk-less Tier3s. The caching solution allows to operate a local storage with minimal human intervention: transfers are automatically done on a single file basis, and the cache is maintained operational by automatic removal of old files.

  12. Assessing the psychosocial impact of the ICD: a national survey of implantable cardioverter defibrillator health care providers.

    PubMed

    Sears, S F; Todaro, J F; Urizar, G; Lewis, T S; Sirois, B; Wallace, R; Sotile, W; Curtis, A B; Conti, J B

    2000-06-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) provides a survival advantage over antiarrhythmic medications for patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. However, the effect of ICD therapy on quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning are not as well understood. Health care providers (e.g., physicians, nurses) can serve as a valuable source of information related to these ICD outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate health care provider perceptions regarding: (1) the quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning of their ICD recipients, (2) the concerns or problems reported by ICD recipients, and (3) the degree of provider comfort in managing these concerns. The final sample of health care providers (n = 261) rated ICD recipients' global quality-of-life and psychosocial functioning, and specific concerns about health care, lifestyle, special population adjustment, marital and family adjustment, and emotional well-being. With regard to quality-of-life, health care providers reported that the majority of ICD recipients were functioning better (38%) or about the same (47%) than before implantation. However, health care providers reported that 15% of recipients experienced worse quality-of-life postimplantation. Similarly, health care providers indicated that 10%-20% of ICD recipients experienced worse emotional functioning and strained family relationships. Moreover, issues related to driving, dealing with ICD shocks, and depression were the most common ICD recipient concerns. Significant differences were noted between physicians and nurses/other health care professionals on a wide range of psychosocial issues. Health care providers generally reported the most comfort dealing with traditional medical issues (i.e., patient adherence), and the least comfort in managing emotional well-being issues (e.g., depression and anxiety). These results suggest that routine attention to ICD quality-of-life and psychosocial outcomes is indicated for

  13. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports. PMID:19227671

  14. [Considerations on limits and profits of registries].

    PubMed

    Addis, Antonio; Costa, Enrico; De Palma, Rossana; Magrini, Nicola; Marata, Anna Maria; Martelli, Luisa; Papini, Donato; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The article collects the summary of the discussion occurred in the setting of PRIER II, in the session dedicated to the taxonomy of registries. Shown below, some specific contributions by health professionals working at the regional departments, which deal with registries, as well as the contribution on the same subject by specialists working at some pharmaceutical companies. In particular, after the presentation summarized in the article by prof. Giuseppe Costa1, the contributions, respectively by a representative of the Emilia-Romagna Region, of a health and hospital service and by the PRIER II workgroup, are following. Finally, a collective work with all participants to the working group took place to focus on all the issues considered to be crucial in defining clinical registries. At the same discussion table, institutional representatives of the regulatory national and regional branch were also invited to take into consideration the points of view of all public and private registry users, in particular in their benefits, limits and purposes. Going through the discussion on a specific check list and deepening a number of statements identified by the working group, a list of key points, essential to characterize each clinical registry, was produced. PMID:26418504

  15. [Italian emigration to the Americas].

    PubMed

    Cerase, F P

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on structural conditions and other factors involved in Italian migration to the Americas. The actual migratory experience and the effects of migration on the areas of origin are also discussed. PMID:12268612

  16. Revisiting Desensitization and Allergen Immunotherapy Concepts for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Calderon, Moises A; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Rosenwasser, Lanny J; Bousquet, Jean; Pawankar, Ruby; Sisul, Juan Carlos; Cepeda, Alfonso Mario; Li, James; Muraro, Antonella; Fineman, Stanley; Sublett, James L; Katelaris, Constance H; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Hee-Bom; Casale, Thomas; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Allergy and hypersensitivity intervention management procedures, such as desensitization and/or tolerance induction and immunotherapy, have not been pondered up to now in the content of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) context because the focus has been on prioritizing the condition implementations. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to implementing allergic and hypersensitivity conditions in the forthcoming ICD-11. However, we consider that it is crucial now to have nomenclature and classification universally accepted for these procedures to be able to provide scientifically consistent proposals into the new ICD-11 platform for the best practice parameters of our specialty. With the aim of promoting a harmonized comprehension and aligning it with the ICD-11 revision, we have reviewed the definitions and concepts currently used for desensitization and/or tolerance induction and immunotherapy. We strongly believe that this review is a key instrument to support the allergy specialty identity into the ICD-11 framework and serves as a platform to perform positive quality improvement in clinical practice. PMID:26969269

  17. Gender incongruence of childhood in the ICD-11: controversies, proposal, and rationale.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Reed, Geoffrey M

    2016-03-01

    As part of the development of the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), WHO appointed a Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health to recommend changes necessary in the classification of mental and behavioural disorders in ICD-10 that are related to sexuality and gender identity. This Personal View focuses on the Working Group's proposals to include the diagnosis gender incongruence of childhood in ICD-11 and to move gender incongruence of childhood out of the mental and behavioural disorders chapter of ICD-11. We outline the history of ICD and DSM child gender diagnoses, expert consensus, knowledge gaps, and controversies related to the diagnosis and treatment of extremely gender-variant children. We argue that retaining the gender incongruence of childhood category is justified as a basis to structure clinical care and to ensure access to appropriate services for this vulnerable population, which provides opportunities for education and informed consent, the development of standards and pathways of care to help guide clinicians and family members, and a basis for future research efforts. PMID:26946394

  18. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, L.; De, K. , Draper, P. , Gallas, E. , Li, J. , Sosebee, M. , Stephens, R.W. , White, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO`s WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ``L0`` capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment.

  19. Optimal Programming of ICDs for Prevention of Appropriate and Inappropriate Shocks.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ronald; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Hsia, Henry; Zei, Paul C; Wang, Paul J

    2008-09-01

    Expansion of indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has led to a significant increase in the number of patients receiving ICDs and the number of lives saved because of ICD therapy. However, appropriate or inappropriate shocks are frequent and may result in a significant decrease in quality of life in patients with ICDs. Atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response, sinus tachycardia, atrial tachycardia or atrial flutter with rapid conduction, and other supraventricular tachycardias are the most common arrhythmias causing inappropriate therapy. Other causes include oversensing of diaphragmatic potentials or myopotentials, T-wave oversensing, double or triple counting of intracardiac signals, lead fractures or header connection problems, lead chatter or noise, and electromagnetic interference. Strategies to reduce inappropriate therapy using device programming rely on the ability to distinguish supraventricular and atrial arrhythmias from ventricular tachycardia. Avoiding therapy for nonsustained ventricular arrhythmias and increasing the role of antitachycardia pacing to terminate ventricular tachycardia are key approaches to reducing shocks for ventricular arrhythmias. Optimal programming holds great promise for decreasing the overall incidence of shock therapy and increasing ICD acceptance. PMID:18814830

  20. Lessons Learned from an ICD-10-CM Clinical Documentation Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moczygemba, Jackie; Fenton, Susan H

    2012-01-01

    On October 1, 2013, the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) will be mandated for use in the United States in place of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). This new classification system will used throughout the nation's healthcare system for recording diagnoses or the reasons for treatment or care. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether current levels of inpatient clinical documentation provide the detail necessary to fully utilize the ICD-10-CM classification system for heart disease, pneumonia, and diabetes cases. The design of this pilot study was cross-sectional. Four hundred ninety-one de-identified records from two sources were coded using ICD-10-CM guidelines and codebooks. The findings of this study indicate that healthcare organizations need to assess clinical documentation and identify gaps. In addition, coder proficiency should be assessed prior to ICD-10-CM implementation to determine the need for further education and training in the biomedical sciences, along with training in the new classification system. PMID:22548021

  1. Inappropriate Shock Delivered By Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator - Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (ICD-CRT) Due To Myopotential Oversensing

    PubMed Central

    Barakpour, Hamid; Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of ICD-CRT therapy depends on accurate sensing of intracardiac signals and sensing algorithms. We report the occurrence of sensing abnormality in a patient with ICD-CRT. In this patient, oversensing of myopotentials during strenuous muscular activity resulted in an inappropriate ICD-CRT discharge. Although modern ICDs are highly effective in detecting and terminating malignant tachyarrhythmias, their detection specificity must be improved. It is possible to find the mechanism of arrhythmia by EGM. Simple device reprogramming make it possible to avoid the oversensing of myopotentials. PMID:19165363

  2. US Beryllium Case Registry through 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Sprince, N.L.; Kazemi, H.

    1980-02-01

    A synopsis of the cases reported to the Beryllium Case Registry between 1973 and 1977 is presented. As of 1973, there were 832 cases of beryllium disease entered into the Registry. In the five years since that report, 55 additional cases have been added, 40 men and 15 women. Exposures occured in the electronics and nuclear industries in the production and use of beryllium containing alloys and beryllium oxide ceramis. Pathological changes in the lung tissue are described. Cases continue to be reported in which the diagnosis was sarcoidosis until the history of beryllium exposure led to the finding of beryllium in the lung tissue or mediastinal lymph node biopsy. Data from the Registry support the fact that chronic beryllium disease is a continued occupational hazard.

  3. A registry of ankylosing spondylitis registries and prospects for global interfacing

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the optimal criteria and conditions for establishing a clinical registry, as well as detailing their application in a number of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) Registries already in existence. Recent findings Recent genetic studies and studies of long-term treatment efficacy and side-effects have underscored the need for large numbers of patients, much larger than would be possible from a single center or consortium. An optimal Registry should have its aims established upfront, with appropriate governance and oversight, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for participating collaborators and subject defined. Collaborators contributing subjects to a Registry should use validated instruments for which they have been previously trained. The numerous cross-sectional and longitudinal Registries on AS and axSpA have been recently established that differ widely depending on the referral and selection issues. Summary The challenge of large-scale examinations of genetics, comorbidities, medication usage, and side-effects in spondyloarthritis underscores the need for combining data from well characterized registries of AS patients which require careful planning. There are currently many such registries available internationally, offering promise for collaborations and data pooling that can answer some of the pressing questions facing rheumatology clinicians and researchers. PMID:23656716

  4. International variation in the definition of 'main condition' in ICD-coded health data.

    PubMed

    Quan, H; Moskal, L; Forster, A J; Brien, S; Walker, R; Romano, P S; Sundararajan, V; Burnand, B; Henriksson, G; Steinum, O; Droesler, S; Pincus, H A; Ghali, W A

    2014-10-01

    Hospital-based medical records are abstracted to create International Classification of Disease (ICD) coded discharge health data in many countries. The 'main condition' is not defined in a consistent manner internationally. Some countries employ a 'reason for admission' rule as the basis for the main condition, while other countries employ a 'resource use' rule. A few countries have recently transitioned from one of these approaches to the other. The definition of 'main condition' in such ICD data matters when it is used to define a disease cohort to assign diagnosis-related groups and to perform risk adjustment. We propose a method of harmonizing the international definition to enable researchers and international organizations using ICD-coded health data to aggregate or compare hospital care and outcomes across countries in a consistent manner. Inter-observer reliability of alternative harmonization approaches should be evaluated before finalizing the definition and adopting it worldwide. PMID:24990594

  5. Obsessive compulsive and related disorders: comparing DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Marras, Anna; Fineberg, Naomi; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been recognized as mainly characterized by compulsivity rather than anxiety and, therefore, was removed from the anxiety disorders chapter and given its own in both the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the Beta Draft Version of the 11th revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). This revised clustering is based on increasing evidence of common affected neurocircuits between disorders, differently from previous classification systems based on interrater agreement. In this article, we focus on the classification of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs), examining the differences in approach adopted by these 2 nosological systems, with particular attention to the proposed changes in the forthcoming ICD-11. At this stage, notable differences in the ICD classification are emerging from the previous revision, apparently converging toward a reformulation of OCRDs that is closer to the DSM-5. PMID:27401060

  6. Tourette and tic disorders in ICD-11: standing at the diagnostic crossroads.

    PubMed

    Woods, Douglas W; Thomsen, Per H

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects discussion by the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders. After reviewing the historical classification of tic disorders, this article discusses their placement in ICD-11. Existing problems with diagnostic labels and criteria, appropriate placement of the tic disorders category within the ICD-11 system, and pragmatic factors affecting classification are reviewed. The article ends with recommendations to (a) maintain consistency with the DSM-5 diagnostic labels for tic disorders, (b) add a minimum duration guideline for a provisional tic disorder diagnosis, (c) remove the multiple motor tic guideline for the diagnosis of Tourette disorder, and (d) co-parent the tic disorder diagnoses in the disorders of the nervous system and the mental and behavioral disorders categories, with secondary co-parenting in the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders sections. PMID:25388612

  7. Charts versus Discharge ICD-10 Coding for Sternal Wound Infection Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Danielle A.; Doherty, Christopher; De Souza, Michael A.; Quan, Hude; Harrop, A. Robertson; Nickerson, Duncan; Rabi, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection (SWI) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) can carry a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this work is to describe the methods used to identify cases of SWI in an administrative database and to demonstrate the effectiveness of using an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) coding algorithm for this purpose. Methods ICD-10 codes were used to identify cases of SWI within one year of CABG between April 2002 and November 2009. We randomly chose 200 charts for detailed chart review (100 from each of the groups coded as having SWI and not having SWI) to determine the utility of the ICD-10 coding algorithm. Results There were 2,820 patients undergoing CABG. Of these, 264 (9.4 percent) were coded as having SWI. Thirty-eight cases of SWI were identified by chart review. The ICD-10 coding algorithm of T81.3 or T81.4 was able to identify incident SWI with a positive predictive value of 35 percent and a negative predictive value of 97 percent. The agreement between the ICD-10 coding algorithm and presence of SWI remained fair, with an overall kappa coefficient of 0.32 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.22–0.43). The effectiveness of identifying deep SWI cases is also presented. Conclusions This article describes an effective algorithm for identifying a cohort of patients with SWI following open sternotomy in large databases using ICD-10 coding. In addition, alternative search strategies are presented to suit researchers' needs. PMID:26396556

  8. Assessing the planning and implementation strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition in Alabama hospitals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians' documentation in health records, coders' process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers' reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders' productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. PMID:23805061

  9. Sensing lead insulation defect resulting in a damage of the ICD pulse generator case.

    PubMed

    Gummert, J; Krauss, B; Hutschenreiter, W; Hambrecht, R; Mohr, F W

    1998-02-01

    Eight months after ICD implantation with an electrically active case the patient presented with ICD system sensing failure. Upon reoperation, we found an insulation defect of the proximal sensing lead and the generator case showed arc marks suggesting a short circuit between the sensing lead and case. The generator was replaced, the original sensing lead insulated, and a new sensing lead inserted. Bench testing of the explanted generator showed a damaged internal circuitry. Proximal lead insulation defects combined with electrically active cases may result in damage of the case. The potential damage of internal circuitry warrants generator replacement. PMID:9507556

  10. The role of the partner atom and resonant excitation energy in ICD in rare gas dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Patrick; Ripani, Enrico; Bolognesi, Paola; Coreno, Marcello; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Devetta, Michele; Callegari, Carlo; Di Praia, Michele; Prince, Kevin; Richter, Robert; Alagial, Michele; Kivimäkil, Antti

    2014-04-01

    We show experimental evidence for Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) in mixed rare gas dimers following resonant Auger decay. A velocity map imaging apparatus together with a cooled supersonic beam containing Ar2, ArNe and ArKr dimers was used to record electron VMI images in coincidence with two mass selected ions following excitation on five resonances converging to the Ar+ 2p-11/2 and 2p-13/2 thresholds using the synchrotron radiation. The results show that the kinetic energy distribution of the ICD electrons observed in coincidence with the ions from Coulomb explosion of the dimers depends on the partner ion and resonant photon energy.

  11. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills. PMID:26436185

  12. [Cancer registry of laryngectomized persons in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Pavlić, Blazenka

    2014-03-01

    Cancer poses a major problem in the population of Croatia. Owing to Professor Zivko Kulcar, who founded Cancer Registry at the Institute of Public Health in 1959, statistical data on patients with malignant cancer, including information on the entire territory of the Republic of Croatia, are available. The Act on Official Statistics (Official Gazette 103/2003) and Annual Implementation Plan regulate data recording in Cancer Registry, which is performed by the County Public Health Institutes that control the volume and quality of registration, after which the information is forwarded to the Croatian National Public Health Institute. If information and statistical data are needed for public health or scientific research purposes, one should approach Cancer Registry, having previously filled out a form for aggregated or individual information. However, when requesting information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy, such information is not available. If information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy is needed, e.g., how many of such individuals there are out there, when, where and how they are treated, or their demographic characteristics, such information unfortunately is not available. Therefore, establishment of the registry of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is proposed, which would be maintained by nurses working at ENT departments. PMID:24979893

  13. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  17. NATIONAL CONGENITAL RUBELLA SYNDROME REGISTRY (NCRSR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The system compiles information on all U.S. congenital rubella syndrome cases. The registry includes cases reported to CDC since 1969. Information collected includes demographic data, laboratory results, and disease symptoms. These data are used to calculate incidence rates and o...

  18. Targeted Development of Registries of Biological Parts

    PubMed Central

    Peccoud, Jean; Blauvelt, Megan F.; Cai, Yizhi; Cooper, Kristal L.; Crasta, Oswald; DeLalla, Emily C.; Evans, Clive; Folkerts, Otto; Lyons, Blair M.; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Shelton, Rebecca; Sweede, Matthew A.; Waldon, Sally A.

    2008-01-01

    Background The design and construction of novel biological systems by combining basic building blocks represents a dominant paradigm in synthetic biology. Creating and maintaining a database of these building blocks is a way to streamline the fabrication of complex constructs. The Registry of Standard Biological Parts (Registry) is the most advanced implementation of this idea. Methods/Principal Findings By analyzing inclusion relationships between the sequences of the Registry entries, we build a network that can be related to the Registry abstraction hierarchy. The distribution of entry reuse and complexity was extracted from this network. The collection of clones associated with the database entries was also analyzed. The plasmid inserts were amplified and sequenced. The sequences of 162 inserts could be confirmed experimentally but unexpected discrepancies have also been identified. Conclusions/Significance Organizational guidelines are proposed to help design and manage this new type of scientific resources. In particular, it appears necessary to compare the cost of ensuring the integrity of database entries and associated biological samples with their value to the users. The initial strategy that permits including any combination of parts irrespective of its potential value leads to an exponential and economically unsustainable growth that may be detrimental to the quality and long-term value of the resource to its users. PMID:18628824

  19. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  20. [The Austrian Stroke-Unit-Registry].

    PubMed

    Hofer, Christine; Kiechl, Stefan; Lang, Wilfried

    2008-01-01

    Since 2003 the Austrian Stroke-Unit-Registry has been administered by the Gesundheit Osterreich GmbH. A total of 26 out of the 32 existing Stroke Units in Austria take part in the project, financed by the Federal Ministry of Health and accompanied by a steering group. This paper provides a description of the objectives, organisation, methodology and the data set of the registry. The main objective of the registry is quality assurance and quality improvement of stroke-treatment in stroke units. Therefore, the participating stroke units document their cases using a web-based database. The data are discussed in the steering group and the stroke units get feedback in terms of benchmarking-graphs. The data set follows a modular approach and contains information about stroke, transport, admission to the hospital, stroke unit discharge and the 3-month follow-up. Between 2003 and 2007 about 27,000 cases (containing about 20,000 strokes) were documented in the registry. PMID:18766309

  1. Consequences of the Diagnostic Criteria Proposed for the ICD-11 on the Prevalence of PTSD in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sachser, Cedric; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, a working group of the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a reformulation of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic criteria for the upcoming 11(th) edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11; Maercker, Brewin, Bryant, Cloitre, van Ommeren, et al., 2013). This study investigated the consequences of the proposed ICD-11 PTSD symptom reduction on the prevalence of PTSD in children and adolescents. Prevalence rates of PTSD in a clinical sample of 159 traumatized children and adolescents were compared applying criteria according to the 4(th) edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), the ICD-10 (WHO, 1992), and the ICD-11. The prevalence rate was 76.1% using DSM-IV, 88.1% using ICD-10, and 61.0% using ICD-11. The use of the criteria proposed for ICD-11 resulted in 27.1% less positive cases compared with ICD-10 and 15.1% less positive cases compared with DSM-IV. Our results showed that in a clinical sample of children and adolescents the prevalence of PTSD was significantly affected by the use of different diagnostic systems. This will constitute a major challenge for research and practice because, depending on the algorithm used, different groups of patients will be included in studies and different groups of individuals will be able to access medical care and therapy. PMID:26915520

  2. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  3. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  4. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  5. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S., the... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section...

  6. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  7. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  8. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... order posted on the Electronic Job Registry until the end of 50 percent of the contract period as set... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job...

  9. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  10. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  11. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  12. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  13. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  14. Using a registry to improve immunization delivery.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Steven W; Gubernick, Ruth S; Millican, Adrienne; Adams, William G

    2006-07-01

    The NJIPSP was successful in encouraging a group of small urban practices to adopt the use of immunization registry and to transform immunization delivery from a mechanistic well-child service to a visible, monitored process of care. The project represents a unique combination of technology, public-private collaboration, and well-established quality improvement techniques. The change process involved the whole office as a team in adopting new immunization delivery roles and services. The greatest barrier to acceptance of the registry was (and continues to be) the need for manual data entry as the primary source of data collection, rather than electronic data transfer from other systems. The manual entry of data was labor intensive for participating practices and affected data measurement. Despite this barrier, however, the majority of practices substantially improved the quality of their immunization delivery practices in multiple areas. The rapid movement of primary care practices toward some form of electronic record may reduce this barrier and increase the percentage of practices willing to use a community registry. Practices that engaged collectively in the change process gained momentum from the group effort. Equally important was the public health partnership that helped identify and reduce improvement obstacles. Sustainability of practice-based immunization changes will rely, in part, on the registry's ease of use and the continued visibility of public health at the practice level. Active practice level collaboration by public health adds great value to change efforts. We believe that the best possible immunization delivery relies on both technology (registries and the EMR) and effective office systems. Projects like the NJIPSP are models for systems that integrate technology, practice change, and quality improvement, and their success has the potential to foster the spread of this approach to other primary care practices (especially in New Jersey). The

  15. Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators at End of Battery Life: Opportunities for Risk (Re)-Stratification in ICD Recipients.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Faisal M; Quest, Tammie; Leon, Angel R; El-Chami, Mikhael F

    2016-02-01

    Although implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are frequently viewed as a lifelong commitment in that patients are routinely scheduled for generator exchange (GE) at end of battery life, several considerations should prompt a reevaluation of risks and benefits before GE. Compared with initial ICD implant, patients receiving replacement devices are older, and have more comorbidities and shorter life expectancy, all of which may limit the benefit of ICD therapy following GE. Additionally, GE is associated with significant complications, including infection, which may increase the risk of mortality. In this paper, we review recent data regarding opportunities for risk stratification before GE, with a particular focus on those with improved left ventricular function and those who have not experienced ICD therapies during the first battery life. We also provide a broader perspective on ICD therapy, focusing on how decisions regarding GE may affect goals of care at the end of life. PMID:26821633

  16. AAIDD Proposed Recommendations for "ICD-11" and the Condition Previously Known as Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasse, Marc J.; Luckasson, Ruth; Nygren, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of seeking input from professional stakeholder groups and consumers regarding the draft proposals of the 11th edition of the "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD-11"). The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) convened a small group of…

  17. Spiritual well-being may buffer psychological distress in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD).

    PubMed

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Crawford, Sybil; Tran, Chau; Goldberg, Robert; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Ockene, Ira

    2012-10-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and has been associated with a worse prognosis. The authors examined whether spiritual wellbeing is associated with reduced psychological distress in patients with ICDs. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Wellbeing (FACIT-SWB) questionnare and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to measure spiritual wellbeing and overall psychological distress. Multivariate linear regression was used to explore the relationship between these variables.The study sample included 46 ICD outpatients (32 M, 14 F; age range 43-83). An inverse association between HADS and FACIT-SWB scores was found, persisting after adjustment for demographics, anxiety/depression, medications, therapist support, and functional status (F = 0.001; β= -0.31, CI: -0.44, -0.19). In conclusion, spiritual wellbeing was independently associated with lower psychological distress in ICD outpatients. Spiritual wellbeing could act as a protective factor against psychological distress in these high-risk patients. PMID:23050210

  18. Spiritual well-being may buffer psychological distress in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Crawford, Sybil; Tran, Chau; Goldberg, Robert; Rosenthal, Lawrence; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and has been associated with a worse prognosis. The authors examined whether spiritual wellbeing is associated with reduced psychological distress in patients with ICDs. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Wellbeing (FACIT-SWB) questionnare and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used to measure spiritual wellbeing and overall psychological distress. Multivariate linear regression was used to explore the relationship between these variables. The study sample included 46 ICD outpatients (32 M, 14 F; age range 43–83). An inverse association between HADS and FACIT-SWB scores was found, persisting after adjustment for demographics, anxiety/depression, medications, therapist support, and functional status (F = 0.001; β= −0.31, CI: −0.44, −0.19). In conclusion, spiritual wellbeing was independently associated with lower psychological distress in ICD outpatients. Spiritual wellbeing could act as a protective factor against psychological distress in these high-risk patients. PMID:23050210

  19. Adapting a Clinical Data Repository to ICD-10-CM through the use of a Terminology Repository.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Remennick, Lyubov

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data repositories frequently contain patient diagnoses coded with the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM). These repositories now need to accommodate data coded with the Tenth Revision (ICD-10-CM). Database users wish to retrieve relevant data regardless of the system by which they are coded. We demonstrate how a terminology repository (the Research Entities Dictionary or RED) serves as an ontology relating terms of both ICD versions to each other to support seamless version-independent retrieval from the Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) at the National Institutes of Health. We make use of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs) to reduce the modeling effort required to determine whether ICD-10-CM terms should be added to the RED as new concepts or as synonyms of existing concepts. A divide-and-conquer approach is used to develop integration heuristics that offer a satisfactory interim solution and facilitate additional refinement of the integration as time and resources allow. PMID:25954344

  20. Development of a robust mapping between AIS 2+ and ICD-9 injury codes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Ryan T; Loftis, Kathryn L; Martin, R Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-03-01

    Motor vehicle crashes result in millions of injuries and thousands of deaths each year in the United States. While most crash research datasets use Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) codes to identify injuries, most hospital datasets use the International Classification of Diseases, version 9 (ICD-9) codes. The objective of this research was to establish a one-to-one mapping between AIS and ICD-9 codes for use with motor vehicle crash injury research. This paper presents results from investigating different mapping approaches using the most common AIS 2+ injuries from the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS). The mapping approaches were generated from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) (428,637 code pairs), ICDMAP (2500 code pairs), and the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) (4125 code pairs). Each approach may pair given AIS code with more than one ICD-9 code (mean number of pairs per AIS code: NTDB=211, ICDMAP=7, CIREN=5), and some of the potential pairs are unrelated. The mappings were evaluated using two comparative metrics coupled with qualitative inspection by an expert physician. Based on the number of false mappings and correct pairs, the best mapping was derived from CIREN. AIS and ICD-9 codes in CIREN are both manually coded, leading to more proper mappings between the two. Using the mapping presented herein, data from crash and hospital datasets can be used together to better understand and prevent motor vehicle crash injuries in the future. PMID:23333320

  1. 77 FR 32975 - AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of Quality Indicators (QIs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion of...-10-CM/PCS, incorporating coding expertise, clinical expertise, and health services research/quality... individuals with relevant clinical expertise (e.g., cardiovascular disease, neurologic disease, orthopedic...

  2. A conceptual framework for the revision of the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is revising the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders, under the leadership of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse and within the framework of the overall revision framework as directed by the World Health Assembly. This article describes WHO’s perspective and priorities for mental and behavioural disorders classification in ICD-11, based on the recommendations of the International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders. The WHO considers that the classification should be developed in consultation with stakeholders, which include WHO member countries, multidisciplinary health professionals, and users of mental health services and their families. Attention to the cultural framework must be a key element in defining future classification concepts. Uses of the ICD that must be considered include clinical applications, research, teaching and training, health statistics, and public health. The Advisory Group has determined that the current revision represents a particular opportunity to improve the classification’s clinical utility, particularly in global primary care settings where there is the greatest opportunity to identify people who need mental health treatment. Based on WHO’s mission and constitution, the usefulness of the classification in helping WHO member countries, particularly low- and middle-income countries, to reduce the disease burden associated with mental disorders is among the highest priorities for the revision. This article describes the foundation provided by the recommendations of the Advisory Group for the current phase of work. PMID:21633677

  3. Teenage pregnancy with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and documented ICD discharges.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aziez; Phillips, John R

    2016-04-01

    We report the first case of pregnancy in a pediatric patient with catecholiminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Pregnant adolescents with CPVT are at high risk for NSVT and malignant VT during pregnancy, despite antiarrhythmic medication. They may receive multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies. Such patients require close monitoring with special care during the first trimester. PMID:27099728

  4. Frequent Home Monitoring of ICD Is Effective to Prevent Inappropriate Defibrillator Shock Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Paolo; Argenziano, Luigi; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario; Sansone, Mario; Casella, Stefano; Nardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Recently, in the context of telemedicine, telemonitoring services are gaining attention. They are offered, for example, to patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. The telemonitoring can provide a valid support to intensify followup visits, in order to improve the prevention of inappropriate defibrillator shock, thus enhancing patient safety. Inappropriate shock generally depends on atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, and abnormal sensing (such as those caused by electromagnetic interferences). As a practical example, an unusual case of an ICD patient who risked an inappropriate shock while taking a shower is reported. Continuous remote telemonitoring was able to timely warn cardiologist via GSM-SMS, who were able to detect improper sensing examining the intracardiac electrogram via Web. Patient was promptly contacted and warned to not further come in contact with the hydraulic system and any electrical appliance to prevent an inappropriate defibrillator shock. This demonstrates the effectiveness and usefulness of continuous remote telemonitoring in supporting ICD patients. PMID:24592279

  5. Sleep, Psychosocial Functioning, and Device-Specific Adjustment in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs).

    PubMed

    McCrae, Christina S; Roth, Alicia J; Ford, Jessica; Crew, Earl C; Conti, Jamie B; Berry, Richard B; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-01-01

    Rates of sleep disorders and associated adjustment were examined in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs; n = 42; Mage = 61.57, SD = 12.60). One night of ambulatory polysomnography, 14 days of sleep diaries, and questionnaires (mood, sleepiness, fatigue, device acceptance) were administered. Controlling for ischemia, MANCOVA examined adjustment by sleep diagnosis. Apnea was most common (28.6%), followed by Insomnia (16.7%) and Comorbid Insomnia/Apnea (11.9%). Patients with insomnia reported poorer mood, greater sleepiness, and lower device acceptance than good sleepers; they also demonstrated poorer mood and less ICD device acceptance than patients with sleep apnea. Patients with comorbid insomnia/apnea also exhibited poorer mood and less ICD device acceptance than good sleepers; however, comorbid patients did not significantly differ from insomnia or apnea patients on any measure. Those with disordered sleep (regardless of type) reported greater fatigue than good sleepers. Assessment (and treatment) of difficulties with sleep, mood, fatigue, and device acceptance may be important for the comprehensive clinical management of ICD patients. Further research appears warranted. PMID:25174823

  6. Classification for clinical practice: how to make ICD and DSM better able to serve clinicians.

    PubMed

    First, Michael B; Westen, Drew

    2007-10-01

    With DSM-V and ICD-11 on the horizon, now is an excellent time to consider options for improving their utility in clinical practice. A prerequisite for determining what can be done to improve their clinical utility is to establish a baseline from which to work. Surprisingly, there is virtually no information available that illuminates how clinicians actually use the DSM-IV and ICD-10 in clinical practice settings. Our first recommendation is for studies to be conducted that examine how the DSM-IV and ICD-10 is being used in the field and then to identify areas in need of improvement. We then propose two new diagnostic approaches to be considered that might significantly improve the system's clinical utility: (1) the addition of clinically useful dimensions (i.e., dimensions for indicating disorder severity, dimensions that cut across various disorders that would quantify symptoms of particular treatment-relevance such as psychosis, and dimensions to measure functioning) and (2) the augmentation of the DSM and ICD operationalized diagnostic criteria with the addition of a prototype-matching system that is likely to more closely conform to the way clinicians think about psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:17896228

  7. Using Semantic Web technology to support icd-11 textual definitions authoring.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    The beta phase of the 11th revision of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) intends to accept public input through a distributed model of authoring. One of the core use cases is to create textual definitions for the ICD categories. The objective of the present study is to design, develop, and evaluate approaches to support ICD-11 textual definitions authoring using Semantic Web technology. We investigated a number of heterogeneous resources related to the definitions of diseases, including the linked open data (LOD) from DBpedia, the textual definitions from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and the formal definitions of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). We integrated them in a Semantic Web framework (i.e., the Linked Data in a Resource Description Framework [RDF] triple store), which is being proposed as a backend in a prototype platform for collaborative authoring of ICD-11 beta. We performed a preliminary evaluation on the usefulness of our approaches and discussed the potential challenges from both technical and clinical perspectives. PMID:23601451

  8. Using Semantic Web technology to support icd-11 textual definitions authoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The beta phase of the 11th revision of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) intends to accept public input through a distributed model of authoring. One of the core use cases is to create textual definitions for the ICD categories. The objective of the present study is to design, develop, and evaluate approaches to support ICD-11 textual definitions authoring using Semantic Web technology. We investigated a number of heterogeneous resources related to the definitions of diseases, including the linked open data (LOD) from DBpedia, the textual definitions from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and the formal definitions of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine—Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). We integrated them in a Semantic Web framework (i.e., the Linked Data in a Resource Description Framework [RDF] triple store), which is being proposed as a backend in a prototype platform for collaborative authoring of ICD-11 beta. We performed a preliminary evaluation on the usefulness of our approaches and discussed the potential challenges from both technical and clinical perspectives. PMID:23601451

  9. Data management procedures for Tiepoint Registration, pre and post processing, and ICD116

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, B. S.

    1983-01-01

    The data management procedures for tiepoint registration, pre and post processing, and "ICD116' are described. With each procedure description, the pertinent execs are listed and purposes defined. An example run of each of the 32 execs is included with user inputs identified.

  10. Less is more? Assessing the validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD across multiple trauma samples

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2015-01-01

    Background In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the symptom profile of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was expanded to include 20 symptoms. An alternative model of PTSD is outlined in the proposed 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that includes just six symptoms. Objectives and method The objectives of the current study are: 1) to independently investigate the fit of the ICD-11 model of PTSD, and three DSM-5-based models of PTSD, across seven different trauma samples (N=3,746) using confirmatory factor analysis; 2) to assess the concurrent validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD; and 3) to determine if there are significant differences in diagnostic rates between the ICD-11 guidelines and the DSM-5 criteria. Results The ICD-11 model of PTSD was found to provide excellent model fit in six of the seven trauma samples, and tests of factorial invariance showed that the model performs equally well for males and females. DSM-5 models provided poor fit of the data. Concurrent validity was established as the ICD-11 PTSD factors were all moderately to strongly correlated with scores of depression, anxiety, dissociation, and aggression. Levels of association were similar for ICD-11 and DSM-5 suggesting that explanatory power is not affected due to the limited number of items included in the ICD-11 model. Diagnostic rates were significantly lower according to ICD-11 guidelines compared to the DSM-5 criteria. Conclusions The proposed factor structure of the ICD-11 model of PTSD appears valid across multiple trauma types, possesses good concurrent validity, and is more stringent in terms of diagnosis compared to the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:26450830