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Sample records for ice dynamics joint

  1. Arctic odyssey - Five years of data buoys in AIDJEX. [Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Gillespie, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment of 1975-1976 used data bouys in conjunction with tracking satellites to study the interaction of Arctic Sea ice with the environment, and, more specifically, to define the motion of ice on the perimeter of the area of interest and to measure surface barometeric pressure over the same area. Charts are presented, indicating the position of the buoy array along with a table detailing buoy characteristics. The position fix accuracy of RAMS (Random Access Measurement System) buoys is discussed together with position errors due to the along-track motion of the observing satellites. Polar satellite data collection and tracking efficiency is assessed together with satellite system flexibility concepts.

  2. Stochastic ice stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  3. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  4. Ice dynamics at the mouth of ice stream B, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Stephenson, S. N.; Macayeal, D. R.; Shabtaie, S.

    1987-01-01

    Data collected in the region of the mouth of ice stream B, West Antarctica, during three field seasons are presented. The physical characteristics of the mouth of ice stream B are described, and the dynamics in the vicinity of the DNB network are discussed. The dynamics of ice stream B from DNB to the grounding line is briefly considered, and a force analysis of the grounding line region is made. The results demonstrate that the dynamic situation of the region at the mouth of ice stream B is distinctly different from either the greater portion of the ice stream upstream or the Ross ice shelf downstream.

  5. Dynamic Crush Characterization of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2006-01-01

    During the space shuttle return-to-flight preparations following the Columbia accident, finite element models were needed that could predict the threshold of critical damage to the orbiter's wing leading edge from ice debris impacts. Hence, an experimental program was initiated to provide crushing data from impacted ice for use in dynamic finite element material models. A high-speed drop tower was configured to capture force time histories of ice cylinders for impacts up to approximately 100 ft/s. At low velocity, the force-time history depended heavily on the internal crystalline structure of the ice. However, for velocities of 100 ft/s and above, the ice fractured on impact, behaved more like a fluid, and the subsequent force-time history curves were much less dependent on the internal crystalline structure.

  6. FRF based joint dynamics modeling and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpouya, Majid; Graham, Eldon; Park, Simon S.

    2013-08-01

    Complex structures, such as machine tools, are comprised of several substructures connected to each other through joints to form the assembled structures. Joints can have significant contributions on the behavior of the overall assembly and ignoring joint effects in the design stage may result in considerable deviations from the actual dynamic behavior. The identification of joint dynamics enables us to accurately predict overall assembled dynamics by mathematically combining substructure dynamics through the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the joint. The essence of joint identification is the determination of the difference between the measured overall dynamics and the rigidly coupled substructure dynamics. In this study, we investigate the inverse receptance coupling (IRC) method and the point-mass joint model, which considers the joint as lumped mass, damping and stiffness elements. The dynamic properties of the joint are investigated using both methods through a finite element (FE) simulation and experimental tests. `100

  7. Structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, D.; Kochavi, E.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Further insight into the structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice, at low temperatures, was obtained by trapping in it Ar, Ne, H2, and D2. Ballistic water-vapor deposition results in the growth of smooth, approximately 1 x 0.2 micrometer2, ice needles. The amorphous ice seems to exist in at least two separate forms, at T < 85 K and at 85 < T < 136.8 K, and transform irreversibly from one form to the other through a series of temperature-dependent metastable states. The channels formed by the water hexagons in the ice are wide enough to allow the free penetration of H2 and D2 into the ice matrix even in the relatively compact cubic ice, resulting in H2-(D2-) to-ice ratios (by number) as high as 0.63. The larger Ar atoms can penetrate only into the wider channels of amorphous ice, and Ne is an intermediate case. Dynamic percolation behavior explains the emergence of Ar and Ne (but not H2 and D2) for the ice, upon warming, in small and big gas jets. The big jets, each containing approximately 5 x 10(10) atoms, break and propel the ice needles. Dynamic percolation also explains the collapse of the ice matrix under bombardment by Ar , at a pressure exceeding 2.6 dyn cm-2, and the burial of huge amounts of gas inside the collapsed matrix, up to an Ar-to-ice of 3.3 (by number). The experimental results could be relevant to comets, icy satellites, and icy grain mantles in dense interstellar clouds.

  8. Frazil ice dynamics in polynyas and leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Andrew; Rees Jones, David

    2016-04-01

    The initial stage of sea ice formation in a turbulent ocean typically involves the growth of a suspension of frazil ice crystals in supercooled waters. In competition with turbulent mixing, these crystals rise buoyantly and eventually settle at the ocean surface. The resulting rapid growth of granular ice has been observed to make up a significant fraction of ice cover in certain locations. Our recent theoretical work suggests that the growth of individual frazil ice crystals may be significantly faster than had commonly been supposed. We here explore the consequences for the dynamics of a suspension of many frazil ice crystals in a well mixed layer. Frazil suspensions are affected by many processes, including the fluid dynamics of suspensions, nucleation, the collision and sintering of crystals, as well as crystal growth. These processes combine to control the evolving distribution of crystal sizes. We apply a model of the crystal size distribution in a well mixed layer to investigate the comparative importance of these mechanisms, quantify the controls on ice growth, and compare to available laboratory data. We complement our theoretical model with two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection with a suspension of resolved crystals, in order to elucidate the fluid dynamical coupling between ocean convection with crystal rise, and its impact on ice precipitation rates.

  9. AVHRR imagery reveals Antarctic ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, R.A.; Vornberger, P.L. STX Corp., Lanham, MD )

    1990-06-01

    A portion of AVHRR data taken on December 5, 1987 at 06:15 GMT over a part of Antarctica is used here to show that many of the most significant dynamic features of ice sheets can be identified by a careful examination of AVHRR imagery. The relatively low resolution of this instrument makes it ideal for obtaining a broad view of the ice sheets, while its wide swath allows coverage of areas beyond the reach of high-resolution imagers either currently in orbit or planned. An interpretation is given of the present data, which cover the area of ice streams that drain the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet into the Ross Ice Shelf. 21 refs.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  11. Dynamics of quantum excitations in square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, Claudio; Kourtis, Stefanos

    The study of emergent excitations in classical spin ice has culminated in the discovery of a condensed-matter realization of magnetic monopoles. In spin-ice materials where quantum fluctuations play an important role, excitations acquire quantum properties that promote them to more complicated and exciting objects. To understand these quantum excitations better in a relatively simple context, we construct a toy model of excited square ice and solve it both exactly by tuning it to a Rokhsar-Kivelson point and numerically for small clusters. We furthermore numerically evaluate the dynamic spin structure factor and compare it to effective free-particle theories. Our results offer a useful point of comparison for further theoretical and experimental work. Supported by ICAM branch contributions, EPSRC Grant No. EP/G049394/1, the Helmholtz Virtual Institute ``New States of Matter and Their Excitations'' and the EPSRC NetworkPlus on ``Emergence and Physics far from Equilibrium''.

  12. Dynamic response of tunnels in jointed rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.; Shaffer, R.J.; Walton, O.R.; Maddix, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    The current proposed site for an underground nuclear waste repository is at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The host rock is a jointed tuff. The question is: how will the repository behave under strong earthquake motion. The basic requirement for analysis is an ability to follow the dynamic motion of a multiplicity of discrete particles, i.e., rock blocks separated by joints and faults. The authors describe the application of the discrete element method (DEM) to the dynamic analysis of the response of tunnels in jointed rocks to earthquake loading. In situations where large motions of many blocks and collapse occur, the discontinuum-based DEM approach appears superior to other methods of analysis.

  13. Ice Stream Dynamics during Deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C.; Margold, M.; Clark, C.

    2014-12-01

    Ice streams can rapidly drain large sectors of ice sheet interiors. At present, they account for approximately 50% and 90% of the mass loss from Greenland and Antarctica, respectively, but there are concerns over recent increases in ice discharge. This has been linked to atmospheric and oceanic warming, but the longer-term implications for ice sheet deglaciation are less clear. A key question is whether the activity of ice streams is predictably linked to climate-driven ice sheet mass balance, or whether their activity might accelerate deglaciation. To explore this, we analyse ice streaming during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) from ~18 to ~7 ka. Following a recent mapping inventory, we bracket the timing of >100 ice streams using published ice margin chronologies. At the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), ice streams formed a drainage network similar to modern ice sheets. Numerous ice streams were located in topographic troughs and likely operated for thousands of years from the LGM. These drained the marine-based sectors of the northern and eastern margins of the ice sheet until ~11 ka and show a degree of spatial self-organisation. Other ice streams operated on much shorter time-scales and turned on and off, perhaps in as little as a few hundred years. These include large ice streams that switched positions over sedimentary bedrock at the western and southern terrestrial margins until ~13 ka. As the LIS retreated onto its low-relief and predominantly crystalline bedrock interior (after ~11 ka), a smaller number of large ice streams operated that were very wide (50-100 km), and have no modern analogue. Overall, the number of ice streams decreased during deglaciation and they drained a smaller proportion of the ice sheet margin: 30% at the LGM (similar to present-day Antarctica), 15% at 12 ka, and 12% at 10 ka. We use simple scaling relationships to estimate the mass loss delivered by ice streams and examine their role during deglaciation.

  14. Role of ice dynamics in anomalous ice conditions in the Beaufort Sea during 2006 and 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, J. K.; Rigor, I. G.

    2012-05-01

    A new record minimum in summer sea ice extent was set in 2007 and an unusual polynya formed in the Beaufort Sea ice cover during the summer of 2006. Using a combination of visual observations from cruises, ice drift, and satellite passive microwave sea ice concentration, we show that ice dynamics during preceding years included events that preconditioned the Beaufort ice pack for the unusual patterns of opening observed in both summers. Intrusions of first year ice from the Chukchi Sea to the Northern Beaufort, and increased pole-ward ice transport from the western Arctic during summer has led to reduced replenishment of multiyear ice, older than five years, in the western Beaufort, resulting in a younger, thinner ice pack in most of the Beaufort. We find ice younger than five years melts out completely by the end of summer, south of 76N. The 2006 unusual polynya was bounded to the south by an ice tongue composed of sea ice older than 5 years, and formed when first year and second year ice melted between 76N and the older ice to the south. In this paper we demonstrate that a recent shift in ice circulation patterns in the western Arctic preconditions the Beaufort ice pack for increased seasonal ice zone extent.

  15. Effects of joint on dynamics of space deployable structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Rongqiang; Deng, Zongquan

    2013-09-01

    Joints are necessary components in large space deployable truss structures which have significant effects on dynamic behavior of these joint dominated structures. Previous researches usually analyzed effects of one or fewer joint characters on dynamics of jointed structures. Effects of joint stiffness, damping, location, number, clearance and contact stiffness on dynamics of jointed structures are systematically analyzed. Cantilever beam model containing linear joints is developed based on finite element method, influence of joint on natural frequencies and mode shapes of the jointed system are analyzed. Analytical results show that frequencies of jointed system decrease dramatically when peak mode shapes occur at joint locations, and there are cusp shapes present in mode shapes. System frequencies increase with joint damping increasing, there are different joint damping to achieve maximum system damping for different joint stiffness. Joint nonlinear force-displacement is described by describing function method, one-DOF model containing nonlinear joints is established to analyze joints freeplay and hysteresis nonlinearities. Analysis results show that nonlinear effects of freeplay and hysteresis make dynamic responses switch from one resonance frequency to another frequency when amplitude exceed demarcation values. Joint contact stiffness determine degree of system nonlinearity, while exciting force level, clearance and slipping force affect amplitude of dynamic response. Dynamic responses of joint dominated deployable truss structure under different sinusoidal exciting force levels are tested. The test results show obvious nonlinear behaviors contributed by joints, dynamic response shifts to lower frequency and higher amplitude as exciting force increasing. The test results are further compared with analytical results, and joint nonlinearity tested is coincident with hysteresis nonlinearity. Analysis method of joint effects on dynamic characteristics of jointed

  16. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

    2009-07-01

    The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

  17. Equivalent dynamic model of DEMES rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; Xing, Zhiguang; McCoul, David; Niu, Junyang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by a small voltage-induced strain of the dielectric elastomer (DE), so it is a suitable candidate to make a rotary joint for a soft robot. Dynamic analysis is necessary for some applications, but the dynamic response of DEMESs is difficult to model because of the complicated morphology and viscoelasticity of the DE film. In this paper, a method composed of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement is presented to model the dynamic response of a DEMES rotary joint under an alternating voltage. Based on measurements of equivalent driving force and damping of the DEMES, the model can be derived. Some experiments were carried out to validate the equivalent dynamic model. The maximum angle error between model and experiment is greater than ten degrees, but it is acceptable to predict angular velocity of the DEMES, therefore, it can be applied in feedforward–feedback compound control.

  18. Laboratory performance of a dynamic ice storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, T.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1991-06-01

    The performance of a commercial 30-ton dynamic ice storage system was measured in a dedicated laboratory test facility and the results analyzed. The ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions to characterize the ice generating performance as a function of condensing conditions, ice build time, and defrost time. The overall efficiency of ice production was determined and the effect of refrigeration system component performance on the overall system efficiency was evaluated. The ability of the charged system -- a tank of ice slush -- to meet a simulated cooling load over was also evaluated. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Changing structures and dynamics of western Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T. O.; Quincey, D. J.; Fricker, H.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last three decades, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves have shown a pattern of sustained retreat, often ending in catastrophic and rapid breakup. This study provides a detailed analysis of the structures and dynamics of three western Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves: Bach, Stange and George VI Ice Shelves. Spatial extent and glaciological surface features were mapped for each ice shelf from 1973 to 2010 using optical and radar satellite images to assess their structural evolution, historical dynamics and stability. InSAR and feature-tracking methods were used to assess the recent dynamic configurations of the ice shelves from 1989 to 2010. Repeat ICESat measurements were used to evaluate their vertical changes from 2003 to 2008. On Bach Ice Shelf, the formation of two large fractures near the ice front is linked to widespread thinning (~2 ma-1) and sustained retreat (~360 km2). It looks likely that iceberg calving along these fractures will alter the frontal geometry sufficiently to promote enhanced, irreversible retreat within the next decade. On George VI Ice Shelf, acceleration is observed at both ice fronts; linked to a release of back-stresses through continued ice loss (1995 km2 in total). The most significant changes are recorded at its southern ice front, with ice flow accelerating up to 360% between ca. 1989 and ca. 2010, coupled with widespread rifting and a mean thinning rate of 2.1 ma-1. On Stange Ice Shelf, shear-induced fracturing was observed between two flow units, also linked to widespread thinning (~4.2 ma-1). A semi-quantitative assessment reveals that the southern margin of George VI Ice Shelf is most susceptible to rapid retreat, whilst its northern ice front, Bach Ice Shelf and the northern front of Stange Ice Shelf are more vulnerable than those situated on the east Antarctic Peninsula.

  20. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamicmore » response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  1. Impact of ice-shelf sediment content on the dynamics of plumes under melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.

    2015-12-01

    When a floating ice shelf melts into an underlying warm salty ocean, the resulting fresh meltwater can rise in a buoyant Ice-Shelf-Water plume under the ice. In certain settings, ice flowing across the grounding line carries a basal layer of debris rich ice, entrained via basal freezing around till in the upstream ice sheet. Melting of this debris-laden ice from floating ice shelves provides a flux of dense sediment to the ocean, in addition to the release of fresh buoyant meltwater. This presentation considers the impact of the resulting suspended sediment on the dynamics of ice shelf water plumes, and identifies two key flow regimes depending on the sediment concentration frozen into the basal ice layer. For large sediment concentration, melting of the debris-laden ice shelf generates dense convectively unstable waters that drive convective overturning into the underlying ocean. For lower sediment concentration, the sediment initially remains suspended in a buoyant meltwater plume rising along the underside of the ice shelf, before slowly depositing into the underlying ocean. A theoretical plume model is used to evaluate the significance of the negatively buoyant sediment on circulation strength and the feedbacks on melting rate, along with the expected depositional patterns under the ice shelf.

  2. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  3. Virtual radar ice buoys - a method for measuring fine-scale dynamic properties of sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvonen, J.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present an algorithm for continuous ice dynamics estimation based on coastal and ship radar data. The ice dynamics are estimated based on automatically selected ice targets in the images. These targets are here called virtual buoys (VB's) and are tracked based on an optical flow method. To maintain continuous ice drift tracking new VB's are added after a~given number of VB's have been lost i.e. they can not be tracked reliably any more. Some tracking results and some computed derived quantities for a~few test cases are presented.

  4. Coupled ice-ocean dynamics in the marginal ice zones Upwelling/downwelling and eddy generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is aimed at modeling mesoscale processes such as upwelling/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A two-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model through interfacial stresses. The parameters of the ocean model were chosen so that the dynamics would be nonlinear. The model was tested by studying the dynamics of upwelling. Wings parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwelling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater than air-ocean momentum flux; thus the Ekman transport is greater than the ice than in the open water. The stability of the upwelling and downwelling jets is discussed. The downwelling jet is found to be far more unstable than the upwelling jet because the upwelling jet is stabilized by the divergence. The constant wind field exerted on a varying ice cover will generate vorticity leading to enhanced upwelling/downwelling regions, i.e., wind-forced vortices. Steepening and strengthening of vortices are provided by the nonlinear terms. When forcing is time-varying, the advection terms will also redistribute the vorticity. The wind reversals will separate the vortices from the ice edge, so that the upwelling enhancements are pushed to the open ocean and the downwelling enhancements are pushed underneath the ice.

  5. SPH non-Newtonian Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-07-07

    We propose a new three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model to study coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. Most existing ice sheet numerical models use a grid-based Eulerian approach, and are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations of the momentum conservation equation. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, solves the full momentum conservation equation. SPH method also allows modeling of free-surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation without employing complex front-tracking schemes, and does not require re-meshing. As a result, SPH codes are highly scalable. Numerical accuracy of the proposed SPH model is first verified by simulating a plane shear flow with a free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. Next, the SPH model is used to investigate the grounding line dynamics of ice sheet/shelf. The steady position of the grounding line, obtained from our SPH simulations, is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of bedrock slopes, ice-to-fluid density ratios, and flux. We examine the effect of non-Newtonian behavior of ice on the grounding line dynamics. The non-Newtonian constitutive model is based on Glen's law for a creeping flow of a polycrystalline ice. Finally, we investigate the effect of a bedrock geometry on a steady-state position of the grounding line.

  6. Joint Chance-Constrained Dynamic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J. Bob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel dynamic programming algorithm with a joint chance constraint, which explicitly bounds the risk of failure in order to maintain the state within a specified feasible region. A joint chance constraint cannot be handled by existing constrained dynamic programming approaches since their application is limited to constraints in the same form as the cost function, that is, an expectation over a sum of one-stage costs. We overcome this challenge by reformulating the joint chance constraint into a constraint on an expectation over a sum of indicator functions, which can be incorporated into the cost function by dualizing the optimization problem. As a result, the primal variables can be optimized by a standard dynamic programming, while the dual variable is optimized by a root-finding algorithm that converges exponentially. Error bounds on the primal and dual objective values are rigorously derived. We demonstrate the algorithm on a path planning problem, as well as an optimal control problem for Mars entry, descent and landing. The simulations are conducted using a real terrain data of Mars, with four million discrete states at each time step.

  7. Dynamic preconditioning of the September sea-ice extent minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James; Tremblay, Bruno; Newton, Robert; Allard, Richard

    2016-04-01

    There has been an increased interest in seasonal forecasting of the sea-ice extent in recent years, in particular the minimum sea-ice extent. We propose a dynamical mechanism, based on winter preconditioning through first year ice formation, that explains a significant fraction of the variance in the anomaly of the September sea-ice extent from the long-term linear trend. To this end, we use a Lagrangian trajectory model to backtrack the September sea-ice edge to any time during the previous winter and quantify the amount of sea-ice divergence along the Eurasian and Alaskan coastlines as well as the Fram Strait sea-ice export. We find that coastal divergence that occurs later in the winter (March, April and May) is highly correlated with the following September sea-ice extent minimum (r = ‑0.73). This is because the newly formed first year ice will melt earlier allowing for other feedbacks (e.g. ice albedo feedback) to start amplifying the signal early in the melt season when the solar input is large. We find that the winter mean Fram Strait sea-ice export anomaly is also correlated with the minimum sea-ice extent the following summer. Next we backtrack a synthetic ice edge initialized at the beginning of the melt season (June 1st) in order to develop hindcast models of the September sea-ice extent that do not rely on a-priori knowledge of the minimum sea-ice extent. We find that using a multi-variate regression model of the September sea-ice extent anomaly based on coastal divergence and Fram Strait ice export as predictors reduces the error by 41%. A hindcast model based on the mean DJFMA Arctic Oscillation index alone reduces the error by 24%.

  8. Sea-ice dynamics strongly promote Snowball Earth initiation and destabilize tropical sea-ice margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, A.; Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Snowball Earth bifurcation, or runaway ice-albedo feedback, is defined for particular boundary conditions by a critical CO2 and a critical sea-ice cover (SI), both of which are essential for evaluating hypotheses related to Neoproterozoic glaciations. Previous work has shown that the Snowball Earth bifurcation, denoted as (CO2, SI)*, differs greatly among climate models. Here, we study the effect of bare sea-ice albedo, sea-ice dynamics and ocean heat transport on (CO2, SI)* in the atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM with Marinoan (~ 635 Ma) continents and solar insolation (94% of modern). In its standard setup, ECHAM5/MPI-OM initiates a~Snowball Earth much more easily than other climate models at (CO2, SI)* ≈ (500 ppm, 55%). Replacing the model's standard bare sea-ice albedo of 0.75 by a much lower value of 0.45, we find (CO2, SI)* ≈ (204 ppm, 70%). This is consistent with previous work and results from net evaporation and local melting near the sea-ice margin. When we additionally disable sea-ice dynamics, we find that the Snowball Earth bifurcation can be pushed even closer to the equator and occurs at a hundred times lower CO2: (CO2, SI)* ≈ (2 ppm, 85%). Therefore, the simulation of sea-ice dynamics in ECHAM5/MPI-OM is a dominant determinant of its high critical CO2 for Snowball initiation relative to other models. Ocean heat transport has no effect on the critical sea-ice cover and only slightly decreases the critical CO2. For disabled sea-ice dynamics, the state with 85% sea-ice cover is stabilized by the Jormungand mechanism and shares characteristics with the Jormungand climate states. However, there is no indication of the Jormungand bifurcation and hysteresis in ECHAM5/MPI-OM. The state with 85% sea-ice cover therefore is a soft Snowball state rather than a true Jormungand state. Overall, our results demonstrate that differences in sea-ice dynamics schemes can be at least as important as differences in sea-ice albedo for

  9. Modelling of dynamic soil-structure-ice interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Tuomo

    A computer model was developed for evaluating the dynamic ice-structure interaction. The effects of soil structure interaction are included in the model. The program can be used in the analysis of events, where an offshore structure is subjected to the action of drifting ice sheets or massive ice features like an iceberg. The new approach is based on a generalized modeling of the ice crushing process which takes into account the dependence of ice load on relative displacement and relative velocity between the ice edge and the structure. A substructure technique, where separate equations are set up for each of the interacting medium, is considered. A zonal approach is applied while modeling the ice failure processes. The effects of nonsimultaneous crushing are considered.

  10. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Monaghan, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is verif;ed by simulating Poiseuille flow, plane shear flow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian fluid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, such that the effect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  11. The Navy/NOAA Joint Ice Center's role in the climate and global change program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniskern, Franklin E.

    1991-07-01

    The Navy/NOAA Joint Ice Center (JIC) is responsible for producing global, regional, and local ice analyses and forecasts for the Arctic, Antarctic, and Great Lakes. Presently, satellite image products are the primary source of sea ice data at the JIC and the NOAA polar orbiting series satellites are the primary source of satellite data. In the future when the JIC's Digital Ice Forecasting and Analysis system (DIFAS) becomes operational, digital satellite data from the NOAA polar orbiters will be used. The JIC is the only organization in the free world that produces weekly global sea ice analyses. These analyses will likely become a good source of data for the cryospheric section of the Climate and Global Change program. Many scientists expect that a change in sea ice extent in the polar regions will be one of the first signals for a change in the earth's climate. A very important new source of data for ice operations and the Climate and Global Change program will be the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data which will be available in limited amounts starting in 1991. This high-resolution, all-weather data source will allow the JIC, in some polar regions, to provide more detailed analyses of ice extent, ice concentration, ice age and certain ice features such as leads and polynyas. Detailed lead and polynya analyses will yield a better estimate of the heat budget in the polar regions which is an important parameter for the Climate and Global Change program. This paper will describe the various products produced at the JIC and how these products and future ice data and products analyzed on DIFAS will contribute to the cryospheric section of the Climate and Global Change program.

  12. Sea-ice dynamics strongly promote Snowball Earth initiation and destabilize tropical sea-ice margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, A.; Abbot, D. S.

    2012-07-01

    The Snowball Earth bifurcation, or runaway ice-albedo feedback, is defined for particular boundary conditions by a critical CO2 and a critical sea-ice cover (SI), both of which are essential for evaluating hypotheses related to Neoproterozoic glaciations. Previous work has shown that the Snowball Earth bifurcation, denoted as (CO2, SI)*, differs greatly among climate models. Here, we revisit the initiation of a Snowball Earth in the atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM for Marinoan (~630 Ma) continents and solar insolation decreased to 94%. In its standard setup, ECHAM5/MPI-OM initiates a Snowball Earth much more easily than other climate models at (CO2, SI)* ≈ (500 ppm, 55%). Previous work has shown that the Snowball Earth bifurcation can be pushed equatorward if a low bare sea ice albedo is assumed because bare sea ice is exposed by net evaporation in the descent region of the Hadley circulation. Consistent with this, when we replace the model's standard bare sea-ice albedo of 0.75 by a much lower value of 0.45, we find (CO2, SI)* ≈ (204 ppm, 70%). When we additionally disable sea-ice dynamics, we find that the Snowball Earth bifurcation can be pushed even closer to the equator and occurs at a much lower CO2: (CO2, SI)* ≈ (2 ppm, 85%). Therefore, both lowering the bare sea-ice albedo and disabling sea-ice dynamics increase the critical sea-ice cover in ECHAM5/MPI-OM, but sea-ice dynamics have a much larger influence on the critical CO2. For disabled sea-ice dynamics, the state with 85% sea-ice cover is stabilized by the Jormungand mechanism and shares characteristics with the Jormungand climate states. However, there is no Jormungand bifurcation between this Jormungand-like state and states with mid-latitude sea-ice margins. Our results indicate that differences in sea-ice dynamics schemes can be as important as sea ice albedo for causing the spread in climate model's estimates of the location of the Snowball Earth bifurcation.

  13. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  14. Dynamics of ice stream temporal variability: Modes, scales, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, A. A.; Degiuli, E.; Schoof, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing temporal variability of ice stream flow remains one of the major barriers to developing accurate models of ice sheet dynamics and ice‒climate interactions. Here we analyze a simple model of ice stream hydrology coupled to ice flow dynamics and including drainage and basal cooling processes. Analytic and numerical results from this model indicate that there are two major modes of ice stream behavior: steady‒streaming and binge‒purge variability. The steady‒streaming mode arises from friction‒stabilized subglacial meltwater production, which may also activate and interact with subglacial drainage. The binge‒purge mode arises from a sufficiently cold environment sustaining successive cycles of thinning‒induced basal cooling and stagnation. Low prescribed temperature at the ice surface and weak geothermal heating typically lead to binge‒purge behavior, while warm ice surface temperature and strong geothermal heating will tend to produce steady‒streaming behavior. Model results indicate that modern Siple Coast ice streams reside in the binge‒purge parameter regime near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation to the steady‒streaming mode. Numerical experiments exhibit hysteresis in ice stream variability as the surface temperature is varied by several degrees. Our simple model simulates Heinrich event‒like variability in a hypothetical Hudson Strait ice stream including dynamically determined purge time scale, till freezing and basal cooling during the binge phase. These findings are an improvement on studies of both modern and paleo‒ice stream variability and provide a framework for interpreting complex ice flow models.

  15. Structural and dynamic changes of Wilkins Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankl, Melanie; Helm, Veit; Braun, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Wilkins Ice Shelf (WIS) has shown considerable ice front retreat since 1990. This retreat includes various break-up events, such as recently in 2008 (Feb: 425 km², May: 160 km², Jul: 1220 km²) and in 2009 (790 km²). The break-up events took place under contrasting surface conditions, which indicates potentially different mechanisms for break-up. WIS shows quite specific peculiarities like a high amount of ice rises, highly variable ice thicknesses across the ice shelf, tributary glaciers draining into inlets as well as only limited nourishing by direct inflow from tributary glaciers. The present study aims to better understand the dynamics and mechanisms leading to disintegration and break-up of WIS. We hence investigate satellite data to reveal changes of glaciological structures like fractures and shear margins, the position of the grounding line, changes of frontal positions and ice surface velocities. Very few in situ measurements are available at WIS, which emphasizes the use of satellite data. Especially Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data show high potential for glaciological purposes. We use SAR data (ALOS PALSAR, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, ERS-1/2) in order to calculate surface velocities of the ice shelf and its tributaries at different times using SAR offset tracking procedures. The combined use of TanDEM-X InSAR surface elevations and IceSAT, CryoSat and NASA Ice Bridge ATM data enables the estimation of ice thickness assuming a constant ice density. First results show surface velocities before and after the break-up events in 2008 and 2009 as well as changing flow velocities of tributary glaciers. The combination of InSAR surface elevation and altimeter data allows for a comprehensive estimation of ice thickness across WIS. Both data sets can be used for subsequent ice dynamic modeling and fracture mechanics.

  16. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark Torre Jorgenson; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Yuri Shur; Natalia Moskalenko; Dana Brown; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Striegl, Rob; Koch, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  17. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, M. T.; Kanevskiy, M.; Shur, Y.; Moskalenko, N.; Brown, D. R. N.; Wickland, K.; Striegl, R.; Koch, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  18. Non-linear joint dynamics and controls of jointed flexible structures with active and viscoelastic joint actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    1990-12-01

    Studies on joint dominated flexible space structures have attracted much interest recently due to the rapid developments in large deployable space systems. This paper describes a study of the non-linear structural dynamics of jointed flexible structures with initial joint clearance and subjected to external excitations. Methods of using viscoelastic and active vibration control technologies, joint actuators, to reduce dynamic contact force and to stabilize the systems are proposed and evaluated. System dynamic equations of a discretized multi-degrees-of-freedom flexible system with initial joint clearances and joint actuators (active and viscoelastic passive) are derived. Dynamic contacts in an elastic joint are simulated by a non-linear joint model comprised of a non-linear spring and damper. A pseudo-force approximation method is used in numerical time-domain integration. Dynamic responses of a jointed flexible structure with and without viscoelastic and active joint actuators are presented and compared. Effectiveness of active/passive joint actuators is demonstrated.

  19. Dynamical conditions of ice supersaturation in the extratropical tropopause regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, M.; Zondlo, M. A.; Pan, L.; Jensen, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are one of the largest sources of uncertainties in predicting future climate. Ice nucleation and ice crystal growth inside cirrus clouds require ice supersaturation (ISS). However, the dynamical processes and conditions that control ISS are not well understood in the upper troposphere. In this work we present an analysis of ISS (T <= -40 °C) using the water vapor measurement by the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) Hygrometer (Zondlo et al., 2010) on the NSF Gulf-stream V research airplane during the Stratosphere Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport (START08) Campaign. START08 campaign sampled chemical and microphysical variables under various dynamical conditions near the extratropical tropopause and upper level jets. The data allow us to contrast ISS and ice crystals generated from the region of convective clouds versus those generated from the mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air near the frontal zone during a stratospheric intrusion. We also compared the dynamical conditions of two different schemes for ISS: suppressed nucleation and suppressed growth schemes. To understand how mixing processes play a role in the formation of ISS and ice crystals, we analyzed how ISS and ice crystals are distributed relative to the jets streams and the extratropical tropopause transition layer based on O3-CO tracer-tracer correlations. The mixing lines represented by the tracer correlations help identify the dynamical processes that dominated the formation of the ISS parcels. Case studies identifying the specific dynamical conditions of observed ISS and ice particles will be presented.

  20. Investigation of Dynamic Flight Maneuvers With an Iced Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed analysis of two of the dynamic maneuvers, the pushover and elevator doublet, from the NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program are discussed. For this series of flight tests, artificial ice shapes were attached to the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer of the NASA Lewis Research Center icing aircraft, a DHC-6 Twin Otter. The purpose of these tests was to learn more about ice-contaminated tailplane stall (ICTS), the known cause of 16 accidents resulting in 139 fatalities. The pushover has been employed by the FAA, JAA and Transport Canada for tailplane icing certification. This research analyzes the pushover and reports on the maneuver performance degradation due to ice shape severity and flap deflection. A repeatability analysis suggests tolerances for meeting the required targets of the maneuver. A second maneuver, the elevator doublet, is also studied.

  1. Dynamics and development of the last North Sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygård, A.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.

    2008-12-01

    The last decade there has been an increasing attention on the dynamics and history of the marine based parts of the large Pleistocene ice sheets. This interest has grown both from the potential influence the stability of these features could have on ocean circulation through rapid meltwater delivery and from the understanding of the critical role these parts have in terms of the dynamics of the large ice sheets. During the last glacial stage the northern North Sea has experienced a number of glacial advances of ice from UK and Fennoscandia. Acoustic data and core data from two contrasting areas are presented. The Norwegian Channel represents the highly dynamic ice stream system draining large parts of the southern Fennoscandian ice sheet. The adjacent Witch Ground basin shows in contrast evidence of smaller scale tidewater glaciers active in a shallow environment, which constituted the eastern limit of the north-eastern British Ice sheet during the deglaciation. Seabed imagery (Olex data) reveals fresh glacial morphology inside (west of) the interpreted ice limits, while the seabed outside (east of) the interpreted ice limits shows very few features, due to a thick cover of glacimarine sediments. The seabed imprint of these systems as well as geometry, genesis and chronology of the sediments from this region will be discussed and their implications for our understanding of the glacial development of the region will be explored.

  2. Satellite-Derived Dynamics of Southern Ocean Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic ERS-2, RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar and ERS-1/2 Scatterometer images were analyzed with SMMI radiometer image time-series data to investigate seasonal variability in satellite-tracked sea-ice dynamics in the Southern Ocean during 1992. Supporting field data were acquired during 'in-situ' experiments including the winter 1992 Ice Station Weddell and Winter Weddell Gyre studies. A variety of surface measurements were made during these experiments including Argos-buoy deployment and GPS drift measurements. These are used in conjunction with International Program for Antarctic Buoys drift trajectories for ice-motion tracking validation. Comparisons between gridded Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) ice-motion vectors and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts/National Centers for Environmental Prediction (ECMWF/NCEP) analyses indicate that large-scale drift is forced predominantly by the long-term mean, large-scale synoptic pressure field. Only sub-daily SAR sea-ice tracking can capture high-frequency fluctuations, driven by polar lows or tidal forcing. In these cases, sea-ice drift can respond rapidly to changes in forcing on semi-diurnal time scales depending on the location with respect to the coastline. Seasonality of ice drift, particularly in the Weddell and Ross Seas, is linked to ice extent and compactness, and internal ice stresses transmitted through the pack ice from the coast. Three-monthly seasonal climatologies are presented of austral winter of ice drift in the Southern Ocean. The large Weddell and Ross Sea gyres are clearly resolved along with key seasonal and spatial attributes of their cyclonic circulation. Regional time series of ice dynamics parameters are used to illustrate correlations with meteorological forcing. Persistent divergence such as that occurring in the Ronne-Filchner polynya system results in large fractions of new ice. Similarly, convergence zones produce large fractions of deformed ice and characterize

  3. Fracture-induced softening for large-scale ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, T.; Levermann, A.

    2014-04-01

    Floating ice shelves can exert a retentive and hence stabilizing force onto the inland ice sheet of Antarctica. However, this effect has been observed to diminish by the dynamic effects of fracture processes within the protective ice shelves, leading to accelerated ice flow and hence to a sea-level contribution. In order to account for the macroscopic effect of fracture processes on large-scale viscous ice dynamics (i.e., ice-shelf scale) we apply a continuum representation of fractures and related fracture growth into the prognostic Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) and compare the results to observations. To this end we introduce a higher order accuracy advection scheme for the transport of the two-dimensional fracture density across the regular computational grid. Dynamic coupling of fractures and ice flow is attained by a reduction of effective ice viscosity proportional to the inferred fracture density. This formulation implies the possibility of non-linear threshold behavior due to self-amplified fracturing in shear regions triggered by small variations in the fracture-initiation threshold. As a result of prognostic flow simulations, sharp across-flow velocity gradients appear in fracture-weakened regions. These modeled gradients compare well in magnitude and location with those in observed flow patterns. This model framework is in principle expandable to grounded ice streams and provides simple means of investigating climate-induced effects on fracturing (e.g., hydro fracturing) and hence on the ice flow. It further constitutes a physically sound basis for an enhanced fracture-based calving parameterization.

  4. Dynamic characterization of bolted joints using FRF decoupling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, Şerife; O¨zgu¨ven, H. Nevzat

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical connections play a significant role in predicting dynamic characteristics of assembled structures. Therefore, equivalent dynamic models for joints are needed. Due to the complexity of joints, it is difficult to describe joint dynamics with analytical models. Reliable models are generally obtained using experimental measurements. In this paper an experimental identification method based on FRF decoupling and optimization algorithm is proposed for modeling joints. In the method the FRFs of two substructures connected with a joint are measured, while the FRFs of the substructures are obtained numerically or experimentally. Then the joint properties are calculated in terms of translational, rotational and cross-coupling stiffness and damping values by using FRF decoupling. In order to eliminate the numerical errors associated with matrix inversion an optimization algorithm is used to update the joint values obtained from FRF decoupling. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated with experimental studies with bolted joints.

  5. Investigating the Flow Dynamics at Ice Shelf Calving Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, Martin; Hindmarsh, Richard; Worster, Grae

    2015-04-01

    Ice-shelf calving-rates and the buttressing ice shelves provide to grounded ice are both difficult to model and quantify. An increased understanding of the mechanics of this process is imperative in determining the dynamics of marine ice sheets and consequently predicting their future extent, thickness and discharge. Alley et al. (2008) proposed an empirically derived calving law, relating the calving rate to the strain rate at the calving front. However, Hindmarsh (2012) showed that a similar relationship could be deduced by considering the viscous flow of the ice shelf. We investigate the relationship between the ice shelf flow field and the strain rate field in the area close to the calving front. Analysis is undertaken of ice surface velocity data for a range of Antarctic ice shelves (data from Rignot et al., 2011) and an inferred strain rate field produced from that data. These geophysical results are compared with a simple mathematical model for laterally confined ice shelf flow. Correlations are calculated between the same variables as Alley et al. but using a new and larger data compilation, which gives a greater degree of scatter. Good agreement is observed between the expected theoretical scaling and geophysical data for the flow of ice near the calving front in the case of laterally confined ice shelves. This lateral confinement ensures flow is aligned in the along-shelf direction and resistance to flow is provided by near stationary ice in the grounded margins. In other cases, the velocity is greater than predicted, which we attribute on a case-by-case basis to marginal weakening or the presence of ice tongues. We develop statistical methodologies for identifying these outliers.

  6. Basal Dynamics and Internal Structure of Ice Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, Michael J.

    The internal structure of ice sheets reflects the history of flow and deformation experienced by the ice mass. Flow and deformation are controlled by processes occurring within the ice mass and at its boundaries, including surface accumulation or ablation, ice rheology, basal topography, basal sliding, and basal melting or freezing. The internal structure and basal environment of ice sheets is studied with ice-penetrating radar. Recently, radar observations in Greenland and Antarctica have imaged large englacial structures rising from near the bed that deform the overlying stratigraphy into anticlines, synclines, and overturned folds. The mechanisms that may produce these structures include basal freeze-on, travelling slippery patches at the ice base, and rheological contrasts within the ice column. In this thesis, I explore the setting and mechanisms that produce large basal stratigraphic structures inside ice sheets. First, I use radar data to map subglacial hydrologic networks that deliver meltwater uphill towards freeze-on structures in East Antarctica. Next, I use a thermomechanical flowline model to demonstrate that trains of alternating slippery and sticky patches can form underneath ice sheets and travel downstream over time. The disturbances to the ice flow field produced by these travelling patches produce stratigraphic folds resembling the observations. I then examine the overturned folds produced by a single travelling sticky patch using a kinematic flowline model. This model is used to interpret stratigraphic measurements in terms of the dynamic properties of basal slip. Finally, I use a simple local one-dimensional model to estimate the thickness of basal freeze-on that can be produced based on the supply of available meltwater, the thermal boundary conditions, ice sheet geometry, and the ice flow regime.

  7. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  8. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschan, B.; Morawetz, K.; Thoms, S.

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  9. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth.

    PubMed

    Kutschan, B; Morawetz, K; Thoms, S

    2014-08-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects, and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water-ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau-type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free-energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments. PMID:25215762

  10. Arctic ice shelves and ice islands: Origin, growth and disintegration, physical characteristics, structural-stratigraphic variability, and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O. )

    1992-08-01

    Ice shelves are thick, floating ice masses most often associated with Antarctica where they are seaward extensions of the grounded Antarctic ice sheet and sources of many icebergs. However, there are also ice shelves in the Arctic, primarily located along the north coast of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. The only ice shelves in North America and the most extensive in the north polar region, the Ellesmere ice shelves originate from glaciers and from sea ice and are the source of ice islands, the tabular icebergs of the Arctic Ocean. The present state of knowledge and understanding of these ice features is summarized in this paper. It includes historical background to the discovery and early study of ice shelves and ice islands, including the use of ice islands as floating laboratories for polar geophysical research. Growth mechanisms and age, the former extent and the twentieth century disintegration of the Ellesmere ice shelves, and the processes and mechanisms of ice island calving are summarized. Surface features, thickness, thermal regime, and the size, shape, and numbers of ice islands are discussed. The structural-stratigraphic variability of ice islands and ice shelves and the complex nature of their growth and development are described. Large-scale and small-scale dynamics of ice islands are described, and the results of modeling their drift and recurrence intervals are presented. The conclusion identifies some unanswered questions and future research opportunities and needs. 97 refs., 18 figs.

  11. The formation of ice rises, their dynamics and role in the deglaciation of the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Numerous underwater mountains emerge from the edge of the continental shelf around the Antarctic ice sheet. During the last deglaciation, those features gave birth to ice rises, each being small scale copies of a continental ice sheet characterised by an ice divide and a local flow going outwards embedded within the fringing ice shelves. The well-known millenium-scale stability of ice rises can be strong indicators for the past deglaciation termination. However, the interpretation of physical measurements of an ice rise is not straightforward due to unknown past ice dynamics. Here, using the Bisicles ice-sheet model, we investigate for the first time the formation of an ice rise on top of an underwater mountain during the retreat of an ideal Antarctic-like ice sheet (i.e., including both grounded and floating ice flow). Prior to the retreat, the underwater mountain is barely detectable from the ice surface geometry and velocity. During the ice sheet retreat, induced by an increase of the sea level, an ice divide develops quickly above the underwater mountain. Within a short period of hundreds of years, the ice rise adopts a thousand years stability along with two main features: (i) a shifted upstream position of the ice rise compared to the mountain underneath and (ii) a geometrical asymmetry of the ice rise showing a gentle slope upstream and a steep slope downstream. We also investigate the influence of a non uniform surface mass balance on the migration of the ice divide. Our results provide additional ice dynamical constraints to facilitate numerical reconstructions of the last deglacial history in Antarctica as we demonstrate that ice rises are stable, but transient features of the ice shelf, stabilizing fast outlet flow. The timing of pinning and unpinning therefore becomes crucial in simulating the episodes of slow and fast grounding line retreat, respectively.

  12. Glacial transport and local ice dynamics under the Keewatin Ice Divide of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, central Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M.; McMartin, I.

    2009-12-01

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M., Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and GEOTOP, University of Quebec in Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8; McMartin, I., Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A OE8 Recent paleogeographic reconstructions indicate that the Keewatin Ice Divide (KID) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was highly dynamic throughout the last glacial cycle. Extensive field measurements of cross-cutting ice-flow erosional features (striations, grooves) on multi-faceted bedrock outcrops, as well as mapping of streamlined landforms indicate significant displacements (up to 500 km) of this ice flow center during the last glacial cycle. These episodes of ice-flow reorganization likely affected the patterns of glacial transport, but the extent of the reworking of former glacial dispersal trains is often unconstrained in certain regions. Here we report ice-flow directional data and associated glacial-dynamic considerations for an area located 100 km north of Baker Lake, central Nunavut. This area lies underneath the zone of migration of the KID (essentially north of its final position), thus representing a key area for understanding the dynamics of this sector of the LIS. Measurements of ice-flow indicators indicate at least 7 ice-flow directions, going from N, NNW, NW to WNW, NNE, W, SE, and SW to WSW. A relative chronology was established from multiple intersecting striations and geometrical relations between multi-faceted outcrops, starting from older phases to younger ones with W, NW, NNW, and N. Surficial mapping using air-photo and satellite images indicate that this region is characterized by zones of fast and slower ice velocity. The presence in the centre of the study area of a drift-free positive relief formed by resistant NE-SW-oriented Proterozoic quartzite appears to have played an important role on the local ice dynamics by slowing down the velocity of the ice. Local example of varying ice velocity systems is expressed by a glacially

  13. Dynamic Ice-Water Interactions Form Europa's Chaos Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Schmidt, B. E.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P.

    2011-12-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. We present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. This model is consistent with key observations of chaos, predicts observables for future missions, and indicates that the surface is likely still active today[1]. We apply lessons from ice-water interaction in the terrestrial cryosphere to hypothesize a dynamic lense-collapse model to for Europa's chaos terrain. Chaos terrain morphology, like that of Conamara chaos and Thera Macula, suggests a four-phase formation [1]: 1) Surface deflection occurs as ice melts over ascending thermal plumes, as regularly occurs on Earth as subglacial volcanoes activate. The same process can occur at Europa if thermal plumes cause pressure melt as they cross ice-impurity eutectics. 2) Resulting hydraulic gradients and driving forces produce a sealed, pressurized melt lense, akin to the hydraulic sealing of subglacial caldera lakes. On Europa, the water cannot escape the lense due to the horizontally continuous ice shell. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid above the lense opens cracks, allowing for the ice to be hydrofractured by pressurized water. Fracture, brine injection and percolation within the ice and possible iceberg toppling produces ice-melange-like granular matrix material. 4) Refreezing of the melt lense and brine-filled pores and cracks within the matrix results in raised chaos. Brine soaking and injection concentrates the ice in brines and adds water volume to the shell. As this englacial water freezes, the now water-filled ice will expand, not unlike the process of forming pingos and other "expansion ice" phenomena on Earth. The refreezing can raise the surface and create the oft-observed matrix "domes" In this presentation, we describe how catastrophic ice-water interactions on Earth have

  14. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  15. Polynyas in a dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólason, E.; Harms, I.

    2009-11-01

    The response of a viscous-plastic dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model to a constant wind forcing is tested in an idealised setting. Bjornsson et al. (2001) have shown that the granular model of Tremblay and Mysak (1997) gives good results in such a set-up compared to a polynya flux model. Here it is shown that these results can be duplicated using the computationally more efficient elliptic yield curve approach by Hibler (1979) and modified Coulombic yield curve by Hibler and Schulson (2000). Some care is, however, required regarding the parametrisations of the ellipse. In addition it is shown that the new ice thickness formulation of Mellor and Kantha (1989) does not allow for proper polynya formation in the bay. In contrast the new ice thickness formulation of Hibler (1979) is found to give good results. Finally we propose a parametrisation of the ice demarcation thickness (h0) in Hibler's formulation, based on wind speed and ice thickness.

  16. Capturing Greenland Meltwater Plume Dynamics with IcePod Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Le Bel, D. A.; Zappa, C. J.; Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.

    2014-12-01

    Meltwater that forms on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet and falls to the ice sheet bed eventually emerges at the calving front as tan, turbid plumes of water. Adjacent to the ice, these meltwater plumes foster mixing in the fjord moving warm ocean water into contact with the front of the ice sheet where it can undercut the ice front and trigger calving. The dynamics of meltwater plumes is difficult to study due to their proximity to the steep calving fronts and their intermittent nature. In July 2014 the IcePod, the ice-ocean imaging system mounted on a New York Air National Guard LC-130, surveyed the 5 glaciers just north of Jakobshavn Isbrae, each of which had an active meltwater plume. The IcePod system has core instrumentation that can resolve high-resolution surface elevations with a scanning laser and visual cameras, the temperature of the surface with an infrared camera, and the structure of snow and ice with two radar systems. For the study of plume dynamics, the key IcePod observations include: (1) the morphology of the calving front captured with the visual camera and the scanning laser and (2) thermal structure, velocity and turbulence of the plume water resolved with the infrared camera. In the future, an expanded IcePod capability will include an AXCTD launching system to recovery the hydrography of the fjord and the plumes. The IcePod survey directly crossed 3 of the 5 meltwater plumes on two subsequent days. The plumes sampled multiple times were Sermeq Avangnardleq A that drains into the Jakobshavn Isbrae Fjord, Eqip Sermia and Sermia Kangilerngata. While each of the ice feeding these three adjacent fjords has experienced the same surface melting conditions the structure of the meltwater plumes was very different in each fjords. Sermeq Avangnardleq A had a narrow angular shaped plume nestled in an embayment in the calving front, Eqip Sermia had two broad diffuse plumes and Sermia Kangilerngata had a narrow circular plume in an ice choked

  17. An Analysis on Ice Storing CharacterIstics in Dynamic-type Ice Storage System using Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Naoki; Tanino, Masayuki; Kozawa, Yoshiyuki

    For an application of the Dynamic-type Ice Storage System to the District Cooling and Heating System, the effects of ice content (IPF) and mass flow rate of supplying ice-slurry on the ice storing characteristics in a tank were investigated by experiments and analyses. In the analytical model, we considered that the ice-rich layer would be ununiform by raising of IPF and the water permeability in the ice-rich layer increases. By raising of IPF and reducing of mass flow rate of supplying ice-slurry, ice-rich layer could not spread in a tank. The porosity of ice-rich layer was contracting to the value of 0.8-0.9 in the ice storing process. The stored ice quantity depends on distribution and porosity of ice-rich layer in a tank decreased to 10% by raising IPF from 2.5wt% to 10wt% and reducing mass flow rate as constant ice flow rate. The analytical results could express the experimental results about stored ice quantity. Our analytical model is considered to be applicable to prediction of the ice storing characteristics and to design of an ice storage tank.

  18. Sensitivity study of a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, D.M.; Mysak, L.A.; Manak, D.K. )

    1993-02-15

    A numerical simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian seas is presented. The sea ice model is extracted from Oberhuber's (1990) coupled sea ice-mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model and is written in spherical coordinates. The advantage of such a model over previous sea ice models is that it can be easily coupled to either global atmospheric or ocean general circulation models written in spherical coordinates. In this model, the thermodynamics are a modification of that of Parkinson and Washington, while the dynamics use the full Hibler viscous-plastic rheology. Monthly thermodynamic and dynamic forcing fields for the atmosphere and ocean are specified. The simulations of the seasonal cycle of ice thickness, compactness, and velocity, for a control set of parameters, compare favorably with the known seasonal characteristics of these fields. A sensitivity study of the control simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover is presented. The sensitivity runs are carried out under three different themes, namely, numerical conditions, parameter values, and physical processes. This last theme refers to experiments in which physical processes are either newly added or completely removed from the model. Approximately 80 sensitivity runs have been performed in which a change from the control run environment has been implemented. Comparisons have been made between the control run and a particular sensitivity run based on time series of the seasonal cycle of the domain-averaged ice thickness, compactness, areal coverage, and kinetic energy. In addition, spatially varying fields of ice thickness, compactness, velocity, and surface temperature for each season are presented for selected experiments. A brief description and discussion of the more interesting experiments are presented. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice cover is shown to be robust. 31 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Icing: a Predictive Tool for In-Flight Icing Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppetelli, Danial

    In-flight icing is a hazard that continues to afflict the aviation industry, despite all the research and efforts to mitigate the risks. The recurrence of these types of accidents has given renewed impetus to the development of advanced analytical predictive tools to study both the accretion of ice on aircraft components in flight, and the aerodynamic consequences of such ice accumulations. In this work, an in-depth analysis of the occurrence of in-flight icing accidents and incidents was conducted to identify high-risk flight conditions. To investigate these conditions more thoroughly, a computational fluid dynamics model of a representative airfoil was developed to recreate experiments from the icing wind tunnel that occurred in controlled flight conditions. The ice accumulations and resulting aerodynamic performance degradations of the airfoil were computed for a range or pitch angles and flight speeds. These simulations revealed substantial performance losses such as reduced maximum lift, and decreased stall angle. From these results, an icing hazard analysis tool was developed, using risk management principles, to evaluate the dangers of in-flight icing for a specific aircraft based on the atmospheric conditions it is expected to encounter, as well as the effectiveness of aircraft certification procedures. This method is then demonstrated through the simulation of in-flight icing scenarios based on real flight data from accidents and incidents. The risk management methodology is applied to the results of the simulations and the predicted performance degradation is compared to recorded aircraft performance characteristics at the time of the occurrence. The aircraft performance predictions and resulting risk assessment are found to correspond strongly to the pilot's comments as well as to the severity of the incident.

  20. Dynamics and hysteresis in square lattice artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysin, G. M.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Mól, L. A. S.; Pereira, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamical effects under geometrical frustration are considered in a model for artificial spin ice on a square lattice in two dimensions. Each island of the spin ice has a three-component Heisenberg-like dipole moment subject to shape anisotropies that influence its direction. The model has real dynamics, including rotation of the magnetic degrees of freedom, going beyond the Ising-type models of spin ice. The dynamics is studied using a Langevin equation solved via a second-order Heun algorithm. Thermodynamic properties such as the specific heat are presented for different couplings. A peak in specific heat is related to a type of melting-like phase transition present in the model. Hysteresis in an applied magnetic field is calculated for model parameters where the system is able to reach thermodynamic equilibrium.

  1. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  2. Dynamic Antarctic ice-sheet response to deglacial meltwater pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Michael; Clark, Peter U.; Timmermann, Axel; Lohmann, Gerrit; Kuhn, Gerhard; Sprenk, Daniela; Gladstone, Rupert

    2013-04-01

    Reconstruction of the last global sea level rise faces uncertainties because only a few robust data evidences are available for Antarctic ice sheets. Deglacial dynamics have mostly been inferred from shallow-water cores on the shelf, where decisive changes are either erased by grounding ice or occur in condensed, lithologically complex successions with partially reversed and generally unreliable 14C ages. Previous modeling studies reconstruct a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 12 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, new findings from two deepwater cores from the Scotia Sea challenge these reconstructions and call for a principal revision of the Antarctic deglacial history. The well-dated sites (Weber et al., 2012, Quaternary Science Reviews) provide the first integrative and representative record of Antarctic Ice Sheet instability. They are located in the central transport route of virtually all Antarctic icebergs, the so-called Iceberg Alley, and demonstrate a highly dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet during the last deglaciation with eight distinct phases of enhanced iceberg routing, dubbed Antarctic Ice Sheet Events (AIE), in contrast to existing models of a late and monotonous ice-sheet retreat which implied only little contribution to the last, natural, sea-level rise 19,000 to 9,000 years ago. We found the first direct evidence for an Antarctic contribution to Meltwater Pulse 1A in the flux rates of ice-rafted debris. Using an ensemble of transient deglacial model simulations we could show that increased export of warmer Circumpolar Deep Water towards Antarctica contributed to Antarctic Ice Sheet melt by ocean thermal forcing (Weber et al., Science, in review). These new findings hold the potential to substantially revise and improve our understanding of the transient response of the ice sheet to external and internal forcings

  3. Skill improvement of dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikken, Folmer; Schmeits, Maurice; Vlot, Willem; Guemas, Virginie; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2016-05-01

    We explore the error and improve the skill of the outcome from dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice reforecasts using different bias correction and ensemble calibration methods. These reforecasts consist of a five-member ensemble from 1979 to 2012 using the general circulation model EC-Earth. The raw model reforecasts show large biases in Arctic sea ice area, mainly due to a differently simulated seasonal cycle and long term trend compared to observations. This translates very quickly (1-3 months) into large biases. We find that (heteroscedastic) extended logistic regressions are viable ensemble calibration methods, as the forecast skill is improved compared to standard bias correction methods. Analysis of regional skill of Arctic sea ice shows that the Northeast Passage and the Kara and Barents Sea are most predictable. These results show the importance of reducing model error and the potential for ensemble calibration in improving skill of seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice.

  4. Antarctic Ice-Shelf Front Dynamics from ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, John W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Time variable elevation profiles from ICESat Laser Altimetry over the period 2003-2009 provide a means to quantitatively detect and track topographic features on polar ice surfaces. The results of this study provide a measure of the horizontal motion of ice-shelf fronts. We examine the time histories of elevation profiles crossing the ice fronts of the Ross, Ronne, Filchner, Riiser-Larson and Fimbul shelves. This provides a basis for estimating dynamics in two dimensions, i.e. in elevation and horizontally in the along-track direction. Ice front velocities, corrected for ground-track intersection angle, range from nearly static to 1.1 km/yr. In many examples, a decrease in elevation up to 1 m/yr near the shelf frontis also detectable. Examples of tabular calving along shelf fronts are seen in some elevation profiles and are confirmed by corresponding MODIS imagery.

  5. Dynamics of coupled ice-ocean system in the marginal ice zone: Study of the mesoscale processes and of constitutive equations for sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at the modelling of mesoscale processed such as up/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A 2-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model (f-plane) through interfacial stresses. The constitutive equations of the sea ice are formulated on the basis of the Reiner-Rivlin theory. The internal ice stresses are important only at high ice concentrations (90-100%), otherwise the ice motion is essentially free drift, where the air-ice stress is balanced by the ice-water stress. The model was tested by studying the upwelling dynamics. Winds parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwilling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater that air-ocean momentum flux, and thus the Ekman transport is bigger under the ice than in the open water. The upwelling simulation was extended to include temporally varying forcing, which was chosen to vary sinusoidally with a 4 day period. This forcing resembles successive cyclone passings. In the model with a thin oceanic upper layer, ice bands were formed.

  6. In vivo human knee joint dynamic properties as functions of muscle contraction and joint position.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Nuber, G; Butler, J; Bowen, M; Rymer, W Z

    1998-01-01

    Information on the dynamic properties (joint stiffness, viscosity and limb inertia) of the human knee joint is scarce in the literature, especially for actively contracting knee musculature. A joint driving device was developed to apply small-amplitude random perturbations to the human knee at several flexion angles with the subject maintaining various levels of muscle contraction. It was found that joint stiffness and viscosity increased with muscle contraction substantially, while limb inertia was constant. Stiffness produced by the quadriceps was highest at 30 degrees flexion and decreased with increasing or decreasing flexion angle, while knee flexors produced highest stiffness at 90 degree flexion. When knee flexion was < 60 degrees, stiffness produced by the quadriceps was higher than that of the hamstrings and gastrocnemius at the same level of background muscle torque, while knee flexor muscles produced higher stiffnesses than the quadriceps at 90 degree flexion. Similar but less obvious trends were observed for joint viscosity. Passive joint stiffness at full knee extension was significantly higher than in more flexed positions. Surprisingly, as the knee joint musculature changed from relaxed to contracting at 50% MVC, system damping ratio remained at about 0.2. This outcome potentially simplifies neuromuscular control of the knee joint. In contrast, the natural undamped frequency increased more than twofold, potentially making the knee joint respond more quickly to the central nervous system commands. The approach described here provides us with a potentially valuable tool to quantify in vivo dynamic properties of normal and pathological human knee joints. PMID:9596540

  7. Changes in Ice Flow Dynamics of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica and Impacts on Ice Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; An, L.

    2014-12-01

    Totten Glacier, East Antarctica is one of the largest glaciers in Antarctica, draining an area of 5.3*105 km2 and containing ice at an equivalent 9 m sea level rise. Lidar/radar altimetry data from 2003-2009 suggests that the glacier is thinning. Thinning is concentrated in areas of fast flow and therefore indicative of changes in ice dynamics. Here, we employ time series of ice velocity from ERS-1/2, RADARSAT-1, LANDSAT-7, ALOS PALSAR, TanDEM/TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed to measure the glacier velocity from 1996 till present. We find significant temporal changes in ice velocity, especially in 1996-2007, followed by a period of slow decrease in 2010-2013. Comparing the results with RACMO2 surface mass balance in the interior suggests that the glacier mass balance was already negative in 1996 and became more negative into the 2000s. The resulting mass loss and stretching of the ice is compatible with the 1.5 m/yr thinning detected by the radar altimeters near the grounding zone. The grounding zone of the glacier includes a vast 15 km long ice plain where the glacier is only grounded a few 10m above hydrostatic equilibrium. We detect a retreat of the region of partial floatation with time, but not solid migration of the grounding line of the glacier. Inverted bathymetry results from gravity data collected offshore suggest the presence of a paleo subglacial channel conducive to the transfer of surface ocean heat, likely diluted circumpolar deep water, whose transfer to the ice shelf cavity may have affected the glacier stability. We suggest that further transfer of ocean heat to the ice shelf could trigger a rapid glacier retreat in this region.

  8. Dynamics of antifreeze glycoproteins in the presence of ice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Phillips, Brian L; Krishnan, Viswanathan V; Feeney, Robert E; Fink, William H; Crowe, John H; Risbud, Subhash H; Tablin, Fern; Yeh, Yin

    2002-01-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins from the Greenland cod Boreogadus saida were dimethylated at the N-terminus (m*AFGP) and their dynamics and conformational properties were studied in the presence of ice using (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. (13)C-NMR experiments of m*AFGP in D(2)O, in H(2)O, and of freeze-dried m*AFGP were performed as a function of temperature. Dynamic parameters ((1)H T(1 rho) and T(CH)) obtained by varying the contact time revealed notable differences in the motional properties of AFGP between the different states. AFGP/ice dynamics was dominated by fast-scale motions (nanosecond to picosecond time scale), suggesting that the relaxation is markedly affected by the protein hydration. The data suggest that AFGP adopts a similar type of three-dimensional fold both in the presence of ice and in the freeze-dried state. FTIR studies of the amide I band did not show a single prevailing secondary structure in the frozen state. The high number of conformers suggests a high flexibility, and possibly reflects the necessity to expose more ice-binding groups. The data suggest that the effect of hydration on the local mobility of AFGP and the lack of significant change in the backbone conformation in the frozen state may play a role in inhibiting the ice crystal growth. PMID:11751333

  9. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  10. Feedbacks between ice and ocean dynamics at the West Antarctic Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf in future global warming scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeller, Sebastian; Timmermann, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    The ice flow at the margins of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is moderated by large ice shelves. Their buttressing effect substantially controls the mass balance of the WAIS and thus its contribution to sea level rise. The stability of these ice shelves results from the balance of mass gain by accumulation and ice flow from the adjacent ice sheet and mass loss by calving and basal melting due to the ocean heat flux. Recent results of ocean circulation models indicate that warm circumpolar water of the Southern Ocean may override the submarine slope front of the Antarctic Continent and boost basal ice shelf melting. In particular, ocean simulations for several of the IPCC's future climate scenarios demonstrate the redirection of a warm coastal current into the Filchner Trough and underneath the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf within the next decades. In this study, we couple the finite elements ocean circulation model FESOM and the three-dimensional thermomechanical ice flow model RIMBAY to investigate the complex interactions between ocean and ice dynamics at the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. We focus on the impact of a changing ice shelf cavity on ocean dynamics as well as the feedback of the resulting sub-shelf melting rates on the ice shelf geometry and implications for the dynamics of the adjacent marine-based Westantarctic Ice Sheet. Our simulations reveal the high sensitivity of grounding line migration to ice-ocean interactions within the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and emphasize the importance of coupled model studies for realistic assessments of the Antarctic mass balance in future global warming scenarios.

  11. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F; van der Veen, Cornelis J; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Simonsen, Sebastian B; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H

    2014-12-30

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993-2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt ⋅ y(-1), equivalent to 0.68 mm ⋅ y(-1) sea level rise (SLR) for 2003-2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004-2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland's outlet glaciers. PMID:25512537

  12. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannuth, Melissa; Mochrie, S. G. J.; Peppin, S. S. L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-03-01

    Solidification of the solvent phase of a colloidal suspension occurs in many natural and technological settings and is becoming a popular technique for creating microporous structures and composite materials. During freezing, regions of high particle density can form as particles are rejected from the growing solid and guided into a variety of macroscopic morphologies. The particles in the high density regions form an amorphous colloidal solid that deforms in response to internal and external stresses. Using X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy, we studied this deformation for silica particles in polycrystalline ice. We found that the particles in the high density regions underwent ballistic motion coupled with a non-exponential decay of the intensity autocorrelation function (ACF) that transitions from a stretched to a compressed exponential with increasing scattering vector q. While ballistic motion and a compressed exponential decay of the ACF is common, the coupling with a stretched exponential decay is very rare and a transition with increasing q has not previously been reported. We explain this behavior in terms of ice grain boundary migration.

  13. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications. PMID:22235939

  14. Dynamics of an assembly of rigid ice floes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabatel, Matthias; Labbé, Stéphane; Weiss, Jérôme

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a model describing the dynamics of a population of ice floes with arbitrary shapes and sizes, which are exposed to atmospheric and oceanic skin drag. The granular model presented is based on simplified momentum equations for ice floe motion between collisions and on the resolution of linear complementarity problems to deal with ice floe collisions. Between collisions, the motion of an individual ice floe satisfies the linear and angular momentum conservation equations, with classical formula applied to account for atmospheric and oceanic skin drag. To deal with collisions, before they lead to interpenetration, we included a linear complementarity problem based on the Signorini condition and Coulombs law. The nature of the contact is described through a constant coefficient of friction μ, as well as a coefficient of restitution >(0≤ɛ≤1>) describing the loss of kinetic energy during the collision. In the present version of our model, this coefficient is fixed. The model was validated using data obtained from the motion of interacting artificial wood floes in a test basin. The results of simulations comprising few hundreds of ice floes of various shapes and sizes, exposed to different forcing scenarios, and under different configurations, are also discussed. They show that the progressive clustering of ice floes as the result of kinetic energy dissipation during collisions is well captured, and suggest a collisional regimes of floe dispersion at small scales, different from a large-scale regime essentially driven by wind forcing.

  15. The glaciology of IRD events: warming and ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Heinrich events, the enormous glacial-period ice-rafting episodeshave been posited to be due to large-scale surges of the Laurentide ice-sheet (3). However, more frequent events such as the Bond events are difficult to explain this way. Recently acquired geological evidence (2,4) suggests that climatic perturbations are correlated with some N. Atlantic IRD events. A model (1) which show how climate perturbations can lead to IRD events is reviewed. The model shows how 20-50km retreats induced by ablation rates of 2 m/yr provide sufficient debris flux through the grounding line to produce large sedimentation events. Such ablation would reduce ice-shelf extent markedly, permitting debris to reach the calving front and be transported by icebergs leading to ice-rafted debris (IRD) events. Surges are not necessary conditions for the production of large IRD events. The glacial dynamics of this climate perturbation model is compared with the surge theory, with particular emphasis on the amount of sediment that either method can deliver to the oceans. Consideration of the non-exclusivety and consistency of the two mechanisms is emphasised. (1) R.C.A. Hindmarsh and A. Jenkins, Centurial-millenial ice-rafted debris pulses from ablating marine ice sheets, Geophys Res. Lett 22(12), 2477-2480, 2001; (2) Paul C. Knutz et al. G3 Multidecadal ocean variability and NW European ice sheet surges during the last deglaciation G3 3(12) 17 December 2002 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000351; (3) MacAyeal,D.R. Binge/purge oscillations of the Laurentide ice-sheet as a cause of the North-Atlantic's Heinrich events, Paleoceanography, 8(6), p.775-784, (1993); (4) M. Moros, et. al. Were glacial iceberg surges in the North Atlantic triggered by climatic warming?, Marine Geology, 192(4), 2002, p.393-417

  16. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  17. Airborne radar evidence for tributary flow switching in Institute Ice Stream, West Antarctica: Implications for ice sheet configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Kate; Woodward, John; Ross, Neil; Dunning, Stuart A.; Bingham, Robert G.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of ice streaming to the evaluation of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) stability we know little about mid- to long-term dynamic changes within the Institute Ice Stream (IIS) catchment. Here we use airborne radio echo sounding to investigate the subglacial topography, internal stratigraphy, and Holocene flow regime of the upper IIS catchment near the Ellsworth Mountains. Internal layer buckling within three discrete, topographically confined tributaries, through Ellsworth, Independence, and Horseshoe Valley Troughs, provides evidence for former enhanced ice sheet flow. We suggest that enhanced ice flow through Independence and Ellsworth Troughs, during the mid-Holocene to late Holocene, was the source of ice streaming over the region now occupied by the slow-flowing Bungenstock Ice Rise. Although buckled layers also exist within the slow-flowing ice of Horseshoe Valley Trough, a thicker sequence of surface-conformable layers in the upper ice column suggests slowdown more than ~4000 years ago, so we do not attribute enhanced flow switch-off here, to the late Holocene ice-flow reorganization. Intensely buckled englacial layers within Horseshoe Valley and Independence Troughs cannot be accounted for under present-day flow speeds. The dynamic nature of ice flow in IIS and its tributaries suggests that recent ice stream switching and mass changes in the Siple Coast and Amundsen Sea sectors are not unique to these sectors, that they may have been regular during the Holocene and may characterize the decline of the WAIS.

  18. Tunable nonequilibrium dynamics of field quenches in spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Mostame, Sarah; Castelnovo, Claudio; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji L.

    2014-01-01

    We present nonequilibrium physics in spin ice as a unique setting that combines kinematic constraints, emergent topological defects, and magnetic long-range Coulomb interactions. In spin ice, magnetic frustration leads to highly degenerate yet locally constrained ground states. Together, they form a highly unusual magnetic state—a “Coulomb phase”—whose excitations are point-like defects—magnetic monopoles—in the absence of which effectively no dynamics is possible. Hence, when they are sparse at low temperature, dynamics becomes very sluggish. When quenching the system from a monopole-rich to a monopole-poor state, a wealth of dynamical phenomena occur, the exposition of which is the subject of this article. Most notably, we find reaction diffusion behavior, slow dynamics owing to kinematic constraints, as well as a regime corresponding to the deposition of interacting dimers on a honeycomb lattice. We also identify potential avenues for detecting the magnetic monopoles in a regime of slow-moving monopoles. The interest in this model system is further enhanced by its large degree of tunability and the ease of probing it in experiment: With varying magnetic fields at different temperatures, geometric properties—including even the effective dimensionality of the system—can be varied. By monitoring magnetization, spin correlations or zero-field NMR, the dynamical properties of the system can be extracted in considerable detail. This establishes spin ice as a laboratory of choice for the study of tunable, slow dynamics. PMID:24379372

  19. Mertz Ice Shelf Dynamics in the Last Twenty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cheng, X.; Shum, C.

    2013-12-01

    . These parameters extracted from remote sensing and altimetry data will provide additional information for studies of the evolution of iceberg, especially in iceberg tracking system. Mertz Ice Shelf Dynamics in the last 20 years

  20. Reconstructing the last Irish Ice Sheet 2: a geomorphologically-driven model of ice sheet growth, retreat and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Sarah L.; Clark, Chris D.

    2009-12-01

    The ice sheet that once covered Ireland has a long history of investigation. Much prior work focussed on localised evidence-based reconstructions and ice-marginal dynamics and chronologies, with less attention paid to an ice sheet wide view of the first order properties of the ice sheet: centres of mass, ice divide structure, ice flow geometry and behaviour and changes thereof. In this paper we focus on the latter aspect and use our new, countrywide glacial geomorphological mapping of the Irish landscape (>39 000 landforms), and our analysis of the palaeo-glaciological significance of observed landform assemblages (article Part 1), to build an ice sheet reconstruction yielding these fundamental ice sheet properties. We present a seven stage model of ice sheet evolution, from initiation to demise, in the form of palaeo-geographic maps. An early incursion of ice from Scotland likely coalesced with local ice caps and spread in a south-westerly direction 200 km across Ireland. A semi-independent Irish Ice Sheet was then established during ice sheet growth, with a branching ice divide structure whose main axis migrated up to 140 km from the west coast towards the east. Ice stream systems converging on Donegal Bay in the west and funnelling through the North Channel and Irish Sea Basin in the east emerge as major flow components of the maximum stages of glaciation. Ice cover is reconstructed as extending to the continental shelf break. The Irish Ice Sheet became autonomous (i.e. separate from the British Ice Sheet) during deglaciation and fragmented into multiple ice masses, each decaying towards the west. Final sites of demise were likely over the mountains of Donegal, Leitrim and Connemara. Patterns of growth and decay of the ice sheet are shown to be radically different: asynchronous and asymmetric in both spatial and temporal domains. We implicate collapse of the ice stream system in the North Channel - Irish Sea Basin in driving such asymmetry, since rapid

  1. Dynamics analysis of space robot manipulator with joint clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Bai, Zheng Feng

    2011-04-01

    A computational methodology for analysis of space robot manipulator systems, considering the effects of the clearances in the joint, is presented. The contact dynamics model in joint clearance is established using the nonlinear equivalent spring-damp model and the friction effect is considered using the Coulomb friction model. The space robot system dynamic equation of manipulator with clearance is established. Then the dynamics simulation is presented and the dynamics characteristics of robot manipulator with clearance are analyzed. This work provides a practical method to analyze the dynamics characteristics of space robot manipulator with joint clearance and improves the engineering application. The computational methodology can predict the effects of clearance on space robot manipulator preferably, which is the basis of space robot manipulator design, precision analysis and ground test.

  2. EBSD observations of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude; Tommasi, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) strongly affects the evolution of microstructure (grain size and shape) and texture (crystal preferred orientation) in materials during deformation at high temperature. Since texturing leads to anisotropic physical properties, predicting the effect of DRX in metals is essential for industrial applications, in rocks for interpreting geophysical data and modeling geodynamic flows, or in ice for predicting ice sheet flow and climate evolution. Owing to its high viscoplastic anisotropy, ice has long been considered as a "model material". This happens to be particularly true in the case of the understanding of the fundamental of DRX mechanisms as they occur under a relatively easily controlled environment. Creep compression experiments were performed on polycrystalline ice samples in the laboratory in order to observe the evolution of the fabrics and microstructures during DRX. During the tests, performed at temperatures of -5°C and -7°C, under 0.8 MPa compressive stress, dynamic recrystallization was initiated after 1% macroscopic strain and could be followed up to 18% strain on separated samples. Fabrics and microstructures were analysed post-mortem using an Automatic Ice Texture Analyser (AITA, Russell-Head and Wilson 2001) and EBSD measurements with the Crystal Probe of Géosciences Montpellier. Both techniques enable high resolution observations, both in space and orientation (5 to 50 microns, EBSD: 0.7° - AITA: 3°), which is new for DRX observations in ice. While AITA provides only the c-axis orientations, EBSD provides full orientations (c- and a-axes). In particular, we could access to an estimate of a relative dislocation density (from the Nye tensor obtained with EBSD) and its evolution with strain. Fabric evolution with strain is very similar to what was measured by Jacka and Maccagnan (1984) with a strong strengthening toward a few maxima for c- and a-axes. The c-axes maxima are oriented about 30° from the compression

  3. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  4. Results of the US contribution to the joint US/USSR Bering Sea experiment. [atmospheric circulation and sea ice cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Chang, T. C.; Fowler, M. G.; Gloersen, P.; Kuhn, P. M.; Ramseier, R. O.; Ross, D. B.; Stambach, G.; Webster, W. J., Jr.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation which occurred during the Bering Sea Experiment, 15 February to 10 March 1973, in and around the experiment area is analyzed and related to the macroscale morphology and dynamics of the sea ice cover. The ice cover was very complex in structure, being made up of five ice types, and underwent strong dynamic activity. Synoptic analyses show that an optimum variety of weather situations occurred during the experiment: an initial strong anticyclonic period (6 days), followed by a period of strong cyclonic activity (6 days), followed by weak anticyclonic activity (3 days), and finally a period of weak cyclonic activity (4 days). The data of the mesoscale test areas observed on the four sea ice option flights, and ship weather, and drift data give a detailed description of mesoscale ice dynamics which correlates well with the macroscale view: anticyclonic activity advects the ice southward with strong ice divergence and a regular lead and polynya pattern; cyclonic activity advects the ice northward with ice convergence, or slight divergence, and a random lead and polynya pattern.

  5. Modeling ice front Dynamics of Greenland outlet glaciers using ISSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlighem, M.; Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H. L.; Rignot, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The recent increase in the rate of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet is primarily due to the acceleration and thinning of outlet glaciers along the coast. This acceleration is a dynamic response to the retreat of calving fronts, which leads to a loss in resistive stresses. These processes need to be included in ice sheet models in order to be able to accurately reproduce current trends in mass loss, and in the long term reduce the uncertainty in the contribution of ice sheets to sea level rise. Today, the vast majority of ice sheet models that include moving boundaries are one dimensional flow line and vertical flow band models, that are not adapted to the complex geometries of Greenland outlet glaciers, as they do not accurately capture changes in lateral stresses. Here, we use the level set method to track moving boundaries within a 2D plane view model of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), and investigate the sensitivity of Store Glacier, in western Greenland, to the amount of melting occurring at its calving front. We explore different calving laws and obtain the best results with a new simple calving law adapted from von Mises yield criterion. We show that the ocean circulation near the front and the amount of runoff are able to trigger ice front advance and retreat depending on the amount of melting that they produce at the calving face, but the bed topography controls the stable positions of the ice front. The modeled calving front of Store Glacier, for which we have quality bed topography and sea floor bathymetry data, is particularly stable because of the presence of a large sill at the glacier terminus. If the ice front detaches from this stabilizing sill due to larger amounts of melting at the front or due to large calving events, the glacier front starts to retreat as the bed deepens inland, until it finds another stabilizing feature in the bed topography. The new bed topography maps based on mass conservation make it possible to model more

  6. The role of sea ice dynamics in global climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibler, William D., III

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: general characteristics of sea ice drift; sea ice rheology; ice thickness distribution; sea ice thermodynamic models; equilibrium thermodynamic models; effect of internal brine pockets and snow cover; model simulations of Arctic Sea ice; and sensitivity of sea ice models to climate change.

  7. Ice crystal growth in a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.

    1980-01-01

    Ice crystals were grown in a supersaturated environment produced by a dynamic thermal diffusion chamber, which employed two horizontal plates separated by a distance of 2.5 cm. Air was circulated between and along the 1.2 m length of the plates past ice crystals which nucleated and grew from a fiber suspended vertically between the two plates. A zoom stereo microscope with a magnification which ranged from 3X to 80X and both 35 mm still photographs and 16 mm time lapse cine films taken through the microscope were used to study the variation of the shape and linear growth rate of ice crystals as a function of the ambient temperature, the ambient supersaturation, and the forced ventilation velocity. The ambient growth conditions were varied over the range of temperature 0 to -40 C, over the range of supersaturation 4% to 50% with respect to ice, and over the range of forced ventilation velocities 0 cm/s to 20 cm/s.

  8. Dynamic analysis for planar beam with clearance joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, XiaoGuang; Guo, XiaoSong; Feng, YongBao; Yu, ChuanQiang; Ma, Changlin

    2015-03-01

    An analytical model was presented in this study to describe the dynamic characteristics of a planar rotation beam with clearance joint. The spherical contact model was introduced to calculate the collision forces for the planar revolute joint. Unlike previous research, to acquire an accurate and convergent solution, the second-order coupling term of the beam axial deformation is taken into account. Then, the flexible beam was divided into discrete elements via the finite element method. The dynamic equations of the model were deduced via the Hamilton's principle. Further, the dynamic responses were obtained and analyzed in the non-inertial and inertial coordinates. To prove the validity of the presented methodology, a virtual prototype model with identical conditions was created in ADAMS. A numerical example was simultaneously calculated by the two different approaches. Comparison of the results shows that the two approaches match quite well. Finally, some valuable conclusions describing the inner-joint collision process are extracted and summarized.

  9. A robotic apparatus that dictates torque fields around joints without affecting inherent joint dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oytam, Yalchin; Lloyd, David; Reid, Campbell S; de Rugy, Aymar; Carson, Richard G

    2010-10-01

    This manuscript describes how motor behaviour researchers who are not at the same time expert roboticists may implement an experimental apparatus, which has the ability to dictate torque fields around a single joint on one limb or single joints on multiple limbs without otherwise interfering with the inherent dynamics of those joints. Such an apparatus expands the exploratory potential of the researcher wherever experimental distinction of factors may necessitate independent control of torque fields around multiple limbs, or the shaping of torque fields of a given joint independently of its plane of motion, or its directional phase within that plane. The apparatus utilizes torque motors. The challenge with torque motors is that they impose added inertia on limbs and thus attenuate joint dynamics. We eliminated this attenuation by establishing an accurate mathematical model of the robotic device using the Box-Jenkins method, and cancelling out its dynamics by employing the inverse of the model as a compensating controller. A direct measure of the remnant inertial torque as experienced by the hand during a 50 s period of wrist oscillations that increased gradually in frequency from 1.0 to 3.8 Hz confirmed that the removal of the inertial effect of the motor was effectively complete. PMID:20728232

  10. Dynamic Inland Propagation of Thinning Due to Ice Loss at the Margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei Li; Li, Jun J.; Zwally, H. Jay

    2012-01-01

    Mass-balance analysis of the Greenland ice sheet based on surface elevation changes observed by the European Remote-sensing Satellite (ERS) (1992-2002) and Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (2003-07) indicates that the strongly increased mass loss at lower elevations (<2000 m) of the ice sheet, as observed during 2003-07, appears to induce interior ice thinning at higher elevations. In this paper, we perform a perturbation experiment with a three-dimensional anisotropic ice-flow model (AIF model) to investigate this upstream propagation. Observed thinning rates in the regions below 2000m elevation are used as perturbation inputs. The model runs with perturbation for 10 years show that the extensive mass loss at the ice-sheet margins does in fact cause interior thinning on short timescales (i.e. decadal). The modeled pattern of thinning over the ice sheet agrees with the observations, which implies that the strong mass loss since the early 2000s at low elevations has had a dynamic impact on the entire ice sheet. The modeling results also suggest that even if the large mass loss at the margins stopped, the interior ice sheet would continue thinning for 300 years and would take thousands of years for full dynamic recovery.

  11. Dynamic Response of Antarctic Ice Shelves to Bedrock Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sainan; Cornford, Stephen; Liu, Yan; Moore, John

    2014-05-01

    Bedrock geometry is an essential boundary condition in ice sheet modelling. The shape of the bedrock on fine scales can influences ice sheet evolution, for example through the formation of pinning points that alter grounding line dynamics. Here we test the sensitivity of the BISICLES adaptive mesh ice sheet model to small amplitude height fluctuations on different spatial scales in the bed rock topography provided by bedmap2 in the catchments of Pine Island Glacier, the Amery Ice Shelf, and a region of East Antarctica including the Denman and Totten Glaciers. We generate an ensemble of bedrock topographies by adding random noise to the bedmap2 data with amplitude determined by the accompanying estimates of bedrock uncertainty. Lower frequency coherent noise, which generates broad spatial scale (over 10s of km) errors in topography with relatively gently slopes, while higher frequency noise has steeper slopes over smaller spatial scales. We find that the small amplitude fluctuations result in only minor changes in the way these glaciers evolve. However, lower frequency noise is more important than higher frequency noise even when the features have the same height amplitudes and the total noise power is maintained. This provides optimism for credible sea level rise estimates with presently achievable densities of thickness measurements. Pine Island Glacier appears to be the most sensitive to errors in bed topography, while Lambert-Amery is stable under the present day observational data uncertainty. Totten-Denman region may undergo a retreat around Totten ice shelf, where the bedrock is lower than the sea level, especially if basal melt rates increase.

  12. Dynamic response of an artificial square spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungfleisch, M. B.; Zhang, W.; Iacocca, E.; Sklenar, J.; Ding, J.; Jiang, W.; Zhang, S.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Ketterson, J. B.; Heinonen, O.; Hoffmann, A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetization dynamics in an artificial square spin-ice lattice made of Ni80Fe20 with magnetic field applied in the lattice plane is investigated by broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The experimentally observed dispersion shows a rich spectrum of modes corresponding to different magnetization states. These magnetization states are determined by exchange and dipolar interaction between individual islands, as is confirmed by a semianalytical model. In the low field regime below 400 Oe a hysteretic behavior in the mode spectrum is found. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the origin of the observed spectra is due to the initialization of different magnetization states of individual nanomagnets. Our results indicate that it might be possible to determine the spin-ice state by resonance experiments and are a first step towards the understanding of artificial geometrically frustrated magnetic systems in the high-frequency regime.

  13. Ice Age Sea Level Change on a Dynamic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Latychev, K.; Rovere, A.; Moucha, R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in global mean sea level (GMSL) are a sensitive indicator of climate variability during the current ice age. Reconstructions are largely based on local sea level records, and the mapping to GMSL is computed from simulations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) on 1-D Earth models. We argue, using two case studies, that resolving important, outstanding issues in ice age paleoclimate requires a more sophisticated consideration of mantle structure and dynamics. First, we consider the coral record from Barbados, which is widely used to constrain global ice volume changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~21 ka). Analyses of the record using 1-D viscoelastic Earth models have estimated a GMSL change since LGM of ~120 m, a value at odds with analyses of other far field records, which range from 130-135 m. We revisit the Barbados case using a GIA model that includes laterally varying Earth structure (Austermann et al., Nature Geo., 2013) and demonstrate that neglecting this structure, in particular the high-viscosity slab in the mantle linked to the subduction of the South American plate, has biased (low) previous estimates of GMSL change since LGM by ~10 m. Our analysis brings the Barbados estimate into accord with studies from other far-field sites. Second, we revisit estimates of GMSL during the mid-Pliocene warm period (MPWP, ~3 Ma), which was characterized by temperatures 2-3°C higher than present. The ice volume deficit during this period is a source of contention, with estimates ranging from 0-40 m GMSL equivalent. We argue that refining estimates of ice volume during MPWP requires a correction for mantle flow induced dynamic topography (DT; Rowley et al., Science, 2013), a signal neglected in previous studies of ice age sea level change. We present estimates of GIA- and DT-corrected elevations of MPWP shorelines from the U.S. east coast, Australia and South Africa in an attempt to reconcile these records with a single GMSL value.

  14. Astronomical Ice: The Effects of Treating Ice as a Porous Media on the Dynamics and Evolution of Extraterrestrial Ice-Ocean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    With the prevalence of water and ice rich environments in the solar system, and likely the universe, becoming more apparent, understanding the evolutionary dynamics and physical processes of such locales is of great importance. Piqued interest arises from the understanding that the persistence of all known life depends on the presence of liquid water. As in situ investigation is currently infeasible, accurate numerical modeling is the best technique to demystify these environments. We will discuss an evolving model of ice-ocean interaction aimed at realistically describing the behavior of the ice-ocean interface by treating basal ice as a porous media, and its possible implications on the formation of astrobiological niches. Treating ice as a porous media drastically affects the thermodynamic properties it exhibits. Thus inclusion of this phenomenon is critical in accurately representing the dynamics and evolution of all ice-ocean environments. This model utilizes equations that describe the dynamics of sea ice when it is treated as a porous media (Hunke et. al. 2011), coupled with a basal melt and accretion model (Holland and Jenkins 1999). Combined, these two models produce the most accurate description of the processes occurring at the base of terrestrial sea ice and ice shelves, capable of resolving variations within the ice due to environmental pressures. While these models were designed for application to terrestrial environments, the physics occurring at any ice-water interface is identical, and these models can be used to represent the evolution of a variety of icy astronomical bodies. As terrestrial ice shelves provide a close analog to planetary ice-ocean environments, we truth test the models validity against observations of ice shelves. We apply this model to the ice-ocean interface of the icy Galilean moon Europa. We include profiles of temperature, salinity, solid fraction, and Darcy velocity, as well as temporally and spatially varying melt and

  15. The NE Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial - a dynamic retreat from the shelf edge triggered by ice melting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Forwick, Matthias; Husum, Katrine

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of the north-eastern sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial are still poorly constrained and large uncertainties about its extent exist. We present new swath-bathymetry data and sub-bottom profiles acquired from the outer parts of a shelf-crossing trough. These data reveal glacial landforms suggesting that grounded ice extended to the shelf break. Thus, the hypothesis of a mid-shelf position of the ice sheet in this area during the last glacial maximum is rejected, instead other studies predicting an ice expansion to the shelf break is reinforced. The results presented here also add further details on the behavior of the ice sheet during the initial deglaciation. The outer trough studied was characterized by the formation of a complex pattern of moraine ridges and sediment wedges overlying mega-scale glacial lineations, providing evidence of repeated halts and readvances of the ice sheet during an early phase of its decay. This suggests that the early deglaciation was related to melting of the grounded ice due to temperature increase in the ocean, rather than being triggered by abrupt sea level rise. The latter should, according to established models, result in ice lift-off and a sea floor dominated by landforms formed during full-glacial conditions (mega-scale glacial lineations) and ice disintegration (iceberg plough-marks).

  16. Neoglacial ice expansion and late Holocene cold-based ice cap dynamics on Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margreth, Annina; Dyke, Arthur S.; Gosse, John C.; Telka, Alice M.

    2014-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating of fossil flora and fauna collected along receding cold-based ice caps and cold-based sections of polythermal glaciers on Cumberland Peninsula reveal insights into Neoglacial ice expansion and late Holocene ice dynamics. The taphonomic advantages of subfossilized moss were exploited to precisely document regional expansions of ice caps through the late Holocene. When compared with climate proxies and records of volcanic eruptions, the moss radiocarbon age distributions indicate i) onset of Neoglaciation shortly after 5 ka, concomitant with increased sea ice cover, ii) intensification of ice expansion between 1.9 and 1.1 ka, followed by halt of ice growth, or ice recession during the Medieval Warm Period, and iii) renewed ice expansion after 0.8 ka, in response to cooling related to a combination of large volcanic eruptions and low solar activity. Overall, the observations support a model of near-instantaneous glacial response to regional climate controls and that these responses were synchronous throughout eastern Canadian Arctic and possibly eastern Greenland.

  17. First principles molecular dynamics study of filled ice hydrogen hydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyun; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Iitaka, Toshiaki

    2012-08-28

    We investigated structural changes, phase diagram, and vibrational properties of hydrogen hydrate in filled-ice phase C(2) by using first principles molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the experimentally reported "cubic" structure is unstable at low temperature and/or high pressure: The "cubic" structure reflects the symmetry at high (room) temperature where the hydrogen bond network is disordered and the hydrogen molecules are orientationally disordered due to thermal rotation. In this sense, the "cubic" symmetry would definitely be lowered at low temperature where the hydrogen bond network and the hydrogen molecules are expected to be ordered. At room temperature and below 30 GPa, it is the thermal effects that play an essential role in stabilizing the structure in "cubic" symmetry. Above 60 GPa, the hydrogen bonds in the framework would be symmetrized and the hydrogen bond order-disorder transition would disappear. These results also suggest the phase behavior of other filled-ice hydrates. In the case of rare gas hydrate, there would be no guest molecules' rotation-nonrotation transition since the guest molecules keep their spherical symmetry at any temperature. On the contrary methane hydrate MH-III would show complex transitions due to the lower symmetry of the guest molecule. These results would encourage further experimental studies, especially nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and neutron scattering, on the phases of filled-ice hydrates at high pressures and/or low temperatures. PMID:22938248

  18. First principles molecular dynamics study of filled ice hydrogen hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Iitaka, Toshiaki

    2012-08-01

    We investigated structural changes, phase diagram, and vibrational properties of hydrogen hydrate in filled-ice phase C2 by using first principles molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the experimentally reported "cubic" structure is unstable at low temperature and/or high pressure: The "cubic" structure reflects the symmetry at high (room) temperature where the hydrogen bond network is disordered and the hydrogen molecules are orientationally disordered due to thermal rotation. In this sense, the "cubic" symmetry would definitely be lowered at low temperature where the hydrogen bond network and the hydrogen molecules are expected to be ordered. At room temperature and below 30 GPa, it is the thermal effects that play an essential role in stabilizing the structure in "cubic" symmetry. Above 60 GPa, the hydrogen bonds in the framework would be symmetrized and the hydrogen bond order-disorder transition would disappear. These results also suggest the phase behavior of other filled-ice hydrates. In the case of rare gas hydrate, there would be no guest molecules' rotation-nonrotation transition since the guest molecules keep their spherical symmetry at any temperature. On the contrary methane hydrate MH-III would show complex transitions due to the lower symmetry of the guest molecule. These results would encourage further experimental studies, especially nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and neutron scattering, on the phases of filled-ice hydrates at high pressures and/or low temperatures.

  19. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is currently not well established. This is largely attributed to the interdependencies of aerosols and cloud microphysical processes, among which primary ice formation contributes to considerable uncertainties. Although it is known that in a large range of thermodynamic conditions aerosol particles are required to initiate ice formation, identifying and characterizing the effect of specific ice nuclei is among current scientific efforts. Here we attempt to quantify the change of cloud properties with varying aerosol background concentrations. We adapt the concept of susceptibilities for mixed-phase and ice clouds, defining the susceptibility as the derivation of a macrophysical quantity with respect to ice nucleating aerosol concentrations. A focus of our study is the use of different model approaches in order to identify the distinct contributions of both cloud microphysics and cloud-dynamical feedbacks to the overall susceptibility. The classical method is the direct comparison of two independent model runs, where the whole range of microphysical and cloud-dynamical feedbacks contributes to different cloud properties in a perturbed simulation. Our alternative method relies on a single simulation which incorporates multiple executions of the microphysical scheme within the same time step, each "perturbed microphysics" scheme with varying aerosol concentrations and an additional set of cloud particle tracers. Since in the latter case the model dynamics are held constant and only microphysical feedbacks contribute to the properties of perturbed clouds, we can distinguish between the pure microphysical effect and the dynamical enhancement or suppression. For a persistent Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud layer which is expected to be particularly sensitive to feedback cycles, we show an enhancement of the cloud susceptibility to ice nucleating particles by dynamics of around 50%, but a decay of the enhancement with time

  20. Dynamic characteristics of a magnetorheological pin joint for civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun

    2014-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) pin joint is a novel device in which its joint moment resistance can be controlled in real-time by altering the applied magnetic field. The smart pin joint is intended to be used as a controllable connector between the columns and beams of a civil structure to instantaneously shift the structural natural frequencies in order to avoid resonance and therefore to reduce unwanted vibrations and hence prevent structural damage. As an intrinsically nonlinear device, modelling of this MR fluid based device is a challenging task and makes the design of a suitable control algorithm a cumbersome situation. Aimed at its application in civil structure, the main purpose of this paper is to test and characterise the hysteretic behaviour of MR pin joint. A test scheme is designed to obtain the dynamic performance of MR pin joint in the dominant earthquake frequency range. Some unique phenomena different from those of MR damper are observed through the experimental testing. A computationally-efficient model is proposed by introducing a hyperbolic element to accurately reproduce its dynamic behaviour and to further facilitate the design of a suitable control algorithm. Comprehensive investigations on the model accuracy and dependences of the proposed model on loading condition (frequency and amplitude) and input current level are reported in the last section of this paper.

  1. ERS satellite microwave radar observations of Antarctic sea-ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    1997-01-01

    ERS-1 and ERS-2 scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used to monitor and track large and small scale sea ice dynamics in the Southern Ocean, and in particular in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Sea ice formation in the Weddell Sea regulates vertical and horizontal thermohaline circulation and influences bottom water production rates. Significant seasonal to interannual variability is observed in the sea ice drift dynamics. Coupled model simulations reproduce this variability and indicate that there is significant interannual variability in Weddelll Sea ice formation, drifts and extent on the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) timescale, with a period of approximately eight years. Changes in ice dynamics on these timescales regulate the amount of sea ice divergence and polynya formation. Anomalies in the timing and duration of the opening of the Ronne ice shelf polynya system are closely related to the variability in outflow of Weddell Sea bottom water measured at Joinville Island.

  2. Ice-dynamical constraints on the existence and impact of subglacial volcanism on West Antarctic ice sheet stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Stefan W.; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    2006-12-01

    Subglacial volcanism in West Antarctica may play a crucial role in the dynamics and stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). Evidence supporting the existence of an individual subglacial volcanic center (Mt. Casertz) in the upper catchments of Whillans and Kamb Ice Stream (WIS and KIS), comes from a comparison of ice sheet modeling results with measured ice velocities. Lubrication of an area, which otherwise should be frozen to its bed, is best explained by basal melt water generated in the vicinity of Mt. Casertz. The estimated melt water production of Mt. Casertz corresponds to ~8 % of the total melt water production in the two catchments. This would be sufficient to offset basal freezing in the dormant KIS, relubricating its bed and potentially causing a restart. Near future volcanic activity changes are speculative, but would have far reaching implications on the dynamics and stability of the WAIS requiring further investigation.

  3. Dynamic fragmentation of cellular, ice-templated alumina scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi Ming; Cervantes, Octavio; Nam, SeanWoo; Molitoris, John D.; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the dynamic failure of ice-templated freeze-cast alumina scaffolds that are being considered as biomimetic hierarchical structures. Three porosities of alumina freeze-cast structures were fabricated, and a systematic variation in microstructural properties such as lamellar width and thickness was observed with changing porosity. Dynamic impact tests were performed in a light-gas gun to examine the failure properties of these materials under high strain-rate loading. Nearly complete delamination was observed following impact, along with characteristic cracking across the lamellar width. Average fragment size decreases with increasing porosity, and a theoretical model was developed to explain this behavior based on microstructural changes. Using an energy balance between kinetic, strain, and surface energies within a single lamella, we are able to accurately predict the characteristic fragment size using only standard material properties of bulk alumina.

  4. Dynamic responses to sinusoidal excitations of beams with frictional joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongsik; Feng, Z. C.

    2004-12-01

    We consider the dynamic responses of a beam with a frictional joint. The frictional force at the joint is modeled using the Coulomb friction model. The frictional force at the joint makes the nature of the boundary conditions at the joint uncertain. Therefore, this problem represents a type of nonlinear problems where the boundary conditions are coupled to the solutions. Using numerical integration of the resulting differential equations obtained by combining the finite element method and the Lagrange equations, we study the steady-state solutions of the system to sinusoidal excitations. We explore the dependence of the system responses to various parameters including the frictional force, the forcing frequency and the forcing amplitude. A result of special interest is the existence of an optimum friction force if the frictional joint is used to control the system response amplitude. We also examine the ways that friction affects the resonance frequency of the structure. Experiments are carried out, which agree qualitatively with the numerical results.

  5. Dynamics of Arctic sea ice discussed at workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James; Ukita, Jinro

    Sea ice is an interesting geophysical material: it behaves as a large-scale hardening plastic. Consider the impact of the sea-ice covers mechanical behavior on the energy and momentum exchange within the complex atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Sea ice acts as an insulator between the relatively warm ocean water and the cold polar atmosphere. Sea ice cover interacts with the atmosphere by regulating air-sea fluxes, changing surface albedo, and influencing the long-wave radiative balance.

  6. Towards a Joint Analysis of Data from the IceCube Neutrino Telescope, the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov; Golup, G.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Aublin, J.; Caccianiga, L.; Ghia, P. L.; Roulet, E.; Unger, M.; Sagawa, H.; Tinyakov, P.

    A joint point-source analysis to search for correlations between the arrival directions of neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being planned by the IceCube, Pierre Auger and Telescope Array Collaborations. A cross-correlation analysis will be performed using ten years of Auger data, six years of Telescope Array data and a signal-rich set of neutrino candidate events detected at IceCube. Also, a likelihood analysis will be applied to the same sample of neutrinos, stacking their arrival directions, and to UHECRs. Finally, another likelihood analysis will be performed on stacked UHECRs and the IceCube 4-year sample of clean, through-going muons that could be associated with charged-current muon neutrino interactions. An outline of the analyses, their sensitivities and discovery potentials is presented here.

  7. Rapid marine deglaciation: asynchronous retreat dynamics between the Irish Sea Ice Stream and terrestrial outlet glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, H.; Hubbard, A.; Bradwell, T.; Glasser, N. F.; Hambrey, M. J.; Clark, C. D.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the retreat behaviour of past marine-ice sheets provides vital context to accurate assessment of the present stability and long-term response of contemporary polar-ice sheets to climate and oceanic warming. Here new multibeam swath-bathymetry data and sedimentological analysis are combined with high resolution ice-sheet modelling to reveal complex landform assemblages and process-dynamics associated with deglaciation of the British-Celtic Ice Sheet (BCIS) within the Irish Sea Basin. Our reconstruction indicates a non-linear relationship between the rapidly receding Irish Sea Ice Stream, the largest draining the BCIS, and the retreat of outlet glaciers draining the adjacent, terrestrially based ice sheet centred over Wales. Retreat of Welsh ice was episodic; superimposed over low-order oscillations of its margin are asynchronous outlet re-advances driven by catchment-wide mass balance variations that are amplified through migration of the ice cap's main ice-divide. Formation of large, linear ridges which extend at least 12.5 km offshore (locally known as sarns) and dominate the regional bathymetry are attributed to repeated frontal and medial morainic deposition associated with the re-advancing phases of these outlet glaciers. Our study provides new insight into ice-sheet extent, dynamics and non-linear retreat across a major palaeo-ice stream confluence zone, and has ramifications for the interpretation of recent fluctuations observed by satellites over short-time scales across marine-sectors of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

  8. Rapid marine deglaciation: asynchronous retreat dynamics between the Irish Sea Ice Stream and terrestrial outlet glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, H.; Hubbard, A.; Bradwell, T.; Glasser, N. F.; Hambrey, M. J.; Clark, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the retreat behaviour of past marine-based ice sheets provides vital context for accurate assessments of the present stability and long-term response of contemporary polar ice sheets to climate and oceanic warming. Here new multibeam swath bathymetry data and sedimentological analysis are combined with high resolution ice-sheet modelling to reveal complex landform assemblages and process dynamics associated with deglaciation of the Celtic ice sheet within the Irish Sea Basin. Our reconstruction indicates a non-linear relationship between the rapidly receding Irish Sea Ice Stream and the retreat of outlet glaciers draining the adjacent, terrestrially based ice cap centred over Wales. Retreat of Welsh ice was episodic; superimposed over low-order oscillations of its margin are asynchronous outlet readvances driven by catchment-wide mass balance variations that are amplified through migration of the ice cap's main ice divide. Formation of large, linear ridges which extend at least 12.5 km offshore (locally known as sarns) and which dominate the regional bathymetry are attributed to repeated frontal and medial morainic deposition associated with the readvancing phases of these outlet glaciers. Our study provides new insight into ice-sheet extent, dynamics and non-linear retreat across a major palaeo-ice stream confluence zone, and has ramifications for the interpretation of recent fluctuations observed by satellites over short timescales across marine sectors of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

  9. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  10. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  11. Warm Atlantic water drives Greenland Ice Sheet discharge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Heywood, K. J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Syvitski, J. P.; Benham, T. J.; Mugford, R. I.; Joughin, I.; Luckman, A.

    2008-12-01

    Greenland outlet glaciers terminating in fjords experience seasonal fluctuations as well as abrupt episodes of rapid retreat and speed-up. The cause of abrupt speed-up events is not firmly established, but synchronous occurrences suggest that it is related to Arctic warming. Here, we report major warming of water masses in Kangerdlugssuaq Fjord, East Greenland, immediately prior to the fast retreat and speed-up of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier in 2004-05. Our hydrographic data show that this event occurred when Atlantic water entered the fjord and increased temperature of surface water by 4°C and deep water by 1°C. On the basis of meteorological records and satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, which fluctuate by up to 4°C in periods of 2-3 years, we infer that inflow of Atlantic water is controlled by the direction and intensity of prevailing winds that force coastal and offshore currents. Our results demonstrate that Greenland Ice Sheet discharge dynamics are modulated by North Atlantic climate variability, which is identified by shifts in the position of atmospheric low pressure over the Labrador and Irminger seas. A persisting westerly position of the Icelandic Low since 1999 may explain why winters in Greenland have been particularly mild during the last decade and it is feasible that widespread and synchronous discharge fluctuations from outlet glaciers, which resulted in high rates of ice loss in southeast Greenland, are a consequence of this synoptic condition.

  12. Real time dynamic behavior of vertex frustrated artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yuyang; Sklenar, Joseph; Gilbert, Ian; Carrasquilo, Isaac; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ice systems comprise two dimensional arrays of nanoscale single domain ferromagnets designed to have frustrated interactions among the moments. By decimating islands from the common square artificial spin ice, one can design lattices with so called `vertex frustration'. In such lattices, the geometry prevents all vertices from occupying local ground states simultaneously. Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), we access the real time thermally induced dynamics of the moment behavior in those lattices. Operating at a proper temperature, the moment direction of each island fluctuates with a sufficiently slow frequency that it can be resolvable by acquiring successive PEEM images. We can extract information regarding the collective excitations of the moments and understand how they reflect the frustration of lattice. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division under Grant No. DE-SC0010778. The work of C.N. was carried out under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at LANL under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA253962. The ALS is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. Extensive dynamic thinning on the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Hamish D; Arthern, Robert J; Vaughan, David G; Edwards, Laura A

    2009-10-15

    Many glaciers along the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets are accelerating and, for this reason, contribute increasingly to global sea-level rise. Globally, ice losses contribute approximately 1.8 mm yr(-1) (ref. 8), but this could increase if the retreat of ice shelves and tidewater glaciers further enhances the loss of grounded ice or initiates the large-scale collapse of vulnerable parts of the ice sheets. Ice loss as a result of accelerated flow, known as dynamic thinning, is so poorly understood that its potential contribution to sea level over the twenty-first century remains unpredictable. Thinning on the ice-sheet scale has been monitored by using repeat satellite altimetry observations to track small changes in surface elevation, but previous sensors could not resolve most fast-flowing coastal glaciers. Here we report the use of high-resolution ICESat (Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimetry to map change along the entire grounded margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. To isolate the dynamic signal, we compare rates of elevation change from both fast-flowing and slow-flowing ice with those expected from surface mass-balance fluctuations. We find that dynamic thinning of glaciers now reaches all latitudes in Greenland, has intensified on key Antarctic grounding lines, has endured for decades after ice-shelf collapse, penetrates far into the interior of each ice sheet and is spreading as ice shelves thin by ocean-driven melt. In Greenland, glaciers flowing faster than 100 m yr(-1) thinned at an average rate of 0.84 m yr(-1), and in the Amundsen Sea embayment of Antarctica, thinning exceeded 9.0 m yr(-1) for some glaciers. Our results show that the most profound changes in the ice sheets currently result from glacier dynamics at ocean margins. PMID:19776741

  14. The role of ice dynamics in shaping vegetation in flowing waters.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Polvi, Lina E; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Ice dynamics is an important factor affecting vegetation in high-altitude and high-latitude streams and rivers. During the last few decades, knowledge about ice in streams and rivers has increased significantly and a respectable body of literature is now available. Here we review the literature on how ice dynamics influence riparian and aquatic vegetation. Traditionally, plant ecologists have focused their studies on the summer period, largely ignoring the fact that processes during winter also impact vegetation dynamics. For example, the freeze-up period in early winter may result in extensive formation of underwater ice that can restructure the channel, obstruct flow, and cause flooding and thus formation of more ice. In midwinter, slow-flowing reaches develop a surface-ice cover that accumulates snow, protecting habitats under the ice from formation of underwater ice but also reducing underwater light, thus suppressing photosynthesis. Towards the end of winter, ice breaks up and moves downstream. During this transport, ice floes can jam up and cause floods and major erosion. The magnitudes of the floods and their erosive power mainly depend on the size of the watercourse, also resulting in different degrees of disturbance to the vegetation. Vegetation responds both physically and physiologically to ice dynamics. Physical action involves the erosive force of moving ice and damage caused by ground frost, whereas physiological effects - mostly cell damage - happen as a result of plants freezing into the ice. On a community level, large magnitudes of ice dynamics seem to favour species richness, but can be detrimental for individual plants. Human impacts, such as flow regulation, channelisation, agriculturalisation and water pollution have modified ice dynamics; further changes are expected as a result of current and predicted future climate change. Human impacts and climate change can both favour and disfavour riverine vegetation dynamics. Restoration of streams

  15. Mass Balance Changes and Ice Dynamics of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.

    2016-06-01

    During the past few decades the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost ice at accelerating rates, caused by increasing surface temperature. The melting of the two big ice sheets has a big impact on global sea level rise. If the ice sheets would melt down entirely, the sea level would rise more than 60 m. Even a much smaller rise would cause dramatic damage along coastal regions. In this paper we report about a major upgrade of surface elevation changes derived from laser altimetry data, acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite mission (ICESat) and airborne laser campaigns, such as Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). For detecting changes in ice sheet elevations we have developed the Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) method. It computes elevation changes of small surface patches by keeping the surface shape constant and considering the absolute values as surface elevations. We report about important upgrades of earlier results, for example the inclusion of local ice caps and the temporal extension from 1993 to 2014 for the Greenland Ice Sheet and for a comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness and mass changes for the Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  16. Nonlinear model order reduction of jointed structures for dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festjens, H.; Chevallier, G.; Dion, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    Assembled structures generally show weak nonlinearity, thus it is rather commonplace to assume that their modes are both linear and uncoupled. At small to modest amplitude, the linearity assumption remains correct in terms of stiffness but, on the contrary, the dissipation in joints is strongly amplitude-dependent. Besides, the modes of any large structure may be LOCALLY collinear in the localized region of a joint. As a result the projection of the structure on normal modes is not appropriate since the corresponding generalized coordinates may be strongly coupled. Instead of using this global basis, the present paper deals with the use of a local basis to reduce the size of the problem without losing the nonlinear physics. Under an appropriate set of assumptions, the method keeps the dynamic properties of joints, even for large amplitude, which include coupling effects, nonlinear damping and softening effects. The formulation enables us to take into account FE models of any realistic geometry. It also gives a straightforward process for experimental identification. The formulation is detailed and investigated on a jointed structure.

  17. The structure and dynamics of amorphous and crystalline phases of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Tulk, C. A.; Svensson, E. C.; Swainson, I.; Loong, C.-K.

    2000-07-14

    The structures of the high and low-density amorphous phases of ice are studied using several techniques. The diffraction patterns of high and low density amorphous ice are analyzed using reverse Monte Carlo methods and compared with molecular dynamics simulations of these phases. The spectra of crystalline and amorphous phases of ice obtained by Raman and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering are analyzed to yield structural features for comparison with the results of molecular dynamics and Reverse Monte Carlo analysis. The structural details obtained indicate that there are significant differences between the structure of liquid water and the amorphous phases of ice.

  18. Joint angle estimation with accelerometers for dynamic postural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianting; Kharboutly, Haissam; Benali, Abderraouf; Benamar, Faïz; Bouzit, Mourad

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a new accelerometer based method for estimating the posture of a subject standing on a dynamic perturbation platform. The induced perturbation is used to study the control mechanisms as well as the balance requirements that regulate the upright standing. These perturbations are translated into different intensity levels of speed and acceleration along longitudinal and lateral directions of motion. In our method, the human posture is modeled by a tridimensional, three-segment inverted pendulum which simultaneously takes into account both the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral strategies of hip and ankle. Four tri-axial accelerometers are used her, one accelerometer is placed on the platform, and the other three are attached to a human subject. Based on the results, the joint angle estimated compare closely to measurements from magnetic encoders placed on an articulated arm joint. The results were also comparable to those found when using a high-end optical motion capture system coupled with advanced biomechanical simulation software. This paper presents the comparisons of our accelerometer-based method with encoder and optical marker based method of the estimated joint angles under different dynamics perturbations. PMID:26338097

  19. Changes in ice dynamics and mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Rignot, Eric

    2006-07-15

    The concept that the Antarctic ice sheet changes with eternal slowness has been challenged by recent observations from satellites. Pronounced regional warming in the Antarctic Peninsula triggered ice shelf collapse, which led to a 10-fold increase in glacier flow and rapid ice sheet retreat. This chain of events illustrated the vulnerability of ice shelves to climate warming and their buffering role on the mass balance of Antarctica. In West Antarctica, the Pine Island Bay sector is draining far more ice into the ocean than is stored upstream from snow accumulation. This sector could raise sea level by 1m and trigger widespread retreat of ice in West Antarctica. Pine Island Glacier accelerated 38% since 1975, and most of the speed up took place over the last decade. Its neighbour Thwaites Glacier is widening up and may double its width when its weakened eastern ice shelf breaks up. Widespread acceleration in this sector may be caused by glacier ungrounding from ice shelf melting by an ocean that has recently warmed by 0.3 degrees C. In contrast, glaciers buffered from oceanic change by large ice shelves have only small contributions to sea level. In East Antarctica, many glaciers are close to a state of mass balance, but sectors grounded well below sea level, such as Cook Ice Shelf, Ninnis/Mertz, Frost and Totten glaciers, are thinning and losing mass. Hence, East Antarctica is not immune to changes. PMID:16782604

  20. Radar imaging of basement control on ice-sheet dynamics in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R. G.; King, E. C.; Larter, R. D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Pritchard, H. D.; Smith, A.; Vaughan, D.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing measurements show that ice streams draining the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Sea Embayments are accelerating and thinning rapidly, contributing to ~10% of observed global sea-level rise. Losses are dominated by 'dynamic thinning,' the progressive acceleration, thinning and retreat of inland ice, likely forced by oceanic or atmospheric perturbations along the coastline. Recently highlighted as key to improving projections of future ice-sheet contributions to sea-level, the incorporation of dynamic thinning into numerical models has been restricted by lack of knowledge of basal topography so that, for much of the WAIS, the fundamental controls on its dynamic losses, hence the rate and ultimate extent of its potential retreat, remain difficult to quantify. Ice-penetrating radar systems offer the principal means by which we can acquire regional information on the basal conditions known theoretically to exert a strong control on dynamic thinning processes. Here we describe the detailed delineation, with radar, of a subglacial trench up to 2.5 km deep and 20 km wide, connecting the ice-sheet interior to the Bellingshausen margin, whose existence impacts profoundly on current ice-dynamic losses. We use ice-penetrating radar from 2 MHz oversnow radar (the British Antarctic Survey DELORES system) and airborne radar (from Operation IceBridge) in 2009/10 to map the geometry of the trench, and discuss its likely origins as a tectonic line of weakness. The trench represents a conduit through which a palaeo-ice stream was directed onto the continental shelf during glacial maxima, eroding the major Belgica Trough through Eltanin Bay, which today affords warm open-ocean water access to the ice front, promoting further dynamic thinning. We support recently reported findings from airborne geophysics over neighbouring Pine Island Glacier that the spatial configuration of West Antarctica's regions of inland dynamic

  1. Debris-Rich Basal Ice Layer Effects on Polar Glacier Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whorton, E. N.; Pettit, E. C.; Waddington, E. D.; Sletten, R.; Hallet, B.

    2008-12-01

    Many cold-based glaciers have a debris-rich basal ice layer, which may deform more easily than the overlying clean ice. We present results from a study exploring the importance of these debris-rich basal ice layers to the flow dynamics in the terminus region of Taylor Glacier, a cold-based outlet glacier of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Observed surface velocities are 20 times greater than that predicted by laminar flow for clean, homogenous, isotropic ice at the field site. We hypothesize that a soft basal-ice layer near the bed is accommodating the large strain rates. A two-layer two-dimensional flowband model is used to investigate the relative contributions from the debris- rich basal ice and the overlying clean ice to the ice flow rates. The model unknowns are the softness parameters for the clean (EC) and debris-rich ice (EB), and the thickness of the basal layer, which is spatially variable along the flowband. We constrain the model inputs and outputs using 2 years of field observations and previous tunnel studies into the glacier margin (Samyn and others, 2005), which include ground penetrating radar, ablation, ice temperature, basal ice thickness, and surface velocity measurements. The thickness of the debris-rich basal ice is solved for in the model for each chosen softness parameter combination. Analysis of two shallow ice cores in the clean ice indicate that the ice crystals are small and have a distinct preferred orientation; they have a strong, vertical, single-maximum fabric. The clean ice fabric data provides the best ice rheology constraint, and allows four plausible softness parameter combinations in the range 6 ≤ EC ≤ 9 and 38 ≤ EB ≤ 50 to be identified. The relative contribution of the basal ice to the total flow rates in the terminus region of Taylor for these four solutions ranges from 63-76%. This weak layer, therefore, significantly affects the glacier dynamics and suggests the importance of incorporating rheologically distinct

  2. Quantification of cardiorespiratory interactions based on joint symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Muammar M; Saint, David A; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Abbott, Derek; Voss, Andreas; Baumert, Mathias

    2011-10-01

    Cardiac and respiratory rhythms are highly nonlinear and nonstationary. As a result traditional time-domain techniques are often inadequate to characterize their complex dynamics. In this article, we introduce a novel technique to investigate the interactions between R-R intervals and respiratory phases based on their joint symbolic dynamics. To evaluate the technique, electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory signals were recorded in 13 healthy subjects in different body postures during spontaneous and controlled breathing. Herein, the R-R time series were extracted from ECG and respiratory phases were obtained from abdomen impedance belts using the Hilbert transform. Both time series were transformed into ternary symbol vectors based on the changes between two successive R-R intervals or respiratory phases. Subsequently, words of different symbol lengths were formed and the correspondence between the two series of words was determined to quantify the interaction between cardiac and respiratory cycles. To validate our results, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was further studied using the phase-averaged characterization of the RSA pattern. The percentage of similarity of the sequence of symbols, between the respective words of the two series determined by joint symbolic dynamics, was significantly reduced in the upright position compared to the supine position (26.4 ± 4.7 vs. 20.5 ± 5.4%, p < 0.01). Similarly, RSA was also reduced during upright posture, but the difference was less significant (0.11 ± 0.02 vs. 0.08 ± 0.01 s, p < 0.05). In conclusion, joint symbolic dynamics provides a new efficient technique for the analysis of cardiorespiratory interaction that is highly sensitive to the effects of orthostatic challenge. PMID:21618043

  3. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  4. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  5. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  6. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ~3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  7. Motion analysis of knee joint using dynamic volume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Moriya, Hideshige; Mori, Sin-ichiro; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional movement of knee joint is desired in orthopedic surgery. We have developed two methods to obtain dynamic volume images of knee joint. One is a 2D/3D registration method combining a bi-plane dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and a static three-dimensional CT, the other is a method using so-called 4D-CT that uses a cone-beam and a wide 2D detector. In this paper, we present two analyses of knee joint movement obtained by these methods: (1) transition of the nearest points between femur and tibia (2) principal component analysis (PCA) of six parameters representing the three dimensional movement of knee. As a preprocessing for the analysis, at first the femur and tibia regions are extracted from volume data at each time frame and then the registration of the tibia between different frames by an affine transformation consisting of rotation and translation are performed. The same transformation is applied femur as well. Using those image data, the movement of femur relative to tibia can be analyzed. Six movement parameters of femur consisting of three translation parameters and three rotation parameters are obtained from those images. In the analysis (1), axis of each bone is first found and then the flexion angle of the knee joint is calculated. For each flexion angle, the minimum distance between femur and tibia and the location giving the minimum distance are found in both lateral condyle and medial condyle. As a result, it was observed that the movement of lateral condyle is larger than medial condyle. In the analysis (2), it was found that the movement of the knee can be represented by the first three principal components with precision of 99.58% and those three components seem to strongly relate to three major movements of femur in the knee bend known in orthopedic surgery.

  8. Dynamic analysis of a pre-and-post ice impacted blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, G. H.; Reddy, E. S.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of an engine blade are evaluated under pre-and-post ice impact conditions using the NASA in-house computer code BLASIM. The ice impacts the leading edge of the blade causing severe local damage. The local structural response of the blade due to the ice impact is predicted via a transient response analysis by modeling only a local patch around the impact region. After ice impact, the global geometry of the blade is updated using deformations of the local patch and a free vibration analysis is performed. The effects of ice impact location, ice size and ice velocity on the blade mode shapes and natural frequencies are investigated. The results indicate that basic nature of the mode shapes remains unchanged after impact and that the maximum variation in natural frequencies occurs for the twisting mode of the blade.

  9. The land-ice contribution to 21st-century dynamic sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T.; Ridley, J.; Pardaens, A. K.; Hurkmans, R. T. W. L.; Payne, A. J.; Giesen, R. H.; Lowe, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.; Edwards, T. L.; Oerlemans, J.

    2014-06-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence global mean sea level through a number of processes including (but not limited to) thermal expansion of the oceans and enhanced land ice melt. In addition to their contribution to global mean sea level change, these two processes (among others) lead to local departures from the global mean sea level change, through a number of mechanisms including the effect on spatial variations in the change of water density and transport, usually termed dynamic sea level changes. In this study, we focus on the component of dynamic sea level change that might be given by additional freshwater inflow to the ocean under scenarios of 21st-century land-based ice melt. We present regional patterns of dynamic sea level change given by a global-coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model forced by spatially and temporally varying projected ice-melt fluxes from three sources: the Antarctic ice sheet, the Greenland Ice Sheet and small glaciers and ice caps. The largest ice melt flux we consider is equivalent to almost 0.7 m of global mean sea level rise over the 21st century. The temporal evolution of the dynamic sea level changes, in the presence of considerable variations in the ice melt flux, is also analysed. We find that the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is small, with the largest changes occurring in the North Atlantic amounting to 3 cm above the global mean rise. Furthermore, the dynamic sea level change associated with the ice melt is similar regardless of whether the simulated ice fluxes are applied to a simulation with fixed CO2 or under a business-as-usual greenhouse gas warming scenario of increasing CO2.

  10. Discrete Element Method Simulations of Ice Floe Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Bateman, S. P.; Shi, F.; Orzech, M.; Veeramony, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice floes were modeled using LIGGGHTS, an open source discrete element method (DEM) software, where individual elements were bonded together to make floes. The bonds were allowed to break with a critical stress calibrated to existing laboratory measurements for the compressive, tensile, and flexural strength of ice floes. The DEM allows for heterogeneous shape and size distributions of the ice floes to evolve over time. We simulated the interaction between sea ice and ocean waves in the marginal ice zone using a coupled wave-ice system. The waves were modeled with NHWAVE, a non-hydrostatic wave model that predicts instantaneous surface elevation and the three-dimensional flow field. The ice floes and waves were coupled through buoyancy and drag forces. Preliminary comparisons with field and laboratory measurements for coupled simulations will be presented.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic response of a simple ice-structure interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, D.G.; Troesch, A.W.; Wingate, W.C. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The problem addressed in the continuous indentation of a ship or offshore structure into an ice sheet. The impacting ship or offshore structure is represented by a mass-spring-dashpot system having a constant velocity relative to the ice sheet. The dynamic response of this simple analogue model of ice-structure interaction is studied in considerable detail. The complicated, highly nonlinear dynamic response is due to intermittent ice breakage and intermittent contact of the structure with the ice. Periodic motions are found and the periodicity for a particular system is dependent upon initial conditions. For a representative system, a Poincare map is presented showing the fixed points. A description of some of the effects of random variations in system parameters is also presented. Some implications of these findings regarding structural design for ice interaction are discussed.

  12. A dynamical-systems approach for computing ice-affected streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamical-systems approach was developed and evaluated for computing ice-affected streamflow. The approach provides for dynamic simulation and parameter estimation of site-specific equations relating ice effects to routinely measured environmental variables. Comparison indicates that results from the dynamical-systems approach ranked higher than results from 11 analytical methods previously investigated on the basis of accuracy and feasibility criteria. Additional research will likely lead to further improvements in the approach.

  13. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  14. Basal conditions and ice dynamics inferred from radar-derived internal stratigraphy of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisling, B. A.; Christianson, K. A.; Alley, R. B.; Peters, L. E.; Christian, J. E.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Riverman, K. L.; Muto, A.; Jacobel, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present radio-echo sounding (RES), global positioning system (GPS) and active source seismic data from the central portion of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream ~150 km downstream from the onset of streaming flow, which likely initiates due to locally high geothermal flux (~1 W/m2) near the ice sheet summit. Our geophysical data show that ice stream extent is limited via a feedback between basal hydrology and ice sheet surface elevation change. Active-source seismic data reveal water-saturated till beneath the central trunk of streaming flow. Subglacial till becomes increasingly dewatered and consolidated toward the shear margins. We hypothesize that ice accelerates and thins as it flows into NEGIS, producing marginal troughs in surface topography. These troughs create steep gradients in the subglacial hydropotential that generate parallel slippery and sticky bands beneath the margins, which limit ice entrainment across the margin and thus restrict further widening. Complex steady-state folds in radar reflectors within the shear margins form due to the combined influence of geothermal flux, varying basal shear stress, flow convergence, and bands of variable basal friction. Our strain rate and flux analysis of radar internal layers indicates no major changes in flow dynamics during the past ~10,000 years. However, strain rate modeling suggests that steady-state basal shear heating produces plentiful meltwater beneath the central trunk of streaming flow in addition to that supplied by geothermal flux. This meltwater supports the basal lubrication necessary to maintain streaming flow and may allow remobilization of dewatered marginal till. While the main trunk of streaming flow is remarkably stable, complex processes occurring within the shear margins merit closer scrutiny. The feedback between surface elevation change and basal water routing could mobilize currently unconsolidated sediments in the margins and result in shifts in ice dynamics.

  15. Ice flow dynamics and mass loss of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica, from 1989 to 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Rignot, Eric; Mouginot, Jeremie; Scheuchl, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Totten Glacier has the largest ice discharge in East Antarctica and a basin grounded mostly below sea level. Satellite altimetry data have revealed ice thinning in areas of fast flow. Here we present a time series of ice velocity measurements spanning from 1989 to 2015 using Landsat and interferometric synthetic-aperture radar data, combined with ice thickness from Operation IceBridge, and surface mass balance from Regional Atmospheric Climate Model. We find that the glacier speed exceeded its balance speed in 1989-1996, slowed down by 11 ± 12% in 2000 to bring its ice flux in balance with accumulation (65 ± 4 Gt/yr), then accelerated by 18 ± 3% until 2007, and remained constant thereafter. The average ice mass loss (7 ± 2 Gt/yr) is dominated by ice dynamics (73%). Its acceleration (0.6 ± 0.3 Gt/yr2) is dominated by surface mass balance (80%). Ice velocity apparently increased when ocean temperature was warmer, which suggests a linkage between ice dynamics and ocean temperature.

  16. Quantifying Ice-sheet/Ice-shelf Dynamics and Variability with Meter-scale DEM and Velocity Timeseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; Moratto, Z. M.; Porter, C.; Morin, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are losing mass at an increasing rate, although loss due to accelerating flow and dynamic thinning remains poorly understood. We are using complementary data from repeat satellite and airborne observations to investigate the relationship between ice-sheet/ice-shelf dynamics and geometry on seasonal to interannual timescales. High-resolution along-track stereo imagery from commercial satellite vendors DigitalGlobe and GeoEye provides unprecedented spatial (~0.5 m/px with ~17 km swath width) and temporal (weekly/monthly) resolution for these efforts. We have developed an automated pipeline using open-source software to produce orthoimage, DEM, and surface velocity products from DigitalGlobe imagery. High-contrast surface texture (e.g. sastrugi, crevasses) visible at sub-meter resolution provides near-perfect image correlation (~99% success rate) during DEM and velocity map derivation. Elevation data from IceBridge ATM/LVIS, ICESat GLAS, and GPS campaigns are used to correct DEMs and perform accuracy assessment. Preliminary tests over exposed bedrock provide relative vertical accuracy estimates of <1-2 m for Worldview-1/2 DEMs. Velocity data from TerraSAR-X and GPS campaigns provide validation for surface velocity products, with horizontal error estimates of <10 m. Velocity and elevation change products with 2-4 m/px spatial resolution allow for unprecedented 3D dynamic characterization of sub-km flow transition zones (e.g. grounding lines, shear margins), capturing both local and regional variations due to melting and dynamic thinning. We present timeseries for West Greenland (Jakobshavn front - 20 observations, Jakobshavn south catchment - 10) and West Antarctica (Pine Island and Thwaites - 5 each) from 2009-2012. These observations complement ongoing efforts to measure and model outlet glacier dynamics, with implications for future ice-sheet mass balance estimates.

  17. Learning from the past: Antarctic Eemian ice sheet dynamics as an analogy for future warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Johannes; Thoma, Malte; Grosfeld, Klaus; Gierz, Paul; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Facing considerable warming during this century the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is under increasing scrutiny. Recent observations suggest that the marine ice sheet instability of the WAIS has already started . We investigate the dynamic evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet during the last interglacial, forcing a state of the art 3D ice sheet model with Eemian boundary conditions. We elucidate the role of ocean warming and surface mass balance on the coupled ice sheet/shelf and grounding line dynamics. Special focus lies on an ice sheet modeling assessment of Antarctica's potential contribution to global sea level rise during the Eemian. The transient model runs are forced by time slice experiments of a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean global circulation model, as well as different sets of sea level and bedrock reconstructions. The model result show strong evidences for a severe ice-sheet retreat in West Antartica, leading to substantical contribution to global sea level from the Southern Hemisphere. Additionally we compare future warming scenarios of West Antarctic Ice Sheet dynamics to our paleo ice sheet modeling studies.

  18. Dynamics of landfast sea ice near Jangbogo Antarctic Research Station observed by SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Han, H.

    2015-12-01

    Landfast sea ice is a type of sea ice adjacent to the coast and immobile for a certain period of time. It is important to analyze the temporal and spatial variation of landfast ice because it has significant influences on marine ecosystem and the safe operation of icebreaker vessels. However, it has been a difficult task for both remote sensing and in situ observation to discriminate landfast ice from other types of sea ice, such as pack ice, and also to understand the dynamics and internal strss-strain of fast ice. In this study, we identify landfast ice and its annual variation in Terra Nova Bay (74° 37' 4"S, 164° 13' 7"E), East Antarctica, where Jangbogo Antarctic Research Station has recently been constructed in 2014, by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technology. We generated 38 interferograms having temporal baselines of 1-9 days out of 62 COSMO-SkyMed SAR images over Terra Nova Bay obtained from December 2010 to January 2012. Landfast ice began to melt in November 2011 when air temperature raised above freezing point but lasted more than two month to the end of the study period in January 2012. No meaningful relationship was found between sea ice extent and wind and current. Glacial strain (~67cm/day) is similar to tidal strain (~40 cm) so that they appear similar in one-day InSAR. As glacial stress is cumulative while tidal stress is oscillatory, InSAR images with weekly temporal baseline (7~9 days) revealed that a consistent motion of Campbell Glacier Tongue (CGT) is pushing the sea ice continuously to make interferometric fringes parallel to the glacier-sea ice contacts. Glacial interferometric fringe is parallel to the glacier-sea ice contact lines while tidal strain should be parallel to the coastlines defined by sea shore and glacier tongue. DDInSAR operation removed the consistent glacial strain leaving tidal strain alone so that the response of fast ice to tide can be used to deduce physical properties of sea ice in various

  19. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-09-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH. PMID:25008081

  20. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  1. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Kohler, Jack; Andreassen, Karin

    2016-04-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a draw down of isochrones and cold ice. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in ice viscosity and releases deformation energy that can raise the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. Questions that arise are what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice and whether such past drainage events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on ice dynamics as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a full Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy-gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that a rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, can release considerable amounts of deformational energy, with the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in the horizontal extent of subglacial lakes and slippery patches, compared to the average ice column velocity, can create a traveling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past drainage events with ice penetrating radar.

  2. Tropical tropopause ice clouds: a dynamic approach to the mystery of low crystal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, P.; Krämer, M.

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of high, persistent ice supersaturation inside and outside cold cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) remains an enigma that is intensely debated as the "ice supersaturation puzzle". However, it was recently confirmed that observed supersaturations are consistent with very low ice crystal concentrations, which is incompatible with the idea that homogeneous freezing is the major method of ice formation in the TTL. Thus, the tropical tropopause "ice supersaturation puzzle" has become an "ice nucleation puzzle". To explain the low ice crystal concentrations, a number of mainly heterogeneous freezing methods have been proposed. Here, we reproduce in situ measurements of frequencies of occurrence of ice crystal concentrations by extensive model simulations, driven by the special dynamic conditions in the TTL, namely the superposition of slow large-scale updraughts with high-frequency short waves. From the simulations, it follows that the full range of observed ice crystal concentrations can be explained when the model results are composed from scenarios with consecutive heterogeneous and homogeneous ice formation and scenarios with pure homogeneous ice formation occurring in very slow (< 1 cm s-1) and faster (> 1 cm s-1) large-scale updraughts, respectively. This statistical analysis shows that about 80% of TTL cirrus can be explained by "classical" homogeneous ice nucleation, while the remaining 20% stem from heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing occurring within the same environment. The mechanism limiting ice crystal production via homogeneous freezing in an environment full of gravity waves is the shortness of the gravity waves, which stalls freezing events before a higher ice crystal concentration can be formed.

  3. Dynamic cycles, ice streams and their impact on the extent, chronology and deglaciation of the British-Irish ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alun; Bradwell, Tom; Golledge, Nicholas; Hall, Adrian; Patton, Henry; Sugden, David; Cooper, Rhys; Stoker, Martyn

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a suite of forward transient numerical modelling experiments of the British and Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS), consisting of Scottish, Welsh and Irish accumulation centres, spanning the last Glacial period from 38 to 10 ka BP. The 3D thermomechanical model employed uses higher-order physics to solve longitudinal (membrane) stresses and to reproduce grounding-line dynamics. Surface mass balance is derived using a distributed degree-day calculation based on a reference climatology from mean (1961-1990) precipitation and temperature patterns. The model is perturbed from this reference state by a scaled NGRIP oxygen isotope curve and the SPECMAP sea-level reconstruction. Isostatic response to ice loading is computed using an elastic lithosphere/relaxed asthenosphere scheme. A suite of 350 simulations were designed to explore the parameter space of model uncertainties and sensitivities, to yield a subset of experiments that showed close correspondence to offshore and onshore ice-directional indicators, broad BIIS chronology, and the relative sea-level record. Three of these simulations are described in further detail and indicate that the separate ice centres of the modelled BIIS complex are dynamically interdependent during the build up to maximum conditions, but remain largely independent throughout much of the simulation. The modelled BIIS is extremely dynamic, drained mainly by a number of transient but recurrent ice streams which dynamically switch and fluctuate in extent and intensity on a centennial time-scale. A series of binge/purge, advance/retreat, cycles are identified which correspond to alternating periods of relatively cold-based ice, (associated with a high aspect ratio and net growth), and wet-based ice with a lower aspect ratio, characterised by streaming. The timing and dynamics of these events are determined through a combination of basal thermomechanical switching spatially propagated and amplified through longitudinal coupling, but

  4. Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Rosen, Paul; Ranson, Jon; Zebker, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council Earth Science Decadal Survey, Earth Science Applications from Space, recommends that DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice), an integrated L-band InSAR and multibeam Lidar mission, launch in the 2010- 2013 timeframe. The mission will measure surface deformation for solid Earth and cryosphere objectives and vegetation structure for understanding the carbon cycle. InSAR has been used to study surface deformation of the solid Earth and cryosphere and more recently vegetation structure for estimates of biomass and ecosystem function. Lidar directly measures topography and vegetation structure and is used to estimate biomass and detect changes in surface elevation. The goal of DESDynI is to take advantage of the spatial continuity of InSAR and the precision and directness of Lidar. There are several issues related to the design of the DESDynI mission, including combining the two instruments into a single platform, optimizing the coverage and orbit for the two techniques, and carrying out the science modeling to define and maximize the scientific output of the mission.

  5. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-07

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  6. Sea Ice Dynamics in Northern Baffin Analyzed using ICESat and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. J.; Clare, J. C.; Heinrichs, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Polynyas are dynamic environments with complex interactions between the atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice. Our goal was to investigate the spatial structure of sea ice in Northern Baffin Bay using data from ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Three relatively cloud free ICESat tracks that crossed Baffin Bay on March 23rd, 24th, and 25th were collected along with the most concurrent MODIS swaths. Each track contained several areas where isolated points showed a significant drop in measured elevation; these were identified as cracks or refrozen leads. The tracks also contained relatively large scale anomalous areas of relatively high sea ice freeboard. These areas were identified as pack ice containing a significant amount of broken landfast ice. The expected movement of sea ice downwind out of the polynya was observed as well as a rotating large mass of ice trapped between advection streams. ICESat was found to be sensitive to differences in freeboard between different types of sea ice and useful for inferring dynamic processes in a polynya environment.

  7. Dynamic analysis of a pre-and-post ice impacted blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, G. H.; Reddy, E. S.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of an engine blade are evaluated under pre-and-post ice impact conditions using the NASA in-house computer code BLASIM. The ice impacts the leading edge of the blade causing severe local damage. The local structural response of the blade due to the ice impact is predicted via a transient response analysis by modeling only a local patch around the impact region. After ice impact, the global geometry of the blade is updated using deformations of the local patch and a free vibration analysis is performed. The effects of ice impact location, size and ice velocity on the blade mode shapes and natural frequencies are investigated. The results indicate that basic nature of the mode shapes remains unchanged after impact and that the maximum variation in natural frequencies occurs for the twisting mode of the blade.

  8. Decadal slowdown of a land-terminating sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet during sustained climate warming - implications for wider ice sheet hydrology-dynamics coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienow, P. W.; Tedstone, A. J.; Gourmelen, N.; Dehecq, A.; Goldberg, D. N.; Hanna, E.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between surface melting and ice motion will affect how the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) responds to climate and the structure of the subglacial drainage system may be crucial in controlling how changing melt-rates impact ice motion. Ice sheet motion varies over seasonal time-scales in response to varying surface meltwater inputs to the ice-sheet bed which lubricate the ice-bed interface, resulting in periods of faster ice motion. However, the impact of hydro-dynamic coupling on ice motion over decadal timescales remains poorly constrained. Here we utilise remotely-sensed optical Landsat imagery to generate a record of annual motion spanning three decades extending back to 1985. Our observations cover an ˜8000 km2 area along ˜170 km of predominantly land-terminating margin of the west GrIS, and extend ˜50 km inland to 1100 m asl. We find that that annual ice motion was 12% slower in 2007-2014 compared to 1985-1994, despite a corresponding 50% increase in surface meltwater production. Less than 1/3 of the observed slowdown can be explained by a reduction in internal deformation caused by marginal ice sheet thinning, and we therefore hypothesise that increases in subglacial drainage efficiency, associated with sustained larger melt volumes, have reduced basal lubrication resulting in slower ice flow. Our findings suggest that hydro-dynamic coupling in this section of the ablation zone resulted in net ice motion slowdown over decadal timescales — not speedup as previously postulated. Increases in meltwater production from projected climate warming may therefore further reduce the motion of land-terminating margins of the ice-sheet indicating such margins are more resilient to the dynamic impacts of enhanced meltwater production than previously thought. The implications of these observations for wider ice sheet hydrology-dynamics coupling are considered.

  9. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2011-01-01

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  10. Holocene dynamics of the Arctic's largest ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Dermot; Francus, Pierre; Pienitz, Reinhard; St-Onge, Guillaume; Vincent, Warwick F

    2011-11-22

    Ice shelves in the Arctic lost more than 90% of their total surface area during the 20th century and are continuing to disintegrate rapidly. The significance of these changes, however, is obscured by the poorly constrained ontogeny of Arctic ice shelves. Here we use the sedimentary record behind the largest remaining ice shelf in the Arctic, the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (Ellesmere Island, Canada), to establish a long-term context in which to evaluate recent ice-shelf deterioration. Multiproxy analysis of sediment cores revealed pronounced biological and geochemical changes in Disraeli Fiord in response to the formation of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and its fluctuations through time. Our results show that the ice shelf was absent during the early Holocene and formed 4,000 years ago in response to climate cooling. Paleoecological data then indicate that the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf remained stable for almost three millennia before a major fracturing event that occurred ∼1,400 years ago. After reformation ∼800 years ago, freshwater was a constant feature of Disraeli Fiord until the catastrophic drainage of its epishelf lake in the early 21st century. PMID:22025693

  11. Representation of sharp rifts and faults mechanics in modeling ice shelf flow dynamics: Application to Brunt/Stancomb-Wills Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, E.; Khazendar, A.; Borstad, C. P.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E.

    2014-09-01

    Ice shelves play a major role in buttressing ice sheet flow into the ocean, hence the importance of accurate numerical modeling of their stress regime. Commonly used ice flow models assume a continuous medium and are therefore complicated by the presence of rupture features (crevasses, rifts, and faults) that significantly affect the overall flow patterns. Here we apply contact mechanics and penalty methods to develop a new ice shelf flow model that captures the impact of rifts and faults on the rheology and stress distribution of ice shelves. The model achieves a best fit solution to satellite observations of ice shelf velocities to infer the following: (1) a spatial distribution of contact and friction points along detected faults and rifts, (2) a more realistic spatial pattern of ice shelf rheology, and (3) a better representation of the stress balance in the immediate vicinity of faults and rifts. Thus, applying the model to the Brunt/Stancomb-Wills Ice Shelf, Antarctica, we quantify the state of friction inside faults and the opening rates of rifts and obtain an ice shelf rheology that remains relatively constant everywhere else on the ice shelf. We further demonstrate that better stress representation has widespread application in examining aspects affecting ice shelf structure and dynamics including the extent of ice mélange in rifts and the change in fracture configurations. All are major applications for better insight into the important question of ice shelf stability.

  12. Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action

    PubMed Central

    Słowiński, Piotr; Zhai, Chao; Alderisio, Francesco; Salesse, Robin; Gueugnon, Mathieu; Marin, Ludovic; Bardy, Benoit G.; di Bernardo, Mario; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.). We propose here an index of such variability, namely an individual motor signature (IMS) able to capture the subtle differences in the way each of us moves. We show that the IMS of a person is time-invariant and that it significantly differs from those of other individuals. This allows us to quantify the dynamic similarity, a measure of rapport between dynamics of different individuals' movements, and demonstrate that it facilitates coordination during interaction. We use our measure to confirm a key prediction of the theory of similarity that coordination between two individuals performing a joint-action task is higher if their motions share similar dynamic features. Furthermore, we use a virtual avatar driven by an interactive cognitive architecture based on feedback control theory to explore the effects of different kinematic features of the avatar motion on coordination with human players. PMID:27009178

  13. Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action.

    PubMed

    Słowiński, Piotr; Zhai, Chao; Alderisio, Francesco; Salesse, Robin; Gueugnon, Mathieu; Marin, Ludovic; Bardy, Benoit G; di Bernardo, Mario; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-03-01

    Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.). We propose here an index of such variability, namely an individual motor signature (IMS) able to capture the subtle differences in the way each of us moves. We show that the IMS of a person is time-invariant and that it significantly differs from those of other individuals. This allows us to quantify the dynamic similarity, a measure of rapport between dynamics of different individuals' movements, and demonstrate that it facilitates coordination during interaction. We use our measure to confirm a key prediction of the theory of similarity that coordination between two individuals performing a joint-action task is higher if their motions share similar dynamic features. Furthermore, we use a virtual avatar driven by an interactive cognitive architecture based on feedback control theory to explore the effects of different kinematic features of the avatar motion on coordination with human players. PMID:27009178

  14. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, M.; Worster, G.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The collapse of an ice shelf can lead to dramatic acceleration and thinning of the ice streams and glaciers that flowed into the former shelf. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  15. Sea ice melt onset dynamics in the northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago from RADARSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, M. S.; Howell, S.; Geldsetzer, T.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice melt onset, the appearance of liquid water in its snow cover, decreases surface albedo which increases shortwave absorption and thereby accelerates snow and sea ice melting. Earlier melt onset leads to the earlier formation of open water which enhances the ice-albedo feedback. Sea ice melt onset timing and duration vary considerably, both spatially and temporally, owing to variability in atmospheric forcing; this in turn influences the September sea ice extent. Sea ice melt onset variability has been investigated using coarse resolution passive microwave observation in Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA); however, this does not provide sufficient information about sea ice melt dynamics. We developed a new melt onset algorithm using high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from RADARSAT to better understand sea ice melt onset dynamics in northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago (fig 1) from 1997 to 2014. The algorithm is based on the temporal evolution of the SAR backscatter coefficient (σo), using separate thresholds for seasonal first-year ice and multi-year ice. Results indicated that the mean annual average melt onset date in the northern CAA was on year day 164 (mid-June) with a standard deviation of 4 days over the 18 year period. No significant trend for melt onset date was found over the 18 year period (fig: 2) but extreme early melt onset was detected in 1998 and 2012 associated with anomalous atmospheric forcing. Spatially, sea ice onset over the entire northern CAA varied from a 10-day minimum in 2007, to a 35-day maximum in 2011 and exhibited negative correlation (r=0.70) with the rate of increase in surface air temperature (fig 3) derived from Extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) dataset. An earlier (later) melt onset also results in light (heavier) September sea ice area in the northern CAA (fig 4).

  16. Update on the Dynamics of the Late Wisconsinan Northwestern Laurentide Ice-Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Tarasov, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ice streams draining ice from major ice divides over Keewatin, New-Quebec and Foxe Basin-Baffin Island areas constitute a key feature of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). They put constraints on the topographic evolution, volume and stable isotope contents of LIS, thus on LGM ocean volume and isotopic composition. Here, we re-visit field-based information about Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) dynamics in the Hudson Bay and Strait area, from the LGM to its final decay, and confront this information with deep-sea core records from Baffin Bay and the Labrador Sea. Core HU08-029-004 raised off Hudson Strait points to continuous in Hudson Strait throughout the whole interval, with acceleration during Heinrich (H) events 2 and 1, possibly triggered (at least for H1) by a delayed LGM-glacio-isostatic response. Streaming sediment supplies from Hudson Strait are recorded by fine detrital carbonates, without evidence of Foxe Basin sediment sources, thus suggesting streaming from the Ungava Peninsula and southern Baffin Island. Later on, in southern Hudson Bay, the Cochrane surges (~8.7 ka BP) illustrate fast ice streaming southwards, mostly from the Keewatin ice-divide, into Lake Agassiz-Ojibway. Ice-thinning in the Bay and the Foxe Basin areas led to the lake final drainage through Hudson Strait, and its replacement by the Tyrrell Sea (~8.3 ka BP). In Baffin Bay, out of phase surgings, mostly from the Inuitian and Greenland ice sheets, are similarly recorded. These new data and re-interpretation of earlier information corroborate the concept of a dynamic (ice-stream prevalent) North American Ice complex during the Late Wisconsin as evident in recent glaciological reconstructions. This along with recent data-calibrated glaciological reconstructions for the other major ice sheets result in a global shortfall of at least 10m compared to far field relative sea-level records.

  17. Stochastic dynamics of melt ponds and sea ice-albedo climate feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudakov, Ivan

    Evolution of melt ponds on the Arctic sea surface is a complicated stochastic process. We suggest a low-order model with ice-albedo feedback which describes stochastic dynamics of melt ponds geometrical characteristics. The model is a stochastic dynamical system model of energy balance in the climate system. We describe the equilibria in this model. We conclude the transition in fractal dimension of melt ponds affects the shape of the sea ice albedo curve.

  18. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Nicholas R; Fogwill, Christopher J; Mackintosh, Andrew N; Buckley, Kevin M

    2012-10-01

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments-a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets. PMID:22988078

  19. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  20. Detection and Analysis of Complex Patterns of Ice Dynamics in Antarctica from ICESat Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, Gregory Scott

    There remains much uncertainty in estimating the amount of Antarctic ice mass change, its dynamic component, and its spatial and temporal patterns. This work remedies the limitations of previous studies by generating the first detailed reconstruction of total and dynamic ice thickness and mass changes across Antarctica, from ICESat satellite altimetry observations in 2003-2009 using the Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change Detection (SERAC) method. Ice sheet thickness changes are calculated with quantified error estimates for each time when ICESat flew over a ground-track crossover region, at approximately 110,000 locations across the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The time series are partitioned into changes due to surficial processes and ice dynamics. The new results markedly improve the spatial and temporal resolution of surface elevation, volume, and mass change rates for the AIS, and can be sampled at annual temporal resolutions. The results indicate a complex spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic mass loss in Antarctica, especially along individual outlet glaciers, and allow for the quantification of the annual contribution of Antarctic ice loss to sea level rise. Over 5000 individual locations exhibit either strong dynamic ice thickness change patterns, accounting for approximately 500 unique spatial clusters that identify regions likely influenced by subglacial hydrology. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of these regions reveal the complexity and short-time scale variability in the subglacial hydrological system. From the 500 unique spatial clusters, over 370 represent newly identified, and not previously published, potential subglacial water bodies indicating an active subglacial hydrological system over a much larger region than previously observed. These numerous new observations of dynamic changes provide more than simply a larger set of data. Examination of both regional and local scale dynamic change patterns across Antarctica shows newly

  1. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, E.; Humbert, A.; Kleiner, T.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, K.

    2015-07-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a subsequent draw-down of isochrones and cold ice from the surface. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in temperature and ice viscosity, releasing deformation energy which raises the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. A question is what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice, and whether such past events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on the dynamics of a model ice stream as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a Full-Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that the rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, releases large amounts of deformational energy, which has the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature, commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in lake geometry or basal friction create a travelling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past events with ice penetrating radar.

  2. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  3. Influences of Ice Crystal Number Concentrations and Habits on Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komurcu, Muge

    2015-07-01

    Mixed-phase clouds are frequently present in the Arctic atmosphere, and strongly affect the surface energy budget. In this study, the influences of ice crystal number concentrations and crystal growth habits on the Arctic mixed-phase cloud microphysics and dynamics are investigated for internally and externally driven cloud systems using an eddy-resolving model. Separate simulations are performed with increasing ice concentrations and different ice crystal habits. It is found that the habit influence on cloud microphysics and dynamics is as pronounced as increasing the ice crystal concentrations for internally driven clouds and more dominant for externally driven clouds. Habit influence can lead to a 10 % reduction in surface incident longwave radiation flux. Sensitivity tests are performed to identify the interactions between processes affecting cloud dynamics that allow for persistent clouds (i.e., the radiative cooling at cloud top, ice precipitation stabilization at cloud-base). When cloud-base stabilization influences of ice precipitation are weak, cloud dynamics is more sensitive to radiative cooling. Additional sensitivity simulations are done with increasing surface latent and sensible heat fluxes to identify the influences of external forcing on cloud dynamics. It is found that the magnitude of cloud circulations for an externally driven cloud system with strong precipitation and weak surface fluxes is similar to a weakly precipitating, optically thick, internally driven cloud. For cloud systems with intense ice precipitation obtained through either increasing ice crystal concentrations or assuming ice crystal shapes that grow rapidly and fall fast, the cloud layer may collapse despite the moistening effect of surface fluxes.

  4. Jointly characterizing epigenetic dynamics across multiple human cell types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Lin; Yue, Feng; Hardison, Ross C

    2016-08-19

    Advanced sequencing technologies have generated a plethora of data for many chromatin marks in multiple tissues and cell types, yet there is lack of a generalized tool for optimal utility of those data. A major challenge is to quantitatively model the epigenetic dynamics across both the genome and many cell types for understanding their impacts on differential gene regulation and disease. We introduce IDEAS, an integrative and discriminative epigenome annotation system, for jointly characterizing epigenetic landscapes in many cell types and detecting differential regulatory regions. A key distinction between our method and existing state-of-the-art algorithms is that IDEAS integrates epigenomes of many cell types simultaneously in a way that preserves the position-dependent and cell type-specific information at fine scales, thereby greatly improving segmentation accuracy and producing comparable annotations across cell types. PMID:27095202

  5. Pyroclastic density current dynamics and associated hazards at ice-covered volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Cowlyn, J.; Kennedy, B.; McAdams, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes by which pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are emplaced is crucial for volcanic hazard prediction and assessment. Snow and ice can facilitate PDC generation by lowering the coefficient of friction and by causing secondary hydrovolcanic explosions, promoting remobilisation of proximally deposited material. Where PDCs travel over snow or ice, the reduction in surface roughness and addition of steam and meltwater signficantly changes the flow dynamics, affecting PDC velocities and runout distances. Additionally, meltwater generated during transit and after the flow has come to rest presents an immediate secondary lahar hazard that can impact areas many tens of kilometers beyond the intial PDC. This, together with the fact that deposits emplaced on ice are rarely preserved means that PDCs over ice have been little studied despite the prevalence of summit ice at many tall stratovolcanoes. At Ruapehu volcano in the North Island of New Zealand, a monolithologic welded PDC deposit with unusually rounded clasts provides textural evidence for having been transported over glacial ice. Here, we present the results of high-resolution multiphase numerical PDC modeling coupled with experimentaly determined rates of water and steam production for the Ruapehu deposits in order to assess the effect of ice on the Ruapehu PDC. The results suggest that the presence of ice significantly modified the PDC dynamics, with implications for assessing the PDC and associated lahar hazards at Ruapehu and other glaciated volcanoes worldwide.

  6. Upper-Crustal Structures Beneath Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica and their Influence on Ice Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, A.; Peters, L. E.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Christianson, K.; Alley, R. B.; Parizek, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-mass loss in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica has nearly doubled in the past four decades and continues to increase at an accelerating pace. Mass loss from Thwaites Glacier (TG) now rivals that from Pine Island Glacier, and modeling and observational studies indicate that TG may have begun an irreversible retreat into a deep marine basin. This retreat may initiate the disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet sometime in the next several hundred years. However, models cannot yet provide accurate estimates of the rate of ice-mass loss and the resulting sea-level rise. One large unknown in modeling studies is the role of geologic controls on ice dynamics in the TG basin. We use a combination of active-source seismic, ice-penetrating radar and aerogravity data collected on TG to investigate whether upper-crustal structures can exert a fundamental control on TG's ice dynamics. We focus especially on the distribution of sedimentary basins and their association with variability in the ice basal rheology and/or variations in basal-shear stress inferred from modeling. Seismic-reflection/refraction and radar profiling data collected along the main trunk of TG about 250 km inland of the current grounding line indicate the presence of ~10-km wide, >100-m deep sedimentary basin with a relatively smooth ice-bed interface. A co-located Bouguer gravity-anomaly profile, derived from NASA's Operation IceBridge aerogravity data, shows a local gravity-anomaly low that approximately matches the location of this seismically-inferred sedimentary basin. Moreover, this sedimentary basin roughly corresponds to a region of low basal-shear stress inferred from ice-flow modeling. Therefore, we hypothesize that, for at least this location, the sedimentary basin provides a soft, smooth bed for ice flow; hence, upper-crustal structures are closely linked to the basal properties of TG.

  7. Dynamic ice-wallow relief of northern Alaska's nearshore.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Kempema, E.

    1982-01-01

    Contour maps with 0.5m depth interval were prepared for a small area seaward of Reindeer Island, a barrier island in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, by repeated surveys with very accurate navigation and very close trackline spacing. The maps reveal numerous closed depressions and mounds, presumably related to grounded ice floes common in the area year round. These bedforms represent erosion and deposition caused by: a) intensified flow around stationary ice floes serving as obstacles and b) pulsating currents generated by vertical oscillations or rocking motions of grounded floes in a seaway. Because sediment transport occurs around the ice, not where it directly touches the sea floor, the depressions are much larger than the base of the acting floes. Ice-wallow bedforms, are characteristic of arctic nearshore regions with non-cohesive sediments. The bedforms studied here are highly active and must be considered in planning nearshore construction activities. -from Authors

  8. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. PMID:27492241

  9. Modeling of joints for the dynamic analysis of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1987-01-01

    An experimentally-based method for determining the stiffness and damping of truss joints is described. The analytical models use springs and both viscous and friction dampers to simulate joint load-deflection behavior. A least-squares algorithm is developed to identify the stiffness and damping coefficients of the analytical joint models from test data. The effects of nonlinear joint stiffness such as joint dead band are also studied. Equations for predicting the sensitivity of beam deformations to changes in joint stiffness are derived and used to show the level of joint stiffness required for nearly rigid joint behavior. Finally, the global frequency sensitivity of a truss structure to random perturbations in joint stiffness is discussed.

  10. Mars together and FIRE and ICE: Report of the joint US/Russian technical working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Cold War's end opened an opportunity for greater cooperation in planetary exploration for the United States and Russia. Two study groups were formed, Mars Together and FIRE and ICE. The Mars Together team developed a concept for a flight in 1998 that merged one U.S. Mars Surveyor 98 mission with the former Russian Mars 96 mission to further understanding of the Mars surface and atmosphere. The FIRE and ICE team developed concepts for a dual-spacecraft mission to the solar corona and for a mission to Pluto. The missions, scientific potential, and open issues are described.

  11. Geophysical constraints on the dynamics and retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet as a paleobenchmark for models of marine ice sheet deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Henry; Andreassen, Karin; Bjarnadóttir, Lilja R.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Winsborrow, Monica C. M.; Noormets, Riko; Polyak, Leonid; Auriac, Amandine; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of processes relating to the retreat of marine-based ice sheets, such as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and tidewater-terminating glaciers in Greenland today, is still limited. In particular, the role of ice stream instabilities and oceanographic dynamics in driving their collapse are poorly constrained beyond observational timescales. Over numerous glaciations during the Quaternary, a marine-based ice sheet has waxed and waned over the Barents Sea continental shelf, characterized by a number of ice streams that extended to the shelf edge and subsequently collapsed during periods of climate and ocean warming. Increasing availability of offshore and onshore geophysical data over the last decade has significantly enhanced our knowledge of the pattern and timing of retreat of this Barents Sea ice sheet (BSIS), particularly so from its Late Weichselian maximum extent. We present a review of existing geophysical constraints that detail the dynamic evolution of the BSIS through the last glacial cycle, providing numerical modelers and geophysical workers with a benchmark data set with which to tune ice sheet reconstructions and explore ice sheet sensitivities and drivers of dynamic behavior. Although constraining data are generally spatially sporadic across the Barents and Kara Seas, behaviors such as ice sheet thinning, major ice divide migration, asynchronous and rapid flow switching, and ice stream collapses are all evident. Further investigation into the drivers and mechanisms of such dynamics within this unique paleo-analogue is seen as a key priority for advancing our understanding of marine-based ice sheet deglaciations, both in the deep past and in the short-term future.

  12. Mercury Dynamics across the Ocean- Young Sea Ice- Atmosphere Interface in the Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaulk, A. H.; Armstrong, D.; Wang, F.; Stern, G.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury is a global contaminant and has become an increasing concern in the Arctic marine ecosystems. Methyl mercury is highly toxic, biomagnifies in food webs, and is found in elevated levels in marine mammals in some locations. Major research initiatives have been undertaken in recent years to understand the sources and pathways for mercury bioaccumulation in the Arctic marine ecosystems. One major scientific dispute is on the net contribution of the atmospherically transported mercury. Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) provide a possible pathway of increased atmospheric mercury deposition from the atmosphere to the surface. Although direct deposition can occur in open leads, much of the ocean surface is ice-covered at the time when AMDEs occur. The current understanding of mercury dynamics lacks data on mercury concentrations and distribution in sea ice and brine. As part of the International Polar Year Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study (IPY-CFL), sea ice (new, first year, and multi-year) and brine drainage were sampled at various drifting and landfast ice stations in the western Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea throughout the 2008 Arctic AMDE season. Total mercury concentration in brine ranged from 71.2 ng/L to 2.7 ng/L, decreasing from shallow sack holes near the surface to deeper holes near the bottom, and was always much higher than that in the underlying seawater (typically around 0.2 ng/L). Bulk ice cores showed similar profiles with higher mercury concentrations in the surface layer, particularly in the surface frazil layer. Sea ice texture, salinity, and brine volume fraction have all been shown to impact the distribution of mercury within sea ice. Evidence also suggests that atmospheric deposition, although possible, seems relatively unimportant in mercury enrichment in the surface of first year sea ice. In the era of global climate change Arctic sea ice is undergoing rapid change; this changing ice regime will have an effect on the mercury

  13. Effect of joint damping and joint nonlinearity on the dynamics of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Mary; Dugundji, John

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of the effect of linear joint characteristics on the vibrations of a free-free, three-joint beam model show that increasing joint damping increases resonant frequencies and increases modal damping but only to the point where the joint gets 'locked up' by damping. This behavior is different from that predicted by modeling joint damping as proportional damping. Nonlinear analyses of the three-joint model with cubic springs at the joints show all the classical single DOF nonlinear response behavior at each resonance of the multiple DOF system: nondoubling of response for a doubling of forcing amplitude, multiple solutions, jump behavior, and resonant frequency shifts. These properties can be concisely quantified by characteristic backbone curves, which show the locus of resonant peaks for increasing forcing amplitude.

  14. Recent ice dynamic and surface mass balance of Union Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Uribe, J. A.; Jaña, R.; Oberreuter, J.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the results of a comprehensive glaciological investigation of Union Glacier (79°46' S/83°24' W) in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), a major outlet glacier within the Ellsworth Mountains. Union Glacier flows into the Ronne Ice Shelf, where recent models have indicated the potential for significant grounding line zone (GLZ) migrations in response to changing climate and ocean conditions. To elaborate a glaciological base line that can help to evaluate the potential impact of this GLZ change scenario, we installed an array of stakes on Union Glacier in 2007. The stake network has been surveyed repeatedly for elevation, velocity, and net surface mass balance. The region of the stake measurements is in near-equilibrium, and ice speeds are 10 to 33 m a-1. Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) have been used to map the subglacial topography, internal structure, and crevasse frequency and depth along surveyed tracks in the stake site area. The bedrock in this area has a minimum elevation of -858 m a.s.l., significantly deeper than shown by BEDMAP2 data. However, between this deeper area and the local GLZ, there is a threshold where the subglacial topography shows a maximum altitude of 190 m. This subglacial condition implies that an upstream migration of the GLZ will not have strong effects on Union Glacier until it passes beyond this shallow ice pinning point.

  15. Ice-flow structure and ice dynamic changes in the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica from radar-imaged internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert G.; Rippin, David M.; Karlsson, Nanna B.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A.; Le Brocq, Anne M.; Rose, Kathryn C.; Ross, Neil; Siegert, Martin J.

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have aroused concerns over the potential for ice draining the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica to figure more prominently in sea level contributions should buttressing from the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf diminish. To improve understanding of how ice stream dynamics there evolved through the Holocene, we interrogate radio echo sounding (RES) data from across the catchments of Institute and Möller Ice Streams (IIS and MIS), focusing especially on the use of internal layering to investigate ice-flow change. As an important component of this work, we investigate the influence that the orientation of the RES acquisition track with respect to ice flow exerts on internal layering and find that this influence is minimal unless a RES flight track parallels ice flow. We also investigate potential changes to internal layering characteristics with depth to search for important temporal transitions in ice-flow regime. Our findings suggest that ice in northern IIS, draining the Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands, has retained its present ice-flow configuration throughout the Holocene. This contrasts with less topographically constrained ice in southern IIS and much of MIS, whose internal layering evinces spatial changes to the configuration of ice flow over the past ~10,000 years. Our findings confirm Siegert et al.'s (2013) inference that fast flow was diverted from Bungenstock Ice Rise during the Late Holocene and suggest that this may have represented just one component of wider regional changes to ice flow occurring across the IIS and MIS catchments as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has thinned since the Last Glacial Maximum.

  16. Tertiary ice sheet dynamics: The snow gun hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, M.L. ); Matthews, R.K. )

    1991-04-10

    The authors abserve strong negative correlation between Tertiary low- to mid-latitude planktonic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O and the difference between these data and coeval benthic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O. Late Quaternary data do not show this correlation. Coupling statistical model/{delta}{sup 18}O comparisons and evidence for Antarctic ice and ocean temperature variation, they infer that Tertiary ice volume, recorded by tropical planktonic {delta}{sup 18}O became lost in the noise. This renders low correlation between Teritiary planktonic and benthic {delta}{sup 18}O time series compared to late Quaternary data. They contend that Tertiary ice sheet growth was commonly driven by warming of deep water from low- to mid-latitude, cooled. Because tectonic forcing and orbital forcing at low-latitude primarily controlled production and temperature variations of this Warm Saline Deep Water, these influences largely dictated Tertiary ice volume fluctuations. Through the Tertiary, they infer ice volume fluctuations to be an important component of sea level history on timescales between 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 7} years.

  17. Are Patient-Specific Joint and Inertial Parameters Necessary for Accurate Inverse Dynamics Analyses of Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in joint parameter values (axis positions and orientations in body segments) and inertial parameter values (segment masses, mass centers, and moments of inertia) as well as kinematic noise alter the results of inverse dynamics analyses of gait. Three-dimensional linkage models with joint constraints have been proposed as one way to minimize the effects of noisy kinematic data. Such models can also be used to perform gait optimizations to predict post-treatment function given pre-treatment gait data. This study evaluates whether accurate patient-specific joint and inertial parameter values are needed in three-dimensional linkage models to produce accurate inverse dynamics results for gait. The study was performed in two stages. First, we used optimization analyses to evaluate whether patient-specific joint and inertial parameter values can be calibrated accurately from noisy kinematic data, and second, we used Monte Carlo analyses to evaluate how errors in joint and inertial parameter values affect inverse dynamics calculations. Both stages were performed using a dynamic, 27 degree-of-freedom, full-body linkage model and synthetic (i.e., computer generated) gait data corresponding to a nominal experimental gait motion. In general, joint but not inertial parameter values could be found accurately from noisy kinematic data. Root-mean-square (RMS) errors were 3° and 4 mm for joint parameter values and 1 kg, 22 mm, and 74,500 kg*mm2 for inertial parameter values. Furthermore, errors in joint but not inertial parameter values had a significant effect on calculated lower-extremity inverse dynamics joint torques. The worst RMS torque error averaged 4% bodyweight*height (BW*H) due to joint parameter variations but less than 0.25% BW*H due to inertial parameter variations. These results suggest that inverse dynamics analyses of gait utilizing linkage models with joint constraints should calibrate the model’s joint parameter values to obtain accurate joint

  18. Geological and meteorological controls on icing (aufeis) dynamics (1985 to 2014) in subarctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, P. D.; Wolfe, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Icings are widespread yet poorly understood winter hydrological phenomena that develop over the winter by freezing successive overflows of groundwater to the surface. Groundwater hydrology in arctic regions is constrained by geological setting and permafrost extent, and overflows are possibly driven by cold winters, winter warming intervals, high antecedent autumn rainfall, and low early winter snowfall. Consequently, icings are spatially recurrent but not necessarily annually nor to the same extent. We test the significance of identified meteorological forcing variables against a long-term data set of icing dynamics and distribution we developed for the Great Slave region around Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Climate is regionally consistent, but variable geology and permafrost create hydrological conditions representative of much of the subarctic. We mapped 5500 icings in the study area (21,887 km2) with a semiautomated approach utilizing late spring Landsat archival images (1985 to 2014). Individual icing size, ranging 3 orders of magnitude (1.8 × 10-3 km2 to 4.1 km2), is related to return frequency. Infrequent ice (25% return frequency) accounts for 94% of the total icing area (86 km2). Winter warming intervals (≥5°C; typically over 1-3 days) and autumn rainfall (September and October) explain 28% of icing density interannual variation overall. Interannual icing variation and significant meteorological forcing variables differ among ecoregions where varied geological settings and permafrost conditions influence the hydrological regime. Future icings may develop less frequently due to decreasing winter warming intervals, but increasing autumn rainfall may increase icing density where Canadian Shield leads to strong threshold-mediated runoff generation processes.

  19. Polynya dynamics and associated atmospheric forcing at the Ronne Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Lars; Heinemann, Günther

    2014-05-01

    The Ronne Ice Shelf is known as one of the most active regions of polynya developments around the Antarctic continent. Low temperatures are prevailing throughout the whole year, particularly in winter. It is generally recognized that polynya formations are primarily forced by offshore winds and secondarily by ocean currents. Many authors have addressed this issue previously at the Ross Ice Shelf and Adélie Coast and connected polynya dynamics to strong katabatic surge events. Such investigations of atmospheric dynamics and simultaneous polynya occurrence are still severely underrepresented for the southwestern part of the Weddell Sea and especially for the Ronne Ice Shelf. Due to the very flat terrain gradients of the ice shelf katabatic winds are of minor importance in that area. Other atmospheric processes must therefore play a crucial role for polynya developments at the Ronne Ice Shelf. High-resolution simulations have been carried out for the Weddell Sea region using the non-hydrostatic NWP model COSMO from the German Meteorological Service (DWD). For the austral autumn and winter (March to August) 2008 daily forecast simulations were conducted with the consideration of daily sea-ice coverage deduced from the passive microwave system AMSR-E. These simulations are used to analyze the synoptic and mesoscale atmospheric dynamics of the Weddell Sea region and find linkages to polynya occurrence at the Ronne Ice Shelf. For that reason, the relation between the surface wind speed, the synoptic pressure gradient in the free atmosphere and polynya area is investigated. Seven significant polynya events are identified for the simulation period, three in the autumn and four in the winter season. It can be shown that in almost all cases synoptic cyclones are the primary polynya forcing systems. In most cases the timely interaction of several passing cyclones in the northern and central Weddell Sea leads to maintenance of a strong synoptic pressure gradient above the

  20. A new experimental setup to investigate nucleation, dynamic growth and surface properties of single ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Jens; Bieligk, Henner; Niedermeier, Dennis; Clauss, Tina; Chou, Cédric; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of atmospheric ice particles is of importance for both, weather and climate. However, knowledge is still sparse, e.g. when considering the influences of ice particle surface properties on the radiative properties of clouds. Therefore, based on the experiences with our laminar flow tube chamber LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004), we developed a new device to characterize nucleation, dynamic growth and light scattering properties of a fixed single ice crystal in dependence on the prevailing thermodynamic conditions. Main part of the new setup is a thermodynamically controlled laminar flow tube with a diameter of 15 mm and a length of 1.0 m. Connected to the flow tube is a SID3-type (Small Ice Detector, Kaye et al., 2008) instrument called LISA (Leipzig Ice Scattering Apparatus), equipped with an additional optical microscope. For the investigations, a single ice nucleus (IN) with a dry size of 2-5 micrometer is attached to a thin glass fiber and positioned within the optical measuring volume of LISA. The fixed particle is exposed to the thermodynamically controlled air flow, exiting the flow tube. Two mass flow controllers adjusting a dry and a humidified gas flow are applied to control both, the temperature and the saturation ratio over a wide range. The thermodynamic conditions in the experiments were characterized using a) temperature and dew-point measurements, and b) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Dependent on temperature and saturation ratio in the measuring volume, ice nucleation and ice crystal growth/shrinkage can occur. The optical microscope allows a time dependent visualization of the particle/ice crystal, and the LISA instrument is used to obtain 2-D light scattering patterns. Both devices together can be applied to investigate the influence of thermodynamic conditions on ice crystal growth, in particular its shape and surface properties. We successfully performed

  1. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ice-Shelf Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wearing, Martin; Worster, Grae; Hindmarsh, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Ice-shelf buttressing is a major control on the rate of ice discharged from fast-flowing ice streams that drain the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The magnitude of the buttressing force depends on the shelf geometry and confinement. This geometry is determined by the ice-shelf extent, resulting from retreat due to iceberg calving and shelf advance due to flow. In contrast to large-scale ice-sheet models, which require high resolution datasets, we aim to gain insight using simple idealized models, focusing on the transition from lateral confinement to non-confinement. By considering a confined shelf with lateral shear stresses controlling the flow, steady-state analytical solutions can be calculated. These solutions are then compared to a numerical model for a confined flow, which incorporates both shear and extensional stresses. A boundary layer close to the calving front is identified, where both extensional and shear stresses control the dynamics. We test these idealized models against fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments, designed to simulate the flow of an ice shelf in a narrow channel. From these experiments velocity fields and altimetry for the ice-shelf are collected, allowing for comparison with the theoretical models and geophysical data.

  2. A 'Geometric' Downscaling Method for Coupling Dynamical Ice Sheet Models to GEOS-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Cullather, R. I.; Nowicki, S.; Suarez, M.

    2014-12-01

    Plausible projection of future sea level rises requires coupled AOCGMs to include a dynamic ice sheet model (ISM) component. Getting the right forcing on the ice sheet models plays a critical role in the coupling process. The issue is further complicated by the mismatch between the grids used by atmosphere and ice sheet. Typically surface mass balance (SMB) and temperature fields are downscaled from the coarse atmospheric grid to the fine ice grid. We present one technique employed to couple NASA Goddard GEOS5 AGCM to JPL Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). The Greenland ice surface from ISSM is explicitly embedded in the GEOS5 AGCM grid with a 'tile' representation. Atmospheric forcing fields are interpolated and further adjusted to account for elevation differences and fed into a SMB model operating on ice surface tiles. The coupling is done in such a way that mass and energy are conserved. The proposed method is independent of the underlying ice grid and can be used to couple any ISM. Comparison of resultant downscaled SMB fields from a suite of AGCM resolutions will be discussed.

  3. The role of the margins in ice stream dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echelmeyer, Keith; Harrison, William

    1993-01-01

    At first glance, it would appear that the bed of the active ice stream plays a much more important role in the overall force balance than do the margins, especially because the ratio of the half-width to depth for a typical ice stream is large (15:1 to 50:1). On the other hand, recent observations indicate that at least part of the ice stream is underlain by a layer of very weak till (shear strength about 2 kPa), and this weak basal layer would then imply that some or all of the resistive drag is transferred to the margins. In order to address this question, a detailed velocity profile near Upstream B Camp, which extends from the center of the ice stream, across the chaotic shear margin, and onto the Unicorn, which is part of the slow-moving ice sheet was measured. Comparison of this observed velocity profile with finite-element models of flow shows several interesting features. First, the shear stress at the margin is on the order of 130 kPa, while the mean value along the bed is about 15 kPa. Integration of these stresses along the boundaries indicates that the margins provide 40 to 50 percent, and the bed, 60 to 40 percent of the total resistive drag needed to balance the gravitational driving stress in this region. (The range of values represents calculations for different values of surface slope.) Second, the mean basal stress predicted by the models shows that the entire bed cannot be blanketed by the weak till observed beneath upstream B - instead there must be a distribution of weak till and 'sticky spots' (e.g., 85 percent till and 15 percent sticky spots of resistive stress equal to 100 kPa). If more of the bed were composed of weak till, then the modeled velocity would not match that observed. Third, the ice must exhibit an increasing enhancement factor as the margins are approached (E equals 10 in the chaotic zone), in keeping with laboratory measurements on ice under prolonged shear strain. Also, there is either a narrow zone of somewhat stiffer ice (E

  4. Reconstructing the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisling, Benjamin; DeConto, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Today, some outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) are rapidly retreating and may mobilize large volumes of interior ice in the coming centuries. The last period that saw such dramatic, sustained retreat of the GrIS was the last deglaciation, when the ice sheet retreated from its Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) extent. Previous studies have used relative sea level observations to constrain changes in ice thickness and retreat timing during the deglaciation (e.g. Fleming and Lambert 2004, Simpson et al. 2009, Lecavalier et al. 2014). Here we build on these studies by isolating the drivers of ice-sheet retreat, and their spatial and temporal dynamics, during this period. Inclusion of ice-cliff failure and hydrofracturing parameterizations in our model has resulted in a better fit to paleodata for the Antarctic ice sheet, but this modeling approach has not been applied to the GrIS. Here we use a three-dimensional hybrid SSA/SIA ice-sheet model (Pollard et al. 2015) at 10km resolution over Greenland to simulate the last deglaciation. Boundary conditions for the last glacial maximum produce an LGM ice sheet with 3.81 meters sea level equivalent (m s.l.e.) of additional ice. The LGM ice sheet advances to the shelf-break in west, south, and east Greenland with an expansive ice shelf extending across Davis Strait. Applying modern atmospheric and oceanic forcing to the LGM ice sheet yields 1.25 and 1.09 m s.l.e. of melt, respectively, and 1.72 m s.l.e. for both. Ocean warming initially results in a higher rate and magnitude of retreat, but increased surface evaporation over open water results in additional accumulation that offsets losses in 10 kyr simulations. Here, we test the sensitivity of the magnitude of deglacial ice-sheet retreat to uncertainty in bedrock elevation and basal slding coefficients, the applied climate forcing, and the mass balance scheme (positive degree-day or energy balance). We also implement a deglacial climate forcing based on recently

  5. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII–XIV transition

    PubMed Central

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-01-01

    The pressure–temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases. PMID:26076946

  6. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect. PMID:20189182

  7. Examination of upstream flow dynamics in response to the front retreat of ice shelves with different geometric configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelves fringe ~75% of Antarctica's coastline, nourished by numerous terrestrial glacier systems. The ice-shelf disintegrations in recent decades and the observed thinning trends have revealed their susceptibility to the atmospheric and oceanic changes in the climate warming context. The buttressing effect of an ice shelf constrains the ice discharge of its upstream land ice, thus regulating the contribution to sea level of the terrestrial glaciers. The important role of ice shelves in stabilizing the upstream glacier flow dynamics is emphasized by the rapid accelerations and thinning of the tributary glaciers in response to the collapses of the northern Larsen Ice Shelf in Antarctic Peninsula. However, this buttressing effect is determined by the stress balance conditions of an ice shelf, which is further affected by the ice-shelf geometric configurations. The ice shelves confined by fjords, islands, promontories or seabed topographic highs exert greater buttressing effects than those less confined by the lateral or basal shear stresses. This research aims to assess the influences of different ice-shelf configurations on upstream flow dynamics in response to large ice-shelf retreat events. By using remotely sensed imagery acquired by multiple satellite missions, we derived the time series surface velocity records for the Larsen B glacier-ice shelf system in Antarctic Peninsula during 1995 - 2015 and for the Mertz glacier-ice shelf system in East Antarctica during 1997 - 2015, respectively. The former was well confined in the embayment, while the latter is unconfined by lateral margins. We compared the different temporal variation patterns in flow dynamics between these two sites before and after their large retreating events, i.e. the collapse event of Larsen B Ice Shelf in 2002 and the large calving event of Mertz Ice Shelf in 2010. The surface velocity profiles reveal the less sensitivity of upstream responses to the front retreat for the Mertz Ice Shelf.

  8. Joint Community and Anomaly Tracking in Dynamic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baingana, Brian; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2016-04-01

    Most real-world networks exhibit community structure, a phenomenon characterized by existence of node clusters whose intra-edge connectivity is stronger than edge connectivities between nodes belonging to different clusters. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of network behavior, community detection finds many practical applications in diverse settings. Communities in online social networks are indicative of shared functional roles, or affiliation to a common socio-economic status, the knowledge of which is vital for targeted advertisement. In buyer-seller networks, community detection facilitates better product recommendations. Unfortunately, reliability of community assignments is hindered by anomalous user behavior often observed as unfair self-promotion, or "fake" highly-connected accounts created to promote fraud. The present paper advocates a novel approach for jointly tracking communities while detecting such anomalous nodes in time-varying networks. By postulating edge creation as the result of mutual community participation by node pairs, a dynamic factor model with anomalous memberships captured through a sparse outlier matrix is put forth. Efficient tracking algorithms suitable for both online and decentralized operation are developed. Experiments conducted on both synthetic and real network time series successfully unveil underlying communities and anomalous nodes.

  9. Calculation of the coefficient and dynamics of water diffusion in graphite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2006-06-01

    The coefficient and dynamics of water diffusion in adhesive-graphite joints were calculated insitu with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, a method that is significantly simpler than elemental analysis. Water diffusion coefficient and dynamics of adhesive-graphite joints treated by different surface treatment menthods were also investigated. Calculation results indicated that the water diffusion rate in adhesive-graphite joints treated by sandpaper was higher than that treated by chemical oxidation or by silane couple agent. Also the durability of graphite joints treated by coupling agent is superior to that treated by chemical oxidation or sandpaper burnishing.

  10. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM ON JOINTED ROCK FOUNDATION DURING LARGE-SCALE EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yutaka; Horii, Hideyuki; Yazdani, Mahmoud

    Dynamic cracking analysis of concrete gravity dam has been carried out during large-scale earthquake, considering the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation. Firstly, in order to take into account the progressive failure of rock foundation, the constitutive law of jointed rock is assumed and its validity is evaluated by simulation analysis based on the past experimental model. Finally, dynamic cracking analysis of 100-m high dam model is performed, using the previously proposed approach with tangent stiffness-proportional damping to express the propagation behavior of crack and the constitutive law of jointed rock. The crack propagation behavior of dam body and the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation are investigated.

  11. Dynamic evaluation of a traction-drive joint for space telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, Clarence W.; Hankins, Walter W., III

    1988-01-01

    Presented is an analysis and evaluation of a prototype traction-drive joint for robotic manipulators, developed under NASA sponsorship. A dynamic model is developed using the Lagrange formulation. Controllability, observability, dynamic stability, and response characteristics of the joint to test inputs are studied. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) is implemented on the joint model to determine a basis for evaluating the performance of the traction-drive joint under servo control. An evaluation of the results and directions for future investigations are presented.

  12. Full-field predictions of ice dynamic recrystallisation under simple shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul D.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Evans, Lynn A.; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the flow of ice on the microstructural scale is essential for improving our knowledge of large-scale ice dynamics, and thus our ability to predict future changes of ice sheets. Polar ice behaves anisotropically during flow, which can lead to strain localisation. In order to study how dynamic recrystallisation affects to strain localisation in deep levels of polar ice sheets, we present a series of numerical simulations of ice polycrystals deformed under simple-shear conditions. The models explicitly simulate the evolution of microstructures using a full-field approach, based on the coupling of a viscoplastic deformation code (VPFFT) with dynamic recrystallisation codes. The simulations provide new insights into the distribution of stress, strain rate and lattice orientation fields with progressive strain, up to a shear strain of three. Our simulations show how the recrystallisation processes have a strong influence on the resulting microstructure (grain size and shape), while the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) appears to be less affected. Activation of non-basal slip systems is enhanced by recrystallisation and induces a strain hardening behaviour up to the onset of strain localisation and strain weakening behaviour. Simulations demonstrate that the strong intrinsic anisotropy of ice crystals is transferred to the polycrystalline scale and results in the development of strain localisation bands than can be masked by grain boundary migration. Therefore, the finite-strain history is non-directly reflected by the final microstructure. Masked strain localisation can be recognised in ice cores, such as the EDML, from the presence of stepped boundaries, microshear and grains with zig-zag geometries.

  13. Ice dynamics of Bowdoin tidewater glacier, Northwest Greenland, from borehole measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Funk, Martin; Ryser, Claudia; Jouvet, Guillaume; Bauder, Andreas; Sugiyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    The observed rapid retreat of ocean-terminating glaciers in southern Greenland in the last two decades has now propagated to the northwest. Hence, tidewater glaciers in this area, some of which have remain stable for decades, have started retreating rapidly through iceberg calving in recent years, thus allowing a monitoring and investigation of ice dynamical changes starting from the early stages of retreat. Here, we present an ice dynamical study from Bowdoin Glacier, a tidewater outlet glacier located at the northwestern margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The glacier surface experiences lowering at a rate of 1.5 m/a since 2007. A rapid calving front retreat of 260 m/a was also observed since 2008, while no significant changes occurred during the previous 20 years. From July 2014 to July 2015, we monitored, 2 km upstream from the calving front, subglacial water pressure changes in boreholes, internal ice deformation through tilt sensors at different depths, englacial ice temperature profiles from the glacier bed to the surface, and high resolution surface motion from GPS records. These measurement show that the glacier is temperate-based, yet internal deformation accounts for about 10 % of the annual surface motion. A seasonal increase in both deformation and sliding at the onset of the melt season is associated with a drop in water pressure in part of the subglacial system. These observations are used to calibrate the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) for numerical simulations of ice flow in the Bowdoin Glacier catchment, aiming for a better understanding of iceberg calving processes in relation to changes in internal and basal ice dynamics.

  14. Assessing the Extent of Influence Subglacial Hydrology Has on Dynamic Ice Sheet Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have done an excellent job capturing and quantifying the complex pattern of dynamic changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) over the past several decades. The timing of changes in ice velocities and mass balance indicate that the mechanisms controlling these behaviors, both external and internal, act over variable spatial and temporal regimes, can change in rapid and complex fashion, and have significant effect on ice sheet behavior as well as sea level rise. With roughly half of the estimated ice loss from the GrIS attributed to dynamic processes, these changes account for about 250 Gt/yr (2003-2008), equivalence to 0.6 mm/yr sea level rise. One of the primary influences of dynamic ice behavior is ice sheet hydrology, including the storage and transport of water from the supraglacial to subglacial environment, and the subsequent development of water transport pathways, thus demonstrating the need for further characterization of the subglacial environment. Enhanced dynamic flow of ice due to the influence of meltwater distribution on the subglacial environment has been reported, including In-SAR observations of large velocity increases over short periods of time, suggesting regions where dynamic changes are likely being caused by changes in hydrology. Additionally, building upon the 1993-2011 laser altimetry record, analyzed by our Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) procedure, we have detected complex patterns of rapid thickening and thinning patterns over several outlet glaciers. This study presents a comprehensive investigation of hydrologic control on dynamic glacier behavior for several key sites in Greenland. We combine a high resolution surface digital elevation model (DEM) derived by fusing space- and airborne laser altimetry observations and SPIRIT SPOT DEMs, with a high resolution, hydrologically-corrected bedrock DEM derived from a combination of CResIS and Operation Icebridge ice penetrating radar data

  15. Modeling surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics of a seasonally ice-covered hydroelectric reservoir.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Roulet, Nigel T; Strachan, Ian B; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-04-15

    The thermal dynamics of human created northern reservoirs (e.g., water temperatures and ice cover dynamics) influence carbon processing and air-water gas exchange. Here, we developed a process-based one-dimensional model (Snow, Ice, WAater, and Sediment: SIWAS) to simulate a full year's surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for a moderately large (>500km(2)) boreal hydroelectric reservoir in northern Quebec, Canada. There is a lack of climate and weather data for most of the Canadian boreal so we designed SIWAS with a minimum of inputs and with a daily time step. The modeled surface energy fluxes were consistent with six years of observations from eddy covariance measurements taken in the middle of the reservoir. The simulated water temperature profiles agreed well with observations from over 100 sites across the reservoir. The model successfully captured the observed annual trend of ice cover timing, although the model overestimated the length of ice cover period (15days). Sensitivity analysis revealed that air temperature significantly affects the ice cover duration, water and sediment temperatures, but that dissolved organic carbon concentrations have little effect on the heat fluxes, and water and sediment temperatures. We conclude that the SIWAS model is capable of simulating surface energy fluxes and thermal dynamics for boreal reservoirs in regions where high temporal resolution climate data are not available. SIWAS is suitable for integration into biogeochemical models for simulating a reservoir's carbon cycle. PMID:26849343

  16. Glacier velocities and dynamic ice discharge from the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wychen, Wesley; Burgess, David O.; Gray, Laurence; Copland, Luke; Sharp, Martin; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Benham, Toby J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate an increase in glacier mass loss from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago as a result of warmer summer air temperatures. However, no complete assessment of dynamic ice discharge from this region exists. We present the first complete surface velocity mapping of all ice masses in the Queen Elizabeth Islands and show that these ice masses discharged ~2.6 ± 0.8 Gt a-1 of ice to the oceans in winter 2012. Approximately 50% of the dynamic discharge was channeled through non surge-type Trinity and Wykeham Glaciers alone. Dynamic discharge of the surge-type Mittie Glacier varied from 0.90 ± 0.09 Gt a-1 during its 2003 surge to 0.02 ± 0.02 Gt a-1 during quiescence in 2012, highlighting the importance of surge-type glaciers for interannual variability in regional mass loss. Queen Elizabeth Islands glaciers currently account for ~7.5% of reported dynamic discharge from Arctic ice masses outside Greenland.

  17. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A; Fischer, Sean A; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F; Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  18. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; Fischer, Sean A.; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  19. Induced ice melting by the snow flea antifreeze protein from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Todde, Guido; Whitman, Christopher; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-11-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) allow different life forms, insects as well as fish and plants, to survive in subzero environments. AFPs prevent freezing of the physiological fluids. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, the behavior of the small isoform of the AFP found in the snow flea (sfAFP), both in water and at the ice/water interface, of four different ice planes. In water at room temperature, the structure of the sfAFP is found to be slightly unstable. The loop between two polyproline II helices has large fluctuations as well as the C-terminus. Torsional angle analyses show a decrease of the polyproline II helix area in the Ramachandran plots. The protein structure instability, in any case, should not affect its antifreeze activity. At the ice/water interface the sfAFP triggers local melting of the ice surface. Bipyramidal, secondary prism, and prism ice planes melt in the presence of AFP at temperatures below the melting point of ice. Only the basal plane is found to be stable at the same temperatures, indicating an adsorption of the sfAFP on this ice plane as confirmed by experimental evidence. PMID:25353109

  20. Simulations of Vapor/Ice Dynamics in a Freeze-Dryer Condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab; Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2011-05-01

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. Key performance characteristics of a freeze-dryer condenser are largely dependent on the vapor and ice dynamics in the low-pressure environment. The main objective of this work is to develop a modeling and computational framework for analysis of vapor and ice dynamics in such freeze-dryer condensers. The direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique is applied to model the relevant physical processes that accompany the vapor flow in the condenser chamber. Low-temperature water vapor molecular model is applied in the DSMC solver SMILE to simulate the flowfield structure. The developing ice front is tracked based on the mass flux computed at the nodes of the DSMC surface mesh. Verification of ice accretion simulations has been done by comparison with analytical free-molecular solutions. Simulations of ice buildup on the coils of a laboratory-scale dryer have been compared with experiments. The comparison shows that unsteady simulations are necessary to reproduce experimentally observed icing structures. The DSMC simulations demonstrate that by tailoring the condenser topology to the flow-field structure of the water vapor jet expanding into a low-pressure reservoir, it is possible to significantly increase water vapor removal rates and improve the overall efficiency of freeze-drying process.

  1. Investigation of nucleation, dynamic growth and surface properties of single ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Jens; Herenz, Paul; Chou, Cédric; Bieligk, Henner; Clauss, Tina; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ritter, Georg; Ulanowski, Joseph Z.; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Nucleation, dynamic growth and optical light scattering properties of a fixed single ice crystal have been experimentally characterized in dependence of both, the type of the ice nucleus (IN) and the prevailing thermodynamic conditions. The set up was developed based on the laminar flow tube LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004; Hartmann et al., 2011). The flow tube is equipped with a SID3-type (Small Ice Detector, Kaye et al., 2008) instrument called LISA (LACIS Ice Scattering Apparatus) and an additional optical microscope. For the investigations, a single (IN with a dry size of 2-10 micrometer is attached to a thin glass fiber and positioned within the optical measuring volume of LISA. The fixed particle is exposed to the thermodynamically controlled air flow, exiting the flow tube. Temperature and saturation ratio in the measuring volume can be varied on a time scale of 1-2 s by adjusting the humidified gas flow. Dependent on the thermodynamic conditions, ice nucleation and ice particle growth/shrinkage occur and can be studied. Thereby, the LISA instrument is applied to obtain 2-D light scattering patterns, and the additional optical microscope allows a time dependent visualization of the ice crystal. Both devices together allow to investigate the influence of the thermodynamic conditions on ice particle growth, the particle shape and its surface properties (i.e., its surface roughness, Ulanowski et al., 2011; Ulanowski et al., 2012; Ulanowski et al., 2013)). The thermodynamic conditions in the optical measuring volume have been extensively characterized using a) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, b) temperature and dew-point measurements, and c) evaluation of droplet and ice particle growth data. Furthermore, we successfully performed condensation freezing and deposition nucleation experiments with ATD (Arizona Test Dust), kaolinite, illite and SnomaxTM (Johnson Controls Snow, Colorado, USA) particles. In

  2. Computational analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice aggregates during viscoplastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Weikusat, Ilka; Bons, Paul; Lebensohn, Ricardo; Evans, Lynn; Piazolo, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Ice is a common mineral at the Earth's surface. How much ice is stored in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets depends on its mechanical properties. Therefore properties of ice directly impact on human society through its role in controlling sea level. The bulk behaviour of large ice masses is the result of the behaviour of the ensemble of individual ice grains. This is strongly influenced by the viscoplastic anisotropy of these grains and their lattice orientation. Numerical modelling provides a better insight into the mechanics of ice from the micro to the ice sheet scale. We present numerical simulations that predict the microstructural evolution of an aggregate of pure ice grains at different strain rates. We simulate co-axial deformation and dynamic recrystallization up to large strain using a full-field approach. The crystal plasticity code (Lebensohn et al., 2009) is used to calculate the response of a polycrystalline aggregate that deforms by purely dislocation glide, applying a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). This code is coupled with the ELLE microstructural modelling platform to include intracrystalline recovery, as well as grain boundary migration driven by the reduction of surface and strain energies. The results show a strong effect of recrystallization on the final microstructure, producing larger and more equiaxed grains, with smooth boundaries. This effect does not significantly modify the single-maximum pattern of c-axes that are distributed at a low angle to the shortening direction. However, in experiments with significant recrystallization the a-axes rotate towards the elongation axis at the same time as the c-axes rotate towards the compression axis. If slip systems on prismatic and/or pyramidal planes are active, it is thought that a-axes gradually concentrate with depth (Miyamoto, 2005). The bulk activity of the slip systems is different depending on the relative activity of deformation versus recrystallization: the non-basal slip systems

  3. Overview of ICE Project: Integration of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, James D.; Blech, Richard A.; Babrauckas, Theresa L.; Jones, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a prototype integrated environment for interactively exploring, analyzing, and validating information from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations and experiments. The Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project is a first attempt at providing a researcher with a common user interface for control, manipulation, analysis, and data storage for both experiments and simulation. ICE can be used as a live, on-tine system that displays and archives data as they are gathered; as a postprocessing system for dataset manipulation and analysis; and as a control interface or "steering mechanism" for simulation codes while visualizing the results. Although the full capabilities of ICE have not been completely demonstrated, this report documents the current system. Various applications of ICE are discussed: a low-speed compressor, a supersonic inlet, real-time data visualization, and a parallel-processing simulation code interface. A detailed data model for the compressor application is included in the appendix.

  4. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.; Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Chang, C. H.; Roy, K.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  5. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Lew, W. S.; Chang, C. H.; Roy, K.

    2015-10-28

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  6. Towards an annually-resolved record of Lateglacial Patagonian ice sheet dynamics using glaciolacustrine varves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, Jacob; Palmer, Adrain; Thorndycraft, Varyl

    2016-04-01

    Proglacial sedimentary archives, in particular, glaciolacustrine varve sequences, offer the potential for detailed reconstructions of past ice sheet dynamics. Specifically, glaciolacustrine varves (i) allow reconstructions of sediment (and thus meltwater) influx at annual and even sub-annual resolution; and (ii) provide a continuous, annually-resolved chronology to estimate rates of change and/or the duration of significant events in the deglaciation of a basin. In South America, glacial geologists have relied heavily on cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating to construct chronologies for palaeoglaciological activity. Whilst effective, the typical uncertainties associated with boulder dating methods (±10%) preclude the investigation of short-term (e.g. ≤ centennial-scale) glacier and/or climatic change(s), which are shown to be important at modern ice-margins. Moreover, moraine chronologies are fragmentary, and inherently biased towards episodes of positive glacier mass balance (i.e. moraine construction), and thus limit our understanding of ice sheet retreat dynamics. By contrast, long, continuous, high-resolution (i.e. varve) palaeolimnological records have the potential to significantly refine models of ice sheet deglaciation. In this talk, we present data from Valle Fenix Chico, in the Lago Buenos Aires (LBA) basin (-46.57°S -71.07°W), in which ice-contact Glacial Lake Buenos Aires formed as the LBA ice lobe of Patagonian ice sheet withdrew from its innermost LGM moraine (~17.2 ± 0.9 ka). Thick (>40m) sequences of laminated glaciolacustrine sediment were deposited in the palaeolake, and are now exposed in a sub-aerial canyon that was cut when the lake drained. We report on the detailed macro- and micro-facies of the LBA sediments. In particular, we: (1) develop a process model for the formation of silt and clay couplets, which suggests an annual (varve) origin; (2) present varve series for the initial phase (~1kyr) of LBA ice lobe deglaciation.

  7. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Low Temperature Ice and Kuiper Belt Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Fat'yanov, O. V.; Engelhardt, H.; Fraser, W. C.

    2009-09-01

    We model mutual gravitationally driven impact interactions in a nearly gas-free environment of the Kuiper belt (KB) and use low-temperature (< 100 K) ice dynamic strength dependent collisional out-come (accretion vs. erosion and fragmentation) models. These lead to theoretically predictable distributions of object number density, vs. mass distributions. These derived mass distributions are comparable to the now rapidly growing KB survey data. Tensional failure of single and polycrystalline ice in the temperature range from 263 to 128 K was measured for high strain rate, c.a. 104 s-1, dynamic loading conditions. Experiments, similar to Lange and Ahrens(1991)(LA), were conducted using a gas gun launched Lexan projectile. The liquid nitrogen cooled ice target approaching KB-like temperatures was partially confined, rather than using the LA confined geometry. Another set of experiments used a drop tube projectile launcher within the 263 K Caltech Ice Laboratory and at 163 K in a liquid nitrogen cooled chamber. New experiments give tensile strengths of 7.6±1.5 MPa at 263 K and 9.1±1.5 MPa at 163 K for unconfined, free of visual initial defects and measurable imperfections ice samples. The new strengths are lower than the earlier LA data ( 17 MPa). The major differences arise from ice target assembly. LA used polycrystalline ice samples confined in annular stainless steel target rings. New measurements were partially confined, in not initially contacting concentric target rings. Later shots used unconfined configurations with ice pellets affixed to aluminum foil. Circumferential confinement is known to increase the material damage threshold upon both compression and tensile loading. Previous confinement in LA is the main cause of the above discrepancy. Present tensile strengths are only a few times higher than 0.7 - 3.0 MPa summarized in Petrovic (2003) for quasistatic tension at 10-7 to 10-3 s-1 strain rate.

  8. Migration phenology and seasonal fidelity of an Arctic marine predator in relation to sea ice dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Seth G; Derocher, Andrew E; Thiemann, Gregory W; Lunn, Nicholas J

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how seasonal environmental conditions affect the timing and distribution of synchronized animal movement patterns is a central issue in animal ecology. Migration, a behavioural adaptation to seasonal environmental fluctuations, is a fundamental part of the life history of numerous species. However, global climate change can alter the spatiotemporal distribution of resources and thus affect the seasonal movement patterns of migratory animals. We examined sea ice dynamics relative to migration patterns and seasonal geographical fidelity of an Arctic marine predator, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Polar bear movement patterns were quantified using satellite-linked telemetry data collected from collars deployed between 1991-1997 and 2004-2009. We showed that specific sea ice characteristics can predict the timing of seasonal polar bear migration on and off terrestrial refugia. In addition, fidelity to specific onshore regions during the ice-free period was predicted by the spatial pattern of sea ice break-up but not by the timing of break-up. The timing of migration showed a trend towards earlier arrival of polar bears on shore and later departure from land, which has been driven by climate-induced declines in the availability of sea ice. Changes to the timing of migration have resulted in polar bears spending progressively longer periods of time on land without access to sea ice and their marine mammal prey. The links between increased atmospheric temperatures, sea ice dynamics, and the migratory behaviour of an ice-dependent species emphasizes the importance of quantifying and monitoring relationships between migratory wildlife and environmental cues that may be altered by climate change. PMID:23510081

  9. Design and Dynamic Analysis of a Novel Biomimetic Robotics Hip Joint.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bingyan; Chen, Liwen; Wang, Zhijun; Zhao, Yuanhao; Li, Zhanxian; Jin, Zhenlin

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the workspace and the carrying capacity of biomimetic robotics hip joint, a novel biomimetic robotics hip joint was developed. The biomimetic robotics hip joint is mainly composed of a moving platform, frame, and 3-RRR orthogonal spherical parallel mechanism branched chains, and has the characteristics of compact structure, large bearing capacity, high positioning accuracy, and good controllability. The functions of the biomimetic robotics hip joint are introduced, such as the technical parameters, the structure and the driving mode. The biomimetic robotics hip joint model of the robot is established, the kinematics equation is described, and then the dynamics are analyzed and simulated with ADAMS software. The proposed analysis methodology can be provided a theoretical base for biomimetic robotics hip joint of the servo motor selection and structural design. The designed hip joint can be applied in serial and parallel robots or any other mechanisms. PMID:27018226

  10. Design and Dynamic Analysis of a Novel Biomimetic Robotics Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bingyan; Chen, Liwen; Wang, Zhijun; Zhao, Yuanhao; Li, Zhanxian; Jin, Zhenlin

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the workspace and the carrying capacity of biomimetic robotics hip joint, a novel biomimetic robotics hip joint was developed. The biomimetic robotics hip joint is mainly composed of a moving platform, frame, and 3-RRR orthogonal spherical parallel mechanism branched chains, and has the characteristics of compact structure, large bearing capacity, high positioning accuracy, and good controllability. The functions of the biomimetic robotics hip joint are introduced, such as the technical parameters, the structure and the driving mode. The biomimetic robotics hip joint model of the robot is established, the kinematics equation is described, and then the dynamics are analyzed and simulated with ADAMS software. The proposed analysis methodology can be provided a theoretical base for biomimetic robotics hip joint of the servo motor selection and structural design. The designed hip joint can be applied in serial and parallel robots or any other mechanisms. PMID:27018226

  11. The hierarchical structure of glacial climatic oscillations: Interactions between ice-sheet dynamics and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Paillard, D.

    1995-04-01

    Abrupt climatic oscillations around the North Atlantic have been identified recently in Greenland ice cores as well as in North Atlantic marine sediment cores. The good correlation between the {open_quote}Dansgaard Oeschger events{close_quote} in the ice and the {open_quote}Heinrich events{close_quote} in the ocean suggests climate, in the North Atlantic region, underwent several massive reorganizations in the last glacial period. A characteristic feature seems to be their hierarchical structure. Every 7 to 10-thousand years, when the temperature is close to its minimum, the ice-sheet undergoes a massive iceberg discharge. This Heinrich event is followed by an abrupt warming. then by other oscillations, each lasting between one and two thousand years. These secondary oscillations do not have a clear signature in marine sediments but constitute most of the{open_quote} Dansgaard-Oeschger events{close_quote} found in the ice. A simplified model coupling an ice-sheet and an ocean basin, to illustrate how the interactions between these two components can lead to such a hierarchical structure. The ice-sheet model exhibits internal oscillations composed of growing phases and basal ice melting phases that induce massive iceberg discharges. These fresh water inputs in the ocean stop for a moment the thermohaline circulation, enhancing the temperature contrast between low- and high-latitudes. Just after this event, the thermohaline circulation restarts and an abrupt warming of high-latitude regions is observed. For some parameter values, these warmer temperatures have some influence on the ice-sheet, inducing secondary oscillations similar to those found in paleoclimatic records. Although the mechanism presented here may be too grossly simplified. it nevertheless underlines the potential importance of the coupling between ice-sheet dynamics and oceanic thermohaline circulation on the structure of the climatic records during the last glacial period. 33 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Numerical Investigations of the Dynamic Shear Behavior of Rough Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junyu; Xu, Songlin; Hu, Shisheng

    2014-09-01

    The dynamic shear behavior of rock joints is significant to both rock engineering and earthquake dynamics. With the discrete element method (DEM), the dynamic direct-shear tests on the rough rock joints with 3D (sinusoidal or random) surface morphologies are simulated and discussed. Evolution of the friction coefficient with the slip displacement shows that the 3D DEM joint model can accurately reproduce the initial strengthening, slip-weakening, and steady-sliding responses of real rock joints. Energy analyses show that the strengthening and weakening behavior of the rock joint are mainly attributed to the rapid accumulation and release of the elastic energy in the joint. Then, effects of the surface roughness and the normal stress on the friction coefficient and the micro shear deformation mechanisms, mainly volume change and asperity damage, of the rock joint are investigated. The results show that the peak friction coefficient increases logarithmically with the increasing surface roughness, but decreases exponentially with the increasing normal stress. In addition, the rougher rock joint exhibits both higher joint dilation and asperity degradation. However, high normal stress constrains the joint dilation, but promotes the degree of asperity degradation significantly. Lastly, the effects of the 3D surface morphology on the shear behavior of the rock joint are investigated with a directional roughness parameter. It is observed that the anisotropy of the surface roughness consequently results in the variation of the peak friction coefficient of the joint corresponding to different shearing directions as well as the micro shear deformation mechanisms, e.g., the extent of joint dilation.

  13. Study of ice cluster impacts on amorphous silica using the ReaxFF reactive force field molecular dynamics simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnamoun, A.; van Duin, A. C. T.

    2016-03-01

    We study the dynamics of the collisions between amorphous silica structures and amorphous and crystal ice clusters with impact velocities of 1 km/s, 4 km/s, and 7 km/s using the ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation method. The initial ice clusters consist of 150 water molecules for the amorphous ice cluster and 128 water molecules for the crystal ice cluster. The ice clusters are collided on the surface of amorphous fully oxidized and suboxide silica. These simulations show that at 1 km/s impact velocities, all the ice clusters accumulate on the surface and at 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, some of the ice cluster molecules bounce back from the surface. At 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, few of the water molecules dissociations are observed. The effect of the second ice cluster impacts on the surfaces which are fully covered with ice, on the mass loss/accumulation is studied. These studies show that at 1 km/s impacts, the entire ice cluster accumulates on the surface at both first and second ice impacts. At higher impact velocities, some ice molecules which after the first ice impacts have been attached to the surface will separate from the surface after the second ice impacts at 7 km/s impact velocity. For the 4 km/s ice cluster impact, ice accumulation is observed for the crystal ice cluster impacts and ice separation is observed for the amorphous ice impacts. Observing the temperatures of the ice clusters during the collisions indicates that the possibility of electron excitement at impact velocities less than 10 km/s is minimal and ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation can predict the chemistry of these hypervelocity impacts. However, at impact velocities close to 10 km/s the average temperature of the impacting ice clusters increase to about 2000 K, with individual molecules occasionally reaching temperatures of over 8000 K and thus it will be prudent to consider the concept of electron excitation at these higher impact velocities

  14. Temporal Changes in Spatial Distribution of Basal Melting and Freezing in the Catchment Areas of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C, West Antarctica: Interplay of Climatic Changes and Ice Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, S. W.; Tulaczyk, S.; Joughin, I.

    2002-12-01

    Basal thermal regimen of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) plays the key role in determining the dynamics and stability of this ice sheet. Basal melt water lubricates the ice base allowing fast ice streaming while basal freeze-on increases basal resistance to ice flow. Within WAIS, basal melting is dominant in the interior, where geothermal heat is trapped underneath ~2-to-4-km-thick layer of ice. Basal freeze-on is dominant beneath the slow moving, ~1-km-thick interstream ridges separating fast-moving ice streams. There, conductive heat escape through exceeds the geothermal flux and basal frictional heating is low. Using a time-dependent basal energy balance model (Vogel et al., in press) we examined spatial and temporal distribution of basal melting and freezing in the catchment areas of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~20,000 years ago). Model results indicate that basal melting peaked despite lower surface temperatures during late LGM (~15,000), due to a thickened ice sheet (Steig et al., 2001). This widespread and abundant basal lubrication may have initiated the retreat and thinning of the ice sheet that continued through the Holocene. However, the ice-sheet thinning itself caused gradually a general decrease in basal melting rates in spite of higher Holocene surface temperatures. This reduction in basal water production may be responsible for the recent stoppage of Ice Stream C and slow down of the Whillans Ice Stream. Our modeling results indicate that WAIS is still adjusting to the significant climate warming that marked the end of the LGM and the beginning of Holocene. Only the thinnest portions of the Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C (<1 km) might have adjusted enough to cause locally significant basal freeze-on and to, at least temporarily, slow the ice sheet decay (Joughin and Tulaczyk, 2002). Basal thermal regimen of the rest of WAIS is changing in such a way as to favor increased basal melting, and

  15. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Helium Absorption by Amorphous and Crystalline Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilic, Ante; Jónsson, Hannes; Kay, Bruce D.

    2001-03-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations employing classical trajectory techniques are used to study the absorption of He atoms by thin amorphous and crystalline ice films at low temperatures. On the basal plane of hexagonal crystalline ice the He absorption probability increases strongly with increasing translational energy and decreases dramatically as the incident angle is moved away from the surface normal. Analysis of the trajectories indicates that absorption occurs through hexagonal ring structures existing at the ice surface and that the active absorption zone is highly-localized near the center of these rings. Furthermore, the area of this active absorption zone increases dramatically with increasing translational energy. These findings are indicative of a large activation barrier and a strong steric effect for the insertion of the He atoms into the bulk. Helium uptake by amorphous ice is studied on a glassy solid formed by rapid quenching of a thermally equilibrated, high-temperature liquid. The He absorption probability increases with incident translation energy and decreases with incident angle but in a much less dramatic manner than on crystalline ice. The differences between crystalline and amorphous ice arise from a broader distribution of absoprtion sites on the amorphous sample. The details of the simulations and comparison with recent experiments will be presented. *Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

  16. Molecular Reorientation Dynamics Govern the Glass Transitions of the Amorphous Ices.

    PubMed

    Shephard, J J; Salzmann, C G

    2016-06-16

    The glass transitions of low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) are the topic of controversial discussions. Understanding their exact nature may be the key to explaining the anomalies of liquid water but has also got implications in the general context of polyamorphism, the occurrence of multiple amorphous forms of the same material. We first show that the glass transition of hydrogen-disordered ice VI is associated with the kinetic unfreezing of molecular reorientation dynamics by measuring the calorimetric responses of the corresponding H2O, H2(18)O, and D2O materials in combination with X-ray diffraction. Well-relaxed LDA and HDA show identical isotopic-response patterns in calorimetry as ice VI, and we conclude that the glass transitions of the amorphous ices are also governed by molecular reorientation processes. This "reorientation scenario" seems to resolve the previously conflicting viewpoints and is consistent with the fragile-to-strong transition from water to the amorphous ices. PMID:27243277

  17. Maximum extent and dynamic behaviour of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet west of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Jared Lee; Benetti, Sara; Dunlop, Paul; Ó Cofaigh, Colm

    2015-11-01

    A complete reconstruction of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) is hindered by uncertainty surrounding its offshore extent and dynamic behaviour. This study addresses this problem by reconstructing the depositional history of four sediment cores taken from a series of sinuous glacigenic sediment ridges on the continental shelf west of Ireland. We present new geomorphic, sedimentary and micropaleontological data that record a maximum westward BIIS extent that was at least 80 km farther offshore from any previous estimates. The data suggests that a large ice shelf formed over parts of the shelf prior to retreat. This new data increases the areal extent of grounded BIIS ice by ˜6700 km2 from previous estimates, which represents a ˜3% increase in the Irish Sector of the ice sheet. Three new AMS radiocarbon dates demonstrate for the first time that the BIIS advanced to the shelf edge during last glaciation (Late Midlandian/Late Devensian), with ice advance onto the Porcupine Bank occurring after 24,720 ± 260 yr Cal. BP. Deglaciation was complete by 19,182 ± 155 yr Cal. BP, thus constraining BIIS occupation over the Porcupine Bank to less than 5500 years. Estimated retreat rates of marine-terminating ice across the shelf range from ˜70 to 180 myr-1.

  18. Changes in ice dynamics of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica in the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Morlighem, M.; Scheuchl, B.

    2015-12-01

    Totten Glacier, East Antarctica, a glacier that holds a 3.9 m sea level change equivalent, has thinned and lost mass for decades. Observed thinning by satellite altimeters is concentrated in areas of fast flow, hence is probably of dynamic origin. In this study, we derive time series of ice velocity from Landsat and interferometric (InSAR) data (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT-1, ALOS PALSAR, TanDEM/TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed) for the past two decades. We find significant speed-up in ice velocity, especially in 2002-2007, followed by a period of slow decrease in 2010-2014. Comparing the results with RACMO2 surface mass balance suggests that the glacier mass balance was already negative in 1996 and became more negative into the 2000s. To examine the stability of the glacier, we develop high-resolution topographies of the ice surface and ice bottom using NASA Operation IceBridge data, TanDEM-X data, InSAR ice velocities and a mass conservation method. The results reveal a 1,500-2,300 m deep grounding zone that extends 15 km inland along two prominent side lobes grounded only 15-50 m above hydrostatic equilibrium, or ice plain. At the glacier center, we detect a 1-3±0.12 km retreat of the grounding line by comparing differential InSAR data acquired 17 years apart. The retreat is asymmetrical along the two lobes, but consistently indicates a total thinning of 12 m from 1996 to 2013. On the ice plain, the glacier is prone to rapid retreat around a region about 7 km long, but inland the bed elevation rises. Sustained thinning will cause further retreat and probably speed up, but will not be conducive to a marine- instability. The ultimate cause of the changes is not known, but probably of oceanic origin, with most changes taking place in 2002-2007.

  19. Water Dynamics, Ice Stability, and Salts in Victoria Valley Soils, Antarctica: An Instructive Analog for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Hallet, B.

    2006-12-01

    Typical of many hyper arid soils of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, soils in Victoria Valley contain ~10% ice (at 0.3 m depth) and ~0.4% salt, mostly calcium and sodium sulfates and chlorides, making them excellent analogs to Martian soils. Vapor diffusion models designed to investigate ground ice dynamics on Mars are not entirely satisfactory because they lead to the unrealistic expectation that soils in Antarctica should be ice free within a 1000 years of being saturated with ice, and yet even ancient soils characteristically contain abundant ice near the surface. Validation of these diffusion models has been limited because of the paucity of field based climate and soil climate data. Moreover the models ignore the significant effects of snow cover, surface melt water and salts on vapor fluxes. To better understand the presence and stability of the shallow subsurface ice we are exploring the effect of snow cover and salts on vapor fluxes. Ice stability was investigated using high-resolution climate and soil temperature data from 2002 to 2005. According to the vapor diffusion model ice sublimates at an average rate of 0.22 mm a-1, corresponding to an ice recession of ~1.3 mm a-1 for soil with 10% ice content. Some of the water vapor is transported to the atmosphere; however, some water vapor accumulates at depth in the soil. Furthermore, snow cover during the summer may substantially reduce annual ice loss. Stable isotopes (δ18O & δD) in ice along a 1.6m vertical soil profile reveal a deuterium excess (-13 to -77 ‰) with the greatest enrichment of heavy isotopes at the top of the ice cement and decreasing with depth to form a concave-down profile. This isotopic profile was interpreted using a quantitative model of H2O transport in perennially frozen soil, including the advection-dispersion of heavy isotope- enriched surface water into the ice-cement. It suggests an average infiltration rate of 0.7 mm a-1 of brine if 2.5% of the H2O present is unfrozen, a

  20. Correlation and prediction of dynamic human isolated joint strength from lean body mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Abhilash K.; Hasson, Scott M.; Aldridge, Ann M.; Maida, James C.; Woolford, Barbara J.

    1992-01-01

    A relationship between a person's lean body mass and the amount of maximum torque that can be produced with each isolated joint of the upper extremity was investigated. The maximum dynamic isolated joint torque (upper extremity) on 14 subjects was collected using a dynamometer multi-joint testing unit. These data were reduced to a table of coefficients of second degree polynomials, computed using a least squares regression method. All the coefficients were then organized into look-up tables, a compact and convenient storage/retrieval mechanism for the data set. Data from each joint, direction and velocity, were normalized with respect to that joint's average and merged into files (one for each curve for a particular joint). Regression was performed on each one of these files to derive a table of normalized population curve coefficients for each joint axis, direction, and velocity. In addition, a regression table which included all upper extremity joints was built which related average torque to lean body mass for an individual. These two tables are the basis of the regression model which allows the prediction of dynamic isolated joint torques from an individual's lean body mass.

  1. Continuous Ice Formation in a Tube by Using Water-Oil Emulsion for Dynamic-type Ice-Making Cold Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yoshinari; Nakagawa, Shinji; Okada, Masashi; Matsumoto, Koji; Kawagoe, Tetsuo

    Dynamic-type of ice-making cold thermal energy storage systems using water-silicone oil emulsion with an additive, (C2H50)3SiC3H6NH2, has been proposed. Two kinds of heat exchanger were examined and the performances were compared with each other. One type of heat exchanger was a spiral tube and it was immersed in a low temperature thermostatic bath. The other was coil-shaped double tube heat exchanger using two tubes. The emulsion was circulated to make ice continuously. These systems were operated under various cooling conditions (flow rates of the emulsion and brine temperatures). The effects of the tube materials (fluororesin and non-fluororesin) and thickness were also examined. Slurry ice was formed continuously without adhesion of ice to the cooling wall under certain conditions. Using the fluororesin tube prevented ice from the adhesion and it enlarged the range of the cooling conditions under which slurry ice was formed continuously. Furthermore, by making thickness of the tube thinner and increasing the heat transfer coefficient on the outside of the tube, ice was made continuously without lowering the rate of ice formation at a higher brine temperature.

  2. Topographic controls on post-Oligocene changes in ice-sheet dynamics, Prydz Bay region, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Siegert, M. J.; Payne, A. J.; Hambrey, M. J.; O'Brien, P. E.; Cooper, A. K.; Leitchenkov, G.

    2004-03-01

    Within the general trend of post-Eocene cooling, the largest and oldest outlet of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet underwent a change from ice-cliff to ice-stream and/or ice-shelf dynamics, with an associated switch from line-source to fan sedimentation. Available geological data reveal little about the causes of these changes in ice dynamics during the Miocene Epoch, or the subsequent effects on Pliocene Pleistocene ice-sheet history. Ice-sheet numerical modeling reveals that bed morphology was probably responsible for driving changes in both ice-sheet extent and dynamics in the Lambert-Amery system at Prydz Bay. The modeling shows how the topography and bathymetry of the Lambert graben and Prydz Bay control ice-sheet extent and flow. The changes in bathymetric volume required for shelf-edge glaciation correlate well with the Prydz Channel fan sedimentation history. This suggests a negative feedback between erosion and glaciation, whereby the current graben is overdeepened to such an extent that shelf-edge glaciation is now not possible, even if a Last Glacial Maximum environment recurs. We conclude that the erosional history of the Lambert graben and Prydz Bay in combination with the uplift histories of the surrounding mountains are responsible for the evolution of this section of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, once the necessary initial climatic conditions for glaciation were achieved at the start of the Oligocene Epoch.

  3. Simulations of Sea-Ice Dynamics Using the Material-Point Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulsky, D.; Schreyer, H.; Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Coon, G.; Kwok, R.

    2006-01-01

    provide similar overall deformation as the viscous-plastic model; however, explicit regions of opening and shear are predicted. Furthermore, the efficiency of MPM with the elastic-decohesive model is competitive with the current best methods for sea ice dynamics. Simulations will also be presented for an area of the Beaufort Sea, where predictions can be validated against satellite observations of the Arctic.

  4. Polar bear population dynamics in the southern Beaufort Sea during a period of sea ice decline.

    PubMed

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Mcdonald, Trent L; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Richardson, Evan S; Regehr, Eric V; Douglas, David C; Durner, George M; Atwood, Todd; Amstrup, Steven C

    2015-04-01

    In the southern Beaufort Sea of the United States and Canada, prior investigations have linked declines in summer sea ice to reduced physical condition, growth, and survival of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Combined with projections of population decline due to continued climate warming and the ensuing loss of sea ice habitat, those findings contributed to the 2008 decision to list the species as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Here, we used mark-recapture models to investigate the population dynamics of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea from 2001 to 2010, years during which the spatial and temporal extent of summer sea ice generally declined. Low survival from 2004 through 2006 led to a 25-50% decline in abundance. We hypothesize that low survival during this period resulted from (1) unfavorable ice conditions that limited access to prey during multiple seasons; and possibly, (2) low prey abundance. For reasons that are not clear, survival of adults and cubs began to improve in 2007 and abundance was comparatively stable from 2008 to 2010, with ~900 bears in 2010 (90% CI 606-1212). However, survival of subadult bears declined throughout the entire period. Reduced spatial and temporal availability of sea ice is expected to increasingly force population dynamics of polar bears as the climate continues to warm. However, in the short term, our findings suggest that factors other than sea ice can influence survival. A refined understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying polar bear population dynamics is necessary to improve projections of their future status and facilitate development of management strategies. PMID:26214910

  5. Polar bear population dynamics in the southern Beaufort Sea during a period of sea ice decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; McDonald, Trent L.; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E.; Richardson, Evan S.; Regehr, Eric V.; Douglas, David C.; Durner, George M.; Atwood, Todd C.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    In the southern Beaufort Sea of the United States and Canada, prior investigations have linked declines in summer sea ice to reduced physical condition, growth, and survival of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Combined with projections of population decline due to continued climate warming and the ensuing loss of sea ice habitat, those findings contributed to the 2008 decision to list the species as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Here, we used mark–recapture models to investigate the population dynamics of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea from 2001 to 2010, years during which the spatial and temporal extent of summer sea ice generally declined. Low survival from 2004 through 2006 led to a 25–50% decline in abundance. We hypothesize that low survival during this period resulted from (1) unfavorable ice conditions that limited access to prey during multiple seasons; and possibly, (2) low prey abundance. For reasons that are not clear, survival of adults and cubs began to improve in 2007 and abundance was comparatively stable from 2008 to 2010, with ~900 bears in 2010 (90% CI 606–1212). However, survival of subadult bears declined throughout the entire period. Reduced spatial and temporal availability of sea ice is expected to increasingly force population dynamics of polar bears as the climate continues to warm. However, in the short term, our findings suggest that factors other than sea ice can influence survival. A refined understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying polar bear population dynamics is necessary to improve projections of their future status and facilitate development of management strategies.

  6. Ice dynamic contribution to sea-level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula over the next 300 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, Clemens; Barrand, Nicholas; Hindmarsh, Richard; Radic, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Ice shelves fringing the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice sheet have collapsed or retreated in response to rapid regional climate warming. This removal of ice shelves has led to speed-up and subsequent dynamic thinning of outlet glaciers, contributing to sea-level rise (SLR). The British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model (BAS-APISM) was used to simulate the grounded ice sheet response to future ice shelf collapse over the next 300 years. BAS-APISM solves the linearized shallow ice approximation, permitting low computational cost and a large ensemble of scenario calculations. To simulate the ice-dynamic SLR contribution from the AP, the timing of future ice shelf collapse events are estimated by tracking thermal limits of ice shelf viability (-5°C and -9°C mean annual isotherm) in IPCC global climate model (GCM) ensemble temperature projections. If the ice shelf collapses, a grounding-line retreat is applied to each drainage basin feeding into the ice shelf. Temperature fields from 14 different GCMs with two emission scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) are used. Grounding-line retreat scenarios at individual outlet glacier drainage basins are derived using a new parameterization based on multivariate linear regression. A total of 210 ice shelf nourishing basins are modelled. Owing to the linearized ice sheet model, each drainage basin can be modelled individually and SLR contributions from each drainage basin are then simply summed over all basins. Each individual ice shelf nourishing drainage basin was simulated using the ice shelf collapse timing of 14 GCMs with two emission scenarios and tracking the pair of ice shelf viability limits in each GCM. This amounts to ~22000 simulations for all 210 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins. Simulations throughout the GCM and emission ensembles result in SLR of between ~2 and ~17 mm, depending on the timing and collapse state of individual ice shelves. The results highlight the critical role of George VI Ice

  7. Submarine glacial landforms record Late Pleistocene ice-sheet dynamics, Inner Hebrides, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Dayton; Arosio, Riccardo; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Howe, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We use ˜7000 km2 of high-resolution swath bathymetry data to describe and map the submarine glacial geomorphology, and reconstruct Late Pleistocene ice sheet flow configurations and retreat dynamics within the Inner Hebrides, western Scotland. Frequently dominated by outcrops of structurally complex bedrock, the seabed also comprises numerous assemblages of well-preserved glacigenic landforms typical of grounded ice sheet flow and punctuated ice-margin retreat. The occurrence and character of the glacially streamlined landforms is controlled in part by the shallow geology and topography, however these factors alone cannot account for the location, orientation, and configuration of the observed landforms. We attribute the distribution of these elongate streamlined landforms to the onset zone of the former Hebrides Ice Stream (HIS) - part of a major ice stream system that drained 5-10% of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). We suggest this geomorphic signature represents the transition from slow 'sheet flow' to 'streaming flow' as ice accelerated out from an environment characterized by numerous bedrock obstacles (e.g. islands, headlands), towards the smooth, sediment dominated shelf. The majority of streamlined landforms associated with the HIS indicate ice sheet flow to the southwest, with regional-scale topography clearly playing a major role in governing the configuration of flow. During maximal glacial conditions (˜29-23 ka) we infer that the HIS merged with the North Channel-Malin Shelf Ice Stream to form a composite ice stream system that ultimately reached the continental shelf edge at the Barra-Donegal Trough-Mouth Fan. Taken collectively however, the pattern of landforms now preserved at seabed (e.g. convergent flow indicators, cross-cutting flow sets) is more indicative of a thinning ice mass, undergoing reorganization during overall ice sheet retreat (during latter stages of Late Weischselian glaciation). Suites of moraines overprinting the

  8. Brownian motion and quantum dynamics of magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Bovo, L.; Bloxsom, J.A.; Prabhakaran, D.; Aeppli, G.; Bramwell, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    Spin ice illustrates many unusual magnetic properties, including zero point entropy, emergent monopoles and a quasi liquid–gas transition. To reveal the quantum spin dynamics that underpin these phenomena is an experimental challenge. Here we show how crucial information is contained in the frequency dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and in its high frequency or adiabatic limit. The typical response of Dy2Ti2O7 spin ice indicates that monopole diffusion is Brownian but is underpinned by spin tunnelling and is influenced by collective monopole interactions. The adiabatic response reveals evidence of driven monopole plasma oscillations in weak applied field, and unconventional critical behaviour in strong applied field. Our results clarify the origin of the relatively high frequency response in spin ice. They disclose unexpected physics and establish adiabatic susceptibility as a revealing characteristic of exotic spin systems. PMID:23443563

  9. Middle and Late Pennsylvanian cyclothems, American Midcontinent: Ice-age environmental changes and terrestrial biotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaine Cecil, C.; DiMichele, William A.; Elrick, Scott D.

    2014-07-01

    The Pennsylvanian portion of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age was characterized by stratigraphic repetition of chemical and siliciclastic rocks in the equatorial regions of the Pangean interior. Known as “cyclothems”, these stratigraphic successions are a 105 yr-record of glacial waxing and waning, superimposed on longer term, 106 yr intervals of global warming and cooling and a still longer term trend of increasing equatorial aridity. During periods of maximum ice-minimum sea level, the interior craton was widely exposed. Epicontinental landscapes were initially subjected to dry subhumid climate when first exposed, as sea level fell, but transitioned to humid climates and widespread wetlands during maximum lowstands. During interglacials (ice-minima) seasonally dry vegetation predominated. The wetland and seasonally dry biomes were compositionally distinct and had different ecological and evolutionary dynamics.

  10. Influence of Subglacial Conditions on Ice Stream Dynamics: Seismic and Potential Field Data from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Bingham, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    A synthesis of geophysical and glaciological data sets are used to investigate the relationship between ice dynamics and the underlying geology on Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica. We find correlations between subglacial geology and the variability in the flow of the overlying ice. Seismic reflection amplitude analysis shows a layer of soft water-saturated sediment immediately beneath the ice. Beneath this, gravity and magnetic data indicate harder rocks containing a significant geological boundary, aligned in the ice-flow direction. Crossing this boundary, the ice velocity decreases whilst bed roughness and modeled basal drag both increase. The acoustic impedance of the soft sediments at the ice-bed interface shows no significant change across the boundary. The smoother glacier bed, overlying thicker sediments, appears to facilitate the fastest flow. Where the bed is rougher, the soft sediment layer beneath the ice is very thin and overlies basement rocks. We propose that the rough surface of the basement rocks beneath this thin sediment increases the basal drag on the ice, through the intervening soft sediment, without a detectable influence on the sediment's acoustic properties. Changes in the sub-bed (i.e. deeper than the ice-bed interface) lithology appear to account for the contrasting basal drag and ice velocity patterns over the glacier. Subglacial erosion could soon remove the thin sediment layer leading to increased basal drag and reduced ice flow in the future. We conclude that the subglacial geology plays a significant role in controlling the spatial pattern of present-day ice flow and that the consequences of subglacial erosion may be reflected in temporal changes to the ice dynamics in the past and perhaps also in the near future. Schematic of synthesized subglacial interpretation from the area of the seismic surveys. Arrow lengths for ice velocity and basal drag indicate relative magnitudes.

  11. Model calibration for ice sheets and glaciers dynamics: a general theory of inverse problems in glaciology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudici, M.; Baratelli, F.; Comunian, A.; Vassena, C.; Cattaneo, L.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical modelling of the dynamic evolution of ice sheets and glaciers requires the solution of discrete equations which are based on physical principles (e.g. conservation of mass, linear momentum and energy) and phenomenological constitutive laws (e.g. Glen's and Fourier's laws). These equations must be accompanied by information on the forcing term and by initial and boundary conditions (IBCs) on ice velocity, stress and temperature; on the other hand the constitutive laws involve many physical parameters, some of which depend on the ice thermodynamical state. The proper forecast of the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers requires a precise knowledge of several quantities which appear in the IBCs, in the forcing terms and in the phenomenological laws. As these quantities cannot be easily measured at the study scale in the field, they are often obtained through model calibration by solving an inverse problem (IP). The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough and rigorous conceptual framework for IPs in cryospheric studies and in particular: to clarify the role of experimental and monitoring data to determine the calibration targets and the values of the parameters that can be considered to be fixed; to define and characterise identifiability, a property related to the solution to the forward problem; to study well-posedness in a correct way, without confusing instability with ill-conditioning or with the properties of the method applied to compute a solution; to cast sensitivity analysis in a general framework and to differentiate between the computation of local sensitivity indicators with a one-at-a-time approach and first-order sensitivity indicators that consider the whole possible variability of the model parameters. The conceptual framework and the relevant properties are illustrated by means of a simple numerical example of isothermal ice flow, based on the shallow-ice approximation.

  12. Overview of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance and Dynamics from ICESat Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the ICESat mission was to determine the present-day mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, identify changes that may be occurring in the surface-mass flux and ice dynamics, and estimate their contributions to global sea-level rise. Although ICESat's three lasers were planned to make continuous measurements for 3 to 5 years, the mission was re-planned to operate in 33-day campaigns 2 to 3 times each year following failure of the first laser after 36 days. Seventeen campaigns were conducted with the last one in the Fall of 2009. Mass balance maps derived from measured ice-sheet elevation changes show that the mass loss from Greenland has increased significantly to about 170 Gt/yr for 2003 to 2007 from a state of near balance in the 1990's. Increased losses (189 Gt/yr) from melting and dynamic thinning are over seven times larger'than increased gains (25 gt/yr) from precipitation. Parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Antarctic Peninsula are losing mass at an increasing rate, but other parts of West Antarctica and the East Antarctic ice sheet are gaining mass at an increasing rate. Increased losses of 35 Gt/yr in Pine Island, Thwaites-Smith, and Marie-Bryd.Coast are more than balanced by gains in base of Peninsula and ice stream C, D, & E systems. From the 1992-2002 to 2003-2007 period, the overall mass balance for Antarctica changed from a loss of about 60 Gt/yr to near balance or slightly positive.

  13. The dynamics of frazil ice formation in leads and its role in the mass balance of the sea ice pack.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Lead are cracks in sea ice that expose the ocean to the cold atmosphere resulting in the supercooling of the ocean and the formation of frazil ice crystals within the mixed layer. Here we present two studies of ice formation in leads: a single lead model focussing on frazil crystals of varying size within the vertical structure of the mixed layer; a new module explicitly describing frazil ice formation in leads incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE). Both studies consider the supercooling of the ocean, the concentration of frazil crystals within the ocean and their precipitation to the ocean surface as grease ice pushed against one of the lead edges by wind and water drag. The results from the single lead model show how the vertical structure of the mixed layer develops after the lead opens. Sensitivity studies reveal how changing wind speeds play the greatest role in the time taken to refreeze a lead. In the CICE model the new module slows down the refreezing of leads resulting in an longer period of frazil ice production when compared to the original model code. The fraction of frazil-derived sea ice increases from 10% to 50% with the inclusion of the new module. Ice formation rates are increased in areas of high ice concentration and thus has a greater impact within multiyear ice than in the marginal seas. The thickness of sea ice in the central Arctic increases by over 0.5 m whereas within the Antarctic it remains unchanged.

  14. Modelling the impact of submarine frontal melting and ice mélange on glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, J.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Weiss, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two mechanisms are generally proposed to explain seasonal variations in the calving front of tidewater glaciers: submarine melting of the calving face and the mechanical back-force applied by the ice mélange. However, the way these processes affect the calving rate and the glacier dynamics remains uncertain. In this study, we used the finite element model Elmer/Ice to simulate the impact of these forcings on more than 200 two dimensional theoretical flowline glacier configurations. The model, which includes calving processes, suggests that frontal melting affects the position of the terminus only slightly (< a few hundred meters) and does not affect the pluriannual glacier mass balance at all. However, the ice mélange has a greater impact on the advance and retreat cycles of the glacier front (more than several 1000 m) and its consequences for the mass balance are not completely negligible, stressing the need for better characterization of forcing properties. We also show that ice mélange forcing against the calving face can mechanically prevent crevasse propagation at sea level and hence prevent calving. Results also revealed different behaviors in grounded and floating glaciers: in the case of a floating extension, the heaviest forcings can disrupt the glacier equilibrium by modifying its buttressing and ice flux at the grounding line.

  15. Simulation of dynamics of beam structures with bolted joints using adjusted Iwan beam elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Hartwigsen, C. J.; McFarland, D. M.; Vakakis, A. F.; Bergman, L. A.

    2004-05-01

    Mechanical joints often affect structural response, causing localized non-linear stiffness and damping changes. As many structures are assemblies, incorporating the effects of joints is necessary to produce predictive finite element models. In this paper, we present an adjusted Iwan beam element (AIBE) for dynamic response analysis of beam structures containing joints. The adjusted Iwan model consists of a combination of springs and frictional sliders that exhibits non-linear behavior due to the stick-slip characteristic of the latter. The beam element developed is two-dimensional and consists of two adjusted Iwan models and maintains the usual complement of degrees of freedom: transverse displacement and rotation at each of the two nodes. The resulting element includes six parameters, which must be determined. To circumvent the difficulty arising from the non-linear nature of the inverse problem, a multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFF) is employed to extract joint parameters from measured structural acceleration responses. A parameter identification procedure is implemented on a beam structure with a bolted joint. In this procedure, acceleration responses at one location on the beam structure due to one known impulsive forcing function are simulated for sets of combinations of varying joint parameters. A MLFF is developed and trained using the patterns of envelope data corresponding to these acceleration histories. The joint parameters are identified through the trained MLFF applied to the measured acceleration response. Then, using the identified joint parameters, acceleration responses of the jointed beam due to a different impulsive forcing function are predicted. The validity of the identified joint parameters is assessed by comparing simulated acceleration responses with experimental measurements. The capability of the AIBE to capture the effects of bolted joints on the dynamic responses of beam structures, and the efficacy of the MLFF parameter

  16. An Observationally-Validated Theory of Viscous Flow Dynamics at the Ice-Shelf Calving-Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Calving of floating ice shelves exerts a fundamental control on their geometry, which directly determines the forces acting on grounded ice that control ice-sheet stability. At the calving front, the viscous supply of ice is balanced by calving. I show that a boundary layer in viscous ice flow exists at the calving front with simple quantitative characteristics matching one set of empirically-derived calving relationships [1]. This relationship is consequently likely to be related to viscous supply rather than fracturing. This explanation has a deeper significance, since the boundary layer is dynamically analogous to one posited to control the stability of ice flow at the grounding line. The observational validation of the properties of the calving front boundary layer shown here is consequently significant confirmation of the boundary layer theory of grounding-line dynamics [2] and the likelihood of a marine ice-sheet instability. [1] Alley, R.B. and 7 others. (2008). A simple law for ice-shelf calving. Science, 322(5906), 1344. (10.1126/science.1162543.) [2] Ice sheet grounding line dynamics: Steady states, stability and hysteresis. J. Geophys. Res., 112, F03S28, doi:10.1029/2006JF000664.

  17. Biomechanical loading of the shoulder complex and lumbosacral joints during dynamic cart pushing task.

    PubMed

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Sun, Yun; Jaridi, Majid; Hsiao, Hongwei

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of dynamic cart pushing exertions on the biomechanical loading of shoulder and low back. Ten participants performed cart pushing tasks on flat (0°), 5°, and 10° ramped walkways at 20 kg, 30 kg, and 40 kg weight conditions. An optoelectronic motion capturing system configured with two force plates was used for the kinematic and ground reaction force data collection. The experimental data was modeled using AnyBody modeling system to compute three-dimensional peak reaction forces at the shoulder complex (sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and glenohumeral) and low back (lumbosacral) joints. The main effect of walkway gradient and cart weight, and gradient by weight interaction on the biomechanical loading of shoulder complex and low back joints was statistically significant (all p < 0.001). At the lumbosacral joint, negligible loading in the mediolateral direction was observed compared to the anterioposterior and compression directions. Among the shoulder complex joints, the peak reaction forces at the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints were comparable and much higher than the sternoclavicular joint. Increased shear loading of the lumbosacral joint, distraction loading of glenohumeral joint and inferosuperior loading of the acromioclavicular joint may contribute to the risk of work-related low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorder with prolonged and repetitive use of carts. PMID:23566675

  18. Inverse Dynamics Control of Constrained Robots in the Presence of Joint Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IDER, S. KEMAL

    1999-07-01

    An inverse dynamics control algorithm for constrained flexible-joint robots is developed. It is shown that in a flexible-joint robot, the acceleration level inverse dynamic equations are singular because of the elastic media. Implicit numerical integration methods that account for the higher order derivative information are utilized for solving the singular set of differential equations. The control law proposed linearizes and decouples the system and achieves simultaneous and asymptotically stable trajectory tracking control of the end-effector motion and contact forces. Together with the integrators for improving robustness due to modelling errors and disturbances, a fifth order position error dynamics and a third order contact force error dynamics are obtained. A 3R spatial robot with all joints flexible is simulated to illustrate the performance of the method.

  19. Greenland Ice Sheet sediment dynamics with Landsat: Island-wide mapping shows sediment export controlled by ice discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, B. D.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Morlighem, M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a satellite-based survey of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) sediment processes using all images of Greenland in the Landsat7 archive (1999 - 2013). Imaging over 150 proglacial rivers near their ice sheet source to calculate median suspended sediment concentration (SSC) for the Landsat7 era, we find ice sheet evacuation of suspended sediment via rivers is highly spatially variable, with a small percentage of ice sheet termini evacuating sediment at elevated SSCs. Most (67 %) of termini had a median SSC value less than 1000 mg/l, while only 8% had values greater than 2000 mg/l, yet these termini with SSC in excess of 2000 mg/l export ~90 % of suspended sediment from the ice sheet. Combining surface ice velocity data and ice thickness data we find that ice discharge at ice sheet termini largely drives this spatial variability in SSC. Though 1% of the Earth's land surface area, using modeled ice sheet runoff we estimate that the GrIS exports 6 to 11 % of the total sediment export to the global ocean if all sediment is assumed to reach the ocean. Finally, we find river mouth SSC high enough to cause hyperpycnal flow to occur. Hence, sediment can at times be efficiently mobilized from ice sheet directly to fjord bottom/continental shelf.

  20. A Physiological Dynamic Testing Machine for the Elbow Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Johannes; Wendlandt, Robert; Heinritz, Marcus; Schall, Angelika; Schulz, Arndt-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was to develop a test setup combining realistic force transmission with physiological movement patterns at a frequency that mimicked daily use of the elbow, to assess implants in orthopedic joint reconstruction and trauma surgery. Methods: In a multidisciplinary approach, an in vitro biomechanical testing machine was developed and manufactured that could simulate the repetitive forceful movement of the human elbow joint. The construction involved pneumatic actuators. An aluminum forearm module enabled movements in 3 degrees of freedom, while motions and forces were replicated via force and angular sensors that were similar to in vivo measurements. Results: In the initial testing, 16 human elbow joint specimens were tested at 35 Nm in up to 5000 cycles at a range of 10° extension to 110° flexion. The transmitted forces led to failure in 9 out of the 16 tested specimens, significantly more often in females and small specimens. Conclusions: It is possible to construct a testing machine to simulate nearly physiological repetitive elbow motions. The prototype has a number of technical deficiencies that could be modified. When testing implants for the human elbow with cadaver specimens, the specimen has to be chosen according to the intended use of the implant under investigation. PMID:23667406

  1. Numerical Ice-Sheet Modeling of the Long-Term Development of Prydz Bay, Antarctica: Tectonic Controls on Ice-Sheet Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Hambrey, M. J.; Siegert, M. J.; Payne, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    A large quantity of geological data are now available from both offshore and onshore Prydz Bay and the Lambert Graben, East Antarctica, covering the growth and change of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) since early Oligocene time. We have collated much of this information, in order to constrain the rates of deposition of ice-sheet erosional products in this important sector of the EAIS, together with changes in the limits and styles of glaciation. Sedimentological data and indications of past climate from geological archives therefore formed the basis for constructing time-slice snapshots of possible morphological and climatic settings throughout the past 30-35 Ma. All of these data have then been used to constrain, or been tested by, a three-dimensional numerical ice-sheet model, which incorporates grounding-line physics. The primary concern was to assess likely ice-sheet configurations which can be forced to match the geological data, in particular, examining the possible causes of the onset of ice-stream formation in Prydz Bay after the late Miocene epoch. We suggest that tectonically induced changes in the bathymetry of the Lambert Graben and Prydz Bay are one of the major likely causes of changes in ice-sheet dynamics, and thus ice-sheet extent, in this sector of the EAIS. The results of the numerical ice-sheet modeling show clearly that tectonically induced bathymetric changes are sufficient to alter the glacial environment in this region significantly, in particular by controling the grounding and stability of ice within the Lambert Graben and by focusing ice flow from the surrounding area. The history of positive topographic features such as the bounding Prince Charles Mountains are probably not that significant in controlling ice flow, however. Glacial erosion may also have played a role in excavating the Lambert Graben by promoting fast-flowing ice in a positive feedback. We have also assessed possible changes in mass balance regime (climate) and find

  2. Impact of mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic changes in sea ice on the development of low pressure systems in the Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bungert, U.; Schlünzen, K. H.; Ries, H.

    2009-09-01

    In polar regions the exchange of heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere depends on the sea ice distribution. Sea ice acts as an insulating layer between the relatively warm ocean water and the mostly cold air. The sea ice concentration can change on time scales from several hours to a few days due to dynamic processes like ice drift or breaking of the ice sheet and thermodynamic processes like melting and freezing. The influence of these mesoscale changes of the ice distribution on the heat exchange at the surface and on atmospheric processes is investigated by numerical simulations for the Fram Strait region. The studies are performed with the model system METRAS/MESIM (Dierer et al., 2005). It consists of the mesoscale atmospheric model METRAS (Lüpkes and Schlünzen, 1996; Schlünzen, 1990) that is interactively coupled with the mesoscale sea ice model MESIM (Birnbaum, 1998). The sea ice model is able to simulate dynamic and thermodynamic processes in the ice jointly and separately. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate the influence of these processes on the ice concentration and the resulting impact on low pressure systems in detail. Two periods are simulated: The first one from 05 to 07 March 2002, and the second one from 12 to 15 March 2002. During the first phase, a trough was passing from East to West through the Fram Strait region. During the second phase, three cyclones were passing in series over Fram Strait (Brümmer et al., 2008). In March 2002, the field experiment FRAMZY 2002 took place in the region of Svalbard and Fram Strait including ship measurements, aircraft measurements and drift buoys (Brümmer et al., 2005). The model results are compared with these measurements and the influence of changes in the sea ice cover on the exchange of heat and momentum at the surface and on the development of the trough (first phase) and the "cyclone family" (second phase) are investigated. For this development dynamically caused changes of the

  3. Ice nucleation of an insect lipoprotein ice nucleator (LPIN) correlates with retardation of the hydrogen bond dynamics at the myo-inositol ring.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Alexander; Duman, John G; Havenith, Martina

    2016-07-28

    Remarkably little is known about the mechanism of action of ice nucleation proteins (INPs), although their ability to trigger ice nucleation could be used in a broad variety of applications. We present CD measurements of an insect lipoprotein ice nucleator (LPIN) which show that the lipoproteins consist of a high amount of β-structures (35%). Terahertz absorption spectroscopy is used to probe the influence of the LPIN on the H-bond network dynamics. We observe a small, but significant THz excess, as an indication of an influence on the H-bond network dynamics. When adding the ice nucleation inhibitor sodium borate, this effect is considerably reduced, similar to that observed before for antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs). We propose that myo-inositol, the functional group of phosphatidylinositols, is crucial for the observed change of the H-bond network dynamics of hydration water. This hypothesis is confirmed by additional THz experiments which revealed that the influence of myo-inositol on the hydrogen bond network can be blocked by sodium borate, similar to the case of LPINs. Interestingly, we find a less significant effect when myo-inositol is replaced for chiro- and allo-inositol which underlines the importance of the exact positioning of the OH groups for the interaction with the H-bond network. We propose that a local ordering of water molecules is supporting ice nucleation activity for the LPIN in a similar way to that found for AFP activity in the case of hyperactive insect AFPs. PMID:27373225

  4. Reconstructing the last Irish Ice Sheet 1: changing flow geometries and ice flow dynamics deciphered from the glacial landform record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Sarah L.; Clark, Chris D.

    2009-12-01

    The glacial geomorphological record provides an effective means to reconstruct former ice sheets at ice sheet scale. In this paper we document our approach and methods for synthesising and interpreting a glacial landform record for its palaeo-ice flow information, applied to landforms of Ireland. New, countrywide glacial geomorphological maps of Ireland comprising >39,000 glacial landforms are interpreted for the spatial, glaciodynamic and relative chronological information they reveal. Seventy one 'flowsets' comprising glacial lineations, and 19 ribbed moraine flowsets are identified based on the spatial properties of these landforms, yielding information on palaeo-ice flow geometry. Flowset cross-cutting is prevalent and reveals a highly complex flow geometry; major ice divide migrations are interpreted with commensurate changes in the flow configuration of the ice sheet. Landform superimposition is the key to deciphering the chronology of such changes, and documenting superimposition relationships yields a relative 'age-stack' of all Irish flowsets. We use and develop existing templates for interpreting the glaciodynamic context of each flowset - its palaeo-glaciology. Landform patterns consistent with interior ice sheet flow, ice stream flow, and with time-transgressive bedform generation behind a retreating margin, under a thinning ice sheet, and under migrating palaeo-flowlines are each identified. Fast ice flow is found to have evacuated ice from central and northern Ireland into Donegal Bay, and across County Clare towards the south-west. Ice-marginal landform assemblages form a coherent system across southern Ireland marking stages of ice sheet retreat. Time-transgressive, 'smudged' landform imprints are particularly abundant; in several ice sheet sectors ice flow geometry was rapidly varying at timescales close to the timescale of bedform generation. The methods and approach we document herein could be useful for interpreting other ice sheet histories

  5. A finite element approach for the dynamic analysis of joint-dominated structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wu, Shih-Chin

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method to model dynamic structural systems undergoing large rotations is presented. The dynamic systems are composed of rigid joint bodies and flexible beam elements. The configurations of these systems are subject to change due to the relative motion in the joints among interconnected elastic beams. A body fixed reference is defined for each joint body to describe the joint body's displacements. Using the finite element method and the kinematic relations between each flexible element and its corotational reference, the total displacement field of an element, which contains gross rigid as well as elastic effects, can be derived in terms of the translational and rotational displacements of the two end nodes. If one end of an element is hinged to a joint body, the joint body's displacements and the hinge degree of freedom at the end are used to represent the nodal displacements. This results in a highly coupled system of differential equations written in terms of hinge degrees of freedom as well as the rotational and translational displacements of joint bodies and element nodes.

  6. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    output which indicates that non-linear retreat, grounding line stability and up-ice surface thinning is heavily influenced by both vertical and lateral constrictions in marine trough systems. While the offshore ice stream corridors are beginning to reveal their dynamic retreat history, knowledge of the inter-stream areas on the continental shelf remains very poor. The western, onshore sector of the GrIS has a much improved deglacial chronology derived from radiocarbon and new cosmogenic surface exposure dating undertaken in the last decade, but the deglacial history of wide swathes of the inner, mid and outer continental shelf remains completely unknown. The Hellefiske moraines on the West Greenland shelf were described in the late 1970's but little is known of ice sheet retreat behaviour across these areas. Understanding the deglacial signature of such regions is important if we are to use palaeo-reconstructions to understand ice sheet collapse/retreat mechanisms and to inform future model predictions.

  7. Sea ice pCO2 dynamics and air-ice CO2 fluxes during the Sea Ice Mass Balance in the Antarctic (SIMBA) experiment - Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Tison, J.-L.; Ackley, S. F.; Galley, R. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Miller, L. A.; Delille, B.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal evolution of pCO2 profiles in sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica, in October 2007 shows physical and thermodynamic processes controls the CO2 system in the ice. During the survey, cyclical warming and cooling strongly influenced the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of the ice cover. Two sampling sites with contrasting characteristics of ice and snow thickness were sampled: one had little snow accumulation (from 8 to 25 cm) and larger temperature and salinity variations than the second site, where the snow cover was up to 38 cm thick and therefore better insulated the underlying sea ice. We show that each cooling/warming event was associated with an increase/decrease in the brine salinity, total alkalinity (TA), total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2), and in situ brine and bulk ice CO2 partial pressures (pCO2). Thicker snow covers reduced the amplitude of these changes: snow cover influences the sea ice carbonate system by modulating the temperature and therefore the salinity of the sea ice cover. Results indicate that pCO2 was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere both in the in situ bulk ice (from 10 to 193 μatm) and brine (from 65 to 293 μatm), causing the sea ice to act as a sink for atmospheric CO2 (up to 2.9 mmol m-2 d-1), despite supersaturation of the underlying seawater (up to 462 μatm).

  8. Dynamics and reactivity of trapped electrons on supported ice crystallites.

    PubMed

    Stähler, Julia; Gahl, Cornelius; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-17

    The solvation dynamics and reactivity of localized excess electrons in aqueous environments have attracted great attention in many areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This manifold attraction results from the importance of water as a solvent in nature as well as from the key role of low-energy electrons in many chemical reactions. One prominent example is the electron-induced dissociation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Low-energy electrons are also critical in the radiation chemistry that occurs in nuclear reactors. Excess electrons in an aqueous environment are localized and stabilized by the local rearrangement of the surrounding water dipoles. Such solvated or hydrated electrons are known to play an important role in systems such as biochemical reactions and atmospheric chemistry. Despite numerous studies over many years, little is known about the microscopic details of these electron-induced chemical processes, and interest in the fundamental processes involved in the reactivity of trapped electrons continues. In this Account, we present a surface science study of the dynamics and reactivity of such localized low-energy electrons at D(2)O crystallites that are supported by a Ru(001) single crystal metal surface. This approach enables us to investigate the generation and relaxation dynamics as well as dissociative electron attachment (DEA) reaction of excess electrons under well-defined conditions. They are generated by photoexcitation in the metal template and transferred to trapping sites at the vacuum interface of crystalline D(2)O islands. In these traps, the electrons are effectively decoupled from the electronic states of the metal template, leading to extraordinarily long excited state lifetimes on the order of minutes. Using these long-lived, low-energy electrons, we study the DEA to CFCl(3) that is coadsorbed at very low concentrations (∼10(12) cm(-2)). Using rate equations and direct measurement of the change of surface dipole moment, we

  9. On the apparent insignificance of the randomness of flexible joints on large space truss dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, R. M.; Klosner, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Deployable periodic large space structures have been shown to exhibit high dynamic sensitivity to period-breaking imperfections and uncertainties. These can be brought on by manufacturing or assembly errors, structural imperfections, as well as nonlinear and/or nonconservative joint behavior. In addition, the necessity of precise pointing and position capability can require the consideration of these usually negligible and unknown parametric uncertainties and their effect on the overall dynamic response of large space structures. This work describes the use of a new design approach for the global dynamic solution of beam-like periodic space structures possessing parametric uncertainties. Specifically, the effect of random flexible joints on the free vibrations of simply-supported periodic large space trusses is considered. The formulation is a hybrid approach in terms of an extended Timoshenko beam continuum model, Monte Carlo simulation scheme, and first-order perturbation methods. The mean and mean-square response statistics for a variety of free random vibration problems are derived for various input random joint stiffness probability distributions. The results of this effort show that, although joint flexibility has a substantial effect on the modal dynamic response of periodic large space trusses, the effect of any reasonable uncertainty or randomness associated with these joint flexibilities is insignificant.

  10. Dynamic Recrystallization in Ice : In-Situ Observation of the Strain Field during Grain Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Tommasi, A.; Vacher, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurs in minerals, metals, ice and impact on large scale mechanisms as seismic anisotropy, mechanical properties inside the Earth mantle, material forming and anisotropic flow in polar ice sheet, for instance. In this frame, ice can be considered as a model material due to a strong viscoplastic anisotropy and deformation heterogeneities, which are precursors of the recrystallization. During creep deformation at high temperature, DRX occurs from 1% strain and involves grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. As DRX induces an evolution of microstructure and texture, it strongly affects the mechanical behavior, and it is expected to modify the strain field at the grain and/or the sample scale. Creep test (σ=0.5-0.8 MPa) were performed at high temperature (T/Tf 0,98) on granular polycrystalline ice (grains size 1mm) and columnar polycrystalline ice (microstructure 2D 1/2 in plane grain size 10mm) up to 18 % strain. Columnar ice provides interesting feature as it contains only one grain through the thickness and the columns are parallel. Post-deformation texture analysis with an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and with EBSD (Geoscience Montpellier) were used to investigate DRX impact on texture and microstructure, at different scales. With increasing strain texture evolves to a strong concentrated girdle with a preferential orientation of c-axis close to 35° from the compression axis. During the experiment, local strain field is measured on the surface of the sample by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) with a spatial resolution between 0.2 and 0.5 mm, and a strain resolution between 0.2% to 1%. Grain size being large, we obtain a relatively good intra-granular resolution of the strain field. Thanks to the 2D configuration of the columnar ice samples, we can superimpose the strain field measured by DIC. We will present an overview of the impact of DRX on the texture and microstructure, from the 3D configuration down to a