Science.gov

Sample records for ice melting temperature

  1. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  2. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  3. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (<15 days) and sustained mass loss below 2000 m elevation was triggered in 2004 and 2005 as recorded by GRACE when surface melt begins. Initiation of large-scale surface melt was followed rapidly by mass loss. This indicates that surface meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  4. Melting of ice under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2008-01-01

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10–50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above ≈45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid. PMID:18809909

  5. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  6. Linear relation between TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for aqueous solutions of sucrose, trehalose, and maltose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Soga, Makoto; Kajiwara, Kazuhito

    2007-08-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures ( THs) of aqueous sucrose, trehalose, and maltose solutions were measured together with melting temperatures ( Tms). It is shown that there is a linear relation between TH and Tm for these solutions. Almost identical supercooling behavior is observed for these aqueous disaccharide solutions.

  7. The physical basis of enhanced temperature index ice melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalaya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Maxime; Shea, Joseph; Koch, Inka; Wagnon, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Glacier melt is an important component of seasonal water flows in the Himalayas. Due to scarce data availability and computational convenience, most glaciological projections in the Himalayan region derive ice melt from temperature index (TI) or enhanced temperature index (ETI) parameterizations, which require only temperature and solar radiation as inputs. Still, the processes linking these variables to melt remain poorly documented under high-altitude climates, where the air is cold, and the main input is shortwave radiation. In this study, we question the physical basis of enhanced temperature index (ETI) melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalayas. Using atmospheric weather station (AWS) installed on Yala glacier at 5090 m a.s.l and Mera glaciers at 6350 m a.s.l., we study the surface energy balance (SEB) during one melt season, i.e, the monsoon and surrounding weeks, in 2014. The SEB estimates provide insights into the atmospheric controls on the glaciers. We study the variability of correlation coefficients linking daily means of temperature, SEB and SEB components. On Yala at 5090 m a.s.l, energy inputs are high during the pre-monsoon due to low surface albedo and strong incoming solar radiation near the solstice, and melt is strong. The temperature correlates moderately with the SEB (R = 0.58) mainly through sublimation and net longwave radiation. During the monsoon snow deposition reduces the magnitude of net shortwave radiation, thus dampening the melt rates. Strong longwave emission from clouds compensates for the surface emission, and the correlation of temperature with the SEB, mainly explained through net shortwave radiation, decreases (R = 0.49). During the post-monsoon, high albedo, heat losses through sublimation and clear-skies favoring longwave losses at the surface lead to a near zero SEB, and reduced melt. Temperature correlates well with the SEB (R = 0.88) through net longwave radiation. On Mera at 6300 m a.s.l, high surface albedo and

  8. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  9. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  10. Relationship Between Ice Nucleation Temperature Depression and Equilibrium Melting Points Depression of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Norihito; Suzuki, Toru

    We measured the ice nucleation temperature depression , ΔTf , and equilibrium melting points depression, ΔTm, of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos with different cryoprotectant (ethylene glycol, 1.3-propanediol, 1.4-butanediol, glycerol aqueous solutions) treatments. Our obtained results showed the good relationship between the ΔTf ,and ΔTm all samples. In addition the value of λ , which can be obtained from the linear relationship, ΔTf =λ ΔTm, were confirmed to show correlation with the value of λ , as obtained by the W/O emulsion method.

  11. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  12. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  13. Temperature and pressure dependence of the mode Grüneisen parameters close to the melting point in hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacali, H.; Yurtseven, H.

    2007-02-01

    We reexamine the Pippard relations in this study by relating the specific heat CP to the Raman frequency shifts 1/ν∂ and the thermal expansivity αp to the 1/ν∂, when the mode Grüneisen parameter depends on the temperature and pressure close to the melting point in hexagonal ice. From linear relations between them, the values of the slope {dP}/{dT} are deduced in this crystal. Our slope values calculated here do not change significantly compared to those obtained when the mode Grüneisen parameter is taken as a constant close to the melting point in hexagonal ice.

  14. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  15. Developing Temperature Forcing for Snow and Ice Melt Runoff Models in High Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, A. P.; Armstrong, R. L.; Brodzik, M. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Raup, B. H.; Rittger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers and snow cover are natural storage reservoirs that delay runoff on seasonal and longer time-scales. Glacier wastage and reduced snow packs will impact the volume and timing of runoff from mountain basins. Estimates of the contributions of glacier and snow melt to runoff in river systems draining mountain regions are critical for water resources planning. The USAID funded CHARIS project aims to estimate the contributions of glacier and snow melt to streamflow in the Ganges, Indus, Brahmaputra, Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Most efforts to estimate glacier and snow melt contributions use temperature-index or degree-day approaches. Near-surface air temperature is a key forcing variable for such models. As with all mountain regions, meteorological stations are sparse and may have short records. Few stations exist at high elevations, with most stations located in valleys below the elevations of glaciers and seasonal snow cover. Reanalyses offer an alternative source of temperature data. However, reanalyses have coarse resolution and simplified topography, especially in the Himalaya. Surface fields are often biased. Any reanalysis product must be both bias-corrected and "downscaled" to the resolution of the melt-runoff model. We present a combined empirically-based bias-correction and downscaling procedure that uses near-surface air temperature from global atmospheric reanalyses to generate near-surface temperature forcing fields for the five river basins in the CHARIS study area. We focus on three 3rd Generation reanalyses; NASA MERRA, NCEP CFSR and ECMWF ERA-Interim. Evaluation of reanalysis temperature fields reveals differences between seasonal means of 500 hPa air temperatures for the three products are of the order of 1 °C, indicating choice of reanalysis can impact model results. The procedure accounts for these seasonal variations in biases of the reanalysis products and in lapse rates.

  16. Climatology of increased temperatures and melt at Swiss Camp, western slope of Greenland ice sheet, 1991-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; McGrath, D.

    2013-12-01

    Climate observations (1991-2012) will be discussed from the Swiss Camp (69deg 33‧53″N, 49deg 19‧51″W, 1176 m), located at the western slope of the Greenland ice sheet, 60 km inland from Ilulissat. The mean annual temperature of -12 C increased 3.6 C between 1991 and 2012 (1.7 C per decade) with large interannual variability in all seasons. The mean spring temperature increased from -16.0 C to -13.8 C, and the fall temperature increased from -12.4 C to -11.3 C in the same time. The winter temperature showed the largest increase of 6.5 C, whereas summer temperatures increased 3.0 C during the 21 years (1991 - 2012). Radiation has been monitored continuously at Swiss Camp since 1993. Net radiation of 50 W/ m2 was recorded in 2012, the warmest summer month on record. The entire annual snow cover melted at Swiss Camp, reducing the monthly albedo value to 0.4 with bare ice exposed. Interannual variability of snow accumulation ranged between 0.07 and 0.70 m water equivalent, whereas annual snow and ice ablation varied between +0.35 (net gain) and -1.8 m (net loss) for the time period 1991-2012. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is no longer located at Swiss Camp (1176 m elevation) with a net surface lowering of 9.5 m since 1991. Increasing summer air temperatures have resulted in an upward migration of both the percolation facies and ablation area of the Greenland ice sheet. The 0°C isothermal migrated upward at a rate of 35 m/a over the 1995-2012 period in West Greenland. There is a 50% probability of the mean annual dry snow line migrating above Summit by 2025, at which time Summit will experience routine melt on an annual basis. The surface mass balance observations similarly indicate that the ELA has migrated upwards at a rate of 44 m/a over the 1997-2011 period in West Greenland, resulting in a more than doubling of the ablation zone width during this period. Inter-annual variability of monthly mean albedo at the Swiss Camp (1993 - 2012). Albedo at 0.5 is

  17. Basal melt beneath whillans ice stream and ice streams A and C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Teluezyk, S.; Engelhardt, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have used a recently derived map of the velocity of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Streams A and C to help estimate basal melt. Temperature was modeled with a simple vertical advection-diffusion equation, 'tuned' to match temperature profiles. We find that most of the melt occurs beneath the tributaries where larger basal shear stresses and thicker ice favors greater melt (e.g., 10-20 mm/yr). The occurrence of basal freezing is predicted beneath much of the ice plains of Ice Stream C and Whillans Ice Stream. Modelled melt rates for when Ice Stream C was active suggest there was just enough melt water generated in its tributaries to balance basal freezing on its ice plain. Net basal melt for Whillans Ice Stream is positive due to smaller basal temperature gradients. Modelled temperatures on Whillans Ice Stream, however, were constrained by a single temperature profile at UpB. Basal temperature gradients for Whillans B1 and Ice Stream A may have conditions more similar to those beneath Ice Streams C and D, in which case, there may not be sufficient melt to sustain motion. This would be consistent with the steady deceleration of Whillans stream over the last few decades.

  18. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, S.; Adami, N.; Dubois, C.; Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Darbois-Texier, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4°C for which the water density is maximum. The 4°C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  19. Satellite-derived, melt-season surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2000-2005) and its relationship to mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Casey, K.A.; DiGirolamo, N.E.; Wan, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet was measured for each melt season from 2000 to 2005 using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived land-surface temperature (LST) data-product maps. During the period of most-active melt, the mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the ice sheet was highest in 2002 (-8.29 ?? 5.29??C) and 2005 (-8.29 ?? 5.43??C), compared to a 6-year mean of -9.04 ?? 5.59??C, in agreement with recent work by other investigators showing unusually extensive melt in 2002 and 2005. Surface-temperature variability shows a correspondence with the dry-snow facies of the ice sheet; a reduction in area of the dry-snow facies would indicate a more-negative mass balance. Surface-temperature variability generally increased during the study period and is most pronounced in the 2005 melt season; this is consistent with surface instability caused by air-temperature fluctuations. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Ice-shelf melting around Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Rignot, E; Jacobs, S; Mouginot, J; Scheuchl, B

    2013-07-19

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance. Basal melt of 1325 ± 235 gigatons per year (Gt/year) exceeds a calving flux of 1089 ± 139 Gt/year, making ice-shelf melting the largest ablation process in Antarctica. The giant cold-cavity Ross, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves covering two-thirds of the total ice-shelf area account for only 15% of net melting. Half of the meltwater comes from 10 small, warm-cavity Southeast Pacific ice shelves occupying 8% of the area. A similar high melt/area ratio is found for six East Antarctic ice shelves, implying undocumented strong ocean thermal forcing on their deep grounding lines. PMID:23765278

  1. Ice-Shelf Melting Around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance. Basal melt of 1325 ± 235 gigatons per year (Gt/year) exceeds a calving flux of 1089 ± 139 Gt/year, making ice-shelf melting the largest ablation process in Antarctica. The giant cold-cavity Ross, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves covering two-thirds of the total ice-shelf area account for only 15% of net melting. Half of the meltwater comes from 10 small, warm-cavity Southeast Pacific ice shelves occupying 8% of the area. A similar high melt/area ratio is found for six East Antarctic ice shelves, implying undocumented strong ocean thermal forcing on their deep grounding lines.

  2. Monitoring snow melt characteristics on the Greenland ice sheet using a new MODIS land surface temperature and emissivity product (MOD21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, G. C.; Hall, D. K.; Hook, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are sensitive energy-balance parameters that control melt and energy exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. MODIS LST is currently used to monitor melt zones on glaciers and can be used for glacier or ice sheet mass balance calculations. Much attention has been paid recently to the warming of the Arctic in the context of global warming, with a focus on the Greenland ice sheet because of its importance with sea-level rise. Various researchers have shown a steady decline in the extent of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice, both the total extent and the extent of the perennial or multiyear ice. Surface melt characteristics over the Greenland ice sheet have been traditionally monitored using the MODIS LST and albedo products (e.g. MOD11 and MOD10A1). Far fewer studies have used thermal emissivity data to monitor surface melt characteristics due to the lack of suitable data. In theory, longwave emissivity combined with LST information should give a more direct measure of snow melt characteristics since the emissivity is an intrinsic property of the surface, whereas the albedo is dependent on other factors such as solar zenith angle, and shadowing effects. Currently no standard emissivity product exists that can dynamically retrieve changes in longwave emissivity consistently over long time periods. This problem has been addressed with the new MOD21 product, which uses the ASTER TES algorithm to dynamically retrieve LST and spectral emissivity (bands 29, 31, 32) at 1-km resolution. In this study we show that using a new proposed index termed the snow emissivity difference index (SEDI) derived from the MOD21 longwave emissivity product, combined with the LST, will improve our understanding of snow melt and freezeup dynamics on ice sheets such as Greenland. The results also suggest that synergistic use of both thermal-based and albedo data will help to improve our understanding of snow melt dynamics on glaciers and ice

  3. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  4. Mathematical Modelling of Melt Lake Formation on an Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzard, Sammie; Feltham, Daniel; Flocco, Daniela; Sammonds, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of surface meltwater on ice shelves can lead to the formation of melt lakes. These structures have been implicated in crevasse propagation and ice shelf collapse; the Larsen B ice shelf was observed to have a large amount of melt lakes present on its surface just before its collapse in 2002. Through modelling the transport of heat through the surface of the Larsen C ice shelf, where melt lakes have also been observed, this work aims to provide new insights into the ways in which melt lakes are forming and the effect that meltwater filling crevasses on the ice shelf will have. This will enable an assessment of the role of meltwater in triggering ice shelf collapse. The Antarctic Peninsula, where Larsen C is situated, has warmed several times the global average over the last century and this ice shelf has been suggested as a candidate for becoming fully saturated with meltwater by the end of the current century. Here we present results of a 1D mathematical model of heat transfer through an idealised ice shelf. When forced with automatic weather station data from Larsen C, surface melting and the subsequent meltwater accumulation, melt lake development and refreezing are demonstrated through the modelled results. Furthermore, the effect of lateral meltwater transport upon melt lakes is examined. This will be developed through the estimations of meltwater catchment areas and the fraction of the ice shelf where melt lakes are present. Investigating the role of meltwater in ice shelf stability is key as collapse can affect ocean circulation and temperature, and cause a loss of habitat. Additionally, it can cause a loss of the buttressing effect that ice shelves can have on their tributary glaciers, thus allowing the glaciers to accelerate, contributing to sea level rise.

  5. Rapid bottom melting widespread near Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding lines.

    PubMed

    Rignot, Eric; Jacobs, Stanley S

    2002-06-14

    As continental ice from Antarctica reaches the grounding line and begins to float, its underside melts into the ocean. Results obtained with satellite radar interferometry reveal that bottom melt rates experienced by large outlet glaciers near their grounding lines are far higher than generally assumed. The melting rate is positively correlated with thermal forcing, increasing by 1 meter per year for each 0.1 degrees C rise in ocean temperature. Where deep water has direct access to grounding lines, glaciers and ice shelves are vulnerable to ongoing increases in ocean temperature. PMID:12065835

  6. Ice-shelf melting around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.

    2008-12-01

    The traditional view on the mass balance of Antarctic ice shelves is that they loose mass principally from iceberg calving with bottom melting a much lower contributing factor. Because ice shelves are now known to play a fundamental role in ice sheet evolution, it is important to re-evaluate their wastage processes from a circumpolar perspective using a combination of remote sensing techniques. We present area average rates deduced from grounding line discharge, snow accumulation, firn depth correction and ice shelf topography. We find that ice shelf melting accounts for roughly half of ice-shelf ablation, with a total melt water production of 1027 Gt/yr. The attrition fraction due to in-situ melting varies from 9 to 90 percent around Antarctica. High melt producers include the Ronne, Ross, Getz, Totten, Amery, George VI, Pine Island, Abbot, Dotson/Crosson, Shackleton, Thwaites and Moscow University Ice Shelves. Low producers include the Larsen C, Princess Astrid and Ragnhild coast, Fimbul, Brunt and Filchner. Correlation between melt water production and grounding line discharge is low (R2 = 0.65). Correlation with thermal ocean forcing from the ocean are highest in the northern parts of West Antarctica where regressions yield R2 of 0.93-0.97. Melt rates in the Amundsen Sea exhibit a quadratic sensitivity to thermal ocean forcing. We conclude that ice shelf melting plays a dominant role in ice shelf mass balance, with a potential to change rapidly in response to altered ocean heat transport onto the Antarctic continental shelf.

  7. Mathematical Modelling of Melt Lake Formation On An Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzard, Sammie; Feltham, Daniel; Flocco, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of surface meltwater on ice shelves can lead to the formation of melt lakes. These structures have been implicated in crevasse propagation and ice-shelf collapse; the Larsen B ice shelf was observed to have a large amount of melt lakes present on its surface just before its collapse in 2002. Through modelling the transport of heat through the surface of the Larsen C ice shelf, where melt lakes have also been observed, this work aims to provide new insights into the ways in which melt lakes are forming and the effect that meltwater filling crevasses on the ice shelf will have. This will enable an assessment of the role of meltwater in triggering ice-shelf collapse. The Antarctic Peninsula, where Larsen C is situated, has warmed several times the global average over the last century and this ice shelf has been suggested as a candidate for becoming fully saturated with meltwater by the end of the current century. Here we present results of a 1-D mathematical model of heat transfer through an idealized ice shelf. When forced with automatic weather station data from Larsen C, surface melting and the subsequent meltwater accumulation, melt lake development and refreezing are demonstrated through the modelled results. Furthermore, the effect of lateral meltwater transport upon melt lakes and the effect of the lakes upon the surface energy balance are examined. Investigating the role of meltwater in ice-shelf stability is key as collapse can affect ocean circulation and temperature, and cause a loss of habitat. Additionally, it can cause a loss of the buttressing effect that ice shelves can have on their tributary glaciers, thus allowing the glaciers to accelerate, contributing to sea-level rise.

  8. Mathematical Modelling of Melt Lake Formation on an Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltham, D. L.; Buzzard, S. C.; Flocco, D.; Sammonds, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The accumulation of surface meltwater on ice shelves can lead to the formation of melt lakes. These structures have been implicated in crevasse propagation and ice shelf collapse; the Larsen B ice shelf was observed to have a large amount of melt lakes present on its surface just before its collapse in 2002. Through modelling the transport of heat through the surface of the Larsen C ice shelf, where melt lakes have also been observed, this work aims to provide new insights into the ways in which melt lakes are forming and the effect that meltwater filling crevasses on the ice shelf will have. This will enable an assessment of the role of meltwater in triggering ice shelf collapse.The Antarctic Peninsula, where Larsen C is situated, has warmed several times the global average over the last century and this ice shelf has been suggested as a candidate for becoming fully saturated with meltwater by the end of the current century. Here we present preliminary results of a mathematical model of heat transfer through an idealised ice shelf. When forced with automatic weather station data from Larsen C, surface melting and the subsequent meltwater accumulation and melt lake development are demonstrated through the modelled results. Investigating the role of meltwater in ice shelf stability is key as collapse can affect ocean circulation and temperature, and cause a loss of habitat. Additionally, it can cause a loss of the buttressing effect that ice shelves can have on their tributary glaciers, thus allowing the glaciers to accelerate, contributing to sea level rise.

  9. Greenland Ice Sheet Melt from MODIS and Associated Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Worthen, Denise L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) derived from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000-2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500hPa height (from NCEPNCAR). Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward ( 5 days) to full-fledged blocks (5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the largest MODIS melt years (2002 and 2012), the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14-year June-July mean, results in a melt fraction of 40 or more. Summer 2007 had the most blocking days, however atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting.

  10. Turbulent plumes from ice melting into a linearly stratified ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Andrew; Magorrian, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    The melting of submerged marine glacier termini and ice shelves floating atop the ocean has important implications for ice sheet dynamics and sea level rise. When vertical or inclined ice faces melt into a warm salty ocean, the fresh meltwater rises in a buoyant plume along the ice-ocean interface and the resulting turbulent heat transfer provides a feedback on melting rates. We apply a turbulent plume model to consider the dynamics of well-mixed meltwater plumes rising along planar ice faces through a linearly stratified ocean, with vertical gradients of background ocean temperature and salinity. When the driving buoyancy force is dominated by salinity differences, the flow develops in a repeating series of layers, with the meltwater plume accelerating along the slope, rising past its neutral density level, and then separating from the ice face and intruding into the background ocean. We determine approximate scaling laws for the layer heights, melting rates and flow properties as a function of the background ocean temperature and salinity. These scaling laws provide a good collapse across a range of numerical solutions of the plume model, and may prove useful as a simple parameterisation of glacial melting in stratified Greenland fjords.

  11. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  12. Floating Ice-Algal Aggregates below Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  13. Calving fluxes and melt rates of Antarctic ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depoorter, Mathieu A.; Griggs, Jennifer A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2013-04-01

    Iceberg calving has been assumed to be the dominant mass loss term for the Antarctic ice sheet, with previous estimates of the calving flux exceeding 2,000 Gt yr-1. More recently, the importance of melting by the ocean has been demonstrated close to the grounding line and near the calving front. To date, however, no study has reliably quantified the volume of bottom (sub-shelf) melt (BM) and the calving flux (CF) for the whole of Antarctica. The distribution of freshwater in the Southern Ocean and its partitioning between liquid and solid phase is, therefore, poorly constrained. Here, we estimate the mass budget of Antarctic ice shelves using satellite measurements of calving flux, grounding line flux and modelled ice shelf accumulation rates. We obtain a total calving flux of 938 ± 109 Gt yr-1 and a total net bottom melt of 1,130 ± 241 Gt yr-1. Thus, about half of the ice sheet surface mass gain is lost through oceanic erosion before reaching the ice front and the calving flux is less than half the estimate derived from iceberg tracking. Calving is therefore not the most important term in the mass loss of the continent. In addition, the fraction of mass loss from bottom melt varies dramatically from ~10 to 90% between ice shelves. We find that ice shelves with high melt ratios correlate well with those experiencing thinning and enhanced discharge, suggesting that a high melt ratio may be a good indicator of ice shelf vulnerability to changes in ocean temperature.

  14. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems. PMID:25019705

  15. Greenland ice sheet melting during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebroek, Petra M.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-04-01

    During the last interglacial period (LIG) peak temperatures over Greenland were several degrees warmer than today. The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) retreated causing a global sea-level rise in the order of several meters. Large uncertainties still exist in the exact amount of melt and on the source location of this melt. Here we examine the GIS response to LIG temperature and precipitation patterns using the SICOPOLIS ice sheet model. The LIG climate was simulated by forcing the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) with the appropriate greenhouse gases and orbital settings. The resulting LIG ice volume evolution strongly depends on the chosen value of uncertain model parameters for the ice sheet (e.g. basal sliding parameter, PDD factors, and atmospheric temperature lapse rate). We reduce the uncertainty by evaluating an ensemble of model results against present-day observations of ice sheet size, elevation and stability, together with paleo information from deep ice cores. We find a maximum GIS reduction equivalent to 0.8 to 2.2m of global sea-level rise. In this model set-up most of the melting occurs in southwestern Greenland.

  16. Greenland ice sheet melt from MODIS and associated atmospheric variability

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K; Shuman, Christopher A; Worthen, Denise L; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000–2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500 hPa height. Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward (<5 days) to full-fledged blocks (≥5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the years with the greatest melt (2002 and 2012) during the MODIS era, the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14 year June-July mean results in a melt fraction of 40% or more. Though the summer of 2007 had the most blocking days, atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting. Key Points Short-term atmospheric blocking over Greenland contributes to melt episodes Associated temperature anomalies are equally important for the melt Duration and strength of blocking events contribute to surface melt intensity PMID:25821277

  17. Radiatively-driven convection in melt ponds on sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Andrew; Moon, Woosok; Rees Jones, David; Kim, Joo-Hong; Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Melt ponds have a significant impact on the energy budget of sea ice, and the predictability of the evolving summer sea ice cover. Recent observations of melt-pond temperature show complex vertical structure, with significant diurnal variability. To understand the driving physical mechanisms, we use two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in a relatively fresh melt pond. We quantify the competition between internal radiative heating and surface fluxes in controlling the strength of convective flow. We explore variability in the resulting energy balance for a range of forcing, including effects of the diurnal cycle. The results are evaluated in light of the strong sensitivity of sea-ice thickness to net energy flux perturbations of order of a few watts per square metre.

  18. Islands uncovered by melting polar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    Thawing glaciers north of Norway's Svalbard archipelago have revealed at least two unmapped and unclaimed islands, one roughly the size of a basketball court, according to a 20 August Reuters report. In addition, information released in August by the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center indicated that with one month left in the melting season, Arctic sea ice is already below the record minimum. "Reductions of snow and ice are happening at an alarming rate," said Norwegian Environment Minister Helen Bjoernoy. She suggested that these observations may indicate that the loss of sea ice is perhaps accelerating faster than predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which warned in February that summer sea ice could almost vanish by the end of this century.

  19. Using Melting Ice to Teach Radiometric Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald Underkofler

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a mystery setting is used to motivate students to construct their own decay curves of melting ice used as an analogy to radioactive decay. Procedures, materials, apparatus, discussion topics, presentation, and thermodynamics are discussed. (CW)

  20. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  1. Sub-ice shelf circulation and basal melting of the Fimbul Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nost, Ole Anders

    2010-05-01

    The Fimbul Ice Shelf is the largest of the ice shelves in Dronning Maud Land. Due to a narrow and some places non-existent continental shelf, the ice shelves in Dronning Maud Land are situated close to the Warm Deep Water. The Antarctic Slope Front separates the Warm Deep Water from the ice shelves and complicated exchange processes working across this front controls the melting of the Fimbul Ice Shelf and the other ice shelves in Dronning Maud Land. Here we will present analysis of unique data from the Dronning Maud Land coastal zone, as well as preliminary results from the 2009/2010 field work on the Fimbul Ice Shelf. In 2008 eight elephant seals equipped with CTD data loggers collected hydrographic data in the Dronning Maud Land coastal zone from February through October. Analysis of these data shows that overturning of the Antarctic Slope Front is the main process exchanging heat into the ice shelf cavities. This overturning together with an onshore surface Ekman flow leads to a seasonal cycle in the salinity of the coastal water masses, while glacial melting sea ice formation has little influence. During the 2009/2010 field season on the Fimbul Ice Shelf glaciological and oceanographic data were collected. We will show preliminary results of ice flow, ice thickness and basal melting measured using stake nets and phase sensitive radar. Oceanographic data were collected through three hot water drilled access holes in the ice shelf. These data show a water column with temperatures close to the surface freezing point over most of the water column. Relatively warmer water was observed near the bottom on one of the CTD stations. Maximum observed temperature is -1.57 °C. We compare the sub iceshelf hydrography with the hydrography observed by the elephant seals near the ice front in an attempt to reveal the sub ice shelf circulation. We also compare estimated melt rates from the oceanographic data with melt rates estimated with the phase sensitive radar and stake

  2. Massive Ice Layer Formed by Refreezing of Ice-shelf Surface Melt Ponds: Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Luckman, A. J.; Ashmore, D.; Bevan, S. L.; Kulessa, B.; Jansen, D.; O'Leary, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface melt ponds now form frequently on ice shelves across the northern sector of the Antarctic Peninsula in response to regional warming and local föhn winds. Analysis of a new, 1-year set of observations from an Automatic Weather Station on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica, reveals that föhn winds are able to cause intense melt in summer, and even into the late austral autumn. A potentially important, but hitherto unknown, consequence of this intense surface melting and ponding is the formation of high-density near-surface ice from the refreezing of that water. We report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and ground-based radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the formation and spatial extent of this layer, found to be tens of kilometres across and tens of metres deep. The presence of this ice layer has the effect of raising local ice shelf density by ~190 kg m-3 and temperature by 5 - 10 °C above values found in areas unaffected by ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow.

  3. Ocean variability contributing to basal melt rate near the ice front of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzeno, Isabella B.; Beardsley, Robert C.; Limeburner, Richard; Owens, Breck; Padman, Laurie; Springer, Scott R.; Stewart, Craig L.; Williams, Michael J. M.

    2014-07-01

    Basal melting of ice shelves is an important, but poorly understood, cause of Antarctic ice sheet mass loss and freshwater production. We use data from two moorings deployed through Ross Ice Shelf, ˜6 and ˜16 km south of the ice front east of Ross Island, and numerical models to show how the basal melting rate near the ice front depends on sub-ice-shelf ocean variability. The moorings measured water velocity, conductivity, and temperature for ˜2 months starting in late November 2010. About half of the current velocity variance was due to tides, predominantly diurnal components, with the remainder due to subtidal oscillations with periods of a few days. Subtidal variability was dominated by barotropic currents that were large until mid-December and significantly reduced afterward. Subtidal currents were correlated between moorings but uncorrelated with local winds, suggesting the presence of waves or eddies that may be associated with the abrupt change in water column thickness and strong hydrographic gradients at the ice front. Estimated melt rate was ˜1.2 ± 0.5 m a-1 at each site during the deployment period, consistent with measured trends in ice surface elevation from GPS time series. The models predicted similar annual-averaged melt rates with a strong annual cycle related to seasonal provision of warm water to the ice base. These results show that accurately modeling the high spatial and temporal ocean variability close to the ice-shelf front is critical to predicting time-dependent and mean values of meltwater production and ice-shelf thinning.

  4. Sea ice melt onset dynamics in the northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago from RADARSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, M. S.; Howell, S.; Geldsetzer, T.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice melt onset, the appearance of liquid water in its snow cover, decreases surface albedo which increases shortwave absorption and thereby accelerates snow and sea ice melting. Earlier melt onset leads to the earlier formation of open water which enhances the ice-albedo feedback. Sea ice melt onset timing and duration vary considerably, both spatially and temporally, owing to variability in atmospheric forcing; this in turn influences the September sea ice extent. Sea ice melt onset variability has been investigated using coarse resolution passive microwave observation in Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA); however, this does not provide sufficient information about sea ice melt dynamics. We developed a new melt onset algorithm using high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from RADARSAT to better understand sea ice melt onset dynamics in northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago (fig 1) from 1997 to 2014. The algorithm is based on the temporal evolution of the SAR backscatter coefficient (σo), using separate thresholds for seasonal first-year ice and multi-year ice. Results indicated that the mean annual average melt onset date in the northern CAA was on year day 164 (mid-June) with a standard deviation of 4 days over the 18 year period. No significant trend for melt onset date was found over the 18 year period (fig: 2) but extreme early melt onset was detected in 1998 and 2012 associated with anomalous atmospheric forcing. Spatially, sea ice onset over the entire northern CAA varied from a 10-day minimum in 2007, to a 35-day maximum in 2011 and exhibited negative correlation (r=0.70) with the rate of increase in surface air temperature (fig 3) derived from Extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) dataset. An earlier (later) melt onset also results in light (heavier) September sea ice area in the northern CAA (fig 4).

  5. Strong thermodynamic coupling between sub-ice-shelf melting and sea ice in a high-resolution global sea-ice-ocean isopycnal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-ice-shelf melting(freezing) of the Antarctic ice shelves acts as a source(sink) of freshwater, therefore, affects ocean water properties and circulation. In its turn, sub-ice-shelf melting/freezing is controlled by the ocean water properties that reach the sub-ice-shelf cavities. The properties of these water masses are determined by heat and fresh-water exchange with sea ice and atmosphere. Simulations of a high-resolution (1/8 deg) global sea-ice-ocean isopycnal model capable to resolve the ocean circulation in sub-ice-shelf cavities of Antarctic ice shelves and account for the thermodynamic interaction of the circulation with ice shelves show that melting/freezing rates have a strong seasonal cycle with highest melting rates observed in the Austral Fall. On the continental shelf, subsurface ocean temperatures (100-300 m) have a similar seasonal cycle which is lagged with respect to the surface. Shelf temperatures peak in the summertime, followed by rapid cooling towards the freezing point as seasonal ice cover increases. The lagged warming in the subsurface is attributable to reduced heat loss to the atmosphere in the presence of seasonal sea ice. This suggests that the seasonal cycle in melt rates is controlled by the phasing of subsurface temperatures on the continental shelf, which is in turn dominated by sea ice. The outflowing fresh, cold and light meltwater formed in sub-ice-shelf cavities remains in the mixed layer and promotes formation of sea ice and its longer persistence into the Austral Summer. These processes suggest the presence of strong mutual feedbacks between sub-ice-shelf melting and sea ice formation around Antarctic ice shelves.

  6. Duration of the Arctic sea ice melt season: Regional and interannual variability, 1979-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    Melt onset dates, freeze onset dates, and melt season duration were estimated over Arctic sea ice, 1979-2001, using passive microwave satellite imagery and surface air temperature data. Sea ice melt duration for the entire Northern Hemisphere varied from a 104-day minimum in 1983 and 1996, to a 124-day maximum in 1989. Ranges in melt duration were highest in peripheral seas, numbering 32, 42, 44, and 51 days in the Laptev, Barents-Kara, East Siberian and Chukchi Seas, respectively. In the Arctic Ocean, average melt duration varied from a 75-day minimum in 1987 to a 103-day maximum in 1989. On average, melt onset in annual ice began 10.6 days earlier than perennial ice, and freeze onset in perennial ice commenced 18.4 days earlier than annual ice. Average annual melt dates, freeze dates, and melt durations in annual ice were significantly correlated with seasonal strength of the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Following high-index AO winters (January-March), spring melt tended to be earlier and autumn freeze later, leading to longer melt season durations. The largest increases in melt duration were observed in the eastern Siberian Arctic, coincident with cyclonic low pressure and ice motion anomalies associated with high-index AO phases. Following a positive AO shift in 1989, mean annual melt duration increased 2-3 weeks in the northern East Siberian and Chukchi Seas. Decreasing correlations between consecutive-year maps of melt onset in annual ice during 1979-2001 indicated increasing spatial variability and unpredictability in melt distributions from one year to the next. Despite recent declines in the winter AO index, recent melt distributions did not show evidence of reestablishing spatial patterns similar to those observed during the 1979-88 low-index AO period. Recent freeze distributions have become increasingly similar to those observed during 1979-88, suggesting a recurrent spatial pattern of freeze chronology under low-index AO conditions.

  7. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  8. Massive Ice Layer Formed by Refreezing of Ice-shelf Surface Melt Ponds: Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Jansen, Daniela; O'Leary, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Surface melt ponds now form frequently on ice shelves across the northern sector of the Antarctic Peninsula in response to regional warming and local föhn winds. A potentially important, but hitherto unknown, consequence of this surface melting and ponding is the formation of high-density near-surface ice from the refreezing of that water. We report the discovery and physical character of a massive subsurface ice layer located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and ground-based radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the formation and spatial extent of this layer, found to be tens of kilometres across and tens of metres deep. The presence of this ice layer has the effect of raising local ice shelf density by ~190 kg m^-3 and temperature by 5 - 10 degrees C above values found in areas unaffected by ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow.

  9. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  10. Melting beneath Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David; Perrette, Mahé; Beckmann, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Basal melting of fast-flowing Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams due to frictional heating at the ice-bed interface contributes significantly to total glacier mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, yet modelling this basal melt process in Greenland has received minimal research attention. A one-dimensional dynamic ice-flow model is calibrated to the present day longitudinal profiles of 10 major Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams (including the Jakobshavn Isbrae, Petermann Glacier and Helheim Glacier) and is validated against published ice flow and surface elevation measurements. Along each longitudinal profile, basal melt is calculated as a function of ice flow velocity and basal shear stress. The basal shear stress is dependent on the effective pressure (difference between ice overburden pressure and water pressure), basal roughness and a sliding parametrization. Model output indicates that where outlet glaciers and ice streams terminate into the ocean with either a small floating ice tongue or no floating tongue whatsoever, the proportion of basal melt to total melt (surface, basal and submarine melt) is 5-10% (e.g. Jakobshavn Isbrae; Daugaard-Jensen Glacier). This proportion is, however, negligible where larger ice tongues lose mass mostly by submarine melt (~1%; e.g. Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier). Modelled basal melt is highest immediately upvalley of the grounding line, with contributions typically up to 20-40% of the total melt for slippery beds and up to 30-70% for resistant beds. Additionally, modelled grounding line and calving front migration inland for all outlet glaciers and ice streams of hundreds of metres to several kilometres occurs. Including basal melt due to frictional heating in outlet glacier and ice stream models is important for more accurately modelling mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, and therefore, more accurately modelling outlet glacier and ice stream dynamics and responses to future climate change.

  11. Quantification of Dead-ice Melting in Ice-Cored Moraines at the High-Arctic Glacier Holmströmbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomacker, A.; Kjaer, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive dead-ice area has developed at the stagnant snout of the Holmströmbreen glacier on Svalbard following its Little Ice Age maximum. Dead-ice appears mainly as ice-cored moraines, ice-cored eskers and ice- cored kames. The most common dead-ice landform is sediment gravity flows on ice-cored slopes surrounding a large ice-walled, moraine-dammed lake. The lake finally receives the sediment from the resedimentation processes. Dead-ice melting is described and quantified through field studies and analyses of high-resolution, multi-temporal aerial photographs and satellite imagery. Field measurements of backwasting of ice-cored slopes indicate short-term melting rates of c. 9.2 cm/day. Long-term downwasting rates indicate a surface lowering of ice-cored moraines of c. 0.9 m/yr from 1984-2004. Different measures for dead-ice melting are assessed in relation to the temperature record from Svalbard since the termination of the Little Ice Age. The most prominent impact of dead-ice melting is the evolution of the ice-walled lake with an area increasing near-exponentially over the last 40 years. As long as backwasting and mass movement processes prevent build-up of an insulating debris-cover and expose ice-cores to melting, the de-icing continues even though the area is characterized by continuous permafrost.

  12. Antarctic Ice Sheet melting in the southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stanley S.; Hellmer, Hartmut H.; Jenkins, Adrian

    The first oceanographic measurements across a deep channel beneath the calving front of Pine Island Glacier reveal a sub-ice circulation driven by basal melting of 10-12 m yr-1. A salt box model described here gives a melt rate similar to that of ice balance and numerical models, 5-50 times higher than averages for the George VI and Ross Ice Shelves. Melting is fueled by relatively warm Circumpolar Deep Water that floods the deep floor of the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Sea continental shelves, reaching the deep draft of this floating glacier. A revised melt rate for ice shelves in the Southeast Pacific sector raises circumpolar ice shelf melting to 756 Gt yr-1. Given prior estimates of surface accumulation and iceberg calving, this suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet is currently losing mass to the ocean.

  13. Deformation-induced melting in the margins of the West Antarctic ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckale, Jenny; Platt, John D.; Perol, Thibaut; Rice, James R.

    2014-05-01

    Flow of glacial ice in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet localizes in narrow bands of fast-flowing ice streams bordered by ridges of nearly stagnant ice, but our understanding of the physical processes that generate this morphology is incomplete. Here we study the thermal and mechanical properties of ice-stream margins, where flow transitions from rapid to stagnant over a few kilometers. Our goal is to explore under which conditions the intense shear deformation in the margin may lead to deformation-induced melting. We propose a 2-D model that represents a cross section through the ice stream margin perpendicular to the downstream flow direction. We limit temperature to the melting point to estimate melt rates based on latent heat. Using rheology parameters as constrained by laboratory data and observations, we conclude that a zone of temperate ice is likely to form in active shear margins.

  14. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  15. Seasonal evolution of melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Melinda A.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Perovich, Donald K.; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A.; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Light, Bonnie

    2015-09-01

    The seasonal evolution of melt ponds has been well documented on multiyear and landfast first-year sea ice, but is critically lacking on drifting, first-year sea ice, which is becoming increasingly prevalent in the Arctic. Using 1 m resolution panchromatic satellite imagery paired with airborne and in situ data, we evaluated melt pond evolution for an entire melt season on drifting first-year and multiyear sea ice near the 2011 Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS) site in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. A new algorithm was developed to classify the imagery into sea ice, thin ice, melt pond, and open water classes on two contrasting ice types: first-year and multiyear sea ice. Surprisingly, melt ponds formed ˜3 weeks earlier on multiyear ice. Both ice types had comparable mean snow depths, but multiyear ice had 0-5 cm deep snow covering ˜37% of its surveyed area, which may have facilitated earlier melt due to its low surface albedo compared to thicker snow. Maximum pond fractions were 53 ± 3% and 38 ± 3% on first-year and multiyear ice, respectively. APLIS pond fractions were compared with those from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) field campaign. APLIS exhibited earlier melt and double the maximum pond fraction, which was in part due to the greater presence of thin snow and first-year ice at APLIS. These results reveal considerable differences in pond formation between ice types, and underscore the importance of snow depth distributions in the timing and progression of melt pond formation.

  16. Regional variability in sea ice melt in a changing Arctic.

    PubMed

    Perovich, Donald K; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A

    2015-07-13

    In recent years, the Arctic sea ice cover has undergone a precipitous decline in summer extent. The sea ice mass balance integrates heat and provides insight on atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The amount of surface melt and bottom melt that occurs during the summer melt season was measured at 41 sites over the time period 1957 to 2014. There are large regional and temporal variations in both surface and bottom melting. Combined surface and bottom melt ranged from 16 to 294 cm, with a mean of 101 cm. The mean ice equivalent surface melt was 48 cm and the mean bottom melt was 53 cm. On average, surface melting decreases moving northward from the Beaufort Sea towards the North Pole; however interannual differences in atmospheric forcing can overwhelm the influence of latitude. Substantial increases in bottom melting are a major contributor to ice losses in the Beaufort Sea, due to decreases in ice concentration. In the central Arctic, surface and bottom melting demonstrate interannual variability, but show no strong temporal trends from 2000 to 2014. This suggests that under current conditions, summer melting in the central Arctic is not large enough to completely remove the sea ice cover. PMID:26032323

  17. Regional variability in sea ice melt in a changing Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Perovich, Donald K.; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the Arctic sea ice cover has undergone a precipitous decline in summer extent. The sea ice mass balance integrates heat and provides insight on atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The amount of surface melt and bottom melt that occurs during the summer melt season was measured at 41 sites over the time period 1957 to 2014. There are large regional and temporal variations in both surface and bottom melting. Combined surface and bottom melt ranged from 16 to 294 cm, with a mean of 101 cm. The mean ice equivalent surface melt was 48 cm and the mean bottom melt was 53 cm. On average, surface melting decreases moving northward from the Beaufort Sea towards the North Pole; however interannual differences in atmospheric forcing can overwhelm the influence of latitude. Substantial increases in bottom melting are a major contributor to ice losses in the Beaufort Sea, due to decreases in ice concentration. In the central Arctic, surface and bottom melting demonstrate interannual variability, but show no strong temporal trends from 2000 to 2014. This suggests that under current conditions, summer melting in the central Arctic is not large enough to completely remove the sea ice cover. PMID:26032323

  18. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming.

    PubMed

    Cziko, Paul A; DeVries, Arthur L; Evans, Clive W; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999-2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals. PMID:25246548

  19. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming

    PubMed Central

    Cziko, Paul A.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Evans, Clive W.; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999–2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals. PMID:25246548

  20. In-Situ Biological Decontamination of an Ice Melting Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digel, Ilya

    A major concern in space and even many terrestrial missions is the forward contamination of the alien environment with microbes and biological molecules, transported on spacecraft from Earth. Furthermore, organisms and molecules can be brought to the sampling place from the surface. All this can lead to serious misinterpretations of the obtained data and more impor-tantly, could irreversibly alter the pristine nature of the extraterrestrial environments. These issues were addressed and are constantly updated in COSPAR planetary protection policy (20 October 2002; Amended 24 March 2005; 20 July 2008). The objective of our study was to investigate the efficacy of different in-situ decontamination protocols in the conditions of thermo-mechanical ice-melting. We evaluated survival rate of microorganisms on the melting probe as a function of both time and penetration depth. Special focus was made on deter-mination of the optimal concentration of chemical decontaminants (hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite) the peculiarities of their antimicrobial action at low temperatures (-80 to 0C) combined with constant dilution with melted ice and mechanical abrasion. Common, non-pathogenic microbial strains belonging to different morphological and metabolic groups (Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Escherichia, Bacillus and others) were chosen as test objects for this study. The working part of the melting probe was first controllably contaminated by in-cubation in suspension of microbial cells. After appropriate sedimentation of microbial cells had been reached, the drilling-melting process was started using specially prepared sterile ice blocks. Every 2 minutes the samples were taken and analyzed. In the control tests, 1 mL of distilled water was injected into the penetration site at the onset of drilling. In the other tests, 1 mL of hydrogen peroxide (30Collected data suggest high efficacy of both used compounds in respect of all tested microbial groups. Typically, 99.9

  1. The impact of under-ice melt ponds on Arctic sea ice volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naomi; Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional, thermodynamic model of Arctic sea ice [Flocco et al, 2015] has been adapted to study the evolution of under-ice melt ponds, pools of fresh water that are found below the Arctic sea ice, and false bottoms, sheets of ice that form at the boundary between the under-ice melt pond and the oceanic mixed layer. Over time, either the under-ice melt pond freezes or the false bottom is completely ablated. We have been investigating the impact that these features have on the growth or ablation of sea ice during the time that they are present. The sensitivity of our model to a range of parameters has been tested, revealing some interesting effects of the thermodynamic processes taking place during the life-cycle of these phenomena. For example, the under-ice melt pond and its associated false bottom can insulate the sea ice layer from ocean, increasing the thickness of sea ice present at the end of the time frame considered. A comparison of the results of the model of under-ice melt pond evolution with that of sea ice with a bare base has been used to estimate the impact of under-ice melt ponds on sea ice volume towards the end of the melt season. We find that the under-ice melt ponds could have a significant impact on the mass balance of the sea ice, suggesting that it could be desirable to include a parameterisation of the effects of under-ice melt pond in the sea ice components of climate models.

  2. Diamond stabilization of ice multilayers at human body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2007-08-01

    Diamond is a promising material for wear-resistant medical coatings. Here we report a remarkable increase in the melting point of ice resting on a diamond (111) surface modified with a submonolayer of Na+ . Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the interfacial ice bilayer melts at a temperature 130K higher than in free ice, and relatively thick ice films ( 2.6nm at 298K and 2.2nm at 310K ) are stabilized by dipole interactions with the substrate. This unique physical effect may enable biocompatibility-enhancing ice overcoatings for diamond at human body temperature.

  3. Directional close-contact melting in glacier ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Julia; Schüller, Kai

    2015-04-01

    The Saturnian moon Enceladus shows incidence of liquid water underneath a thick ice sheet cover and is thought to be a potential candidate for extraterrestrial life. However, direct exploration of these subglacial aquatic ecosystems is very challenging. Within the scope of the joint research project 'Enceladus Explorer' (EnEx) (consisting of FH Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Universität Bremen, TU Braunschweig und Bundeswehr Universität München), initiated by the German Space Agency, a maneuverable close-contact melting probe has been developed. The force-regulated and heater-controlled probe is able to melt against gravity or even on a curved trajectory. Hence, it offers additional degrees of freedom in its melting motion, e.g. for target oriented melting or obstacle avoidance strategies. General feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in various field tests. However, in order to optimize its design and to adopt it to extraterrestrial missions a simulation model is needed, capable of determining melting velocity and efficiency at given environmental conditions and system configurations. Within this contribution, the physical situation is abstracted into a quasi-stationary mathematical model description, and a numerical solution strategy is developed to compute melting velocity and temperature distribution within the probe and the surrounding ice. We present an inverse solution approach, in which a background velocity field of the ice mimics the melting velocity. The fundamental balance laws are solved with the corresponding melting rate. Following Newton's laws, the resulting force acting on the probe has to balance the contact force exerted by the probe and can hence be used for convergence. We present both, analytical results to a simplified head geometry, as well as results from a simulation model implemented into the open source software Elmer for arbitrary head geometries. The latter can deal with the full 3d situation

  4. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  5. Melting of ice stuck on cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2016-04-01

    Melting of ice stuck on seven in-lined cooling cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct is investigated by means of a numerical analysis on the PHOENICS Code. The numerical results are validated compared with the experiment of an ice sphere melting. Parameters for calculations are inlet temperature, inlet velocity and clearance between the cylinders. The most concern of the melting is a finding of a curious behavior that is the melting in small inlet velocity on the long clearance between the cylinders.

  6. Stronger ocean circulation and increased melting under Pine Island Glacier ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stanley S.; Jenkins, Adrian; Giulivi, Claudia F.; Dutrieux, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    In 1994, ocean measurements near Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier showed that the ice shelf buttressing the glacier was melting rapidly. This melting was attributed to the presence of relatively warm, deep water on the Amundsen Sea continental shelf. Heat, salt and ice budgets along with ocean modelling provided steady-state calving and melting rates. Subsequent satellite observations and modelling have indicated large system imbalances, including ice-shelf thinning and more intense melting, glacier acceleration and drainage basin drawdown. Here we combine our earlier data with measurements taken in 2009 to show that the temperature and volume of deep water in Pine Island Bay have increased. Ocean transport and tracer calculations near the ice shelf reveal a rise in meltwater production by about 50% since 1994. The faster melting seems to result mainly from stronger sub-ice-shelf circulation, as thinning ice has increased the gap above an underlying submarine bank on which the glacier was formerly grounded. We conclude that the basal melting has exceeded the increase in ice inflow, leading to the formation and enlargement of an inner cavity under the ice shelf within which sea water nearly 4°C above freezing can now more readily access the grounding zone.

  7. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  8. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination. PMID:11452998

  9. How much can Greenland melt? An upper bound on mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    With observations showing accelerated mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface melt, the Greenland Ice Sheet is becoming one of the most significant contributors to sea level rise. The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet o sea level rise is likely to accelerate in the coming decade and centuries as atmospheric temperatures continue to rise, potentially triggering ever larger surface melt rates. However, at present considerable uncertainty remains in projecting the contribution to sea level of the Greenland Ice Sheet both due to uncertainty in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet response to climate forcing. Here we seek an upper bound on the contribution of surface melt from the Greenland to sea level rise in the coming century using a surface energy balance model coupled to an englacial model. We use IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP8.5, RCP6, RCP4.5, RCP2.6) climate scenarios from an ensemble of global climate models in our simulations to project the maximum rate of ice volume loss and related sea-level rise associated with surface melting. To estimate the upper bound, we assume the Greenland Ice Sheet is perpetually covered in thick clouds, which maximize longwave radiation to the ice sheet. We further assume that deposition of black carbon darkens the ice substantially turning it nearly black, substantially reducing its albedo. Although assuming that all melt water not stored in the snow/firn is instantaneously transported off the ice sheet increases mass loss in the short term, refreezing of retained water warms the ice and may lead to more melt in the long term. Hence we examine both assumptions and use the scenario that leads to the most surface melt by 2100. Preliminary models results suggest that under the most aggressive climate forcing, surface melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet contributes ~1 m to sea level by the year 2100. This is a significant contribution and ignores dynamic effects. We also examined a lower bound

  10. Circulation and melting beneath the ross ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S S; Gordon, A L; Ardai, J L

    1979-02-01

    Thermohaline observations in the water column beneath the Ross Ice Shelf and along its terminal face show significant vertical stratification, active horizontal circulation, and net melting at the ice shelf base. Heat is supplied by seawater that moves southward beneath the ice shelf from a central warm core and from a western region of high salinity. The near-freezing Ice Shelf Water produced flows northward into the Ross Sea. PMID:17734137

  11. Ice shelf melt rates and 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Cameron Scott

    Ice shelves are sensitive indicators of climate change and play a critical role in the stability of ice sheets and oceanic currents. Basal melting of ice shelves plays an important role in both the mass balance of the ice sheet and the global climate system. Airborne- and satellite based remote sensing systems can perform thickness measurements of ice shelves. Time separated repeat flight tracks over ice shelves of interest generate data sets that can be used to derive basal melt rates using traditional glaciological techniques. Many previous melt rate studies have relied on surface elevation data gathered by airborne- and satellite based altimeters. These systems infer melt rates by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, an assumption that may not be accurate, especially near an ice shelf's grounding line. Moderate bandwidth, VHF, ice penetrating radar has been used to measure ice shelf profiles with relatively coarse resolution. This study presents the application of an ultra wide bandwidth (UWB), UHF, ice penetrating radar to obtain finer resolution data on the ice shelves. These data reveal significant details about the basal interface, including the locations and depth of bottom crevasses and deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium. While our single channel radar provides new insight into ice shelf structure, it only images a small swatch of the shelf, which is assumed to be an average of the total shelf behavior. This study takes an additional step by investigating the application of a 3D imaging technique to a data set collected using a ground based multi channel version of the UWB radar. The intent is to show that the UWB radar could be capable of providing a wider swath 3D image of an ice shelf. The 3D images can then be used to obtain a more complete estimate of the bottom melt rates of ice shelves.

  12. Melt Pond Development on Arctic Land-Fast Sea Ice in Relation to Snow and Ice Properties During the Ice Growth Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrich, C.; Eicken, H.; Pringle, D.; Sturm, M.; Perovich, D.; Polashenski, C.; Finnegan, D.

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics of melt pond development on sea ice were studied on a well-defined patch of level land-fast sea ice off the coast of Barrow, Alaska in 2008. The pond development was correlated with both sea ice properties and the history of snow distribution during the ice growth season. In mid January, the ice was covered by an almost level snow layer of 4~cm thickness. We observed an increase in snow depth and development of snow dunes since February. At least some snow dunes stayed in place, and at the end of April ice thickness was negatively correlated with the thickness of compacted snow dunes. Snow salinity remained above 5~psu in the bottom 4 to 5~cm of the snow pack throughout the ice growth season. In comparison, snow more than 5~cm above the snow--ice interface was almost devoid of salt. The air temperature increased rapidly in early May and started to exceed 0°C on May 15. From this day on, thermistor string data show that the sea ice temperature profile deviated from linear with the lowest temperature inside the body of ice rather than at the surface. Superimposed ice was present with certainty after May 24. The superimposed ice investigated in early June exhibited a rough texture consistent with meltwater percolation columns in the snow pack. It was found only under snow dunes; no superimposed ice was observed under thin snow (2~cm) or melt ponds. Meltwater collected at topographic low points that surrounded distinct ice islands. Aerial photography and surface LiDAR measurements at various times during the early melt season showed that the location of these ice islands coincided with the locations of wind packed snow dunes that had been tracked since February. The lateral movement of surface waters was relatively slow during the very early stages of melt pond formation. However, we observed a significant lateral redistribution of meltwater under the ice surface; this redistribution happened through distinct veins. The sea ice salinity profiles showed

  13. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, K. M.; Albert, M. R.; McConnell, J.; Baker, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet experiences melting at low elevations near the coastline annually. However, surface melt is rare over the dry snow region in its center. In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland ice sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. It had been previously unknown when the ice sheet had experienced melt events of this magnitude, or what caused them. Here we show that the most recent previous widespread melt occurred in 1889, and demonstrate that warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold, permitting the melt events in both 1889 and 2012. Furthermore, we use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the ice sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century.

  14. Daily Accumulated Area of Snow Melt Onset on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, A. C.; Anderson, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The ice and snow in the Arctic are vital components of the global climate system, which has seen record-breaking changes in recent years. Changes in the onset of melting in the Arctic during the spring and summer months greatly changes the surface albedo of snow and ice covered surfaces, impacting sea ice loss through the remainder of the melt season. The present study utilizes the date on which melting begins in the snow atop sea ice, derived from passive microwave brightness temperatures from the DMSP SMMR, SSM/I (F08-F13), and SSMIS (F17) platforms, to analyze regional and inter-annual variability in the onset of melting in the Arctic. The Advanced Horizontal Range Algorithm (AHRA) snowmelt onset dates used in this study exploit the changes between 19 GHz (18 GHz for SMMR) and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to derive snow melt onset dates over Arctic sea ice from 1979-2011. Each annual AHRA snowmelt onset date grid indicates the day from the first of the year that melting occurred at each grid point. To analyze snowmelt onset on a daily basis, the annual grids are partitioned by date. A melt onset area is calculated by summing the number of grid points experiencing melt on individual dates then multiplying by the grid resolution to produce an areal extent of melt onset for each date during the melt seasons throughout the study period. By totaling the daily areal extent of melt onset, an accumulation is calculated by summing the area of melt each day throughout the melt season. Variations observed in the melt accumulation pattern through a melt season can be attributed to the weather conditions present at the time of melt onset. Analysis of the daily accumulation of melt area indicates high variability in the timing of snowmelt onset over the 1979-2011 record and a trend towards earlier melt onset dates for the Arctic region as a whole and sub-regionally. The accumulation of melt area through the melt season shows the SMMR years (1979-1987) to generally be below

  15. Strong sensitivity of Pine Island ice-shelf melting to climatic variability.

    PubMed

    Dutrieux, Pierre; De Rydt, Jan; Jenkins, Adrian; Holland, Paul R; Ha, Ho Kyung; Lee, Sang Hoon; Steig, Eric J; Ding, Qinghua; Abrahamsen, E Povl; Schröder, Michael

    2014-01-10

    Pine Island Glacier has thinned and accelerated over recent decades, significantly contributing to global sea-level rise. Increased oceanic melting of its ice shelf is thought to have triggered those changes. Observations and numerical modeling reveal large fluctuations in the ocean heat available in the adjacent bay and enhanced sensitivity of ice-shelf melting to water temperatures at intermediate depth, as a seabed ridge blocks the deepest and warmest waters from reaching the thickest ice. Oceanic melting decreased by 50% between January 2010 and 2012, with ocean conditions in 2012 partly attributable to atmospheric forcing associated with a strong La Niña event. Both atmospheric variability and local ice shelf and seabed geometry play fundamental roles in determining the response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to climate. PMID:24385606

  16. Dissociative melting of ice VII at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sanloup, Chrystele; Goldman, Nir; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Bastea, Sorin; Howard, W.M.; Fried, Laurence E.; Guignot, Nicolas; Mezouar, Mohamed; Meng, Yue

    2009-04-02

    We have used x-ray diffraction to determine the structure factor of water along its melting line to a static pressure of 57 GPa (570 kbar) and a temperature of more than 1500 K, conditions which correspond to the lower mantle of the Earth, and the interiors of Neptune and Uranus up to a depth of 7000 km. We have also performed corresponding first principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Above a pressure of 4 GPa the O-O structure factor is found to be very close to that of a simple soft sphere liquid, thus permitting us to determine the density of liquid water near the melting line. By comparing these results with the density of ice, also determined in this study, we find that the enthalpy of fusion ({Delta}H{sub f}) increases enormously along the melting line, reaching approximately 120 kJ/mole at 40 GPa (compared to 6 kJ/mole at 0 GPa), thus revealing significant molecular dissociation of water upon melting. We speculate that an extended two-phase region could occur in planetary processes involving the adiabatic compression of water.

  17. Dissociative melting of ice VII at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexander F; Sanloup, Chrystele; Goldman, Nir; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Bastea, Sorin; Howard, W M; Fried, Laurence E; Guignot, Nicolas; Mezouar, Mohamed; Meng, Yue

    2009-03-28

    We have used x-ray diffraction to determine the structure factor of water along its melting line to a static pressure of 57 GPa (570 kbar) and a temperature of more than 1500 K, conditions which correspond to the lower mantle of the Earth, and the interiors of Neptune and Uranus up to a depth of 7000 km. We have also performed corresponding first principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Above a pressure of 4 GPa the O-O structure factor is found to be very close to that of a simple soft sphere liquid, thus permitting us to determine the density of liquid water near the melting line. By comparing these results with the density of ice, also determined in this study, we find that the enthalpy of fusion (DeltaH(f)) increases enormously along the melting line, reaching approximately 120 kJ/mole at 40 GPa (compared to 6 kJ/mole at 0 GPa), thus revealing significant molecular dissociation of water upon melting. We speculate that an extended two-phase region could occur in planetary processes involving the adiabatic compression of water. PMID:19334858

  18. The extreme melt across the Greenland ice sheet in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Albert, M. R.; Keegan, K.; Shuman, C. A.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of the 2012 extreme melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt maps, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that melt occurred at or near the surface of the Greenland ice sheet across 98.6% of its entire extent on 12 July 2012, including the usually cold polar areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow facies of the ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge of warm air that became stagnant over Greenland. As seen in melt occurrences from multiple ice core records at Summit reported in the published literature, such a melt event is rare with the last significant one occurring in 1889 and the next previous one around seven centuries earlier in the Medieval Warm Period. Given its rarity, the 2012 extreme melt across Greenland provides an exceptional opportunity for new studies in broad interdisciplinary geophysical research.

  19. Numerical simulation of melting ice around a floating by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakzian, Esmail; Parsian, Armin; Lakzian, Kazem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new method in using microwaves is provided for melting the ice around a floating equipment in a freezing condition in cold regions. The numerical simulation's results for validation are compared with the simple model's experimental data. Using microwave in melting the ice around a floating equipment is caused by lack of the mechanical wear, low energy dissipation factor and acceptable defrosting process speed in small lakes.

  20. Observing ice-shelf channels and basal melting from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Sophie; Drews, Reinhard; Helm, Veit; Rack, Wolfgang; Lenaerts, Jan; Ligtenberg, Stefan; Pattyn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Ice-shelf channels (along-flow lineations in which ice is thinner) are ubiquitous in Antarctic ice shelves. Although these features are readily visible in satellite imagery, ice-thickness and ice-velocity variations in their surrounding are typically heavily undersampled. Ice-shelf channels focus channelized melting and significantly alter the basal mass balance (and hence ice-shelf stability) on short horizontal scales. Here we use interferometrically-derived TandDEM-X digital elevation models and ice-flow velocities with a horizontal gridding of 125 m illustrating the ice-shelf dynamics of the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Dronning Maud Land (East Antarctica) in unprecedented detail. Using ground-based GPS surface elevation, we demonstrate that TanDEM-X is an ideal sensor to map the channel morphology at the ice-shelf surface. We find velocity anomalies surrounding the channels along the entire ice shelf potentially indicating the presence of locally elevated basal melt rates. Using mass conservation in a Lagrangian framework, we find basal melt rates averaging 0.4 m/a in the middle of the ice shelf and peaking at 12 m/a inside some channels. We illustrate the sensitivity of the method with respect to systematic biases in elevation/velocity and also with respect to lateral variations of the depth-density relationship. With the increased availability of high-resolution radar satellites (such as Sentinel1), the techniques presented here could be applied on an pan-Antarctic scale to map basal melting both in space and time at high-resolution.

  1. Impact of ice-shelf sediment content on the dynamics of plumes under melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.

    2015-12-01

    When a floating ice shelf melts into an underlying warm salty ocean, the resulting fresh meltwater can rise in a buoyant Ice-Shelf-Water plume under the ice. In certain settings, ice flowing across the grounding line carries a basal layer of debris rich ice, entrained via basal freezing around till in the upstream ice sheet. Melting of this debris-laden ice from floating ice shelves provides a flux of dense sediment to the ocean, in addition to the release of fresh buoyant meltwater. This presentation considers the impact of the resulting suspended sediment on the dynamics of ice shelf water plumes, and identifies two key flow regimes depending on the sediment concentration frozen into the basal ice layer. For large sediment concentration, melting of the debris-laden ice shelf generates dense convectively unstable waters that drive convective overturning into the underlying ocean. For lower sediment concentration, the sediment initially remains suspended in a buoyant meltwater plume rising along the underside of the ice shelf, before slowly depositing into the underlying ocean. A theoretical plume model is used to evaluate the significance of the negatively buoyant sediment on circulation strength and the feedbacks on melting rate, along with the expected depositional patterns under the ice shelf.

  2. The melting of floating ice raises the ocean level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.; Brower, Kay R.

    2007-07-01

    It is shown that the melting of ice floating on the ocean will introduce a volume of water about 2.6 per cent greater than that of the originally displaced sea water. The melting of floating ice in a global warming will cause the ocean to rise. If all the extant sea ice and floating shelf ice melted, the global sea level would rise about 4cm. The sliding of grounded ice into the sea, however, produces a mean water level rise in two parts; some of the rise is delayed. The first part, while the ice floats, is equal to the volume of displaced sea water. The second part, equal to 2.6 per cent of the first, is contributed as it melts. These effects result from the difference in volume of equal weights of fresh and salt water. This component of sea rise is apparently unrecognized in the literature to date, although it can be interpreted as a form of halosteric sea level change by regarding the displaced salt water and the meltwater (even before melting) as a unit. Although salinity changes are known to affect sea level, all existing analyses omit our calculated volume change. We present a protocol that can be used to calculate global sea level rise on the basis of the addition of meltwater from grounded and floating ice; of course thermosteric volume change must be added.

  3. Applying Archimedes' Law to Ice Melting in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.; Brower, K. R.

    2006-12-01

    Archimedes stated that a floating body displaces its own weight of liquid, but his law has been widely misapplied to ice floating in the oceans by scientists who assumed that equal weights correspond to equal liquid volumes. It is often said that when floating ice melts, the sea level does not rise "because of Archimedes' law." True when ice floats in fresh water, but a myth for ice in oceans! Most ice floating in the oceans is nearly pure water. When it melts, the pure water produced has about 2.6% more volume than the salt water that was displaced, and the ocean slightly rises. It is often suggested that students demonstrate the "fact" of no rise in the sea surface by melting ice cubes floating in a glass of water; such a demonstration even appears in the movie "An Inconvenient Truth." Let's teach students to spot such errors. We highlight a couple more "surprise issues." First, the density of the floating ice, if it is free of salt and dirt, is irrelevant, so long as it floats. Next, when "grounded" ice (resting on land), enters the sea, it initially displaces less water than its melted form will eventually add to the sea. Thus, an event of that kind, such as formation of an iceberg, produces a rise of the sea level in two stages. We conclude with a series of thought-experiments that could help teachers and students discern the correct result, and a photo of a demonstration.

  4. Rapid bottom melting widespread near Antarctic ice sheet grounding lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.

    2002-01-01

    As continental ice from Antartica reaches the grounding line and begins to float, its underside melts into the ocean. Results obtained with satellite radar interferometry reveal that bottom melt rates experienced by large outlet glaciers near their grounding lines are far higher than generally assumed.

  5. Superheated ice: true compression fractures and fast internal melting.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; Knight, N C

    1972-11-10

    Internal melt figures can be nucleated in ice without the presence of a vapor bubble. Their form and growth are fracture-like, different from the normal Tyndall stars, which do contain vapor bubbles. Normal Tyndall figures that grow rapidly are not oriented in the basal plane, and very rapid internal melting gives a peculiar, systematic growth of clouds of Tyndall figures. PMID:17793685

  6. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W.; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ~10 °C warmer and ~170 kg m-3 denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades.

  7. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  8. Quantitative Links between Amundsen Sea Heat and Pine Island Ice Shelf Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, R.; Vaughan, D. G.; Vornberger, P.

    2010-12-01

    Previous researchers have established the strong connection between the Amundsen Sea and basal melt of Pine Island Glacier’s ice shelf in Antarctica. In this presentation we extend this work by focusing on a strong spatial pattern of ice thickness undulations observed on the ice shelf and the predicted temporal pattern of pulses of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) upwelled onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf by variable surface winds (Thoma et al., 2008). After converting the temporal pattern to spatial position on the ice shelf, we show a remarkable correlation over the last decade of these records that allows us to quantitatively associate an amount of heat at the front of the ice shelf, with an amount of melt that occurs at the grounding line. By considering the excess melting driven by pulses of CDW separately from the background melting, we extract a set of heat vs. melt values that suggest a linear relationship supporting the results of Rignot and Jacobs (2002) and disputing the non-linear relationship suggested by Holland et al. (2008). We infer that the current delivering the ocean’s heat is approximately 3.4 cm/sec , that most of the heat is expended by melt, and that the majority of melting is spatially limited to the grounding line vicinity. References cited: Holland, P.R., A. Jenkins and D.M. Holland, 2008. The Response of Ice Shelf Basal Melting to Variations in Ocean Temperature. Journal of Climate, Vol. 21, pp. 2558-2572, DOI: 10.1175/2007JCLI1909.1 Rignot E. and S.S. Jacobs, 2002. Rapid bottom melting widespread near Antarctic ice sheet grounding lines, Science, Vol. 296, No. 5575, p. 2020-2023. Thoma, M., A. Jenkins, D. Holland, and S. Jacobs, 2008. Modelling Circumpolar Deep Water intrusions on the Amundsen Sea continental shelf, Antarctica, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, No. 18, L18602, doi: 10.1029/2008GL034939

  9. On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2009-06-11

    The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ρ = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ρ = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.; Albert, Mary R.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Baker, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  11. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  12. Impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity of thin newly formed sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byong Jun; Ehn, Jens K.; Barber, David G.

    2008-02-01

    This study examines the impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity over thin, newly formed sea ice at 6, 19, and 37 GHz during October 2003 in the southern Beaufort Sea, where the physical properties of newly formed sea ice were coincidently measured with microwave emissions. Six ice stations with distinct properties were selected and divided according to ice surface temperature into warm (above -3°C) or cold (below -3°C) stations. The warm stations had a lower emissivity at the vertical polarization by 0.1 than the cold stations and a corresponding difference in brine volume and dielectric properties. Significant correlations were observed between brine volume and ice emissivity (R2 = 0.8, p value < 0.05). A sensitivity study showed that decreasing ice temperatures from -2.1° to -5.0°C explained the observed difference of 0.1 in ice emissivity between warm and cold stations. The results suggest that the temperature of thin bare ice could be the critical factor in determining ice emissivity near the melting point (about -2°C). Furthermore, a slight decrease in ice temperature (i.e., from -2° to -5°C) significantly reduces the brine volume, thus resulting in high ice emissivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of newly formed ice to cause errors in estimating sea ice concentrations using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E data.

  13. Experimental study of natural convection melting of ice in salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Linehan, J.H.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The solid-liquid interface morphology and the micro-physical process near the moving phase boundary during natural convection melting of a horizontal layer of ice by an overlying pool of salt solution were studied experimentally. A cathetometer which amplifies the interface region was used to measure the ice melting rate. Also measured were the temperature transients of the liquid pool. Within the temperature and the density ratio ranges explored, the ice melting rate was found to be very sensitive to the ratio of pool-to-ice melt density but independent of pool-to-ice temperature difference. By varying the density ratio, three different flow regimes and morphologies of the solid-liquid interface were observed, with melt streamers emanating from the crests of the wavy interface into the pool in all three cases. The measured wavelengths (spacing) between the streamers for four different pairs of materials were correlated with the density ratio and found to agree favorably with the predictions of Taylor instability theory.

  14. Arctic sea-ice ridges—Safe heavens for sea-ice fauna during periods of extreme ice melt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradinger, Rolf; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The abundances and distribution of metazoan within-ice meiofauna (13 stations) and under-ice fauna (12 stations) were investigated in level sea ice and sea-ice ridges in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Canada Basin in June/July 2005 using a combination of ice coring and SCUBA diving. Ice meiofauna abundance was estimated based on live counts in the bottom 30 cm of level sea ice based on triplicate ice core sampling at each location, and in individual ice chunks from ridges at four locations. Under-ice amphipods were counted in situ in replicate ( N=24-65 per station) 0.25 m 2 quadrats using SCUBA to a maximum water depth of 12 m. In level sea ice, the most abundant ice meiofauna groups were Turbellaria (46%), Nematoda (35%), and Harpacticoida (19%), with overall low abundances per station that ranged from 0.0 to 10.9 ind l -1 (median 0.8 ind l -1). In level ice, low ice algal pigment concentrations (<0.1-15.8 μg Chl a l -1), low brine salinities (1.8-21.7) and flushing from the melting sea ice likely explain the low ice meiofauna concentrations. Higher abundances of Turbellaria, Nematoda and Harpacticoida also were observed in pressure ridges (0-200 ind l -1, median 40 ind l -1), although values were highly variable and only medians of Turbellaria were significantly higher in ridge ice than in level ice. Median abundances of under-ice amphipods at all ice types (level ice, various ice ridge structures) ranged from 8 to 114 ind m -2 per station and mainly consisted of Apherusa glacialis (87%), Onisimus spp. (7%) and Gammarus wilkitzkii (6%). Highest amphipod abundances were observed in pressure ridges at depths >3 m where abundances were up to 42-fold higher compared with level ice. We propose that the summer ice melt impacted meiofauna and under-ice amphipod abundance and distribution through (a) flushing, and (b) enhanced salinity stress at thinner level sea ice (less than 3 m thickness). We further suggest that pressure ridges, which extend into deeper, high

  15. Climate Data Records (CDRs) for Ice Motion, Ice Age, and Melt Pond Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschudi, M. A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Fowler, C.; Stroeve, J. C.; Rigor, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    Remotely-sensed Arctic sea ice motion, sea ice age, and melt pond coverage have been proposed for development into full CDRs. The first has a considerable history of use, while the latter two are relatively new products. Our technique to estimate sea ice motion utilizes images from SSM/I, as well as the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors to estimate the daily motion of ice parcels. This method is augmented by incorporating ice motion observations from the network of drifting buoys deployed as part of the International Arctic Buoy Program. Our technique to calculate ice age relies on following the actual age of the ice for each ice parcel, categorizing the parcel as first-year ice, second-year ice, etc. based on how many summer melt seasons the ice parcel survives. Our method to estimate melt pond coverage on sea ice involves solving a set of linear equations that relate each surface feature’s individual reflectance within the sensor’s (currently using the MODIS surface reflectance product, MOD09) pixel to the overall reflectance in that pixel. These three research-grade products have been interpolated onto 25x25 km grid points spanning the entire Arctic Ocean using the Equal-Area Scalable Earth (EASE) grid.

  16. Induced ice melting by the snow flea antifreeze protein from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Todde, Guido; Whitman, Christopher; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-11-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) allow different life forms, insects as well as fish and plants, to survive in subzero environments. AFPs prevent freezing of the physiological fluids. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, the behavior of the small isoform of the AFP found in the snow flea (sfAFP), both in water and at the ice/water interface, of four different ice planes. In water at room temperature, the structure of the sfAFP is found to be slightly unstable. The loop between two polyproline II helices has large fluctuations as well as the C-terminus. Torsional angle analyses show a decrease of the polyproline II helix area in the Ramachandran plots. The protein structure instability, in any case, should not affect its antifreeze activity. At the ice/water interface the sfAFP triggers local melting of the ice surface. Bipyramidal, secondary prism, and prism ice planes melt in the presence of AFP at temperatures below the melting point of ice. Only the basal plane is found to be stable at the same temperatures, indicating an adsorption of the sfAFP on this ice plane as confirmed by experimental evidence. PMID:25353109

  17. Climatic warming and basal melting of large ice sheets: possible implications for East Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, M.R.; Yuen, D.A.; Schubert, G.

    1987-01-01

    Climatic warming is shown to be capable of inducing shear heating instability and basal melting in a model ice sheet that is creeping slowly downslope. Growth times of the instability are calculated from a nonlinear analysis of temperature and flow in the model ice sheet whose surface undergoes a prescribed increase of temperature. The source of instability lies in the decrease of maximum ice thickness for steady downslope creep with increasing surface temperature. A surface temperature increase of 5 to 10 k can cause instability on a 10/sup 4/ year time scale for realistic ice rheology. The instability occurs suddenly after a prolonged period of dormancy. The instability might be relevant to the East Antarctic ice sheet. Warming associated with the Holocene interglacial epoch that heralded the end of the last ice age may have set the East Antarctic ice sheet on a course toward wide-spread instability some 10/sup 4/ years later. The present CO/sub 2/-induced climate warming is also a potential trigger for instability and basal melting of the East Antarctic ice sheet.

  18. The "blob of death", or how warm air advection causes rapid ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, Michael; Shupe, Matthew; Achtert, Peggy; Brooks, Barbara; Brooks, Ian; Johnston, Paul; Persson, Ola; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic; Sedlar, Joseph; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Wolfe, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Clouds in Summer Experiment (ACSE) program obtained measurements of surface energy fluxes, boundary-layer structure, cloud macro- and micro-physical structure, and upper-ocean thermal and salinity structure from pack-ice and open-water regions in the eastern Arctic from early July to early October 2014. ACSE was divided into two legs. The first took a route from Tromsö, Norway, to Barrow, Alaska, during late summer (early July to late August) mostly on the Siberian Shelf, while the second leg was from traversed back mostly north of the shelf during September and early October. This paper will present ACSE and show examples of some results. Energy fluxes at the surface determine the annual summer melt and autumn freeze-up of Arctic sea ice, but are strongly modulated by interactions between atmospheric, ocean, and sea-ice processes. ACSE summer measurements showed energy flux surpluses leading to significant surface melt, while late August and September measurements showed deficits, leading to freeze-up of sea ice and the ocean surface. A weeklong episode with intensive melt resulting from warm air advection from continental Russia will be presented and discussed. During this episode, temperatures up to 20 °C was observed aloft while near surface temperatures over the ice remained near melting. In the surface inversion dense fog formed that enhanced the downward longwave radiation. Together with a downward turbulent sensible heat flux this caused a rapid melt in this area.

  19. Calorimetric study of crystal growth of ice in hydrated methemoglobin and of redistribution of the water clusters formed on melting the ice.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Mayer, E

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetric studies of the melting patterns of ice in hydrated methemoglobin powders containing between 0.43 and 0.58 (g water)/(g protein), and of their dependence on annealing at subzero temperatures and on isothermal treatment at ambient temperature are reported. Cooling rates were varied between approximately 1500 and 5 K min-1 and heating rate was 30 K min-1. Recrystallization of ice during annealing is observed at T > 228 K. The melting patterns of annealed samples are characteristically different from those of unannealed samples by the shifting of the melting temperature of the recrystallized ice fraction to higher temperatures toward the value of "bulk" ice. The "large" ice crystals formed during recrystallization melt on heating into "large" clusters of water whose redistribution and apparent equilibration is followed as a function of time and/or temperature by comparison with melting endotherms. We have also studied the effect of cooling rate on the melting pattern of ice with a methemoglobin sample containing 0.50 (g water)/(g protein), and we surmise that for this hydration cooling at rates of > or = approximately 150 K min-1 preserves on the whole the distribution of water molecules present at ambient temperature. PMID:7819504

  20. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present

  1. Ranking spatially and temporally variable Greenland ice surface melt factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Jason; Mottram, Ruth; Langen, Peter; Boberg, Fredrik; Promice Team

    2014-05-01

    Greenland ice sheet surface melt water production is evaluated via a spatially distributed surface energy budget analysis of the 14 summers spanning 2000-2013. Key ingredients are DMI HIRHAM5 5km x 5km output and NASA MOD10A1 daily albedo. The HIRHAM5 simulated downward solar and infrared fluxes and turbulent fluxes are compared with in-situ data from the Danish PROMICE.org automatic weather stations. The seasonally and spatially evolving relative importance of individual surface energy budget components yields detailed insight into physical processes driving melt variability with some surprising implications to ice sheet surface mass balance sensitivity to climate change.

  2. Forced convective melting at an evolving ice-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Hirsh, Benjamin; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-11-01

    The intrusion of warm Circumpolar Deep Water into the ocean cavity between the base of ice shelves and the sea bed in Antarctica causes melting at the ice shelves' basal surface, producing a turbulent melt plume. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments to investigate how the presence of forced convection (turbulent mixing) changes the delivery of heat to the ice-water interface. We also develop a theoretical model for the heat balance of the system that can be used to predict the change in ice thickness with time. In cases of turbulent mixing, the heat balance includes a term for turbulent heat transfer that depends on the friction velocity and an empirical coefficient. We obtain a new value for this coefficient by comparing the modeled ice thickness against measurements from a set of nine experiments covering one order of magnitude of Reynolds numbers. Our results are consistent with the altimetry-inferred melting rate under Antarctic ice shelves and can be used in climate models to predict their disintegration. This work was supported by NSF grant EAR-110371.

  3. Warm-air advection, air mass transformation and fog causes rapid ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, Michael; Shupe, Matthew D.; Brooks, Ian M.; Persson, P. Ola G.; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic J.; Sedlar, Joseph; Achtert, Peggy; Brooks, Barbara J.; Johnston, Paul E.; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Wolfe, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Direct observations during intense warm-air advection over the East Siberian Sea reveal a period of rapid sea-ice melt. A semistationary, high-pressure system north of the Bering Strait forced northward advection of warm, moist air from the continent. Air-mass transformation over melting sea ice formed a strong, surface-based temperature inversion in which dense fog formed. This induced a positive net longwave radiation at the surface while reducing net solar radiation only marginally; the inversion also resulted in downward turbulent heat flux. The sum of these processes enhanced the surface energy flux by an average of ~15 W m-2 for a week. Satellite images before and after the episode show sea-ice concentrations decreasing from > 90% to ~50% over a large area affected by the air-mass transformation. We argue that this rapid melt was triggered by the increased heat flux from the atmosphere due to the warm-air advection.

  4. Divergent trajectories of Antarctic ice shelf surface melt under 21st century climate scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusel, L. D.; Frey, K. E.; Das, S. B.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic ice shelves represent a critical interface between continental ice masses and the surrounding ocean. Breakup events of several ice shelves in recent decades have been linked to an increase in intense surface melting, and have in turn lead to cascading effects including accelerated glacier discharge into the ocean. In this study, we utilized sophisticated regional and global climate models (GCMs) to assess potential future surface melt trajectories across Antarctica under two climate scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). RACMO2.1, a polar-adapted regional atmospheric climate model, was forced by the ERA-Interim reanalysis (1980-2010) and by two GCMs, EC-EARTH and HadGEM2-ES (2007-2100). Using RACMO2.1, we observed an exponential growth function well represents the relationship between ice shelf surface meltwater production and mean summer (DJF) 2-meter air temperature (t2m). We employed this melt-t2m relationship to project melt using t2m output from an ensemble of five CMIP5-based GCMs incorporating the NCAR Community Land Model 4 (CLM4), following spatial downscaling and bias correction using t2m from ERA-Interim-forced RACMO2.1. Our resulting GCM-derived melt projections provide an independent and methodologically unique perspective into potential future melt pathways, complementary to those derived from RACMO2.1. Most notably, both RACMO2.1 and the CMIP5 ensemble reveal divergent trajectories of meltwater production beyond 2050 under the two climate scenarios. For many ice shelves in RCP4.5, meltwater production through 2100 remains at levels comparable to present. Conversely, under RCP8.5 all methods indicate non-linear melt intensification, resulting in a four-fold increase in the Antarctic-wide meltwater volume by the end of the 21st century. For some ice shelves, including Larsen C and Wilkins (Antarctic Peninsula), and Shackleton and West (Wilkes Land), spatially averaged end-of-century meltwater production within RCP8.5 approaches or surpasses levels

  5. The NE Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial - a dynamic retreat from the shelf edge triggered by ice melting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Forwick, Matthias; Husum, Katrine

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of the north-eastern sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial are still poorly constrained and large uncertainties about its extent exist. We present new swath-bathymetry data and sub-bottom profiles acquired from the outer parts of a shelf-crossing trough. These data reveal glacial landforms suggesting that grounded ice extended to the shelf break. Thus, the hypothesis of a mid-shelf position of the ice sheet in this area during the last glacial maximum is rejected, instead other studies predicting an ice expansion to the shelf break is reinforced. The results presented here also add further details on the behavior of the ice sheet during the initial deglaciation. The outer trough studied was characterized by the formation of a complex pattern of moraine ridges and sediment wedges overlying mega-scale glacial lineations, providing evidence of repeated halts and readvances of the ice sheet during an early phase of its decay. This suggests that the early deglaciation was related to melting of the grounded ice due to temperature increase in the ocean, rather than being triggered by abrupt sea level rise. The latter should, according to established models, result in ice lift-off and a sea floor dominated by landforms formed during full-glacial conditions (mega-scale glacial lineations) and ice disintegration (iceberg plough-marks).

  6. Sea ice melting in the marginal ice zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The heat and salt flux boundary conditions together with the freezing curve relationship are a necessary component of any ice- sea water thermodynamic model. A neutral two-layer oceanic planetary boundary layer model that incorporates these boundary conditions is used. The results are discussed. -from Author

  7. Level-ice melt ponds in the Los Alamos sea ice model, CICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Hebert, David A.; Lecomte, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    A new meltpond parameterization has been developed for the CICE sea ice model, taking advantage of the level ice tracer available in the model. The ponds evolve according to physically based process descriptions, assuming a depth-area ratio for changes in pond volume. A novel aspect of the new scheme is that the ponds are carried as tracers on the level ice area of each thickness category, thus limiting their spatial extent based on the simulated sea ice topography. This limiting is meant to approximate the horizontal drainage of melt water into depressions in ice floes. Simulated melt pond processes include collection of liquid melt water and rain into ponds, drainage through permeable sea ice or over the edges of floes, infiltration of snow by pond water, and refreezing of ponds. Furthermore, snow that falls on top of ponds whose top surface has refrozen blocks radiation from penetrating into the ponds and sea ice below. Along with a control simulation, we present a range of sensitivity tests to parameters related to each subprocess described by the parameterization. With the exception of one parameter that alters the albedo of snow-covered pond ice, results are not highly sensitive to these parameters unless an entire process is removed. The snow simulation itself is critical, because the volume of snow deposition and rate of snow melt largely determine the timing and extent of the simulated melt ponds. Nevertheless, compensating effects moderate the model's sensitivity to precipitation changes. For instance, infiltration of the snow by melt water postpones the appearance of ponds and the subsequent acceleration of melting through albedo feedback, while snow on top of refrozen pond ice also reduces the ponds' effect on the radiation budget. By construction, the model simulation of level and ridged ice is also important for this parameterization. We find that as sea ice thins, either through time or when comparing sensitivity tests, the area of level ice

  8. Greenland ice sheet melt area, volume, and runoff from satellite and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van As, D.; Box, J. E.; Fausto, R. S.; Petersen, D.; Citterio, M.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Andersen, S. B.; Steffen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing provides surface melt area and regional mass change. In situ automatic weather station (AWS) data provide a relatively precise, but very local surface mass budget. Combining the two methods allows melt quantification for the entire Greenland ice sheet. We use interpolated near-surface air temperature from the GC-Net and PROMICE AWS networks, and remotely-sensed MODIS surface albedo to calculate melt with a temperature/albedo-index melt model. The calculations make use of albedo, combined with top-of-the-atmosphere solar radiation and cloud cover, to take into account absorbed shortwave radiation, the dominant melt parameter. In so doing the darkening due to the melt-albedo feedback is accounted. Calculated ablation is calibrated using AWS data. Assuming that surface albedo is a first-order indicator of the firn's available pore space and cold content, refreezing is parameterized as a function of it. Meltwater runoff for selected catchments is validated with river discharge data. The product: observation-based daily maps of near-surface air temperature, melt (extent and volume), and runoff for the Greenland ice sheet.

  9. Antarctic ice-sheet loss driven by basal melting of ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, H D; Ligtenberg, S R M; Fricker, H A; Vaughan, D G; van den Broeke, M R; Padman, L

    2012-04-26

    Accurate prediction of global sea-level rise requires that we understand the cause of recent, widespread and intensifying glacier acceleration along Antarctic ice-sheet coastal margins. Atmospheric and oceanic forcing have the potential to reduce the thickness and extent of floating ice shelves, potentially limiting their ability to buttress the flow of grounded tributary glaciers. Indeed, recent ice-shelf collapse led to retreat and acceleration of several glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. But the extent and magnitude of ice-shelf thickness change, the underlying causes of such change, and its link to glacier flow rate are so poorly understood that its future impact on the ice sheets cannot yet be predicted. Here we use satellite laser altimetry and modelling of the surface firn layer to reveal the circum-Antarctic pattern of ice-shelf thinning through increased basal melt. We deduce that this increased melt is the primary control of Antarctic ice-sheet loss, through a reduction in buttressing of the adjacent ice sheet leading to accelerated glacier flow. The highest thinning rates occur where warm water at depth can access thick ice shelves via submarine troughs crossing the continental shelf. Wind forcing could explain the dominant patterns of both basal melting and the surface melting and collapse of Antarctic ice shelves, through ocean upwelling in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas, and atmospheric warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. This implies that climate forcing through changing winds influences Antarctic ice-sheet mass balance, and hence global sea level, on annual to decadal timescales. PMID:22538614

  10. Simulating Ice Particle Melting using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Pelissier, Craig

    2015-04-01

    To measure precipitation from space requires an accurate estimation of the collective scattering properties of particles suspended in a precipitating column. It is well known that the complicated and typically unknowable shapes of the solid precipitation particles cause much uncertainty in the retrievals involving such particles. This remote-sensing problem becomes even more difficult with the "melting layer" containing partially melted ice particles, where both the geometric shape and liquid-solid fraction of the hydrometeors are variables.. For the scattering properties of these particles depend not only on their shapes, but also their melt-water fraction,and the spatial distribution of liquid and ice within. To obtain an accurate estimation thus requires a set of "realistic" particle geometries and a method to determine the melt-water distribution at various stages in the melting process. Once this is achieved, a suitable method can be used to compute the scattering properties. In previous work, the growth of a set of astoundingly realistic ice particles has been simulated using the "Snowfake" algorithm of Gravner and Griffeath. To simulate the melting process of these particles, the method of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used. SPH is a mesh-less particle-based approach where kinematic and thermal dynamics is controlled entirely through two-body interactions between neighboring SPH particles. An important property of SPH is that the interaction at boundaries between air/ice/water is implicitly taken care of. This is crucial for this work since those boundaries are complex and vary throughout the melting process. We present the SPH implementation and a simulation, using highly parallel Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), with ~1 million SPH particles to represent one of the generated ice particle geometries. We plan to use this method, especially its parallelized version, to simulate the melting of all the "Snowfake" particles (~10,000 of them) in our

  11. Melt ponds and marginal ice zone from new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Tikhonov, Vasiliy; Komarova, Nataliia; Raev, Mikhail; Sharkov, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. A new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval in polar regions from satellite microwave radiometry data is discussed. Beside estimating sea ice concentration, the algorithm makes it possible to indicate ice areas with melting snow and melt ponds. Melt ponds are an important element of the Arctic climate system. Covering up to 50% of the surface of drifting ice in summer, they are characterized by low albedo values and absorb several times more incident shortwave radiation than the rest of the snow and ice cover. The change of melt ponds area in summer period 1987-2015 is investigated. The marginal ice zone (MIZ) is defined as the area where open ocean processes, including specifically ocean waves, alter significantly the dynamical properties of the sea ice cover. Ocean wave fields comprise short waves generated locally and swell propagating from the large ocean basins. Depending on factors like wind direction and ocean currents, it may consist of anything from isolated, small and large ice floes drifting over a

  12. Enhanced Sea Ice Concentration and Ice Temperature Algorithms for AMSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Manning, Will; Gersten, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Accurate quantification of sea ice concentration and ice temperature from satellite passive microwave data is important because they provide the only long term, spatially detailed and consistent data set needed to study the climatology of the polar regions. Sea ice concentration data are used to derive large-scale daily ice extents that are utilized in trend analysis of the global sea ice cover. They are also used to quantify the amount of open water and thin ice in polynya and divergence regions which together with ice temperatures are in turn needed to estimate vertical heat and salinity fluxes in these regions. Sea ice concentrations have been derived from the NASA Team and Bootstrap algorithms while a separate technique for deriving ice temperature has been reported. An integrated technique that will utilizes most of the channels of AMSR (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer) has been developed. The technique uses data from the 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels at vertical polarization obtain an initial estimate of sea ice concentration and ice temperature. The derived ice temperature is then utilized to estimate the emissivities for the corresponding observations at all the other channels. A procedure for calculating the ice concentration similar to the Bootstrap technique is then used but with variables being emissivities instead of brightness temperatures to minimizes errors associated with spatial changes in ice temperatures within the ice pack. Comparative studies of ice concentration results with those from other algorithms, including the original Bootstrap algorithm and those from high resolution satellite visible and infrared data will be presented. Also, results from a simulation study that demonstrates the effectiveness of the technique in correcting for spatial variations in ice temperatures will be shown. The ice temperature results are likewise compared with satellite infrared and buoy data with the latter adjusted to account for the effects of the snow

  13. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oerlemans, J. ); Vugts, H.F. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  14. Comparison of 2013 and 2012 Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Melt and Associated Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jiping

    2016-04-01

    We examine the characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt in summer 2013 and compare the results with 2012. The atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic differences between these two cases and their impacts on the Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt are also examined. Results show that the maximum surface melt extent is only 44% in 2013, which is far less than 97% in 2012. The averaged extent and duration of the surface melt in 2013 are close to the climatology. The summer atmospheric circulation anomalies in 2013 are nearly opposite to those observed in 2012. Greenland and the surrounding areas show anomalously low pressure, particularly a negative height at 500-hPa, which leads to a more zonal pattern than that in 2012. The corresponding anomalous cyclonic circulation in the north and south areas of Greenland is favorable for advecting cold Arctic air to Greenland. Moreover, the surface downward radiation pattern in 2013 is oriented in a southwest-northeast direction over Greenland, which differs from the north-south distribution in 2012. The net downward radiation is small due to the cancellation of downward shortwave and longwave components in 2013. However, downward shortwave dominates from the distribution perspective, leading to an insignificant impact on surface temperatures over Greenland. The combination of dynamic effects of atmospheric circulation and thermodynamic effects of the radiation budget contribute to the surface melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We further find that a positive feedback between the variability in the extent of summer Arctic sea ice and melt area of the summer Greenland ice sheet, which affects the Greenland ice sheet mass balance.

  15. Update on the Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Extent: 1979-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, Waleed; Steffen, Konrad

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet is updated to span the time period 1979-1999 is examined along with its spatial and temporal variability using passive microwave satellite data. In order to acquire the full record, the issue of continuity between previous passive microwave sensors (SMMR, SSM/I F-8, and SSM/I F-11), and the most recent SSM/I F-13 sensor is addressed. The F-13 Cross-polarized gradient ratio (XPGR) melt-classification threshold is determined to be -0.0154. Results show that for the 21-year record, an increasing melt trend of nearly 1 %/yr is observed, and this trend is driven by conditions on in the western portion of the ice sheet, rather than the east, where melt appears to have decreased slightly. Moreover, the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991 is likely to have had some impact the melt, but not as much as previously suspected. The 1992 melt anomaly is 1.7 standard deviations from the mean. Finally, the relationship between coastal temperatures and melt extent suggest an increase in surface runoff contribution to sea level of 0.31 mm/yr for a 1 C temperature rise.

  16. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ∼10 °C warmer and ∼170 kg m(-3) denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades. PMID:27283778

  17. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W.; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ∼10 °C warmer and ∼170 kg m−3 denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades. PMID:27283778

  18. Observation of melt onset on multiyear Arctic sea ice using the ERS 1 synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Nelson, E. D.; Colony, R.; West, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    We present nearly coincident observations of backscattering from the Earth Remote-Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and of near-surface temperature from six drifting buoys in the Beaufort Sea, showing that the onset of melting in snow on multiyear sea ice is clearly detectable in the SAR data. Melt onset is marked by a clean, steep decrease in the backscattering cross section of multiyear ice at 5.3 GHz and VV polarization. We investigate the scattering physics responsible for the signature change and find that the cross section decrease is due solely to the appearance of liquid water in the snow cover overlying the ice. A thin layer of moist snow is sufficient to cause the observed decrease. We present a prototype algorithm to estimate the date of melt onset using the ERS 1 SAR and apply the algorithm first to the SAR data for which we have corresponding buoy temperatures. The melt onset dates estimated by the SAR algorithm agree with those obtained independently from the temperature data to within 4 days or less, with the exception of one case in which temperatures oscillated about 0 C for several weeks. Lastly, we apply the algorithm to the entire ERS 1 SAR data record acquired by the Alaska SAR Facility for the Beaufort Sea north of 73 deg N during the spring of 1992, to produce a map of the dates of melt onset over an area roughly 1000 km on a side. The progression of melt onset is primarily poleward but shows a weak meridional dependence at latitudes of approximately 76 deg-77 deg N. Melting begins in the southern part of the study region on June 13 and by June 20 has progressed to the northermost part of the region.

  19. Melting by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, Iwao; Ishikiriyama, Kazuhiko; Boller, A. |

    1997-09-01

    Well-crystallized macromolecules melt irreversibly due to the need of molecular nucleation, while small molecules melt reversibly as long as crystal nuclei are present to assist crystallization. Furthermore, imperfect crystals of low-molar-mass polymers may have a sufficiently small region of metastability between crystallization and melting to show a reversing heat-flow component due to melting of poor crystals followed by crystallization of imperfect crystals which have insufficient time to perfect before the modulation switches to heating and melts the imperfect crystals. Many metals, in turn. melt sharply and reversibly as long as nuclei remain after melting for subsequent crystallization during the cooling cycle. Their analysis is complicated, however, due to thermal conductivity limitations of the calorimeters. Polymers of sufficiently high molar mass, finally, show a small amount of reversible. local melting that may be linked to partial melting of individual molecules. Experiments by temperature-modulated calorimetry and model calculations are presented. The samples measured included poly(ethylene terephthalate)s, poly(ethylene oxide)s, and indium. Two unsolved problems that arose from this research involve the origin of a high, seemingly stable, reversible heat capacity of polymers in the melting region, and a smoothing of melting and crystallization into a close-to-elliptical Lissajous figure in a heat-flow versus sample-temperature plot.

  20. Distinguishing snow and glacier ice melt in High Asia using MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittger, Karl; Brodzik, Mary J.; Bair, Edward; Racoviteanu, Adina; Barrett, Andrew; Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Armstrong, Richard; Dozier, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    In High Mountain Asia, snow and glacier ice contribute to streamflow, but the contribution of each of these hydrologic components is not fully understood. We generate daily maps of snow cover and exposed glacier ice derived from MODIS at 500 m resolution as inputs to melt models to estimate daily snow and glacier ice contributions to streamflow. The daily maps of 1) exposed glacier ice (EGI), 2) snow over ice (SOI) and 3) snow over land (SOL) between 2000 and 2014 are generated using fractional snow cover, snow grain size, and annual minimum ice and snow from the MODIS-derived MODSCAG and MODICE products. The method allows a systematic analysis of the annual cycle of snow and glacier ice extents over High Mountain Asia. We compare the time series of these three types of surfaces for nine sub-basins of the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) and characterize the variability over the MODIS record. Results show that the Dras Nala, Astore, and Zanskar sub-basins located in the eastern part of the UIB have the highest annual fraction of SOL driven by mid-winter westerly storms. Sub-basins in the northwestern extent of the UIB with relatively high mean elevations, the Hunza, Shigar, and Shyok show the highest annual fraction of both SOI and EGI (i.e. accumulation and ablation zones of the glacier). The largest sub-basin, Kharmong has the smallest annual fraction of SOL, SOI, and EGI, and a smaller SOI and EGI than the mouth of the river (Tarbela). Using these maps, snow and ice melt contributions are then estimated for the nine Upper Indus sub-basins using two melt models: a calibrated temperature-index (TI) model and an uncalibrated energy balance (EB) model. Near-surface air temperatures for the TI model are downscaled from ERA-Interim upper air temperatures, bias corrected using observed temperatures, and aggregated to 100 m elevation bands. We calibrate the seasonally variable degree-day factors for ice and snow by comparing streamflow to the sum of melt (SOL+SOI+EGI) and

  1. Airborne laser scanning based quantification of dead-ice melting in recently deglaciated terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, C.; Sailer, R.; Schümberg, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Stubai Alps in a north to south aligned valley, with 12 rockglaciers of different activities between elevations of 2400 m and 2800 m a.s.l.. Beside the rockglaciers, a big dead ice body (approx. at 2800 m to 2850 m a.s.l.) next to the terminus of the southern Schrankarferner was identified. For the quantification of dead-ice melting, ALS data was used from 2006 - 2009. Additionally, a time series of digital elevation models (DEM) derived from aerial images of different periods (1953 -2003) were integrated in the analysis. In recent years, high-accuracy DEMs from ALS altimetry are emerging as an additional data source to existing field measurements. We present inter annual and annual trends of topographic changes caused by dead-ice melting. These trends are determined from multitemporal DEM differencing. The DEMs are generated from aerial images and ALS data. First results on the three dead-ice bodies of Hintereisferner show significant changes (-0.48 m and -2.24 m respectively per year). The derived melt rates are discussed, summarized and assessed in relation to climate parameters, like mean annual air temperature, mean summer air temperature, mean annual precipitation, mean summer precipitation, and annual sum of positive degree days.

  2. Calving fluxes and basal melt rates of Antarctic ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, M A; Bamber, J L; Griggs, J A; Lenaerts, J T M; Ligtenberg, S R M; van den Broeke, M R; Moholdt, G

    2013-10-01

    Iceberg calving has been assumed to be the dominant cause of mass loss for the Antarctic ice sheet, with previous estimates of the calving flux exceeding 2,000 gigatonnes per year. More recently, the importance of melting by the ocean has been demonstrated close to the grounding line and near the calving front. So far, however, no study has reliably quantified the calving flux and the basal mass balance (the balance between accretion and ablation at the ice-shelf base) for the whole of Antarctica. The distribution of fresh water in the Southern Ocean and its partitioning between the liquid and solid phases is therefore poorly constrained. Here we estimate the mass balance components for all ice shelves in Antarctica, using satellite measurements of calving flux and grounding-line flux, modelled ice-shelf snow accumulation rates and a regional scaling that accounts for unsurveyed areas. We obtain a total calving flux of 1,321 ± 144 gigatonnes per year and a total basal mass balance of -1,454 ± 174 gigatonnes per year. This means that about half of the ice-sheet surface mass gain is lost through oceanic erosion before reaching the ice front, and the calving flux is about 34 per cent less than previous estimates derived from iceberg tracking. In addition, the fraction of mass loss due to basal processes varies from about 10 to 90 per cent between ice shelves. We find a significant positive correlation between basal mass loss and surface elevation change for ice shelves experiencing surface lowering and enhanced discharge. We suggest that basal mass loss is a valuable metric for predicting future ice-shelf vulnerability to oceanic forcing. PMID:24037377

  3. AMOC projections driven by global warming and Greenland Ice Sheet melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Pepijn; Schmittner, Andreas; Lenaerts, Jan; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bi, Dave; van den Broeke, Michiel; Hu, Aixue; Beadling, Rebecca Lynn; Marsland, Simon; Mernhild, Sebastian H.; Ohgaito, Rumi; Rodehacke, Christian; Saenko, Oleg; Swingedouw, Didier; Yang, Shuting; Yin, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is one of the key uncertainties of future climate projections. State-of-art climate models that took part in the CMIP5 project show that over the 21st century the AMOC might reduce by 20-30% under the intermediate RCP4.5 scenario and by 36-44% under the high end RCP8.5 scenario relative to preindustrial values. However, these projections neglect enhanced meltwater input from the Greenland Ice Sheet and lack a thorough uncertainty assessment. We present results of a community effort to use state-of-the-science climate models to simulate the impact of the partial melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the AMOC under future global warming up to the year 2300 (AMOCMIP). A probabilistic uncertainty assessment is presented based on a physics-based AMOC emulator and includes uncertainties in the AMOC's sensitivity to temperature and salinity changes, as well as uncertainties of future global warming, regional temperature amplification and melt rates of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We find that the impact of increased Greenland Ice Sheet melt on the AMOC strength is non-negligible, albeit strongly model dependent. The uncertainty analysis shows that the chance of an collapse of the AMOC is negligible if global temperature change remains below 2°C, but becomes more probable for larger warming.

  4. Radar measurements of melt zones on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.; Gogineni, Prasad; Shanableh, M.

    1994-01-01

    Surface-based microwave radar measurements were performed at a location on the western flank of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Here, firn metamorphasis is dominated by seasonal melt, which leads to marked contrasts in the vertical structure of winter and summer firn. This snow regime is also one of the brightest radar targets on Earth with an average backscatter coefficient of 0 dB at 5.3 GHz and an incidence angle of 25 deg. By combining detailed observations of firn physical properties with ranging radar measurements we find that the glaciological mechanism associated with this strong electromagnetic response is summer ice lens formation within the previous winter's snow pack. This observation has important implications for monitoring and understanding changes in ice sheet volume using spaceborne microwave sensors.

  5. Organochlorine compounds in ice melt water from Italian Alpine rivers.

    PubMed

    Villa, Sara; Negrelli, Christian; Finizio, Antonio; Flora, Onelio; Vighi, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Organochlorine chemicals (OCs) (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) were measured in ice melt water from five glaciers in the Italian Alps. Even though the data collected may not be sufficient for a precise description of persistent organic pollutant release patterns from glacier melting, they have, however, highlighted the potential for surface water contamination. Concentrations were of the same order of magnitude in all glacial streams, indicating comparable contamination levels in different glaciers of the alpine region. OC levels in nonglacial springs sampled in the same areas are usually lower. Even if differences during the melting season (from spring to autumn) have been identified, a regular seasonal pattern in OC concentrations was not observed. Risk for the aquatic environment is excluded through direct water exposure, but it is likely to occur through biomagnification and secondary poisoning exposure. PMID:16054693

  6. Changes of CDW on the Amundsen Sea Shelf as a major cause for Ice Sheet melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Michael; Hellmer, Hartmut; Wisotzki, Andreas; Jacobs, Stan

    2010-05-01

    From February to March 2010 a joint geophysical and oceanographic German expedition with RV Polarstern into the Amundsen Sea will provide an important contribution to the long-term monitoring of CDW characteristics on the Amundsen Sea continental shelf, continuously conducted by colleagues in the US (LDEO) and UK (BAS), as part of the international ASEP (Amundsen Sea Embayment Project). For the Amundsen Sea it is entirely plausible that ocean influence on the WAIS (West-Antarctic Ice Sheet) could increase from changes in ocean temperature, heat transport and vertical thermohaline structure, in response to altered atmospheric forcing, sea ice production, and ice shelf morphology. Previous work has revealed that the ‘warm,' salty CDW gains access to the continental shelf near the sea floor, particularly in the eastern sector, and ponds in glacially scoured troughs that extend deep beneath the ice shelves. The oceanic heat drives basal ice shelf melting rates orders of magnitude faster than beneath the largest ice shelves. Substantial thermohaline variability is apparent in some of the repeated late summer observations, but little is yet known about the seasonal cycle or interannual variability. Heat transport from the continental shelf break to the ice shelf caverns may be influenced by mixing over the rough bottom topography, tidal currents, winds, sea ice production, icebergs, and meltwater impacts on the pycnocline. The talk will focus on first results form CTD measurements conducted during the just finished cruise and the comparison with previous hydrographic data.

  7. Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattermann, T.; Smedsrud, L. H.; Nøst, O. A.; Lilly, J. M.; Galton-Fenzi, B. K.

    2014-10-01

    Melting at the base of floating ice shelves is a dominant term in the overall Antarctic mass budget. This study applies a high-resolution regional ice shelf/ocean model, constrained by observations, to (i) quantify present basal mass loss at the Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS); and (ii) investigate the oceanic mechanisms that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt rates suggested by observations and show that melting is primarily determined by the depth of the coastal thermocline, regulating deep ocean heat fluxes towards the ice. Furthermore, the uneven distribution of ice shelf area at different depths modulates the melting response to oceanic forcing, causing the existence of two distinct states of melting at the FIS. In the simulated present-day state, only small amounts of Modified Warm Deep Water enter the continental shelf, and ocean temperatures beneath the ice are close to the surface freezing point. The basal mass loss in this so-called state of “shallow melting” is mainly controlled by the seasonal inflow of solar-heated surface water affecting large areas of shallow ice in the upper part of the cavity. This is in contrast to a state of “deep melting”, in which the thermocline rises above the shelf break depth, establishing a continuous inflow of Warm Deep Water towards the deep ice. The transition between the two states is found to be determined by a complex response of the Antarctic Slope Front overturning circulation to varying climate forcings. A proper representation of these frontal dynamics in climate models will therefore be crucial when assessing the evolution of ice shelf basal melting along this sector of Antarctica.

  8. Passive microwave-derived snow melt regions on the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, Waleed; Steffen, Konrad

    1995-01-01

    By comparing data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to field data, a melt threshold of the cross-polarized gradient ratio (XPGR), which is a normalized difference between the 19 GHz horizontally-polarized and 37 GHz vertically polarized brightness temperatures, is determined. This threshold, XPGR = -0.025, is used to classify dry and wet snow. The annual areal extent of melt is mapped for the years 1988 through 1991, and inter-annual variations of melt extent are examined. The results show that the melt extent varied from a low of 38.3% of the ice sheet (1990) to a high of 41.7% (1991) during the years 1988-1991.

  9. Bacterial Communities of Surface Mixed Layer in the Pacific Sector of the Western Arctic Ocean during Sea-Ice Melting

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ho Kyung; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Bang Yong; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Hur, Hor-Gil; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    From July to August 2010, the IBRV ARAON journeyed to the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean to monitor bacterial variation in Arctic summer surface-waters, and temperature, salinity, fluorescence, and nutrient concentrations were determined during the ice-melting season. Among the measured physicochemical parameters, we observed a strong negative correlation between temperature and salinity, and consequently hypothesized that the melting ice decreased water salinity. The bacterial community compositions of 15 samples, includicng seawater, sea-ice, and melting pond water, were determined using a pyrosequencing approach and were categorized into three habitats: (1) surface seawater, (2) ice core, and (3) melting pond. Analysis of these samples indicated the presence of local bacterial communities; a deduction that was further corroborated by the discovery of seawater- and ice-specific bacterial phylotypes. In all samples, the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria taxa composed the majority of the bacterial communities. Among these, Alphaproteobacteria was the most abundant and present in all samples, and its variation differed among the habitats studied. Linear regression analysis suggested that changes in salinity could affect the relative proportion of Alphaproteobacteria in the surface water. In addition, the species-sorting model was applied to evaluate the population dynamics and environmental heterogeneity in the bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting. PMID:24497990

  10. Bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Pacific sector of the western Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting.

    PubMed

    Han, Dukki; Kang, Ilnam; Ha, Ho Kyung; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Bang Yong; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Hur, Hor-Gil; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    From July to August 2010, the IBRV ARAON journeyed to the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean to monitor bacterial variation in Arctic summer surface-waters, and temperature, salinity, fluorescence, and nutrient concentrations were determined during the ice-melting season. Among the measured physicochemical parameters, we observed a strong negative correlation between temperature and salinity, and consequently hypothesized that the melting ice decreased water salinity. The bacterial community compositions of 15 samples, includicng seawater, sea-ice, and melting pond water, were determined using a pyrosequencing approach and were categorized into three habitats: (1) surface seawater, (2) ice core, and (3) melting pond. Analysis of these samples indicated the presence of local bacterial communities; a deduction that was further corroborated by the discovery of seawater- and ice-specific bacterial phylotypes. In all samples, the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria taxa composed the majority of the bacterial communities. Among these, Alphaproteobacteria was the most abundant and present in all samples, and its variation differed among the habitats studied. Linear regression analysis suggested that changes in salinity could affect the relative proportion of Alphaproteobacteria in the surface water. In addition, the species-sorting model was applied to evaluate the population dynamics and environmental heterogeneity in the bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting. PMID:24497990

  11. Heat-transfer analysis of the basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Minale, M.; Astarita, G.

    1993-12-01

    Basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves is an important element in the overall balance of Antarctic ice. A heat-transfer model for the basal melting of the Drygalski Ice Tongue is presented. The model does not contain any adjustable parameter. The calculated basal melting rate agrees very well with the value estimated from an overall ice balance on the ice tongue. It is concluded that relatively simple concepts of transport phenomena may be used to model some important features of the dynamics of the Antarctic ice sheet.

  12. Temporal Changes in Spatial Distribution of Basal Melting and Freezing in the Catchment Areas of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C, West Antarctica: Interplay of Climatic Changes and Ice Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, S. W.; Tulaczyk, S.; Joughin, I.

    2002-12-01

    Basal thermal regimen of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) plays the key role in determining the dynamics and stability of this ice sheet. Basal melt water lubricates the ice base allowing fast ice streaming while basal freeze-on increases basal resistance to ice flow. Within WAIS, basal melting is dominant in the interior, where geothermal heat is trapped underneath ~2-to-4-km-thick layer of ice. Basal freeze-on is dominant beneath the slow moving, ~1-km-thick interstream ridges separating fast-moving ice streams. There, conductive heat escape through exceeds the geothermal flux and basal frictional heating is low. Using a time-dependent basal energy balance model (Vogel et al., in press) we examined spatial and temporal distribution of basal melting and freezing in the catchment areas of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~20,000 years ago). Model results indicate that basal melting peaked despite lower surface temperatures during late LGM (~15,000), due to a thickened ice sheet (Steig et al., 2001). This widespread and abundant basal lubrication may have initiated the retreat and thinning of the ice sheet that continued through the Holocene. However, the ice-sheet thinning itself caused gradually a general decrease in basal melting rates in spite of higher Holocene surface temperatures. This reduction in basal water production may be responsible for the recent stoppage of Ice Stream C and slow down of the Whillans Ice Stream. Our modeling results indicate that WAIS is still adjusting to the significant climate warming that marked the end of the LGM and the beginning of Holocene. Only the thinnest portions of the Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Stream C (<1 km) might have adjusted enough to cause locally significant basal freeze-on and to, at least temporarily, slow the ice sheet decay (Joughin and Tulaczyk, 2002). Basal thermal regimen of the rest of WAIS is changing in such a way as to favor increased basal melting, and

  13. Recent Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Melt Onset, Freeze-Up, and Melt Season Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Miller, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freeze-up and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freeze-up. Using this method we analyze trends in melt onset and freeze-up for 10 different Arctic regions. In all regions except for the Sea of Okhotsk, which shows a very slight and statistically insignificant positive trend (O.4 days/decade), trends in melt onset are negative, i.e. towards earlier melt. The trends range from -1.0day/decade for the Bering Sea to -7.3 days/decade for the East Greenland Sea. Except for the Sea of Okhotsk all areas also show a trend towards later autumn freeze onset. The Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Laptev/East Siberian Seas observe the strongest trends with 7 days/decade. For the entire Arctic, the melt season length has increased by about 20 days over the last 30 years. Largest trends of over 1O days/decade are seen for Hudson Bay, the East Greenland Sea the Laptev/East Siberian Seas, and the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas. Those trends are statistically significant a1 the 99% level.

  14. Estimation of Greenland's Ice Cover Melting Area Using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbiriba, B.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Hannon, S.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), we are able to detect the melting of Greenland's ice cover for the July 12, 2012 warming event and estimate the corresponding fractional melted area. We collect all of AIRS' overpasses above Greenland, using the reflected solar radiation to avoid cloudy scenes. We perform a retrieval of the skin surface temperature in order to classify a scene as likely frozen (skin temperature well below the freezing point), likely melted (skin temperature well above freezing point), or thawing. Using empirical snow and water emissivity data we retrieve an effective scene snow/water fraction. For this day we estimate that 90% of the ice cover exhibits some thawing and that 53% of the ice cover area was effectivelly covered with liquid water. For contrast we also look at July 8, 2012, and verify that most of the island, 68%, was frozen at that date. We also see a correlation of the thawing area with the solar angle as the day progresses.

  15. Ross ice shelf cavity circulation, residence time, and melting: Results from a model of oceanic chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Tasha E.; Holland, David M.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2010-04-01

    Despite their harmful effects in the upper atmosphere, anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons dissolved in seawater are extremely useful for studying ocean circulation and ventilation, particularly in remote locations. Because they behave as a passive tracer in seawater, and their atmospheric concentrations are well-mixed, well-known, and have changed over time, they are ideal for gaining insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the isolated cavities found under Antarctic ice shelves, where direct observations are difficult to obtain. Here we present results from a modeling study of air-sea chlorofluorocarbon exchange and ocean circulation in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. We compare our model estimates of oceanic CFC-12 concentrations along an ice shelf edge transect to field data collected during three cruises spanning 16 yr. Our model produces chlorofluorocarbon concentrations that are quite similar to those measured in the field, both in magnitude and distribution, showing high values near the surface, decreasing with depth, and increasing over time. After validating modeled circulation and air-sea gas exchange through comparison of modeled temperature, salinity, and chlorofluorocarbons with field data, we estimate that the residence time of water in the Ross Ice Shelf cavity is approximately 2.2 yr and that basal melt rates for the ice shelf average 10 cm yr -1. The model predicts a seasonal signature to basal melting, with highest melt rates in the spring and also the fall.

  16. Effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, R.; Takeuchi, N.; Aoki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet holds approximately 10% of the fresh water on earth. If it melts all, sea level rises about 7.2meter. It is reported that mass of Greenland ice sheet is decreasing with temperature rising of climate change. Melting of the coastal area is particularly noticeable. It is established that 4 to 23% of the sea level rising from 1993 to 2005 is caused by the melting of Greenland ice sheet. In 2010, amount of melting per year became the largest than the past. However many climate models aren't able to simulate the recent melting of snow and ice in the Arctic including Greenland. One of the possible causes is albedo reduction of snow and ice surface by light absorbing snow impurities such as black carbon and dust and by glacial microorganisms. But there are few researches for effect of glacial microorganism in wide area. So it is important to clarify the impact of glacial microorganisms in wide area. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of microorganism on Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using satellite images of visible, near infrared and thermal infrared wavelength range and observation carried out in northwestern Greenland. We use MODIS Land Surface Temperature Product as ice sheet surface temperature. It estimates land surface temperature based on split window method using thermal infrared bands. MODIS data is bound to cover the whole of Greenland, and calculated the ratio of the temperature change per year. Analysis period is from December 2002 to November 2010. Results of calculating Greenland ice sheet surface temperature change using the MODIS data, our analysis shows that it is upward trend in the whole region. We find a striking upward trend in northern and western part of Greenland. The rate is 0.33±0.03 degree Celsius per a year from 47.5°W to 49°W. While in the coastal area from 49°W to 50.7°W, the rate is 0.26±0.06 degree Celsius per a year. This large upward trend area is the same area as dark region

  17. Bottom melting of Arctic Sea Ice in the Nansen Basin due to Atlantic Water influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muilwijk, Morven; Smedsrud, Lars H.; Meyer, Amelie

    2016-04-01

    Our global climate is warming, and a shrinking Arctic sea ice cover remains one of the most visible signs of this warming. Sea Ice loss is now visible for all months in all regions of the Arctic. Hydrographic and current observations from a region north of Svalbard collected during the Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE2015) are presented here. Comparison with historical data shows that the new observations from January through June fill major gaps in available observations, and help describing important processes linking changes in regional Atlantic Water (AW) heat transport and sea ice. Warm and salty AW originating in the North Atlantic enters the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait and is present below the Arctic Sea Ice cover throughout the Arctic. However, the depth of AW varies by region and over time. In the region north of Svalbard, we assume that depth could be governed primarily by local processes, by upstream conditions of the ice cover (Northwards), or by upstream conditions of the AW (Southwards). AW carries heat corresponding to the volume transport of approximately 9 SV through Fram Strait, varying seasonally from 28 TW in winter to 46 TW in summer. Some heat is recirculated, but the net annual heat flux into the Arctic Ocean from AW is estimated to be around 40 TW. The Atlantic Water layer temperature at intermediate depths (150-900m) has increased in recent years. Until recently, maximum temperatures have been found to be 2-3 C in the Nansen Basin. Studies have shown that for example, in the West Spitsbergen Current the upper 50-200m shows an overall AW warming of 1.1 C since 1979. In general we expect efficient melting when AW is close to the surface. Previously the AW entering through Fram Strait has been considered as less important because changes in the sea ice cover have been connected to greater inflow of Pacific Water through Bering Strait and atmospheric forcing. Conversely it is now suggested that AW has direct impact on melting of

  18. Flow of Ice near a Large Melt Channel in the Ross Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, H.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.; Koutnik, M. R.; Stevens, C.; Winberry, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of large channels incised beneath ice shelves in West Antarctica. However, the genesis of these channels is still not clear. Measurements from the floating tongue of Pine Island Glacier show that sub-shelf channels formed by localized melting (Stanton et al., 2013); oceanographic models of flow in sub-ice-shelf cavities are capable of producing sub-shelf channels through non-linear feed-back mechanisms (Gladish et al. 2012; Sergienko, 2013). On the other hand, other evidence suggests that sub-shelf channels can initiate at locations where melt water beneath grounded ice crosses the grounding line (Le Brocq et al. 2013). Here we use ground-based radar to map a channel incised into the base of the Ross Ice Shelf proximal to the grounding zone of Beardmore Glacier, West Antarctica. Results show that in the grounding zone (ice thickness is 1150m), the channel is 100m deep and 0.5 km wide. On the shelf, the channel widens and deepens down stream; 8km down from the grounding line (ice thickness is 600-800 m), the channel is 200m deep and 1 km wide (see Figure); apparently in this case, the channel originates from beneath the grounded ice. Although there is some indication of radar-detected internal stratigraphy dipping toward the channels indicative of meltin, the pattern of the stratigraphy suggests significant accumulated strain (see Figure). Further, vertical strain-rates calculated from repeat measurements using phase-sensitive radar (pRES), show a more complex pattern over melt-channels than is usually assumed for ice shelves. Specifically, 57 of the 69 pRES measurements exhibit a pattern of compression in the upper 75% of the ice column and extension in the lower 25%. This observation is important because such a pattern affects the ratio of surface- to mean-velocity, which is usually assumed to be unity in shelf-mass balance calculations. FIGURE CAPTION: Unmigrated, across-channel radar profile 8km downstream from the

  19. Antarctic icebergs melt over the Southern Ocean : Climatology and impact on sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Nacho; Le Sommer, Julien; Durand, Gael; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Madec, Gurvan; Mathiot, Pierre; Tournadre, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Recent increase in Antarctic freshwater release to the Southern Ocean is suggested to contribute to change in water masses and sea ice. However, climate models differ in their representation of the freshwater sources. Recent improvements in altimetry-based detection of small icebergs and in estimates of the mass loss of Antarctica may help better constrain the values of Antarctic freshwater releases. We propose a model-based seasonal climatology of iceberg melt over the Southern Ocean using state-of-the-art observed glaciological estimates of the Antarctic mass loss. An improved version of a Lagrangian iceberg model is coupled with a global, eddy-permitting ocean/sea ice model and compared to small icebergs observations. Iceberg melt increases sea ice cover, about 10% in annual mean sea ice volume, and decreases sea surface temperature over most of the Southern Ocean, but with distinctive regional patterns. Our results underline the importance of improving the representation of Antarctic freshwater sources. This can be achieved by forcing ocean/sea ice models with a climatological iceberg fresh-water flux.

  20. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    PubMed

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities. PMID:26347538

  1. Modelling Antarctic ice shelf melting under LGM and doubled CO2 climate using ice shelf-ocean model and climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obase, T.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Kusahara, K.; Hasumi, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice-ocean interaction is thought to be a responsible process on long-term Antarctic ice sheet variations, such as retreat of West Antarctic Ice Sheet during Eemian interglacial. Numerical simulation of Antarctic ice sheet require melt rate at ice shelf base as a boundary condition, but the relation between climate and melt rate is unclear. We calculate Antarctic ocean and basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves under Last Glacial Maximum(LGM) and doubled CO2(2xCO2) climate at equilibrium as well as present-day(CTL). We use circumpolar ice shelf-ocean general circulation model(OGCM, based on COCO) and outputs of climate model(MIROC). For the CTL case, we drive OGCM with surface atmospheric climatology based on reanalysis(OMIP) and present-day ocean temperature and salinity for restoration at northern boundary, placed at around latitude of 40S. The surface boundary conditions for LGM(or 2xCO2) is computed from the outputs from climate model simulations. Annual mean marine 2m air temperature anomaly averaged for south of 60S is -7.3℃ for LGM and +6.0℃ for 2xCO2. LGM (or 2xCO2) anomalies of surface atmospheric variables are superimposed to OMIP to make LGM (or 2xCO2) atmospheric boundary conditions. We modify the ocean temperature and salinity column for restoration at northern boundary by superimposing anomaly to present-day ocean climatology. Present-day geometry of ice sheet and ice shelf is used in all experiments to test the sensitivity to climate. We show that melting amount of Antarctic ice shelves show 23% reduction for the LGM and 3.5 times increase for the 2xCO2 compared to the CTL case. We perform a series of additional sensitivity experiments to investigate the role of surface change in sea surface atmospheric variables (temperature, wind) and ocean structures in the Southern Ocean on melt rate of ice shelves. Water mass, ocean circulation and sea ice production on continental shelf are analyzed.

  2. Observing the Arctic Ocean under melting ice - the UNDER-ICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Hanne; Ullgren, Jenny; Geyer, Florian; Bergh, Jon; Hamre, Torill; Sandven, Stein; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Gammelsrød, Tor; Worcester, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is gradually diminishing in area and thickness. The variability of the ice cover is determined by heat exchange with both the atmosphere and the ocean. A cold water layer with a strong salinity gradient insulates the sea ice from below, preventing direct contact with the underlying warm Atlantic water. Changes in water column stratification might therefore lead to faster erosion of the ice. As the ice recedes, larger areas of surface water are open to wind mixing; the effect this might have on the water column structure is not yet clear. The heat content in the Arctic strongly depends on heat transport from other oceans. The Fram Strait is a crucial pathway for the exchange between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. Two processes of importance for the Arctic heat and freshwater budget and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation take place here: poleward heat transport by the West Spitzbergen Current and freshwater export by the East Greenland Current. A new project, Arctic Ocean under Melting Ice (UNDER-ICE), aims to improve our understanding of the ocean circulation, water mass distribution, fluxes, and mixing processes, sea ice processes, and net community primary production in ice-covered areas and the marginal ice zone in the Fram Strait and northward towards the Gakkel Ridge. The interdisciplinary project brings together ocean acoustics, physical oceanography, marine biology, and sea ice research. A new programme of observations, integrated with satellite data and state-of-the-art numerical models, will be started in order to improve the estimates of heat, mass, and freshwater transport between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. On this poster we present the UNDER-ICE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and GDF Suez E&P Norge AS for the years 2014-2017, and place it in context of the legacy of earlier projects in the area, such as ACOBAR. A mooring array for acoustic tomography combined with

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Growth melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Celik, Yeliz; Di Prinzio, Carlos L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 °C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502) while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30° relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently rotated

  4. Combining Modis and Quikscat Data to Delineate Surface and Near-Surface Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Neumann, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, increasing melt has been measured on the Greenland Ice Sheet, along with mass loss as determined from satellite data, Monitoring the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet becomes critical especially because it is actively losing mass, and the ice sheet has a sea-level rise potential of 7 in. However measurement of the extent of surface melt varies depending on the sensor used, whether it is passive or active microwave or visible or thermal infrared. We have used remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We present a blended MODIS-QS melt daily product for 2007 [1]. The products, including Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST) and a special daily melt product derived from the QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer [2,3] show consistency in delineating the melt boundaries on a daily basis in the 2007 melt season [I], though some differences are identified. An assessment of maximum melt area for the 2007 melt shows that the QSCAT product detects a greater amount of melt (862,769 square kilometers) than is detected by the MODIS LST product (766,184 square kilometers). The discrepancy is largely because the QS product can detect both surface and near-surface melt and the QS product captures melt if it occurred anytime during the day while the MODIS product is obtained from a point in time on a given day. However on a daily bases, other factors influence the measurement of melt extent. In this work we employ the digital-elevation model of Bamber et al. [4] along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data to study some areas and time periods in detail during the 2007 melt season. We focus on times in which the QS and MODIS LST products do not agree exactly. We use NCEP and elevation data to analyze the atmospheric factors forcing the melt process, to gain an improved understanding of the conditions that lead to melt

  5. Documenting Melting Features of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, M.

    2011-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying the Greenland Ice Sheet, its hydrology and dynamics over the short term and longer term because of the potential impact of a warming Arctic. Major studies concern about whether increased surface melting will lead to changes in production of supraglacial lakes and subglacial water pressures and hence , potentially, rates of ice movement. In this talk I will show movies recorded over the past three years form fieldwork activities carried out over the West Greenland ice sheet. In particular, I will project and comment movies concerning surface streams and supraglacial lakes, as the one at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbuFphwJn4c. I will discuss the importance of observing such phenomena and how the recorded videos can be used to summarize scientific studies and communicate the relevance of scientific findings. I will also show, for the first time, the video of the drainage of a supraglacial lake, an event during which a lake ~ 6 m deep and ~ 1 km drained in ~ 1.5 hours. This section of the movie is under development as video material was collected during our latest expedition in June 2011.

  6. Processes and imagery of first-year fast sea ice during the melt season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, B.; Digby, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In June and July 1982, a field program was conducted in the Canadian Arctic on Prince Patrick Island to study sea ice during the melt season with in situ measurements and microwave instrumentation operated near the surface and from aircraft. The objective of the program was to measure physical characteristics together with microwave backscatter and emission coefficients of sea ice during this major period of transition. The present paper is concerned with a study of both surface measurements and imagery of first-year fast ice during the melt season. The melting process observed in first-year fast ice was found to begin with the gradual reduction of the snow cover. For a two- to three-day period in this melt stage, a layer of superimposed ice nodules formed at the snow/ice interface as meltwater froze around ice and snow grains.

  7. Enhanced high-temperature ice nucleation ability of crystallized aerosol particles after preactivation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2014-07-01

    In cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have studied a preactivation mechanism that markedly enhances the particles' heterogeneous ice nucleation ability. First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267-244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the preactivated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and from 4 to 20%, respectively. Preactivation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  8. Strong Isotope Effects on Melting Dynamics and Ice Crystallisation Processes in Cryo Vitrification Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kirichek, Oleg; Soper, Alan; Dzyuba, Boris; Callear, Sam; Fuller, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of crystalline ice during cooling, and further crystallization processes during re-warming are considered to be key processes determining the success of low temperature storage of biological objects, as used in medical, agricultural and nature conservation applications. To avoid these problems a method, termed vitrification, is being developed to inhibit ice formation by use of high concentration of cryoprotectants and ultra-rapid cooling, but this is only successful across a limited number of biological objects and in small volume applications. This study explores physical processes of ice crystal formation in a model cryoprotective solution used previously in trials on vitrification of complex biological systems, to improve our understanding of the process and identify limiting biophysical factors. Here we present results of neutron scattering experiments which show that even if ice crystal formation has been suppressed during quench cooling, the water molecules, mobilised during warming, can crystallise as detectable ice. The crystallisation happens right after melting of the glass phase formed during quench cooling, whilst the sample is still transiting deep cryogenic temperatures. We also observe strong water isotope effects on ice crystallisation processes in the cryoprotectant mixture. In the neutron scattering experiment with a fully protiated water component, we observe ready crystallisation occurring just after the glass melting transition. On the contrary with a fully deuteriated water component, the process of crystallisation is either completely or substantially supressed. This behaviour might be explained by nuclear quantum effects in water. The strong isotope effect, observed here, may play an important role in development of new cryopreservation strategies. PMID:25815751

  9. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-11-12

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  10. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Sudhandra; Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2009-04-01

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  11. Extreme melt on Canada's Arctic ice caps in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Martin; Burgess, David O.; Cogley, J. Graham; Ecclestone, Miles; Labine, Claude; Wolken, Gabriel J.

    2011-06-01

    Canada's Queen Elizabeth Islands contain ˜14% of Earth's glacier and ice cap area. Snow accumulation on these glaciers is low and varies little from year to year. Changes in their surface mass balance are driven largely by changes in summer air temperatures, surface melting and runoff. Relative to 2000-2004, strong summer warming since 2005 (1.1 to 1.6°C at 700 hPa) has increased summer mean ice surface temperatures and melt season length on the major ice caps in this region by 0.8 to 2.2°C and 4.7 to 11.9 d respectively. 30-48% of the total mass lost from 4 monitored glaciers since 1963 has occurred since 2005. The mean rate of mass loss from these 4 glaciers between 2005 and 2009 (-493 kg m-2 a-1) was nearly 5 times greater than the 1963-2004 average. In 2007 and 2008, it was 7 times greater (-698 kg m-2 a-1). These changes are associated with a summer atmospheric circulation configuration that favors strong heat advection into the Queen Elizabeth Islands from the northwest Atlantic, where sea surface temperatures have been anomalously high.

  12. Evaluation of Surface and Near-Surface Melt Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and QuikSCAT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been the focus of much attention recently because of increasing melt in response to regional climate warming. To improve our ability to measure surface melt, we use remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet for the 2007 melt season when record melt extent and runoff occurred. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST), MODIS daily snow albedo, and a special diurnal melt product derived from QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer data, are all effective in measuring the evolution of melt on the ice sheet. These daily products, produced from different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, are sensitive to different geophysical features, though QS- and MODIS-derived melt generally show excellent correspondence when surface melt is present on the ice sheet. Values derived from the daily MODIS snow albedo product drop in response to melt, and change with apparent grain-size changes. For the 2007 melt season, the QS and MODIS LST products detect 862,769 square kilometers and 766,184 square kilometers of melt, respectively. The QS product detects about 11% greater melt extent than is detected by the MODIS LST product probably because QS is more sensitive to surface melt, and can detect subsurface melt. The consistency of the response of the different products demonstrates unequivocally that physically-meaningful melt/freeze boundaries can be detected. We have demonstrated that these products, used together, can improve the precision in mapping surface and near-surface melt extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  13. The effect of basal friction on melting and freezing in ice shelf-ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwyther, David E.; Galton-Fenzi, Benjamin K.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Roberts, Jason L.; Hunter, John R.

    2015-11-01

    The ocean is an important control on the mass budget of the Antarctic ice sheet, through basal melting and refreezing underneath the floating extensions of the ice sheet known as ice shelves. The effect of the ice surface roughness (basal roughness) on melting and refreezing is investigated with idealised ice shelf-ocean numerical simulations. Both "hot" ocean forcing (e.g. Pine Island Glacier; high basal melting) and "cold" ocean forcing (e.g. Amery Ice Shelf; low basal melting, stronger refreezing) environments are investigated. The interaction between the ocean and ice shelf is further explored by examining the contributions to melt from heat exchange across the ice-ocean interface and across the boundary layer-ocean interior, with a varying drag coefficient. Simulations show increasing drag strengthens melting. Refreezing increases with drag in the cold cavity environment, while in the hot cavity environment, refreezing is small in areal extent and decreases with drag. Furthermore, melting will likely be focussed where there are strong boundary layer currents, rather than at the deep grounding line. The magnitude of the thermal driving of the basal melt decreases with increasing drag, except for in cold cavity refreeze zones where it increases. The friction velocity, a function of the upper layer ocean velocity and the drag coefficient, monotonically increases with drag. We find friction-driven mixing into the boundary layer is important for representing the magnitude and distribution of refreezing and without this effect, refreezing is underestimated. Including a spatially- and temporally-varying basal roughness (that includes a more realistic, rougher refreezing drag coefficient) alters circulation patterns and heat and salt transport. This leads to increased refreezing, altered melt magnitude and distribution, and a pattern of altered vertical flow across the entire ice shelf. These results represent a summary of melting and freezing beneath ice shelves and

  14. Freshwater - the key to melt pond formation atop first year sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polashenski, C.; Golden, K. M.; Skyllingstad, E. D.; Perovich, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Melt pond formation atop Arctic sea ice is a primary control of shortwave energy balance and light availability for photosynthesis in the upper Arctic Ocean. The initial formation process of melt ponds on first year ice typically requires that melt water be retained on the surface of ice several to tens of centimeters above sea level for several days. Albedo feedbacks during this time period create below-sea-level depressions which remain ponds later in summer. Both theory and observations, however, show that sea ice is so highly porous and permeable prior to the formation of melt ponds that retention of water tens of centimeters above hydraulic equilibrium for multiple days should not be possible. Here we present results of percolation test experiments that identify the mechanism allowing above-sea level melt pond formation. The infiltration of fresh water from snowmelt into the pore structure of the ice is responsible for plugging the pores with fresh ice, sealing the ice against further water percolation, and allowing water to pool above freeboard. Fresh meltwater availability and desalination processes, therefore, exert considerable influence over the formation of melt ponds. The findings demonstrate another mechanism through which changes in snowfall on sea ice, already being observed, are likely to alter ice mass balance and highlight the importance of efforts to improve treatment of ice salinity in models.

  15. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re ˜2 ×104- 3 ×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  16. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re~2×10^{4}-3×10^{5} and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface. PMID:26252689

  17. When glaciers and ice sheets melt: consequences for planktonic organisms

    PubMed Central

    SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2016-01-01

    The current melting of glaciers and ice sheets is a consequence of climatic change and their turbid meltwaters are filling and enlarging many new proglacial and ice-contact lakes around the world, as well as affecting coastal areas. Paradoxically, very little is known on the ecology of turbid glacier-fed aquatic ecosystems even though they are at the origin of the most common type of lakes on Earth. Here, I discuss the consequences of those meltwaters for planktonic organisms. A remarkable characteristic of aquatic ecosystems receiving the discharge of meltwaters is their high content of mineral suspensoids, so-called glacial flour that poses a real challenge for filter-feeding planktonic taxa such as Daphnia and phagotrophic groups such as heterotrophic nanoflagellates. The planktonic food-web structure in highly turbid meltwater lakes seems to be truncated and microbially dominated. Low underwater light levels leads to unfavorable conditions for primary producers, but at the same time, cause less stress by UV radiation. Meltwaters are also a source of inorganic and organic nutrients that could stimulate secondary prokaryotic production and in some cases (e.g. in distal proglacial lakes) also phytoplankton primary production. How changes in turbidity and in other related environmental factors influence diversity, community composition and adaptation have only recently begun to be studied. Knowledge of the consequences of glacier retreat for glacier-fed lakes and coasts will be crucial to predict ecosystem trajectories regarding changes in biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles and function. PMID:26869738

  18. Numerical analysis on thermal characteristics and ice melting efficiency for microwave deicing vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Yang, Bo; Tan, Gangfeng; Guo, Xuexun; Zhou, Li; Xiong, Shengguang

    2016-05-01

    In the high latitudes, the icy patches on the road are frequently generated and have a wide distribution, which are difficult to remove and obviously affect the normal usage of the highways, bridges and airport runways. Physical deicing, such as microwave (MW) deicing, help the ice melt completely through heating mode and then the ice layer can be swept away. Though it is no pollution and no damage to the ground, the low efficiency hinders the development of MW deicing vehicle equipped without sufficient speed. In this work, the standard evaluation of deicing is put forward firstly. The intensive MW deicing is simplified to ice melting process characterized by one-dimensional slab with uniform volumetric energy generation, which results in phase transformation and interface motion between ice and water. The heating process is split into the superposition of three parts — non-heterogeneous heating for ground without phase change, heat transfer with phase change and the heat convection between top surface of ice layer and flow air. Based on the transient heat conduction theory, a mathematical model, combining electromagnetic and two-phase thermal conduction, is proposed in this work, which is able to reveal the relationship between the deicing efficiency and ambient conditions, as well as energy generation and material parameters. Using finite difference time-domain, this comprehensive model is developed to solve the moving boundary heat transfer problem in a one-dimensional structured gird. As a result, the stimulation shows the longitudinal temperature distributions in all circumstances and quantitative validation is obtained by comparing simulated temperature distributions under different conditions. In view of the best economy and fast deicing, these analytic solutions referring to the complex influence factors of deicing efficiency demonstrate the optimal matching for the new deicing design.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Observations of Summer Ice Melt Using ERS-1 SAR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, B.; Martin, S.

    1995-01-01

    The complete understanding of the heat and mass balance of the polar oceans includes the melting of sea ice in the summer and the reinjection of fresh water into the upper ocean. This study examines the spatial and temporal character of ice melt. Using ERS-1 SAR imagery, the development of small floes formed by melt and deforma- tion, and changes in the fraction of open water and floes is examined.

  20. Stochastic dynamics of melt ponds and sea ice-albedo climate feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudakov, Ivan

    Evolution of melt ponds on the Arctic sea surface is a complicated stochastic process. We suggest a low-order model with ice-albedo feedback which describes stochastic dynamics of melt ponds geometrical characteristics. The model is a stochastic dynamical system model of energy balance in the climate system. We describe the equilibria in this model. We conclude the transition in fractal dimension of melt ponds affects the shape of the sea ice albedo curve.

  1. High basal melting forming a channel at the grounding line of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Oliver J.; Fricker, Helen A.; Siegfried, Matthew R.; Christianson, Knut; Nicholls, Keith W.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Catania, Ginny

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica's ice shelves are thinning at an increasing rate, affecting their buttressing ability. Channels in the ice shelf base unevenly distribute melting, and their evolution provides insight into changing subglacial and oceanic conditions. Here we used phase-sensitive radar measurements to estimate basal melt rates in a channel beneath the currently stable Ross Ice Shelf. Melt rates of 22.2 ± 0.2 m a-1 (>2500% the overall background rate) were observed 1.7 km seaward of Mercer/Whillans Ice Stream grounding line, close to where subglacial water discharge is expected. Laser altimetry shows a corresponding, steadily deepening surface channel. Two relict channels to the north suggest recent subglacial drainage reorganization beneath Whillans Ice Stream approximately coincident with the shutdown of Kamb Ice Stream. This rapid channel formation implies that shifts in subglacial hydrology may impact ice shelf stability.

  2. Variability of Basal Melt Beneath the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf, West Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert; Vaughan, David G.; Vornberger, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Observations from satellite and airborne platforms are combined with model calculations to infer the nature and efficiency of basal melting of the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf, West Antarctica, by ocean waters. Satellite imagery shows surface features that suggest ice-shelf-wide changes to the ocean s influence on the ice shelf as the grounding line retreated. Longitudinal profiles of ice surface and bottom elevations are analyzed to reveal a spatially dependent pattern of basal melt with an annual melt flux of 40.5 Gt/a. One profile captures a persistent set of surface waves that correlates with quasi-annual variations of atmospheric forcing of Amundsen Sea circulation patterns, establishing a direct connection between atmospheric variability and sub-ice-shelf melting. Ice surface troughs are hydrostatically compensated by ice-bottom voids up to 150m deep. Voids form dynamically at the grounding line, triggered by enhanced melting when warmer-than-average water arrives. Subsequent enlargement of the voids is thermally inefficient (4% or less) compared with an overall melting efficiency beneath the ice shelf of 22%. Residual warm water is believed to cause three persistent polynyas at the ice-shelf front seen in Landsat imagery. Landsat thermal imagery confirms the occurrence of warm water at the same locations.

  3. Measurement of Latent Heat of Melting of Thermal Storage Materials for Dynamic Type Ice Thermal Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hisashi; Okada, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shinji

    In order to measure the latent heat of melting of ice slurries with various solute concentrations, an adiabatic calorimeter was constructed. Ice slurries were made from each aqueous solution of ethanol, ethylene glycol and silane coupling agent. The latent heat of melting of ice made from tap water was measured with the present calorimeter and the uncertainty of the result was one percent. Ice slurries were made both by mixing ice particles made from water with each aqueous solution and by freezing each aqueous solution with stirring in a vessel. The latent heat of melting of these ice slurries was measured with various concentrations of solution. The latent heat of melting decreased as the solute concentration or the freezing point depression increased. The latent heat of ice slurries made from ethanol or ethylene glycol aqueous solution agreed with that of ice made from pure water known already. The latent heat of melting of ice slurries made from silane coupling agent aqueous solution got smaller than that of ice made from pure water as the freezing point depression increased.

  4. Lagrangian analysis of ICESat altimetry reveals patterns of ice shelf basal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moholdt, G.; Fricker, H. A.; Padman, L.

    2012-12-01

    Iceberg calving and ice shelf basal melting are normal mass-loss processes that over time roughly balance the outflow of ice from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Most basal melting is thus compensated by ice advection and is not detected by the traditional methods of analyzing surface elevation changes in a fixed geographic coordinate system (Eulerian). Here we present a new method that derive elevation changes in a "Lagrangian" sense from repeat-track ICESat laser altimetry, where specific locations are followed on the advancing ice shelf surface. We use a published ice shelf velocity field to correct for ice advection between consecutive repeats, and then convert the Lagrangian dh/dt estimates into ice thickness changes based on a model of the firn layer. In some locations, the derived ice thickness changes are much larger the Eulerian approach. The Lagrangian approach reduces the noise level of the derived ice thickness changes and reveals clear spatial patterns that we interpret as variations in basal melting. For the largest Antarctic ice shelves (Ross and Filchner-Ronne), we find that the Lagrangian thinning rates increase progressively towards the fronts, which is consistent with oceanographic models that suggest higher basal melt rates in the frontal zone. There are few examples of localized Lagrangian thickening, suggesting that basal melting is likely dominating over basal freezing in the interior of most ice shelves. Combined with data on surface mass balance and firn compaction, our Lagrangian approach can provide new insights into the magnitude and extent of basal melting, as well as being an important validation for models of ice-ocean interaction.

  5. Seasonal changes in ice sheet motion due to melt water lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, I.

    2012-12-01

    Significant temporal variability of ice flow has been observed at the melting margins of the Greenland ice sheet. Seasonal acceleration and deceleration has been partly attributed to changes in resistance at the ice-bed interface caused by subglacial routing of surface melt water, as is the case for valley glaciers. Larger quantities of melt water do not necessarily reduce resistance, however, and the overall effect of melt water lubrication on the mean annual motion of the ice sheet remains unclear. In this work, numerical models are used to explore the coupling between subglacial drainage of surface melt water and ice sheet motion. A synthetic ice sheet is forced to melt according to a prescribed seasonal cycle and the effect of this melting on the speed of the ice is calculated. The model adopts a distributed-channelized structure for the subglacial drainage system, with opening and closing of drainage space controlled by turbulent dissipation, cavitation around bedrock roughness elements, and creep closure of the ice. Subglacial water pressure is assumed to exert the main hydrological control on ice lubrication and is used to parameterize the basal sliding law for a vertically-integrated higher-order ice flow model. The model results suggest that the fastest ice velocities should be expected soon after the onset of surface melting, when runoff into moulins swamps the existing capacity of the drainage system. Periods of relatively high melting at any stage of the melt season can have the same effect, but the establishment of a more efficient drainage system can also have the effect of reducing water pressure and sliding velocities. This behaviour is in broad agreement with current observations. Comparing years with different total melting rates, the model further suggests that slow-down due to the more efficient drainage system is likely to be confined to close to the ice sheet margins (perhaps within about 20km), whereas further away from the margin a larger

  6. How will melting of ice affect volcanic hazards in the twenty-first century?

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh

    2010-05-28

    Glaciers and ice sheets on many active volcanoes are rapidly receding. There is compelling evidence that melting of ice during the last deglaciation triggered a dramatic acceleration in volcanic activity. Will melting of ice this century, which is associated with climate change, similarly affect volcanic activity and associated hazards? This paper provides a critical overview of the evidence that current melting of ice will increase the frequency or size of hazardous volcanic eruptions. Many aspects of the link between ice recession and accelerated volcanic activity remain poorly understood. Key questions include how rapidly volcanic systems react to melting of ice, whether volcanoes are sensitive to small changes in ice thickness and how recession of ice affects the generation, storage and eruption of magma at stratovolcanoes. A greater frequency of collapse events at glaciated stratovolcanoes can be expected in the near future, and there is strong potential for positive feedbacks between melting of ice and enhanced volcanism. Nonetheless, much further research is required to remove current uncertainties about the implications of climate change for volcanic hazards in the twenty-first century. PMID:20403841

  7. Analysis of summer 2002 melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet using MODIS and SSM/I data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Steffen, K.; Chien, J.Y.L.

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the summer of 2002 had the greatest area of snow melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet ever recorded using passive-microwave data. In this paper, we compare the 0?? isotherm derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)-derived melt, at the time of the maximum melt extent in 2002. To validate the MODIS-derived land-surface temperatures (LSTs), we compared the MODIS LSTs with air temperatures from nine stations (using 11 different data points) and found that they agreed to within 2.3??2.09??C, with station temperatures consistently lower than the MODIS LSTs. According to the MODIS LST, the maximum surface melt extended to ???2300 m in southern Greenland; while the SSM/I measurements showed that the maximum melt extended to nearly 2700 m in southeastern Greenland. The MODIS and SSM/I data are complementary in providing detailed information about the progression of surface and near-surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

  8. Analysis of Summer 2002 Melt Extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and SSM/I Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S.; Steffen, Konrad; Chien, Janet Y. L.

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the summer of 2002 had the greatest area of snow melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet ever recorded using passive-microwave data. In this paper, we compare the 0 deg. isotherm derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)-derived melt, at the time of the maximum melt extent in 2002. To validate the MODIS derived land-surface temperatures (LSTs), we compared the MODIS LSTs with air temperatures from nine stations (using 11 different data points) and found that they agreed to within 2.3 +/- 2.09 C, with station temperatures consistently lower than the MODIS LSTs. According to the MODIS LST, the maximum surface melt extended to approx. 2300 m in southern Greenland; while the SSM/I measurements showed that the maximum melt extended to nearly 2700 m in southeastern Greenland. The MODIS and SSM/I data are complementary in providing detailed information about the progression of surface and near- surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

  9. Analysis of Summer 2002 Melt Extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and SSM/I Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Steffen, Konrad; Chien, Y. L.; Foster, James L.; Robinson, David A.; Riggs, George A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the summer of 2002 had the greatest area of snow melt extent on the Greenland ice sheet ever recorded using passive-microwave data. In this paper, we compare the 0 degree isotherm derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)-derived melt, at the time of the maximum melt extent in 2002. To validate the MODIS-derived land-surface temperatures (LSTs), we compared the MODIS LSTs with air temperatures from nine stations (using 11 different data points) and found that they agreed to within 2.3 plus or minus 2.09 C, with station temperatures consistently lower than the MODIS LSTs. According to the MODIS LST, the maximum surface melt extended to approximately 2300 m in southern Greenland; while the SSM/I measurements showed that the maximum melt extended to nearly 2700 m in southeastern Greenland. The MODIS and SSM/I data are complementary in providing detailed information about the progression of surface and near-surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet.

  10. Antarctic sea ice and temperature variations

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.E.; Zwally, H.J.; Weatherly, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    Monthly antarctic station temperatures are used in conjunction with grids of sea ice coverage in order to evaluate temporal trends and the strength of associations between the two variables at lags of up to several seasons. The trends of temperature are predominantly positive in winter and summer, but predominantly negative in spring. The spatially aggregated trend of temperature is small but positive, while the corresponding trend of ice coverage is small but negative. Cross-correlations between concurrent anomalies of the two variables are negative over most of the continent and are strongest over the Antarctic Peninsula, especially in winter. In regions other than the Antarctic Peninsula, lag correlations between seasonal anomalies are generally stronger with ice lagging the summer temperatures and with ice leading the winter temperatures.

  11. Changes in Arctic Melt Season and Implications for Sea Ice Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Markus, T.; Boisvert, L.; Miller, J.; Barrett, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic-wide melt season has lengthened at a rate of 5 days dec-1 from 1979 to 2013, dominated by later autumn freeze-up within the Kara, Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi and Beaufort seas between 6 and 11 days dec(exp -1). While melt onset trends are generally smaller, the timing of melt onset has a large influence on the total amount of solar energy absorbed during summer. The additional heat stored in the upper ocean of approximately 752MJ m(exp -2) during the last decade, increases sea surface temperatures by 0.5 to 1.5 C and largely explains the observed delays in autumn freeze-up within the Arctic Ocean's adjacent seas. Cumulative anomalies in total absorbed solar radiation from May through September for the most recent pentad locally exceed 300-400 MJ m(exp -2) in the Beaufort, Chukchi and East Siberian seas. This extra solar energy is equivalent to melting 0.97 to 1.3 m of ice during the summer.

  12. Potassium-Rich Ices at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. R.; Scott, H. P.; Aarestad, E.; Prakapenka, V.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively, due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and likely vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mole percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 33 GPa and 650 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 300 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded K, K/, and V0 of 24.7±0.9 GPa, 4.44±0.09, and 39.17±0.15 Å3, respectively. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a P-V-T equation of state will be presented. The melting of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was determined up to 625 K and 10.6 GPa and was fit by using a Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve is systematically depressed relative to the melting curve of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. Interestingly, a portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature and pressure. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Birch (1951; JGR, 56, 107-126) has estimated that 40K contributes 2.7 μcal/g.year for each wt.% of K, and our results suggest at least 3.33 wt.% can be incorporated into the structure of ice VII, thus making it a source of heat rather than just a conductive layer. In conclusion, our data illustrate a mechanism that may concentrate K at depth and impact the supposed pressure and temperature within moderate

  13. Glaciation in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands: Ice accumulation, distribution, flow rates, basal melting, and top-down melting rates and patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2015-02-01

    Geological evidence for extensive non-polar ice deposits of Amazonian age indicates that the current cold and dry climate of Mars has persisted for several billion years. The geological record and climate history of the Noachian, the earliest period of Mars history, is less certain, but abundant evidence for fluvial channels (valley networks) and lacustrine environments (open-basin lakes) has been interpreted to represent warm and wet conditions, including rainfall and runoff. Alternatively, recent atmospheric modeling results predict a "cold and icy" Late Noachian Mars in which moderate atmospheric pressure accompanied by a full water cycle produce an atmosphere where temperature declines with elevation following an adiabatic lapse rate, in contrast to the current situation on Mars, where temperature is almost completely determined by latitude. These results are formulated in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands (LNIH) model, in which these cold and icy conditions lead to the preferential deposition of snow and ice at high elevations, such as the southern uplands. What is the fate of this snow and ice and the nature of glaciation in such an environment? What are the prospects of melting of these deposits contributing to the observed fluvial and lacustrine deposits? To address these questions, we report on a glacial flow-modeling analysis using a Mars-adapted ice sheet model with LNIH climate conditions. The total surface/near-surface water inventory is poorly known for the Late Noachian, so we explore the LNIH model in a "supply-limited" scenario for a range of available water abundances and a range of Late Noachian geothermal fluxes. Our results predict that the Late Noachian icy highlands (above an equilibrium line altitude of approximately +1 km) were characterized by extensive ice sheets of the order of hundreds of meters thick. Due to extremely cold conditions, the ice-flow velocities in general were very low, less than a few mm/yr, and the regional ice

  14. Sum-frequency spectroscopic studies. I. Surface melting of ice. II. Surface alignment of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    Surface vibrational spectroscopy via infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) has been established as a useful tool to study the structures of different kinds of surfaces and interfaces. This technique was used to study the (0001) face of hexagonal ice (Ih). SFG spectra in the O-H stretch frequency range were obtained at various sample temperatures. For the vapor(air)/ice interface, the degree of orientational order of the dangling OH bonds at the surface was measured as a function of temperature. Disordering sets in around 200 K and increases dramatically with temperature, which is strong evidence of surface melting of ice. For the other ice interfaces (silica/OTS/ice and silica/ice), a similar temperature dependence of the hydrogen bonded OH stretch peak was observed; the free OH stretch mode, however, appears to be different from that of the vapor(air)/ice interface due to interactions at the interfaces. The technique was also used to measure the orientational distributions of the polymer chains on a rubbed polyvinyl alcohol surface. Results show that the polymer chains at the surface appear to be well aligned by rubbing, and the adsorbed liquid crystal molecules are aligned, in turn, by the surface polymer chains. A strong correlation exists between the orientational distributions of the polymer chains and the liquid crystal molecules, indicating that the surface-induced bulk alignment of a liquid crystal film by rubbed polymer surfaces is via an orientational epitaxy-like mechanism. This thesis also contains studies on some related issues that are crucial to the above applications. An experiment was designed to measure SFG spectra in both reflection and transmission. The result confirms that SFG in reflection is generally dominated by the surface contribution. Another issue is the motional effect due to fast orientational motion of molecules at a surface or interface. Calculations show that the effect is significant if the molecular orientation varies

  15. Delineation of Surface and Near-Surface Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet Using MODIS and QuikSCAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Neumann, Gregory; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of MODIS and QuikSCAT data to measure the surface and sub-surface melting on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The project demonstrated the consistence of this technique for measuring the ice melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The blending of the two instruments data allows for determination of surface vs subsurface melting. Also, the use of albedo maps can provide information about the intensity of the melting.

  16. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  17. Melt ponds on Arctic sea ice determined from MODIS satellite data using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösel, A.; Kaleschke, L.; Birnbaum, G.

    2011-10-01

    Melt ponds on sea ice strongly reduce the surface albedo and accelerate the decay of Arctic sea ice. Due to different spectral properties of snow, ice, and water, the fractional coverage of these distinct surface types can be derived from multispectral sensors like MODIS using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The unmixing was implemented using a multilayer perceptron (MLP) to reduce computational costs. Arctic-wide melt pond fractions and sea ice concentrations are derived from the level 3 MODIS surface reflectance product. The validation of the MODIS melt pond data set was conducted with aerial photos from the MELTEX campaign 2008 in the Beaufort Sea, data sets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for 2000 and 2001 from four sites spread over the entire Arctic, and with ship observations from the trans-Arctic HOTRAX cruise in 2005. The root-mean-square errors (RMSE) range from 3.8 % for the comparison with HOTRAX data, over 10.7 % for the comparison with NSIDC data, to 10.3 % and 11.4 % for the comparison with MELTEX data, with correlations coefficients ranging from R2 = 0.28 to R2 = 0.45. The mean annual cycle of the melt pond fraction for the entire Arctic shows a strong increase in June, reaching a maximum of 15 % by the end of June. The zonal mean of melt pond fractions indicates a dependence of the temporal development of melt ponds from the geographical latitude, and has its maximum in mid-July in latitudes between 80° and 88° N. Furthermore, the MODIS results are used to estimate the influence of melt ponds on retrievals of sea ice concentrations from passive microwave data. Results from a case study comparing sea ice concentrations from ASI-, NASA Team 2-, and Bootstrap-algorithms with MODIS sea ice concentrations indicate an underestimation of around 40 % for sea ice concentrations retrieved with microwave algorithms.

  18. Ice shelf basal melt rates around Antarctica from simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schodlok, M. P.; Menemenlis, D.; Rignot, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce an explicit representation of Antarctic ice shelf cavities in the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) ocean retrospective analysis; and compare resulting basal melt rates and patterns to independent estimates from satellite observations. Two simulations are carried out: the first is based on the original ECCO2 vertical discretization; the second has higher vertical resolution particularly at the depth range of ice shelf cavities. The original ECCO2 vertical discretization produces higher than observed melt rates and leads to a misrepresentation of Southern Ocean water mass properties and transports. In general, thicker levels at the base of the ice shelves lead to increased melting because of their larger heat capacity. This strengthens horizontal gradients and circulation within and outside the cavities and, in turn, warm water transports from the shelf break to the ice shelves. The simulation with more vertical levels produces basal melt rates (1735 ± 164 Gt/a) and patterns that are in better agreement with observations. Thinner levels in the sub-ice-shelf cavities improve the representation of a fresh/cold layer at the ice shelf base and of warm/salty water near the bottom, leading to a sharper pycnocline and reduced vertical mixing underneath the ice shelf. Improved water column properties lead to more accurate melt rates and patterns, especially for melt/freeze patterns under large cold-water ice shelves. At the 18 km grid spacing of the ECCO2 model configuration, the smaller, warm-water ice shelves cannot be properly represented, with higher than observed melt rates in both simulations.

  19. Melting at the base of the Greenland ice sheet explained by Iceland hotspot history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Petrunin, Alexey G.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse V.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Calov, Reinhard; Rickers, Florian; Thomas, Maik; Koulakov, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and ice core drilling have shown that large parts of the north-central Greenland ice sheet are melting from below. It has been argued that basal ice melt is due to the anomalously high geothermal flux that has also influenced the development of the longest ice stream in Greenland. Here we estimate the geothermal flux beneath the Greenland ice sheet and identify a 1,200-km-long and 400-km-wide geothermal anomaly beneath the thick ice cover. We suggest that this anomaly explains the observed melting of the ice sheet’s base, which drives the vigorous subglacial hydrology and controls the position of the head of the enigmatic 750-km-long northeastern Greenland ice stream. Our combined analysis of independent seismic, gravity and tectonic data implies that the geothermal anomaly, which crosses Greenland from west to east, was formed by Greenland’s passage over the Iceland mantle plume between roughly 80 and 35 million years ago. We conclude that the complexity of the present-day subglacial hydrology and dynamic features of the north-central Greenland ice sheet originated in tectonic events that pre-date the onset of glaciation in Greenland by many tens of millions of years.

  20. The effect of basal channels on oceanic ice-shelf melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millgate, Thomas; Holland, Paul R.; Jenkins, Adrian; Johnson, Helen L.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of ice-shelf basal channels has been noted in a number of Antarctic and Greenland ice shelves, but their impact on basal melting is not fully understood. Here we use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model to investigate the effect of ice-shelf basal channels on oceanic melt rate for an idealized ice shelf resembling the floating tongue of Petermann Glacier in Greenland. The introduction of basal channels prevents the formation of a single geostrophically balanced boundary current; instead the flow is diverted up the right-hand (Coriolis-favored) side of each channel, with a return flow in the opposite direction on the left-hand side. As the prescribed number of basal channels is increased the mean basal melt rate decreases, in agreement with previous studies. For a small number of relatively wide channels the subice flow is found to be a largely geostrophic horizontal circulation. The reduction in melt rate is then caused by an increase in the relative contribution of weakly melting channel crests and keels. For a larger number of relatively narrow channels, the subice flow changes to a vertical overturning circulation. This change in circulation results in a weaker sensitivity of melt rates to channel size. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Rossby radius of deformation. Our results explain why basal channels play an important role in regulating basal melting, increasing the stability of ice shelves.

  1. Ocean Properties and Submarine Melt of Ice Shelves in a High-Arctic Fiord (Milne Fiord)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, A.; Mueller, D.; Laval, B.

    2014-12-01

    The role of ambient stratification, the vertical distribution of heat, and fiord circulation on submarine melt rates in glacial fiords in the Canadian Arctic are largely unknown despite recent widespread collapse of ice shelves in this region. A 3-year field study was conducted to investigate ocean influence on ice loss from an ice shelf and glacier tongue in Milne Fiord (82oN), Ellesmere Island. Direct ocean observations of the sub-ice cavities from through-ice profiles showed a vertically stratified water column consisting of a perennial fresh ice-dammed epishelf lake at the surface, above cold relatively fresh Polar Water, and warm saline waters from the upper halocline of the Atlantic layer at depth. The broad continental shelf and a topographic sill prevented the warmest waters of the Atlantic layer from entering the 450 m deep fiord. Meltwater concentrations were highest near the glacier grounding line, with meltwater exported at depth due to the strong ambient stratification. There was little evidence of increased buoyancy-driven melt in summer from subglacial discharge as observed in sub-Arctic fiords (e.g. southern Greenland), suggesting that circulation in high-latitude fiords is largely melt-driven convection with less pronounced seasonality. Basal melt rates estimated using three methods, meltwater flux, divergence of ice flux, and an ocean thermodynamic model, were broadly consistent. Average melt rates of 0.75 ± 0.46 m a-1 and 1.14 ± 0.83 m a-1 were found for the Milne Ice Shelf and Milne Glacier Tongue, respectively, although showed high spatial variability. The highest melt rates (~4 m a-1) were found near the glacier grounding line and were driven by warm upper halocline waters. Similar melt rates occurred in near-surface waters driven by solar heating of the epishelf lake, enhancing melt along the margins of the glacier tongue and the landward edge of the ice shelf. The Milne Ice Shelf and Milne Glacier Tongue are in a state of negative mass

  2. Shifting Arctic Sea-ice Formation and Melt Patterns in a Warming World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Fowler, C.; Tremblay, B.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    As the Arctic warms, sea-ice formation and melt regions are shifting. Ice retreats earlier, open water extends farther north, and fall freeze-up comes later. The changes are already having an impact on important features of the aquatic Arctic system such as surface productivity, water-column stratification, sea-ice velocities, and the export of freshwater (and buoyancy) to the Nordic Seas. These changes are likely to amplify as the trend toward warmer conditions continues. In this contribution we present ice formation and melt patterns over the duration of the polar satellite observation period, from 1979 to the current. The changes are complex, reflecting latitudinal and temporal shifts with warming of the Northern Hemisphere as well as dynamical trends, such as changes in the prevailing surface wind stress patterns and reduction of internal ice stress. We analyze the satellite-derived sea-ice formation and melt dataset with an eye on: the potential impacts on melt/deposition regions (nutrient delivery, water column stratification, contaminant release); the timing of ice formation anddeposition; changes in bathymetric regimes of the formatino and deposition (which imply changes in sea-ice rafted material transport); shifting freshwater transport patterns; and the underlying dynamical mechanisms driving the observed changes.

  3. Structure and decompression melting of a novel, high-pressure nanoconfined 2-D ice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Kalinichev, Andrey G; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2005-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water confined in nanospaces between layers of talc (system composition Mg(3)Si(4)O(10)(OH)(2) + 2H(2)O) at 300 K and pressures of approximately 0.45 GPa show the presence of a novel 2-D ice structure, and the simulation results at lower pressures provide insight into the mechanisms of its decompression melting. Talc is hydrophobic at ambient pressure and temperature, but weak hydrogen bonding between the talc surface and the water molecules plays an important role in stabilizing the hydrated structure at high pressure. The simulation results suggest that experimentally accessible elevated pressures may cause formation of a wide range of previously unknown water structures in nanoconfinement. In the talc 2-D ice, each water molecule is coordinated by six O(b) atoms of one basal siloxane sheet and three water molecules. The water molecules are arranged in a buckled hexagonal array in the a-b crystallographic plane with two sublayers along [001]. Each H(2)O molecule has four H-bonds, accepting one from the talc OH group and one from another water molecule and donating one to an O(b) and one to another water molecule. In plan view, the molecules are arranged in six-member rings reflecting the substrate talc structure. Decompression melting occurs by migration of water molecules to interstitial sites in the centers of six-member rings and eventual formation of separate empty and water-filled regions. PMID:16852798

  4. Local Effects of Ice Floes on Skin Sea Surface Temperature in the Marginal Ice Zone from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, C. J.; Brown, S.; Emery, W. J.; Adler, J.; Wick, G. A.; Steele, M.; Palo, S. E.; Walker, G.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have seen extreme changes in the Arctic. Particularly striking are changes within the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean, and especially in the seas north of the Alaskan coast. These areas have experienced record warming, reduced sea ice extent, and loss of ice in areas that had been ice-covered throughout human memory. Even the oldest and thickest ice types have failed to survive through the summer melt period in areas such as the Beaufort Sea and Canada Basin, and fundamental changes in ocean conditions such as earlier phytoplankton blooms may be underway. Marginal ice zones (MIZ), or areas where the "ice-albedo feedback" driven by solar warming is highest and ice melt is extensive, may provide insights into the extent of these changes. Airborne remote sensing, in particular InfraRed (IR), offers a unique opportunity to observe physical processes at sea-ice margins. It permits monitoring the ice extent and coverage, as well as the ice and ocean temperature variability. It can also be used for derivation of surface flow field allowing investigation of turbulence and mixing at the ice-ocean interface. Here, we present measurements of visible and IR imagery of melting ice floes in the marginal ice zone north of Oliktok Point AK in the Beaufort Sea made during the Marginal Ice Zone Ocean and Ice Observations and Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX) in July-August 2013. The visible and IR imagery were taken from the unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) ScanEagle. The visible imagery clearly defines the scale of the ice floes. The IR imagery show distinct cooling of the skin sea surface temperature (SST) as well as a intricate circulation and mixing pattern that depends on the surface current, wind speed, and near-surface vertical temperature/salinity structure. Individual ice floes develop turbulent wakes as they drift and cause transient mixing of an influx of colder surface (fresh) melt water. The upstream side of the ice floe shows the coldest skin SST, and

  5. Enhanced High-Temperature Ice Nucleation Ability of Crystallized Aerosol Particles after Pre-Activation at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The term pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation describes the observation that the ice nucleation ability of solid ice nuclei may improve after they have already been involved in ice crystal formation or have been exposed to a temperature lower than 235 K. This can be explained by the retention of small ice embryos in cavities or crevices at the particle surface or by the capillary condensation and freezing of supercooled water, respectively. In recent cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have unraveled a further pre-activation mechanism under ice subsaturated conditions which does not require the preceding growth of ice on the seed aerosol particles (Wagner, R. et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, doi: 10.1002/2014JD021741). First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267 - 244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the pre-activated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and 4 to 20%, respectively. Pre-activation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  6. Application of Aerosondes to melt-pond observation over Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, J.; Curry, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Continuous observation of sea ice using a small robotic aircraft called the Aerosonde was made over the Arctic Ocean from Barrow, Alaska, on 20-21 July 2003. Over a region of 350 km off the coast of Barrow, ice concentration data that consists of ice and ponded areas was made using images taken by the aircraft. Melt- pond fraction (A_p) increased northward from 15 % to 30 % as the ice fraction (A_i) increased. However, the fraction of the ice that is ponded (A_p/(A_i+A_p)) was over 30 % in the perennial ice zone while about 25 % in the first year ice zone, suggesting the different stages of melt-pond evolution in each regions. AMSRE-derived ice concentration was underestimated 7% as compared with the observed one (A_i+A_p). These analyses demonstrate new technology for monitoring the spatial variations in the sea ice with melt ponds that would be very difficult to measure using satellites.

  7. Investigating methods to estimate melting event parameters over Arctic sea- ice using SSM/I, OKEAN, and RADARSAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchansky, G.; Eremeev, V.; Mordvintsev, I.; Platonov, N.; Douglas, D.

    The melting events (early melt, melt onset, melt ponding, freeze-up onset) over Arctic sea-ice area are critical for climate and global change studies. They are combined with accuracy of surface energy balances estimates (due to contrasts in the short wave albedo of snow and ice, open water or melt ponds) and drives a number of important processes (onset of snow melt, thawing of boreal forest, etc). M icrowave measurements identify seasonal transition zones due to large differences in emissivity during melt onset, melt ponding and freeze-up periods. This report presents near coincident observation of backscatter cross section (0 ) and brightness temperature (Tb) from Russian OKEAN 01 satellite series, backscatter cross section (0) from RADARSAT-1, brightness temperatures (Tbs) from SSM/I sensors, and near-surface temperature derived from the International Arctic Buoy Program data (IABP) (Belchansky and Douglas, 2000, 2002). To determine the melt duration (time of freeze-up onset minus time of melt onset) passive and active microwave methods were developed. These methods used differences between SSM /I 19.3GHz,H and SSM/I 37.0 GHz, H channels (SSM/I Tb), OKEAN 0 (9.52GHz, VV) and Tb (37.47 GHz, H) channels, RADARSAT-1 0 (5.3GHz, HH), and a threshold technique. An evolution of the SSM/I Tb, OKEAN-01 0 and Tb, RADARSAT ScanSAR 0, MEAN ( 0), SD(0) and SD(0 ) / MEAN(0 ) as function of time was investigated along FY and MY dominant type ice areas during January 1996 through December 1998. The SSM/I, OKEAN and RADARSAT melt onset and freeze up onset algorithms were constructed. The SSM/I algorithm was based- on analysis of the SSM/I Tb. The OKEAN and RADARSAT ScanSAR algorithms were based, respectively, on analysis of OKEAN 0 and Tb of MY and FY sea ice at each MY and FY ice region (200 km by 200 km) determined in OKEAN imagery prior to melting period and changes in RADARSAT SD(0 ) / MEAN(0) of sea-ice during different stages of melting processes at each ice site (75 km

  8. Links Between Acceleration, Melting, and Supraglacial Lake Drainage of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Newmann, T. A.; Andrews, L. C.; Rumrill, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of increasing summer melt on the dynamics and stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet is not fully understood. Mounting evidence suggests seasonal evolution of subglacial drainage mitigates or counteracts the ability of surface runoff to increase basal sliding. Here, we compare subdaily ice velocity and uplift derived from nine Global Positioning System stations in the upper ablation zone in west Greenland to surface melt and supraglacial lake drainage during summer 2007. Starting around day 173, we observe speedups of 6-41% above spring velocity lasting approximately 40 days accompanied by sustained surface uplift at most stations, followed by a late summer slowdown. After initial speedup, we see a spatially uniform velocity response across the ablation zone and strong diurnal velocity variations during periods of melting. Most lake drainages were undetectable in the velocity record, and those that were detected only perturbed velocities for approximately 1 day, suggesting preexisting drainage systems could efficiently drain large volumes of water. The dynamic response to melt forcing appears to 1) be driven by changes in subglacial storage of water that is delivered in diurnal and episodic pulses, and 2) decrease over the course of the summer, presumably as the subglacial drainage system evolves to greater efficiency. The relationship between hydrology and ice dynamics observed is similar to that observed on mountain glaciers, suggesting that seasonally large water pressures under the ice sheet largely compensate for the greater ice thickness considered here. Thus, increases in summer melting may not guarantee faster seasonal ice flow.

  9. Links Between Acceleration, Melting, and Supraglacial Lake Drainage of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Neumann, T. A.; Andrews, L. C.; Rumrill, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of increasing summer melt on the dynamics and stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet is not fully understood. Mounting evidence suggests seasonal evolution of subglacial drainage mitigates or counteracts the ability of surface runoff to increase basal sliding. Here, we compare subdaily ice velocity and uplift derived from nine Global Positioning System stations in the upper ablation zone in west Greenland to surface melt and supraglacial lake drainage during summer 2007. Starting around day 173, we observe speedups of 6-41% above spring velocity lasting 40 days accompanied by sustained surface uplift at most stations, followed by a late summer slowdown. After initial speedup, we see a spatially uniform velocity response across the ablation zone and strong diurnal velocity variations during periods of melting. Most lake drainages were undetectable in the velocity record, and those that were detected only perturbed velocities for approx 1 day, suggesting preexisting drainage systems could efficiently drain large volumes of water. The dynamic response to melt forcing appears to (1) be driven by changes in subglacial storage of water that is delivered in diurnal and episodic pulses, and (2) decrease over the course of the summer, presumably as the subglacial drainage system evolves to greater efficiency. The relationship between hydrology and ice dynamics observed is similar to that observed on mountain glaciers, suggesting that seasonally large water pressures under the ice sheet largely compensate for the greater ice thickness considered here. Thus, increases in summer melting may not guarantee faster seasonal ice flow.

  10. Rapidly Melting Ice Caps of Northern Baffin Island: Insights From Cosmogenic and Conventional Radiocarbon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. K.; Miller, G. H.; Briner, J. P.; Lifton, N.; Devogel, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    The interior plateau of northern Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic is home to several small (< 50 km2) ice caps whose melt has been well recorded since 1949. Modern equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is well above all existing ice and a continuation of current climatic conditions will lead to the disappearance of all ice on the plateau in the future. Between 2000 and 2005, approximately 1 km2 of ice was lost per year, equivalent to ~1.3% of the total ice cover on the plateau. To put this current melt into a larger picture of ice-cap history on the plateau since deglaciation 6 ka, several techniques have been used in concert. The recent extent of the ice caps during the Little Ice Age can be estimated from the preservation of lichen trimlines across much of the plateau. These trimlines represent previous multi-year snow or ice cover and their aerial extent can be measured via satellite imagery. Based on these measurements, modern ice caps represent only ~3% of ice-cap extent during the Little Ice Age. Radiocarbon dating of moss, preserved beneath the ice caps due to their cold-based nature, suggests a sudden expansion of ice cover around 520 calendar years before present (cal BP), indicated by a mode of 7 dates of approximately this age. This coincides with a pulse of global volcanic activity; predicted cooling from increased aerosol loading may have triggered rapid ice-cap growth. However, dead moss emerging at three sites is more than 1000 years old, with a maximum age of 1326±15 cal BP, indicating that portions of the remaining ice caps have remained intact from more than 1000 years Further constraints on ice cap size are provided by 14C cosmogenic exposure dating. 14C concentrations in rocks at the modern ice margin are too low to be the result of continuous exposure since deglaciation followed by shielding for 500-1000 years by ice cover. Exposure history modeling indicates at least one additional prior period of ice cover of approximately 1000 years

  11. Snow Dunes: A Controlling Factor of Melt Pond Distribution on Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrich, Chris; Eicken, Hajo; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Sturm, Matthew; Harbeck, Jeremy P.; Perovich, Donald K.; Finnegan, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The location of snow dunes over the course of the ice-growth season 2007/08 was mapped on level landfast first-year sea ice near Barrow, Alaska. Landfast ice formed in mid-December and exhibited essentially homogeneous snow depths of 4-6 cm in mid-January; by early February distinct snow dunes were observed. Despite additional snowfall and wind redistribution throughout the season, the location of the dunes was fixed by March, and these locations were highly correlated with the distribution of meltwater ponds at the beginning of June. Our observations, including ground-based light detection and ranging system (lidar) measurements, show that melt ponds initially form in the interstices between snow dunes, and that the outline of the melt ponds is controlled by snow depth contours. The resulting preferential surface ablation of ponded ice creates the surface topography that later determines the melt pond evolution.

  12. Cumulates, Dykes and Pressure Solution in the Ice-Salt Mantle of Europa: Geological Consequences of Pressure Dependent Liquid Compositions and Volume Changes During Ice-Salt Melting Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S.; Asphaug, E.; Bruesch, L.

    2002-12-01

    Water-salt analogue experiments used to investigate cumulate processes in silicate magmas, along with observations of sea ice and ice shelf behaviour, indicate that crystal-melt separation in water-salt systems is a rapid and efficient process even on scales of millimetres and minutes. Squeezing-out of residual melts by matrix compaction is also predicted to be rapid on geological timescales. We predict that the ice-salt mantle of Europa is likely to be strongly stratified, with a layered structure predictable from density and phase relationships between ice polymorphs, aqueous saline solutions and crystalline salts such as hydrated magnesium sulphates (determined experimentally by, inter alia, Hogenboom et al). A surface layer of water ice flotation cumulate will be separated from denser salt cumulates by a cotectic horizon. This cotectic horizon will be both the site of subsequent lowest-temperature melting and a level of neutral buoyancy for the saline melts produced. Initial melting will be in a narrow depth range owing to increasing melting temperature with decreasing pressure: the phase relations argue against direct melt-though to the surface unless vesiculation occurs. Overpressuring of dense melts due to volume expansion on cotectic melting is predicted to lead to lateral dyke emplacement and extension above the dyke tips. Once the liquid leaves the cotectic, melting of water ice will involve negative volume change. Impact-generated melts will drain downwards through the fractured zones beneath crater floors. A feature in the complex crater Mannan'an, with elliptical ring fractures around a conical depression with a central pit, bears a close resemblance to Icelandic glacier collapse cauldrons produced by subglacial eruptions. Other structures resembling Icelandic cauldrons occur along Europan banded structures, while resurgence of ice rubble within collapse structures may produce certain types of chaos region. More general contraction of the ice mantle

  13. Ice Regime and Melt-out Timing Cause Divergent Hydrologic Responses among Arctic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondurant, A.; Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Hinkel, K. M.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes are prevalent in the Arctic and thus play a key role in regional hydrology. Because many lakes are shallow and ice grows thick (historically 2-m or greater), lakes often freeze solid (bedfast ice) and this condition fundamentally alters lake energy balance and melt-out processes compared to deeper lakes with perennial liquid water below floating ice. Our analysis of lakes in northern Alaska indicated that ice-off in bedfast ice lakes occurred on average 17 days earlier (22-June) than ice-off in adjacent floating ice lakes (9-July). Earlier melt in bedfast ice lakes caused higher open-water evaporation, 28 % on average, relative to floating ice lakes and this divergence increased in lakes closer to the coast and in cooler summers. Specific conductivity and water isotopes (18O and 2H) indicated similar differences in evaporation between these lake types. Our analysis suggests that ice regimes and associated ice-out timing currently create a strong hydrologic divergence among Arctic lakes, which makes understanding the distribution and dynamics of lakes by ice regime essential for predicting regional hydrology. An observed trend towards more floating ice lakes due to thinner ice growth may initially offset lake drying because of lower evaporative loss from this lake type. This potential negative feedback caused by winter processes is in spite of an overall projected increase in evapotranspiration as the Arctic climate warms. The unusually warm spring observed in 2015 caused much earlier lake ice-out throughout Arctic Alaska, thus providing perfect conditions to test these hypotheses concerning differential lake hydrologic responses.

  14. Energy harvesting in pavement from passing vehicles with piezoelectric composite plate for ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Farjana; Wu, Nan; Kapoor, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    An energy harvester in the road pavement made from a piezoelectric composite plate is designed and studied to collect energy from the passing vehicles for the ice melting aim. Piezoelectric material has the ability to produce electric charge on its surface when strain takes place due to any external loading. Based on this property, a rectangular composite plate harvester is developed consisting of piezoelectric material as the energy generation coating layer and A514 steel as the substrate layer to realize the energy harvesting process from the variable pressure generated in the road pavement by passing vehicles. Based on Westergaards stress model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the three dimensional stress distribution in the pavement. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the optimization of various parameters of the harvester, such as depth of the harvester in the pavement, length and width as well as thicknesses of piezoelectric layer and the substrate. By taking in to consideration the maximum stress that can be sustained by both of the piezoelectric material and also the substrate material, an optimum design of the piezoelectric couple composite plate energy harvester is suggested. It is seen that the maximum output power, which can be generated by a single patch of 0.2m*0.2m*0.0026m dimension with a vehicle passing at 22.2 m/s, can reach up to 23.36 W. With the well-designed pavement energy harvesters, it is feasible to collect enough energy to rise the temperature of the ice with the thickness of 1cm covering a 5m width road by 20 degree Celsius within 2.5 hours. This technique can be applied to melt the ice on the roads and bridges especially in cold countries.

  15. Continued Melting of Greenland Ice-Sheet Regulated Northern Hemisphere Climate During the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govin, A.; Michel, E.; Marti, O.; Braconnot, P.; Jansen, E.; Labeyrie, L.; Landais, A.; Mosquet, E.; Risebrobakken, B.; Swingedouw, D.; Waelbroeck, C.

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of Northern Hemisphere climate during the Last Interglacial (LIG) (129--118 ka) is significant for the study of future climate changes as it may provide information on the climate system responses and feedbacks to radiative forcing (Jansen et al. 2007). We present here a comparison of foraminiferal records from high latitude deep-sea cores with model simulations over the LIG period. We compare high-resolution benthic oxygen and carbon isotope composition records, Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ice-Rafted Detritus (IRD) records from a Southern Ocean core with three North Atlantic cores at different water--depth, and one Norwegian Sea core. Our strategy is to correlate in details high latitude sea surface records from both hemispheres with corresponding ice isotopic records using atmospheric markers for the interhemispheric correlation (e.g. Blunier et al 1998; Landais et al 2003). We observe persistent iceberg melting at the beginning of the LIG which maintained relatively cold and fresh surface-water conditions in the North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas between 129 and 125 ka. Similarly, benthic δ13C data indicate different LIG deep-water ventilation patterns, with North Atlantic Deep Waters sinking shallower during the 129--125 ka interval than during the later climatic optimum. The establishment of peak interglacial conditions in the high northern latitudes and associated strengthening of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation were delayed in consequence. Simulations with the IPSL--CM4 ocean--atmosphere coupled model (Marti et al. 2005) suggest that our results are consistent with the impact of a continued melting of Greenland ice sheet on Northern Hemisphere climate, in response to a particularly high boreal summer insolation.

  16. Modeling of ocean-induced ice melt rates of five west Greenland glaciers over the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Xu, Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Li, X.; Morlighem, M.; Seroussi, H.; den Broeke, M. van; Fenty, I.; Cai, C.; An, L.; Fleurian, B. de

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution, three-dimensional simulations from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model ocean model are used to calculate the subaqueous melt rate of the calving faces of Umiamako, Rinks, Kangerdlugssup, Store, and Kangilerngata glaciers, west Greenland, from 1992 to 2015. Model forcing is from monthly reconstructions of ocean state and ice sheet runoff. Results are analyzed in combination with observations of bathymetry, bed elevation, ice front retreat, and glacier speed. We calculate that subaqueous melt rates are 2-3 times larger in summer compared to winter and doubled in magnitude since the 1990s due to enhanced subglacial runoff and 1.6 ± 0.3°C warmer ocean temperature. Umiamako and Kangilerngata retreated rapidly in the 2000s when subaqueous melt rates exceeded the calving rates and ice front retreated to deeper bed elevation. In contrast, Store, Kangerdlugssup, and Rinks have remained stable because their subaqueous melt rates are 3-4 times lower than their calving rates, i.e., the glaciers are dominated by calving processes.

  17. Laurentide Ice Sheet basal temperatures at the Last Glacial Cycle as inferred from borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    We measured and inverted thirteen temperature-depth profiles (≥1500 m) in boreholes in eastern and central Canada to determine the ground surface temperature histories during and after the last glacial cycle. The sites are located in the southern part of the region covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The inversions yield ground surface temperatures ranging from -1.4 to 3.0oC throughout the last glacial cycle. These temperatures, near the pressure melting point of ice, demonstrate that the southern portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet was not frozen to the bed, allowing for basal flow and fast flowing ice streams at the base. Despite such conditions, which have been inferred from geomorphological data and models, the ice sheet persisted throughout the last glacial cycle. Our results suggest some regional trends in basal temperatures with possible control by internal heat flow.

  18. Molecular transport and phase transition of polycrystalline ice doped with HCl and SO2 near its melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; McCartney, S.; Sadtchenko, V.

    2007-12-01

    HCl and SO2 are major trace gases in atmosphere, which greatly affects chemical properties of atmospheric ice particles. A particular interest to atmospheric science is the effects of impurities on molecular transport and phase transition at grain boundaries in polycrystalline ice. Effects of doped HCl and SO2 on transport and phase transition at grain boundary of 2-4 micrometer polycrystalline ice were studied using a novel technique - Fast Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (FTDS) [1] in the temperature range from -2 to -20 deg. C. In these experiments, H2O/D2O/H2O sandwich-like polycrystalline ice films doped with HCl and SO2 were vapor- deposited on the surface of a thin filament positioned in a vacuum chamber and maintained initially at cryogenic temperatures. After the deposition, the temperature of the filament was rapidly raised to a value near ice melting point, thus, initiating rapids H/D exchange reaction at the interface of H2O and D2O layers. Diffusion controlled rate of isotopic exchange in the desorbing film was monitored with a sensitive mass-spectrometer making it possible to gain quantitative information of the extent of diffusion of chemical species along the grain boundaries in polycrystalline ice samples. Comparisons of the experimental results in pure and doped polycrystalline ice show that water self diffusivity at the grain boundaries is significantly enhanced (by at least an order of magnitude) in the presence of HCl or SO2. The strong, non- Arrhenius, dependence of the water self-diffusivity on temperature indicates that this is due to grain boundary premelting [2], which may occur at temperatures as low as 10 deg. below ice melting point. We will discuss implication of this and other results of our FTDS experiments to various environmental phenomena. References: 1. Haiping Lu, Stephanie A. McCartney, M. Chonde, D. Smyla, and Vlad Sadtchenko, Fast thermal desorption spectroscopy study of morphology and vaporization kinetics of polycrystalline

  19. Comparison of DMSP SSM/I and Landsat 7 ETM+ Sea Ice Concentrations During Summer Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Markus, Thorsten; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of NASA's EOS Aqua sea ice validation program for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E), Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) images were acquired to develop a sea ice concentration data set with which to validate AMSR-E sea ice concentration retrievals. The standard AMSR-E Arctic sea ice concentration product will be obtained with the enhanced NASA Team (NT2) algorithm. The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy to which the NT2 algorithm, using DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imager radiances, retrieves sea ice concentrations under summer melt conditions. Melt ponds are currently the largest source of error in the determination of Arctic sea ice concentrations with satellite passive microwave sensors. To accomplish this goal, Landsat 7 ETM+ images of Baffin Bay were acquired under clear sky conditions on the 26th and 27th of June 2000 and used to generate high-resolution sea ice concentration maps with which to compare the NT2 retrievals. Based on a linear regression analysis of 116 25-km samples, we find that overall the NT2 retrievals agree well with the Landsat concentrations. The regression analysis yields a correlation coefficient of 0.98. In areas of high melt ponding, the NT2 retrievals underestimate the sea ice concentrations by about 12% compared to the Landsat values.

  20. Monitoring southwest Greenland's ice sheet melt with ambient seismic noise.

    PubMed

    Mordret, Aurélien; Mikesell, T Dylan; Harig, Christopher; Lipovsky, Bradley P; Prieto, Germán A

    2016-05-01

    The Greenland ice sheet presently accounts for ~70% of global ice sheet mass loss. Because this mass loss is associated with sea-level rise at a rate of 0.7 mm/year, the development of improved monitoring techniques to observe ongoing changes in ice sheet mass balance is of paramount concern. Spaceborne mass balance techniques are commonly used; however, they are inadequate for many purposes because of their low spatial and/or temporal resolution. We demonstrate that small variations in seismic wave speed in Earth's crust, as measured with the correlation of seismic noise, may be used to infer seasonal ice sheet mass balance. Seasonal loading and unloading of glacial mass induces strain in the crust, and these strains then result in seismic velocity changes due to poroelastic processes. Our method provides a new and independent way of monitoring (in near real time) ice sheet mass balance, yielding new constraints on ice sheet evolution and its contribution to global sea-level changes. An increased number of seismic stations in the vicinity of ice sheets will enhance our ability to create detailed space-time records of ice mass variations. PMID:27386524

  1. Export of algal biomass from the melting Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Boetius, Antje; Albrecht, Sebastian; Bakker, Karel; Bienhold, Christina; Felden, Janine; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hendricks, Stefan; Katlein, Christian; Lalande, Catherine; Krumpen, Thomas; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Rabe, Benjamin; Rogacheva, Antonina; Rybakova, Elena; Somavilla, Raquel; Wenzhöfer, Frank

    2013-03-22

    In the Arctic, under-ice primary production is limited to summer months and is restricted not only by ice thickness and snow cover but also by the stratification of the water column, which constrains nutrient supply for algal growth. Research Vessel Polarstern visited the ice-covered eastern-central basins between 82° to 89°N and 30° to 130°E in summer 2012, when Arctic sea ice declined to a record minimum. During this cruise, we observed a widespread deposition of ice algal biomass of on average 9 grams of carbon per square meter to the deep-sea floor of the central Arctic basins. Data from this cruise will contribute to assessing the effect of current climate change on Arctic productivity, biodiversity, and ecological function. PMID:23413190

  2. A Warmer Atmosphere on Mars Near the Noachian-Hesperian Boundary: Evidence from Basal Melting of the South Polar Ice Cap (Dorsa Argentea Formation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, J. L.; Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Forget, F.; Madeleine, J.-B.

    2011-03-01

    Dorsa Argentea Formation (Noachian-Hesperian) eskers are evidence for basal melting. Ice-flow models show that the mean annual south polar temperature must be raised to -50° to -75°C, providing an independent estimate of elevated lower latitude surface temperature.

  3. Thermohaline circulation below the Ross Ice Shelf - A consequence of tidally induced vertical mixing and basal melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macayeal, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The warmest water below parts of the Ross Ice Shelf resides in the lowest portion of the water column because of its high salinity. Vertical mixing caused by tidal stirring can thus induce ablation by lifting the warm but dense water into contact with the ice shelf. A numerical tidal simulation indicates that vertically well-mixed conditions predominate in the southeastern part of the sub-ice shelf cavity, where the water column thickness is small. Basal melting in this region is expected to be between 0.05 and 0.5 m/yr and will drive a thermohaline circulation having the following characteristics: high salinity shelf water (at - 1.8 C), formed by winter sea ice production in the open Ross Sea, flows along the seabed toward the tidal mixing fronts below the ice shelf; and meltwater (at -2.2 C), produced in the well-mixed region, flows out of the sub-ice shelf cavity along the ice shelf bottom. Sensitivity of this ablation process to climatic change is expected to be small because high salinity shelf water is constrained to have the sea surface freezing temperature.

  4. Does ice accretion temperature and geothernmal heating pace the change from ~40 kyr to ~100 kyr glacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    The growth and decay of ice sheets are clearly linked to cycles of the Earth's orbit, particularly the ~41 kyr obliquity cycle. Early Pleistocene ice ages appear to have grown and decayed on a timescale close to the obliquity period, while the period for late Pleistocene ice ages averages closer to 100 kyr. The thermal state of an ice sheet may control whether the climatic changes produced by orbital changes are can lead to the termination of an ice age. Numerous model studies indicate that the termination of ice ages requires glacial flow that is faster than expected for cold-based ice sheets. Fast flow likely requires that the base of the ice sheet be partially melted. Large ice sheets probably accrete cold, but geothermal heating can melt the base of an ice sheet if the surface of the ice is not too cold (as it may be in Antarctica) or if the accretion rate is not too high (as it may be in Greenland). The timescale for basal melting depends on the initial temperature structure of the ice sheet and on the rate of geothermal heating. For example the melting timescale depends on the square of the initial temperature of the ice sheet base. Although some workers assume parameters that give a melting timescale of less than 10 kyrs, reasonable values of ice temperature and terrestrial heatflow could give a timescale several times longer. One-dimensional numerical ice sheet flow models with a rate of ice accretion/ablation paced at 41 kyrs show a periodicity of the glacial cycles that depends on the period of basal melting. If the melting period is short (say <~30 kyrs) then the base of the ice sheet will be partially melted in time for the obliquity maximum that could produce a termination. The ice sheet then disappears at this first obliquity maximum after ice sheet initiation because it can flow fast enough to melt at lower latitudes and elevations. For longer basal melting periods the entire ice sheet may not be warm enough to flow fast enough to lead to termination

  5. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    PubMed

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas. PMID:26553610

  6. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  7. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    PubMed Central

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas. PMID:26553610

  8. Perception of melting and flavor release of ice cream containing different types and contents of fat.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, L; Linna, M; Tuorila, H; Dijksterhuis, G

    2003-04-01

    Temporal effects of dairy and vegetable fats (0 to 18%) on perception of strawberry flavor release and melting of ice cream were studied using the time intensity sensory method. Also, aroma and flavor attributes of the ice cream samples were evaluated. Only slight effects of fat on the rate of flavor release and flavor intensity were perceived. A slightly faster flavor release from the vegetable fat compared with dairy fat was noticed. Polydextrose and maltodextrin as bodying agents in the fat-free ice cream significantly increased flavor release and melting rate of the ice cream. Increasing fat content slightly retarded melting of ice cream in the mouth. No significant effect of the fat quality on perceived melting was noticed. Significant differences in aroma and flavor attributes of the fat-free and other samples were perceived. Intensity and sharpness of the strawberry aroma and flavor were greater in fat-free samples and they were perceived as nontypical. Fattiness and creaminess were highly correlated. Maltodextrin and polydextrose increased perceived fattiness and creaminess of fat-free ice cream. PMID:12741536

  9. Amplified melt and flow of the Greenland ice sheet driven by late-summer cyclonic rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Samuel H.; Hubbard, Alun; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Box, Jason E.; van As, Dirk; Scharrer, Kilian; Meierbachtol, Toby W.; Smeets, Paul C. J. P.; Harper, Joel T.; Johansson, Emma; Mottram, Ruth H.; Mikkelsen, Andreas B.; Wilhelms, Frank; Patton, Henry; Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Bryn

    2015-08-01

    Intense rainfall events significantly affect Alpine and Alaskan glaciers through enhanced melting, ice-flow acceleration and subglacial sediment erosion, yet their impact on the Greenland ice sheet has not been assessed. Here we present measurements of ice velocity, subglacial water pressure and meteorological variables from the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet during a week of warm, wet cyclonic weather in late August and early September 2011. We find that extreme surface runoff from melt and rainfall led to a widespread acceleration in ice flow that extended 140 km into the ice-sheet interior. We suggest that the late-season timing was critical in promoting rapid runoff across an extensive bare ice surface that overwhelmed a subglacial hydrological system in transition to a less-efficient winter mode. Reanalysis data reveal that similar cyclonic weather conditions prevailed across southern and western Greenland during this time, and we observe a corresponding ice-flow response at all land- and marine-terminating glaciers in these regions for which data are available. Given that the advection of warm, moist air masses and rainfall over Greenland is expected to become more frequent in the coming decades, our findings portend a previously unforeseen vulnerability of the Greenland ice sheet to climate change.

  10. Springtime melt onset on arctic sea ice from satellite observations and related atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Angela C.

    The timing of snowmelt onset (MO) on Arctic sea ice derived from passive microwave satellite data is examined by determining the melting area (in km 2) on a daily basis for the spring and summer melt season months over the 1979 -- 2012 data record. The date of MO on Arctic sea ice has important implications for the amount of total solar energy absorbed by the ice-ocean system in a given year. Increasingly early mean MO dates have been recorded over the 34-year data record. Statistically significant trends indicate that MO is occurring 6.6 days decade-1 earlier in the year over all Arctic sea ice extent. Larger trends exist in sub-regions of the Arctic Ocean including the Barents, Kara, Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas and in the Central Arctic region. The Bering Sea is the only sub-region of the Arctic that has a positive trend in mean MO date indicating that melting is occurring later in the year. Temporal and spatial variability in melting events are examined in the time series of daily MO areas via the identification of several types of melting events. These melting events are characterized based on the magnitude of area melted and duration of the event. Daily maps of MO during melting events are compared with the atmospheric conditions from reanalysis data to investigate the nature of spatial variability in melting area. The occurrence of transient cyclones tends to produce large, contiguous areas of melting on sea ice located in the warm sector of the cyclone. By contrast, high pressure and attendant clear sky conditions tend to produce sporadic, discontinuous areas of melting area. Interannual variability in daily MO area is assessed using an annual accumulation of daily MO area for each melt season. Trends in mean MO dates are evident in the annual accumulations, however, regional variability is high and outlier events can occur. This work illustrates the need for a better understanding of the synoptic weather conditions leading to specific

  11. Contribution of glacial melt water to the recent Southern Ocean sea ice increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Verena; Iovino, Dorotea

    2015-04-01

    In recent years climate change and global warming are topics that are discussed everywhere. Big concerns are the melting of land ice, the reduced summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, and the general decline of the cryosphere. In contrast to those scenarios, the response of Antarctic sea ice to a warming climate is elaborate and puzzling: sea ice extent has been slightly increasing on a circumpolar scale during the last decades. Atmospheric data analysis ascribed this expansion to changes in the wind dynamics; simulations with climate-scale ocean model suggest that accelerated basal melting of ice shelves plays a major role. We investigate the influence of the glacial melt water on the sea ice of the Southern Ocean on the circumpolar and regional scales employing the ocean/sea ice NEMO-LIM coupled system at eddy-permitting resolution. The forcing of the sea ice-ocean model is supplied from the ERA-Interim data set. After a 25-year spin-up period the reference run supplies a realistic simulation of the period 2004-2013. Different volumes and distributions of melt water are applied in individual model runs spanning the same period and results are compared with the reference run. The results of this study will increase our understanding of the effect of climate change on the Southern Ocean at present and thus also of the future development. Questions like how long the increasing trend in sea ice will last or how fast it will be reversed once the tipping point is reached will be able to be addressed with more accuracy.

  12. Melt ponds on Arctic sea ice determined from MODIS satellite data using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösel, A.; Kaleschke, L.; Birnbaum, G.

    2012-04-01

    Melt ponds on sea ice strongly reduce the surface albedo and accelerate the decay of Arctic sea ice. Due to different spectral properties of snow, ice, and water, the fractional coverage of these distinct surface types can be derived from multispectral sensors like the Moderate Resolution Image Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The unmixing was implemented using a multilayer perceptron to reduce computational costs. Arctic-wide melt pond fractions and sea ice concentrations are derived from the level 3 MODIS surface reflectance product. The validation of the MODIS melt pond data set was conducted with aerial photos from the MELTEX campaign 2008 in the Beaufort Sea, data sets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for 2000 and 2001 from four sites spread over the entire Arctic, and with ship observations from the trans-Arctic HOTRAX cruise in 2005. The root-mean-square errors range from 3.8 % for the comparison with HOTRAX data, over 10.7 % for the comparison with NSIDC data, to 10.3 % and 11.4 % for the comparison with MELTEX data, with coefficient of determination ranging from R2=0.28 to R2=0.45. The mean annual cycle of the melt pond fraction per grid cell for the entire Arctic shows a strong increase in June, reaching a maximum of 15 % by the end of June. The zonal mean of melt pond fractions indicates a dependence of the temporal development of melt ponds on the geographical latitude, and has its maximum in mid-July at latitudes between 80° and 88° N. Furthermore, the MODIS results are used to estimate the influence of melt ponds on retrievals of sea ice concentrations from passive microwave data. Results from a case study comparing sea ice concentrations from ARTIST Sea Ice-, NASA Team 2-, and Bootstrap-algorithms with MODIS sea ice concentrations indicate an underestimation of around 40 % for sea ice concentrations retrieved with microwave algorithms.

  13. An optimized estimate of glacial melt from the Ross Ice Shelf using noble gases, stable isotopes, and CFC transient tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, B.; Schlosser, P.; Smethie, W. M.; Jacobs, S.

    2009-08-01

    Isotopes of helium and neon and the H218O/H216O ratio of water are proven proxies for melt from glacial ice beneath floating ice shelves and at ice shelf fronts. Their high concentrations in glacial meltwater, compared to other environmental sources, make them ideal tracers for studies of the pathways of glacial meltwater from its origins into the ocean interior. We combine noble gas and stable isotopes with temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen measurements from three cruises (along the Ross Ice Shelf during the austral summers of 1993-1994 and 1999-2000 and to the Ross Sea in 2000-2001) and use optimal multiparameter analysis to compute the water mass concentration, including glacial meltwater. The distribution of meltwater at the front of the Ross Ice Shelf extended east from 180°W, with the highest concentrations found near 165°W in both 1994 and 2000. The mean meltwater concentration at the ice shelf front was 2.0 ± 0.33‰ in 1994, 2.2 ± 0.36‰ in 2000, and 0.25 ± 0.1‰ in the western Ross Sea in 2001. Water mass concentrations are used to correct for bias in the CFC age, introduced by mixing with CFC-free waters, an effect revealed by comparing CFC age with transit time distribution curves. The water residence time within the ice shelf cavity, using CFCs and the mean meltwater concentration, implies a basal melt rate of 33-50 km3 a-1.

  14. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  15. Channelized ice melting in the ocean boundary layer beneath Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T P; Shaw, W J; Truffer, M; Corr, H F J; Peters, L E; Riverman, K L; Bindschadler, R; Holland, D M; Anandakrishnan, S

    2013-09-13

    Ice shelves play a key role in the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets by buttressing their seaward-flowing outlet glaciers; however, they are exposed to the underlying ocean and may weaken if ocean thermal forcing increases. An expedition to the ice shelf of the remote Pine Island Glacier, a major outlet of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that has rapidly thinned and accelerated in recent decades, has been completed. Observations from geophysical surveys and long-term oceanographic instruments deployed down bore holes into the ocean cavity reveal a buoyancy-driven boundary layer within a basal channel that melts the channel apex by 0.06 meter per day, with near-zero melt rates along the flanks of the channel. A complex pattern of such channels is visible throughout the Pine Island Glacier shelf. PMID:24031016

  16. Sea ice melt onset associated with lead opening during the spring/summer transition near the North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, Frédéric; Hutchings, Jennifer K.; Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Takashi; Morison, James H.; Lourenço, Antonio; Noguchi, Tomohide

    2016-04-01

    In the central Arctic Ocean, autonomous observations of the ocean mixed layer and ice documented the transition from cold spring to early summer in 2011. Ice-motion measurements using GPS drifters captured three events of lead opening and ice ridge formation in May and June. Satellite sea ice concentration observations suggest that locally observed lead openings were part of a larger-scale pattern. We clarify how these ice deformation events are linked with the onset of basal sea ice melt, which preceded surface melt by 20 days. Observed basal melt and ocean warming are consistent with the available input of solar radiation into leads, once the advent of mild atmospheric conditions prevents lead refreezing. We use a one-dimensional numerical simulation incorporating a Local Turbulence Closure scheme to investigate the mechanisms controlling basal melt and upper ocean warming. According to the simulation, a combination of rapid ice motion and increased solar energy input at leads promotes basal ice melt, through enhanced mixing in the upper mixed layer, while slow ice motion during a large lead opening in mid-June produced a thin, low-density surface layer. This enhanced stratification near the surface facilitates storage of solar radiation within the thin layer, instead of exchange with deeper layers, leading to further basal ice melt preceding the upper surface melt.

  17. Physical Mechanisms Controlling Interannual and Seasonal Variations in Melt Pond Evolution on First-Year Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, J.; Ehn, J. K.; Shields, M.; Barber, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    At the transition between spring and summer, melt ponds form and evolve at the surface of Arctic sea ice, significantly modifying energy exchanges between the ice, atmosphere and ocean. Past observations have demonstrated that the fractional coverage of melt ponds on Arctic sea ice can vary widely over the course of a melt season, between years in the same location, and between regions. Here we present two years of melt pond observations from landfast, first-year sea ice in the Canadian Arctic, and analyze which physical mechanisms were responsible for considerable interannual variations in melt pond coverage. In general, the key factors affecting pond coverage were: (1) premelt surface topography, (2) the number of drainage features in the ice and locations of drainage channels, (3) the evolution of ice temperature, and (4) the surface energy balance. Terrestrial LiDAR measurements showed that the premelt topography was rougher in 2011 than in 2012, which led to interannual variations in maximum pond coverage and hydraulic head of 20 pp and 7 cm, respectively. A change in the meltwater balance (production minus drainage) caused the ponds to spread or recede over an area that was almost 90% larger in 2012 than in 2011. The LiDAR measurements also demonstrated that premelt topography was modified due to preferential melting under meltwater drainage channels. Some melt ponds in areas of low-lying premelt topography were unexpectedly drained as the ponds became elevated above deepening channels. Although the sea ice cover was 0.35 m thinner in 2012 than in 2011, ice interior temperatures remained colder later into June, delaying a transition in ice permeability that would allow vertical meltwater drainage from ponds. This permeability transition was observed in 2011 and contributed to a significant drop in pond coverage. For more information see: Landy, J., J. Ehn, M. Shields, and D. Barber (2014), Surface and melt pond evolution on landfast first-year sea ice in the

  18. Reducing the uncertainty in projections of future ice shelf basal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, Ralph; Kauker, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Simulations of ice shelf basal melting in future climate scenarios from the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) have revealed a large uncertainty and the potential of a rapidly increasing basal mass loss particularly for the large cold-water ice shelves in the Ross and Weddell Seas. The large spread in model results was traced back to uncertainties in the freshwater budget on the continental shelf, which is governed by sea ice formation. Differences in sea ice formation, in turn, follow the regional differences between the atmospheric heat fluxes imprinted by the climate models. A more recent suite of BRIOS and FESOM model experiments was performed with output from two members of the newer generation of climate models enganged in the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Comparing simulations forced with output from the AR5/CMIP5 models HadGem2 and MPI-ESM, we find that uncertainties arising from inter-model differences in high latitudes have reduced considerably. Projected heat fluxes and thus sea ice formation over the Southern Ocean continental shelves have converged to an ensemble with a much smaller spread than between the AR4 experiments. For most of the ten larger ice shelves in Antarctica, a gradual (but accelerating) increase of basal melt rates during the 21st century is a robust feature throughout the various realisations. Both with HadGem2 and with MPI-ESM forcing, basal melt rates for Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf in FESOM increase by a factor of two by the end of the 21st century in the RCP85 scenario. For the smaller, warm-water ice shelves, inter-model differences in ice shelf basal mass loss projections are still slightly larger than differences between the scenarios RCP45 and RCP85; compared to AR4 projections, however, the model-dependent spread has been strongly reduced.

  19. Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over a soft bed.

    PubMed

    Bougamont, M; Christoffersen, P; Hubbard, A L; Fitzpatrick, A A; Doyle, S H; Carter, S P

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) depends on feedbacks between surface meltwater delivery to the subglacial environment and ice flow. Recent work has highlighted an important role of hydrological processes in regulating the ice flow, but models have so far overlooked the mechanical effect of soft basal sediment. Here we use a three-dimensional model to investigate hydrological controls on a GrIS soft-bedded region. Our results demonstrate that weakening and strengthening of subglacial sediment, associated with the seasonal delivery of surface meltwater to the bed, modulates ice flow consistent with observations. We propose that sedimentary control on ice flow is a viable alternative to existing models of evolving hydrological systems, and find a strong link between the annual flow stability, and the frequency of high meltwater discharge events. Consequently, the observed GrIS resilience to enhanced melt could be compromised if runoff variability increases further with future climate warming. PMID:25262753

  20. Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over a soft bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougamont, M.; Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, A. L.,; Fitzpatrick, A. A.; Doyle, S. H.; Carter, S. P.

    2014-09-01

    The dynamic response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) depends on feedbacks between surface meltwater delivery to the subglacial environment and ice flow. Recent work has highlighted an important role of hydrological processes in regulating the ice flow, but models have so far overlooked the mechanical effect of soft basal sediment. Here we use a three-dimensional model to investigate hydrological controls on a GrIS soft-bedded region. Our results demonstrate that weakening and strengthening of subglacial sediment, associated with the seasonal delivery of surface meltwater to the bed, modulates ice flow consistent with observations. We propose that sedimentary control on ice flow is a viable alternative to existing models of evolving hydrological systems, and find a strong link between the annual flow stability, and the frequency of high meltwater discharge events. Consequently, the observed GrIS resilience to enhanced melt could be compromised if runoff variability increases further with future climate warming.

  1. Physical Basis for the Temperature-Based Melt-Index Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2001-04-01

    The close relationship between air temperature measured at standard screen level and the rate of melt on snow and ice has been widely used to estimate the rate of melt. The parameterization of the melt rate using air temperature usually takes a simple form as a function of either the mean temperature for the relevant period or positive degree-day statistics. The computation provides the melt rate with sufficient accuracy for most practical purposes. Because of its simplicity, it is often called a crude method and is rated as inferior to other more sophisticated methods such as the energy balance method. The method is often used with the justification that temperature data are easily available or that obtaining energy balance fluxes is difficult. The physical process responsible for the temperature effect on the melt rate is often attributed to the sensible heat conduction from the atmosphere. The simulation capacity of the temperature-based melt-index method, however, is too good to be called crude and inferior. The author investigated physical processes that make the air temperature so effective a parameter for melt rate. Air temperature has a more profound influence on melt than previously has been acknowledged. The influence of air temperature through the turbulent sensible heat flux is limited, however. The air temperature information is transferred to the surface mainly through longwave atmospheric radiation, which is by far the most important heat source for melt. Under cloudless-sky conditions, as much as 60% of the atmospheric emission is derived from within the first 100 m and 90% from the first 1 km of the atmosphere. When the sky is overcast with the cloud bottom within the first 1 km, more than 90% originates within this layer between the surface and the bottom of the cloud. When the sky is overcast with the cloud bottom higher than 1 km, the first 1 km of the atmosphere still makes up about 70% of the longwave irradiance at the surface, for which the

  2. Effect of Frozen Storage Temperature on the Quality of Premium Ice Cream

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hee; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The market sales of premium ice cream have paralleled the growth in consumer desire for rich flavor and taste. Storage temperature is a major consideration in preserving the quality attributes of premium ice cream products for both the manufacturer and retailers during prolonged storage. We investigated the effect of storage temperature (−18℃, −30℃, −50℃, and −70℃) and storage times, up to 52 wk, on the quality attributes of premium ice cream. Quality attributes tested included ice crystal size, air cell size, melting resistance, and color. Ice crystal size increased from 40.3 μm to 100.1 μm after 52 wk of storage at −18℃. When ice cream samples were stored at −50℃ or −70℃, ice crystal size slightly increased from 40.3 μm to 57-58 μm. Initial air cell size increased from 37.1 μm to 87.7 μm after storage at −18℃ for 52 wk. However, for storage temperatures of −50℃ and −70℃, air cell size increased only slightly from 37.1 μm to 46-47 μm. Low storage temperature (−50℃ and −70℃) resulted in better melt resistance and minimized color changes in comparison to high temperature storage (−18℃ and −30℃). In our study, quality changes in premium ice cream were gradually minimized according to decrease in storage temperature up to−50℃. No significant beneficial effect of −70℃ storage was found in quality attributes. In the scope of our experiment, we recommend a storage temperature of −50℃ to preserve the quality attributes of premium ice cream. PMID:26877639

  3. Effect of Frozen Storage Temperature on the Quality of Premium Ice Cream.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Geun-Pyo; Davaatseren, Munkhtugs; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The market sales of premium ice cream have paralleled the growth in consumer desire for rich flavor and taste. Storage temperature is a major consideration in preserving the quality attributes of premium ice cream products for both the manufacturer and retailers during prolonged storage. We investigated the effect of storage temperature (-18℃, -30℃, -50℃, and -70℃) and storage times, up to 52 wk, on the quality attributes of premium ice cream. Quality attributes tested included ice crystal size, air cell size, melting resistance, and color. Ice crystal size increased from 40.3 μm to 100.1 μm after 52 wk of storage at -18℃. When ice cream samples were stored at -50℃ or -70℃, ice crystal size slightly increased from 40.3 μm to 57-58 μm. Initial air cell size increased from 37.1 μm to 87.7 μm after storage at -18℃ for 52 wk. However, for storage temperatures of -50℃ and -70℃, air cell size increased only slightly from 37.1 μm to 46-47 μm. Low storage temperature (-50℃ and -70℃) resulted in better melt resistance and minimized color changes in comparison to high temperature storage (-18℃ and -30℃). In our study, quality changes in premium ice cream were gradually minimized according to decrease in storage temperature up to-50℃. No significant beneficial effect of -70℃ storage was found in quality attributes. In the scope of our experiment, we recommend a storage temperature of -50℃ to preserve the quality attributes of premium ice cream. PMID:26877639

  4. Ionic conductivity measurements of H2O ice at high pressure and temperature and superionic ice in the mantle of ice giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, E.; Komabayashi, T.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The experimental evidence for the superionic conduction in H2O ice at high pressure (P) and temperature (T) has been long-searched since its theoretical prediction. Melting experiments reported a steep rise of the melting curve at P-T range of 35-43 GP and 1000-1600 K, which could be due to a first-order phase transition in the solid phases, namely the presence of the triple point of water, ice VII, and a high-T phase which was assumed superionic. Nonetheless, there has still been no report on direct experimental evidence for superionic conduction (ca. 0.1 S/cm) in ice at high pressure. Here we examined ionic conductivity and isothermal molar volume of ice at high-P-T based on impedance spectroscopy (IS) and x-ray diffraction measurements in an externally-resistive heated diamond anvil cell. In situ IS measurements up to 62 GPa and 920 K demonstrated that ice exhibits superionic conduction (> 0.1 S/cm) above 580-720 K at 20-60 GPa. This suggests that superionic conduction occurs at sufficiently lower P-T than the triple point. Isothermal P-V data collected at P = 33-101 GPa and T = 873 K revealed that an anomalous volume reduction occurs at P = 50-53 GPa. This compression manner corresponds to the previously reported highly compressible regime at P = 40-60 GPa, T = 300 K, which were attributed to hydrogen bond symmetrization. There is no volume discontinuity in the isothermal compression, which contradicts the proposed first order P-T boundary between ice VII and superionic ice. Furthermore, all the conductivity data is expressed by a single Arrhenius equation so that the superionic conduction occurs regardless of the ongoing hydrogen bond symmetrization upon compression. We suggests that the previously reported steep rise of the melting temperature of ice above 35-43 GPa is independent of superionic transition, and is a consequence of the hydrogen bond symmetrization. Combining above results with the existing planetary isentropes, superionic conduction in H2O ice

  5. Surface Melt Magnitude Retrieval Over Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica Using Coupled MODIS Optical and Thermal Satellite Measurements During the 2002-03 Melt Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Lampkin, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Ice shelf stability is of crucial importance in the Antarctic because shelves serve as buttresses to glacial ice advancing from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Surface melt has been increasing over recent years, especially over the Antarctic Peninsula, contributing to disintegration of shelves such as Larsen. Unfortunately, we are not realistically able to quantify surface snowmelt from ground-based methods because there is sparse coverage in automatic weather stations. Satellite based assessments of melt from passive microwave systems are limited in that they only provide an indication of melt occurrence and have coarse resolution. Though this is useful in tracking the duration of melt, melt amount of magnitude is still unknown. Coupled optical/thermal surface measurements from MODIS were calibrated by estimates of liquid water fraction (LWF) in the upper 1cm of the firn derived from a one-dimensional thermal snowmelt model (SNTHERM). SNTHERM was forced by hourly meteorological data from automatic weather station data at reference sites spanning a range of melt conditions across the Ross Ice Shelf during a particularly intense melt season. Melt intensities or LWF were derived for satellite composite periods covering the Antarctic summer months at a 4km resolution over the entire Ross Ice Shelf, ranging from 0-2 percent LWF in early December to areas along the coast with upwards of 10 percent LWF during the time of peak surface melt. Spatial and temporal variations in the amount of surface melt are seen to be related to both katabatic wind strength and wind shifts due to the progression of cyclones along the circumpolar vortex. Sea ice concentration along the ice shelf front, specifically the formation of polynyas, are also thought to be driving factors for surface melt as latent and sensible heat fluxes increase by one to three orders of magnitude as polynyas form. A future application of surface melt mapping using this empirical retrieval model is to determine melt

  6. Austral Summer Sea Ice Melt Revealed in Antarctic ERS-1/2 and NSCAT Scatterometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Liu, X.

    1999-01-01

    The first in-situ field observations of Antarcic austral summer sea-ice melt were made in the Bellingshausen Sea by Arctowski (1908) on Belgica in 1899, and later by Wordie (1921) during the ill-fated drift of Endurance in the Weddell Sea from 1914-1916.

  7. Empirical Retrieval of Surface Melt Magnitude from Coupled MODIS Optical and Thermal Measurements over the Greenland Ice Sheet during the 2001 Ablation Season

    PubMed Central

    Lampkin, Derrick; Peng, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated ice flow near the equilibrium line of west-central Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has been attributed to an increase in infiltrated surface melt water as a response to climate warming. The assessment of surface melting events must be more than the detection of melt onset or extent. Retrieval of surface melt magnitude is necessary to improve understanding of ice sheet flow and surface melt coupling. In this paper, we report on a new technique to quantify the magnitude of surface melt. Cloud-free dates of June 10, July 5, 7, 9, and 11, 2001 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily reflectance Band 5 (1.230-1.250μm) and surface temperature images rescaled to 1km over western Greenland were used in the retrieval algorithm. An optical-thermal feature space partitioned as a function of melt magnitude was derived using a one-dimensional thermal snowmelt model (SNTHERM89). SNTHERM89 was forced by hourly meteorological data from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) at reference sites spanning dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones in the Jakobshavn drainage basin in western GIS. Melt magnitude or effective melt (E-melt) was derived for satellite composite periods covering May, June, and July displaying low fractions (0-1%) at elevations greater than 2500m and fractions at or greater than 15% at elevations lower than 1000m assessed for only the upper 5 cm of the snow surface. Validation of E-melt involved comparison of intensity to dry and wet zones determined from QSCAT backscatter. Higher intensities (> 8%) were distributed in wet snow zones, while lower intensities were grouped in dry zones at a first order accuracy of ∼ ±2%.

  8. Light reflection from a sea-ice cover during the onset of summer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Govoni, John W.

    1992-12-01

    A knowledge of the reflection of light from a sea ice cover is important for both the interpretation of remote sensing imagery at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and for climatological studies involving the energy balance of the polar regions. Spectral measurements of albedo, bidirectional reflectance function (BDRF), and polarized reflectance were made for sea ice conditions found during the onset of melt in the Canadian Arctic. The wavelength region studied was from the ultraviolet to the near infrared (370 - 1000 nm). Results for five surface types are presented: (1) dry snow, (2) dry snow with a glazed surface, (3) bare ice, (4) blue ice, and (5) a melt pond. Results indicate that spectral albedos decrease at all wavelengths as the melt season progresses and the surface conditions evolve from (1) through (5), and that the decrease is most pronounced at longer wavelengths. Reflectance data suggest that (1) at most angles reflectance has the same spectral shape as albedo, (2) at 30 degree(s) elevation reflectance is for the most part azimuthally isotropic and (3) at 60 degree(s) elevation a significant specular component was evident at 0 degree(s) azimuth, especially for the bare ice case.

  9. Ice-melt rates in liquid-filled cavities during explosive subglacial eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, D. C.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    Subglacial eruptions are often associated with rapid penetration of overlying ice and release of large flow rates of water as jökulhlaups. Observations of recent subglacial eruptions indicate rapid syn-eruptive ice melting within liquid-filled subglacial cavities, but quantitative descriptions of possible heat transfer processes need to be developed. Calculations of heat flux from the ice cavity fluid to the melting ice surface indicate that up to 0.6 MW m-2 may be obtained for fluids undergoing single-phase free convection, similar to minimum estimates of heat flux inferred from observations of recent eruptions. Our model of boiling two-phase free convection in subglacial cavities indicates that much greater heat fluxes, in the range 3-5 MW m-2, can be obtained in the vent region of the cavity and may be increased further by momentum transfer from the eruption jet. Rapid magma-water heat transfer from fragmented magma is needed to sustain these heat fluxes. Similar heat fluxes are anticipated for forced convection of subcooled cavity water induced by momentum transfer from an eruption jet. These heat fluxes approach those required to explain jökulhlaup flow rates and rapid ice penetration rates by melting in some, but not all recent eruptions.

  10. Hydrograph peaks caused by ice channel melt in Black Hills streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, P.H. . Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The Black Hills has an average annual precipitation of approximately 20 inches, most of which occurs in early summer. The winters are typically cold and fairly dry. Most streams within the Precambrian central Black Hills have perennial and ephemeral reaches which are related to the presence of surficial deposits. During the winter, ice accumulates in the channels of some stream reaches, completely filling the channels, particularly in shady locations below springs or seeps. High discharges occur during warm spells in late winter and early spring. These high discharges are not due to snow melt because many watersheds are often void of snow. Ice-channel surveys were conducted on Spring, Battle, French, Slate, and Grace Coolidge Creeks during 1988. High discharges occurred during the warm spells at the end of March. Since no precipitation occurred during this time, and the watersheds were barren of snow, the discharge peaks are believed due to melting of ice stored in the channels. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the volume of the water stored as ice was approximately the same as the volume of water represented by the discharge anomaly. The ice stored in channels primarily results from ground water discharge over the winter. It is not due to melting snow or surface water runoff per se. Separation of the hydrograph into surface and ground water components should take into account this phenomena.

  11. Investigations of the temperature regimes of the selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel, Yu.

    2012-06-01

    The principles of measuring the surface temperature of powder bed in the focal spot of the laser radiation while scanning the surface using galvoscanner with F-teta lens have been elaborated. Investigation of the melting of overhang layers has been conducted under full temperature monitoring. Temperature regimes of the selective laser melting process of the 3D object from steel 316L powder have been investigated.

  12. Aragonite undersaturation in the Arctic Ocean: effects of ocean acidification and sea ice melt.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Kawai, Michiyo; McLaughlin, Fiona A; Carmack, Eddy C; Nishino, Shigeto; Shimada, Koji

    2009-11-20

    The increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and attendant increase in ocean acidification and sea ice melt act together to decrease the saturation state of calcium carbonate in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. In 2008, surface waters were undersaturated with respect to aragonite, a relatively soluble form of calcium carbonate found in plankton and invertebrates. Undersaturation was found to be a direct consequence of the recent extensive melting of sea ice in the Canada Basin. In addition, the retreat of the ice edge well past the shelf-break has produced conditions favorable to enhanced upwelling of subsurface, aragonite-undersaturated water onto the Arctic continental shelf. Undersaturation will affect both planktonic and benthic calcifying biota and therefore the composition of the Arctic ecosystem. PMID:19965425

  13. Chemistry and nanoparticulate compositions of a 10,000 year-old ice core melt water.

    PubMed

    Murr, L E; Esquivel, E V; Bang, J J; de la Rosa, G; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2004-11-01

    Particulates extracted from a single section of a 10,000 year-old ice core melt sample exhibited characteristics of contemporary, airborne fine particulates: a majority were microcrystalline particulates and aggregated microcrystals, including some mixtures of microcrystals and carbonaceous matter. Particularly significant were the presence of carbon nanotubes and fullerene nanocrystals composing aggregated particulates reflecting global combustion products similar to contemporary, airborne carbon nanocrystal aggregates. ICP elemental analysis of the melt water showed significant concentrations of Ca, K and especially Na (corresponding to K, NaCl), S, Si, Se, and Zn. Overall, the elemental analysis of the melt water is similar to local tap water. However, lead was absent in the local tap water and only half the concentration of selenium was present in the tap water in contrast to the ice core water. While these observations cannot be generalized, the methodology illustrates the potential to characterize and compare airborne particulate regimes and water chemistries in antiquity. PMID:15491674

  14. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  15. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  16. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  17. Satellite observation of winter season subsurface liquid melt water retention on the Greenland ice sheet using spectroradiometer and scatterometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. Z.; Forster, R. R.; Long, D. G.; Brewer, S.

    2013-12-01

    controlled by surface heat flux and the detection of subsurface liquid water content controlled by the retention process. Surface freeze-up is identified using MODIS-derived ice surface temperatures. We then identify distinct microwave signatures suggesting the presence of subsurface liquid water content, characterize the stratigraphy and geophysical processes controlling the observed response, and derive a retrieval algorithm using a simple radiative transfer model. Over the 4 year time series (2009-2013), results indicate subsurface liquid melt water persists within Ku-band penetration depth up to ~1 month and within C-band penetration depth between ~1-5 months following surface-freeze-up. Detection occurs exclusively in regions where the PFA has previously been mapped using field (Arctic Circle Traverse) and airborne (IceBridge) observations and the spatial extent is consistent with regional climate model (RACMO2) simulations.

  18. The influence of double-diffusive processes on the melting of ice in the Arctic Ocean: laboratory analogue experiments and their interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. S.; Veronis, G.

    2004-03-01

    This study has been motivated by two oceanographic observations: an increased rate of melting of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, and the advance of an anomalously warm tongue of Atlantic water across the Arctic below the halocline over the last few decades. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out in order to explore the physical principles underlying these phenomena, and the possibility that the extra heating at depth is responsible for the enhanced melting rate. A tank was filled with salt solution having various constant vertical density gradients. A block of ice one third of the length of the tank was floated on the surface at one end, and the rest of the surface and the walls of the tank were insulated. When no extra heat was supplied the melting rate (loss of weight of the ice in 1 h) systematically decreased as the stratification was changed from homogeneous fluid to increasingly large density gradients, while keeping the salinity of the solution in contact with the ice constant. An analogue of the intruding Atlantic water was produced by heating the lower portion of the vertical end wall at the end of the tank opposite to the ice end, keeping its temperature constant, and using the same range of salinity gradients as in the unheated experiments. Again the melting rate decreased as the density gradient was increased, but for low gradients it was larger than that in the unheated experiments. Above a certain intermediate gradient there was no significant difference in melting rate between the unheated and heated runs. The melting data were supplemented by photographs and vertical temperature and salinity profiles. The upward transfer of heat from the body of the fluid to melt the ice was clearly double-diffusive: overturning layers, separated by 'diffusive' interfaces, were visible on shadowgraphs, and the thickness of the layers decreased as the density gradient increased. The mean thickness of the layers through the depth of the tank also

  19. Radar-Inference of the Basal Properties and Englacial Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Jordan, T.; Williams, C.; Paden, J. D.; Siegert, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the basal properties (primarily the presence of basal melting, and bed roughness) are important for defining the lower boundary condition for thermomechanical models of ice sheets. Additionally, constraining the englacial temperature provides a test of the steady state solution of such models. Whilst direct measurements of the basal properties and temperature can only be made at a limited number of borehole sights, radio echo sounding provides a means to infer the spatial distribution of both throughout entire ice sheets. The radar-inference of basal melt is possible due to a wet basal interface having a ~10-15 decibel higher reflection coefficient than an ice-bedrock interface, and the radar-inference of englacial temperature is possible due to there being an exponential Arrhenius relationship with the radar attenuation rate. In our study we use ~10 years of radio echo sounding data to map the spatial distribution of basal melt and depth-averaged temperature for the Greenland ice sheet. A necessary precursor to our investigation has been the development of a refined algorithm to infer the radar attention rate using the variation in bed-returned power with ice thickness. The algorithm is conditioned using a prior Arrhenius model calculation of the attenuation rate, and enables sample regions to be selected that are not significantly biased by an inhomogeneous bed. We demonstrate that, for the first time, this algorithm approaches the necessary accuracy to distinguish basal melt directly, with the uncertainty for the radar-inferred attenuation loss less than the decibel separation in reflection coefficients for wet and dry beds. We further cross-validate our method by using the radar-inferred attenuation loss as a constraint to predict the spatial distribution of geothermal heat flux, and to reconstruct temperature profiles that are closer to borehole measurements than zeroth order thermomechanical ice sheet models.

  20. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  1. Surface and basal sea ice melt from autonomous buoy arrays during the 2014 sea ice retreat in the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, T. L.; Wilkinson, J.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    As the Arctic continues its transition to a seasonal ice cover, the nature and role of the processes driving sea ice retreat are expected to change. Key questions revolve around how the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamic processes and potential changes in the role of melt ponds contribute to an accelerated seasonal ice retreat. To address these issues, 44 autonomous platforms were deployed in four arrays in the Beaufort Sea in March, 2014, with an additional array deployed in August in the Chukchi Sea to monitor the evolution of ice conditions during the seasonal sea ice retreat. Each "5-dice" array included four or five co-sited ice mass balance buoys (IMB) and wave buoys with digital cameras, and one automatic weather station (AWS) at the array center. The sensors on these buoys, combined with satellite imagery monitoring the large-scale evolution of the ice cover, provide a near-complete history of the processes involved in the seasonal melt of sea ice. We present a preliminary analysis of the contributions of several key processes to the seasonal ice decay. The evolution of surface ponding was observed at several sites with differing ice types and surface morphologies. The records of surface melt and ice thickness demonstrate a key role of ice type in driving the evolution of the ice cover. Analysis of the surface forcing and estimates of solar energy partitioning between the surface and upper ocean is compared to the surface and basal mass balance from the IMBs. The role of ice divergence and deformation in driving sea ice decay - in particular its role in accelerating thermodynamic melt processes - is discussed.

  2. Modeling the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Tian-Shu

    2016-06-22

    The effect of size, composition and dimension on the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys was investigated by considering the interatomic interaction. The established thermodynamics model without any arbitrarily adjustable parameters can be used to predict the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys. It is found that, the melting temperature and interatomic interaction of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys decrease with the decrease in size and the increasing composition of the lower surface energy metal. Moreover, for the nanoscaled bimetallic alloys with the same size and composition, the dependence of the melting temperature on the dimension can be sequenced as follows: nanoparticles > nanowires > thin films. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by the recent experimental and computer simulation results. PMID:27292044

  3. Unusually loud ambient noise in tidewater glacier fjords: A signal of ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, Erin Christine; Lee, Kevin Michael; Brann, Joel Palmer; Nystuen, Jeffrey Aaron; Wilson, Preston Scot; O'Neel, Shad

    2015-04-01

    In glacierized fjords, the ice-ocean boundary is a physically and biologically dynamic environment that is sensitive to both glacier flow and ocean circulation. Ocean ambient noise offers insight into processes and change at the ice-ocean boundary. Here we characterize fjord ambient noise and show that the average noise levels are louder than nearly all measured natural oceanic environments (significantly louder than sea ice and nonglacierized fjords). Icy Bay, Alaska, has an annual average sound pressure level of 120 dB (referenced to 1 μPa) with a broad peak between 1000 and 3000 Hz. Bubble formation in the water column as glacier ice melts is the noise source, with variability driven by fjord circulation patterns. Measurements from two additional fjords, in Alaska and Antarctica, support that this unusually loud ambient noise in Icy Bay is representative of glacierized fjords. These high noise levels likely alter the behavior of marine mammals.

  4. Unusually loud ambient noise in tidewater glacier fjords: a signal of ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettit, Erin C.; Lee, Kevin M.; Brann, Joel P.; Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Preston S.; O'Neel, Shad

    2015-01-01

    In glacierized fjords, the ice-ocean boundary is a physically and biologically dynamic environment that is sensitive to both glacier flow and ocean circulation. Ocean ambient noise offers insight into processes and change at the ice-ocean boundary. Here we characterize fjord ambient noise and show that the average noise levels are louder than nearly all measured natural oceanic environments (significantly louder than sea ice and non-glacierized fjords). Icy Bay, Alaska has an annual average sound pressure level of 120 dB (re 1 μPa) with a broad peak between 1000 and 3000 Hz. Bubble formation in the water column as glacier ice melts is the noise source, with variability driven by fjord circulation patterns. Measurements from two additional fjords, in Alaska and Antarctica, support that this unusually loud ambient noise in Icy Bay is representative of glacierized fjords. These high noise levels likely alter the behavior of marine mammals.

  5. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  6. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  7. Estimating the time of melt onset and freeze onset over Arctic sea-ice area using active and passive microwave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Mordvintsev, I.N.; Platonov, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate calculation of the time of melt onset, freeze onset, and melt duration over Arctic sea-ice area is crucial for climate and global change studies because it affects accuracy of surface energy balance estimates. This comparative study evaluates several methods used to estimate sea-ice melt and freeze onset dates: (1) the melt onset database derived from SSM/I passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) using Drobot and Anderson's [J. Geophys. Res. 106 (2001) 24033] Advanced Horizontal Range Algorithm (AHRA) and distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC); (2) the International Arctic Buoy Program/Polar Exchange at the Sea (IABP/POLES) surface air temperatures (SATs); (3) an elaborated version of the AHRA that uses IABP/POLES to avoid anomalous results (Passive Microwave and Surface Temperature Analysis [PMSTA]); (4) another elaborated version of the AHRA that uses T b variance to avoid anomalous results (Mean Differences and Standard Deviation Analysis [MDSDA]); (5) Smith's [J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998) 27753] vertically polarized Tb algorithm for estimating melt onset in multiyear (MY) ice (SSM/I 19V-37V); and (6) analyses of concurrent backscattering cross section (????) and brightness temperature (T b) from OKEAN-01 satellite series. Melt onset and freeze onset maps were created and compared to understand how the estimates vary between different satellite instruments and methods over different Arctic sea-ice regions. Comparisons were made to evaluate relative sensitivities among the methods to slight adjustments of the Tb calibration coefficients and algorithm threshold values. Compared to the PMSTA method, the AHRA method tended to estimate significantly earlier melt dates, likely caused by the AHRA's susceptibility to prematurely identify melt onset conditions. In contrast, the IABP/POLES surface air temperature data tended to estimate later melt and earlier freeze in all but perennial ice. The MDSDA method was least sensitive to

  8. Arctic warming: nonlinear impacts of sea-ice and glacier melt on seabird foraging.

    PubMed

    Grémillet, David; Fort, Jérôme; Amélineau, Françoise; Zakharova, Elena; Le Bot, Tangi; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Arctic climate change has profound impacts on the cryosphere, notably via shrinking sea-ice cover and retreating glaciers, and it is essential to evaluate and forecast the ecological consequences of such changes. We studied zooplankton-feeding little auks (Alle alle), a key sentinel species of the Arctic, at their northernmost breeding site in Franz-Josef Land (80°N), Russian Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that little auks still benefit from pristine arctic environmental conditions in this remote area. To this end, we analysed remote sensing data on sea-ice and coastal glacier dynamics collected in our study area across 1979-2013. Further, we recorded little auk foraging behaviour using miniature electronic tags attached to the birds in the summer of 2013, and compared it with similar data collected at three localities across the Atlantic Arctic. We also compared current and historical data on Franz-Josef Land little auk diet, morphometrics and chick growth curves. Our analyses reveal that summer sea-ice retreated markedly during the last decade, leaving the Franz-Josef Land archipelago virtually sea-ice free each summer since 2005. This had a profound impact on little auk foraging, which lost their sea-ice-associated prey. Concomitantly, large coastal glaciers retreated rapidly, releasing large volumes of melt water. Zooplankton is stunned by cold and osmotic shock at the boundary between glacier melt and coastal waters, creating new foraging hotspots for little auks. Birds therefore switched from foraging at distant ice-edge localities, to highly profitable feeding at glacier melt-water fronts within <5 km of their breeding site. Through this behavioural plasticity, little auks maintained their chick growth rates, but showed a 4% decrease in adult body mass. Our study demonstrates that arctic cryosphere changes may have antagonistic ecological consequences on coastal trophic flow. Such nonlinear responses complicate modelling exercises of current and future

  9. Modelling the impact of submarine frontal melting and ice mélange on glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, J.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Weiss, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two mechanisms are generally proposed to explain seasonal variations in the calving front of tidewater glaciers: submarine melting of the calving face and the mechanical back-force applied by the ice mélange. However, the way these processes affect the calving rate and the glacier dynamics remains uncertain. In this study, we used the finite element model Elmer/Ice to simulate the impact of these forcings on more than 200 two dimensional theoretical flowline glacier configurations. The model, which includes calving processes, suggests that frontal melting affects the position of the terminus only slightly (< a few hundred meters) and does not affect the pluriannual glacier mass balance at all. However, the ice mélange has a greater impact on the advance and retreat cycles of the glacier front (more than several 1000 m) and its consequences for the mass balance are not completely negligible, stressing the need for better characterization of forcing properties. We also show that ice mélange forcing against the calving face can mechanically prevent crevasse propagation at sea level and hence prevent calving. Results also revealed different behaviors in grounded and floating glaciers: in the case of a floating extension, the heaviest forcings can disrupt the glacier equilibrium by modifying its buttressing and ice flux at the grounding line.

  10. A microwave technique for mapping ice temperature in the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone

    SciTech Connect

    St. Germain, K.M.; Cavalieri, D.J.

    1997-07-01

    A technique for deriving ice temperature in the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone from passive microwave radiances has been developed. The algorithm operates on brightness temperatures derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and uses ice concentration and type from a previously developed thin ice algorithm to estimate the surface emissivity. Comparisons of the microwave derived temperatures with estimates derived from infrared imagery of the Bering Strait yield a correlation coefficient of 0.93 and an RMS difference of 2.1 K when coastal and cloud contaminated pixels are removed. SSM/I temperatures were also compared with a time series of air temperature observations from Gambell on St. Lawrence Island and from Point Barrow, AK weather stations. These comparisons indicate that the relationship between the air temperature and the ice temperature depends on ice type.