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Sample records for icf ignition revision

  1. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  2. Nova Upgrade: A proposed ICF facility to demonstrate ignition and gain, revision 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    The present objective of the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is to determine the scientific feasibility of compressing and heating a small mass of mixed deuterium and tritium (DT) to conditions at which fusion occurs and significant energy is released. The potential applications of ICF will be determined by the resulting fusion energy yield (amount of energy produced) and gain (ratio of energy released to energy required to heat and compress the DT fuel). Important defense and civilian applications, including weapons physics, weapons effects simulation, and ultimately the generation of electric power will become possible if yields of 100 to 1,000 MJ and gains exceeding approximately 50 can be achieved. Once ignition and propagating bum producing modest gain (2 to 10) at moderate drive energy (1 to 2 MJ) has been achieved, the extension to high gain (greater than 50) is straightforward. Therefore, the demonstration of ignition and modest gain is the final step in establishing the scientific feasibility of ICF. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes the Nova Upgrade Facility to achieve this demonstration by the end of the decade. This facility would be constructed within the existing Nova building at LLNL for a total cost of approximately $400 M over the proposed FY 1995-1999 construction period. This report discusses this facility.

  3. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  4. Resolving a central ICF issue for ignition: Implosion symmertry

    SciTech Connect

    Cray, M.; Delamater, N.D.; Fernandez, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program focuses on resolving key target-physics issues and developing technology needed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This work is being performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A major requirement for the indirect-drive NIF ignition target is to achieve the irradiation uniformity on the capsule surface needed for a symmetrical high-convergence implosion. Los Alamos employed an integrated modeling technique using the Lasnex radiation-hydrodynamics code to design two different targets that achieve ignition and moderate gain. Los Alamos is performing experiments on the Nova Laser at LLNL in order to validate our NIF ignition calculations.

  5. OMEGA Experiments on the Shock-Ignition ICF Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.

    2007-11-01

    Shock ignition is an ICF concept that assembles thermonuclear fuel to high areal densities and then ignites it by launching a strong shock wave into the compressed fuel. The low-adiabat fuel assembly implodes with a velocity that is less than that required for hot-spot ignition. An intensity spike at the end of the main drive pulse generates a strong shock that is timed to meet the return shock bouncing back from the capsule center in the hot spot. The resulting fuel assembly is non-isobaric and will ignite with less energy than a conventional isobaric implosion.^1 Experiments to study the shock-ignition concept were performed on the OMEGA Laser System using 40-μm-thick, 0.9-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas. The targets were driven by a relaxation adiabat-shaping laser pulse with a short picket pulse and a high-intensity spike. The implosion was optimized by measuring the fuel assembly performance as a function of the timing of the picket pulse and the spike. Neutron-averaged areal densities of ˜200 mg/cm^2 were measured. The shock-generated implosion showed fusion product yields enhanced by a factor of ˜4 compared to an implosion without the spike. The measured neutron yield for a 25-atm fill, an adiabat of 1.6, and 17 kJ of laser energy was ˜10% of the 1-D simulation prediction. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreements DE-FC52-92SF19460 and DE-FC02-04ER54789. Contributors: R. Betti,^* C. Stoeckl, K.S. Anderson,^* J.A. Delettrez, V.Yu. Glebov, F.J. Marshall, D.N. Maywar, R.L. McCrory, D.D. Meyerhofer, P.B. Radha, T.C. Sangster, V.A. Smalyuk, A.A. Solodov,^* B. Yaakobi, and C.D. Zhou, UR/LLE; J.A. Frenje, C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, and F.H. S'eguin, MIT-PSFC; L.J. Perkins, LLNL; D. Shvarts, NRCN (Israel). ^*Also at the Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter and Fast Ignition.

  6. Energy Gain Investigation in Fast Ignition ICF with Electron Ignition Beam by Changing Fuel Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi, Mohadeseh; Ahmadi, Masoume; Ghasemizad, Abbas

    2014-02-01

    Fast ignition is a method in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) in which an ignition spark in pre-compression fuel is formed by an ultra-intense laser beam. In applying this method, a hot spot is built by relative electrons which are produced by the ultra-intense laser beam. For a better understanding, a fuel energy gain curve based on density is drawn and it can be observed that the ignition by an electron beam has the maximum energy gain. The maximum energy gain has been observed in equimolar DT fuel with a density of 500 g/cm3 and in fuel with tritium (10%) with a density of 1000 g/cm3.

  7. Possible new light pulse expansors and compressors for the ICF fast ignition concept

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, P.

    1995-12-31

    New kinds of optical diffraction dispersive devices which could be possible candidates for the Chirp Pulse Amplification technique used in the ICF Fast Ignition concept are proposed. These dispersive filters show linear group delay time dispersion versus frequency with either positive and negative slopes avoiding the necessity of slope inversion.

  8. Scaling formula of ICF ignition targets and study of targets optimized in stability performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Dai, Zhensheng; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-10-01

    LPI and RTI are the two main ingredients affecting the success of ignition. The gas fill near the Au wall along the inner laser cone is the main region which stimulates SRS instabilities. At this region, pressure balance and energy balance between the inside and the outside of inner laser cone path are obtained. A plasma scaling model in ignition hohlraums of ICF has been developed. RTI could be described by IFAR(InFlight Aspect Ratio) according to linear theory. Considering other scaling formula in capsule, a index, SPI (Stability performance Index), has been proposed, which describes the balance between SPI and RTI. Designing of ignition targets is directed by using this index to obtain more margin for LPI and RTI.

  9. Thermonuclear Burn in Ignition-Scale ICF Targets under Highly Compressed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. Grant; Zimmerman, George; Moody, John; Ho, Darwin; Strozzi, David; Rhodes, Mark; Caporaso, George; Werner, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that demonstrate the impact of highly compressed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of spherically-converging ICF targets with application to the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive ignition capsule [L.J.Perkins et al., Phys. Plasmas, to be published Aug 2013]. Initial seed fields of 20-100T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 104 T (100 MG) under implosion can relax hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ~50% in targets degraded by lower-mode perturbations compared to those with no applied field. This accrues from range shortening and magnetic mirror trapping of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and potential reduction of hydrodynamic instability growth. This may permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities. The field may also ameliorate adverse hohlraum plasma conditions such as stimulated Raman scattering. We also discuss experimental concepts for a potential NIF hohlraum coil driven by a co-located pulsed power supply that may be capable of detectable alpha particle heating and fusion yield through magnetized volumetric burn in a high pressure DT gas capsule.

  10. Thin Shell, High Velocity, High-Foot ICF Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Macphee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing ICF capsule ablators that are 175 μm in thickness, 10% thinner than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the High-Foot and most of the National Ignition Campaigns. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Early results have shown good repeatability, with little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot-spot, and >1/2 the yield coming from α-particle self-heating. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. The LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Program: Progress toward ignition in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bernat, T.P.; Bibeau, C.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Campbell, J.H.; Coleman, L.W.; Cook, R.C.; Correll, D.L.; Darrow, C.B.; Davis, J.I.; Drake, R.P.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Ellis, R.J.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Haendler, B.L.; Hatcher, C.W.; Hatchett, S.P.; Hermes, G.L.; Hunt, J.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Kruer, W.L.; Kyrazis, D.T.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann

    1990-10-02

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made substantial progress in target physics, target diagnostics, and laser science and technology. In each area, progress required the development of experimental techniques and computational modeling. The objectives of the target physics experiments in the Nova laser facility are to address and understand critical physics issues that determine the conditions required to achieve ignition and gain in an ICF capsule. The LLNL experimental program primarily addresses indirect-drive implosions, in which the capsule is driven by x rays produced by the interaction of the laser light with a high-Z plasma. Experiments address both the physics of generating the radiation environment in a laser-driven hohlraum and the physics associated with imploding ICF capsules to ignition and high-gain conditions in the absence of alpha deposition. Recent experiments and modeling have established much of the physics necessary to validate the basic concept of ignition and ICF target gain in the laboratory. The rapid progress made in the past several years, and in particular, recent results showing higher radiation drive temperatures and implosion velocities than previously obtained and assumed for high-gain target designs, has led LLNL to propose an upgrade of the Nova laser to 1.5 to 2 MJ (at 0.35 {mu}m) to demonstrate ignition and energy gains of 10 to 20 -- the Nova Upgrade.

  12. ICStatus and progress of the National Ignition Facility as ICF and HED user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Kauffman, R. L.; Larson, D. W.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    Since its completion in 2009, the National Ignition Facility has been operated in support of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship mission, providing unique experimental data in the high energy density regime. We will describe the progress made by the National Ignition facility in the user office and management, facility capabilities, target diagnostics and diagnostics development. We will also discuss the results of a major effort to increase the shot rate on NIF. An extensive set of projects, developed in conjunction with the HED community and drawing on best practices at other facilities, improved shot rate by over 80% and recently enabled us to deliver 356 target experiments in FY15 in support of the users. Through an updated experimental set-up and review process, computer controlled set-up of the laser and diagnostics and disciplined operations, NIF also continued to deliver experimental reliability, precision and repeatability. New and complex platforms are introduced with a high success rate. Finally we discuss how new capabilities and further efficiency improvements will enable the successful execution of ICF and HED experimental programs required to support the quest for Ignition and the broader Science Based Stockpile Stewardship mission

  13. Physics issues related to the confinement of ICF experiments in the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, M.; Anderson, A.; Latkowski, J.; Singh, M.; Marshall, C.; Bernat, T.

    1996-05-01

    ICF experiments planned for the proposed US National Ignition Facility [NIF] will produce emissions of neutrons, x rays, debris, and shrapnel. The NIF Target Area [TA] must acceptably confine these emissions and respond to their effects to allow an efficient rate of experiments, from 600 to possibly 1500 per year, and minimal down time for maintenance. Detailed computer code predictions of emissions are necessary to study their effects and impacts on Target Area operations. Preliminary results show that the rate of debris shield transmission loss [and subsequent periodicity of change-out] due to ablated material deposition is acceptable, neutron effects on optics are manageable, and preliminary safety analyses show a facility rating of low hazard, non-nuclear. Therefore, NIF Target Area design features such as fused silica debris shields, refractory first wall coating, and concrete shielding are effective solutions to confinement of ICF experiment emissions.

  14. National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

    1996-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

  15. The National Ignition Facility Project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-06-16

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project.

  16. Foot-pulse radiation drive necessary for ICF ignition capsule demonstrated on Z generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.

    1999-07-01

    Implosion and ignition of an indirectly-driven ICF capsule operating near a Fermi-degenerate isentrope requires initial Planckian-radiation-drive temperatures of 70-to-90 eV to be present for a duration of 10-to-15 ns prior to the main drive pulse. Such capsules are being designed for high pulsed-power generators. This foot-pulse drive capability has been recently demonstrated in a NIF-sized ({phi} = 6-mm 1 = 7-mm), gold hohlraum, using a one-sided static-wall hohlraum geometry on the Z generator. The general arrangement utilized nested tungsten-wire arrays of radii (mass) 20 mm (2 mg) and 10 mm (1 mg) that had an axial length of {approximately} 10 mm. The arrays were driven by a peak current of {approximately} 21 MA and were made to implode on a 2-{micro}m-thick Cu annulus (mass = 4.5 mg), which had a radius of 4 mm and was filled with a low-density CH foam, all centered about the z-axis. The gold hohlraum was mounted on axis and above the Cu/foam target. A 2.9-mm-radius axial hole between the top of the target and hohlraum permitted the x-rays generated from the implosion to enter the hohlraum. The radiation within the hohlraum was monitored by viewing the hohlraum through a 3-mm diameter hole on the lateral side of the hohlraum with a suite of diagnostics.The radiation entering the hohlraum was estimated by an additional suite of on-axis diagnostics, in a limited number of separate shots, when the hohlraum was not present. Additionally, the radiation generated outside the Cu annulus was monitored, for all shots, through a 3-mm diameter aperture located on the outside of the current return can. In the full paper, the characteristics of the radiation measured from these diagnostic sets, including the Planckian temperature of the hohlraum and radiation images, will be discussed as a function of the incident wire-array geometry (single vs nested array and array mass), target length (10, or 20 mm), annulus material (Cu, Au, or nothing), and CH-foam-fill density (10

  17. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang, Weiyan; tu He, Xia

    2009-03-01

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either "direct "or "in-direct x-ray driven" type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of "chirped" lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of "fast ignition (FI)" to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed "block ignition" (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter "clusters" of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B11 with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B11 fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B11 power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle. Power plants using p

  18. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang Weiyan; Tuhe Xia

    2009-03-16

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B{sup 11} with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B{sup 11} fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B{sup 11} power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle

  19. Development of the re-emit technique for ICF foot symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Milovich, Jose; Edwards, John; Thomas, Cliff; Kalantar, Dan; Meeker, Don; Jones, Ogden

    2007-11-01

    Tuning of the the symmetry of the hohlraum radiation drive for the first 2 ns of the ICF pulse on NIF will be assessed by the re-emit technique [1] which measures the instantaneous x-ray drive asymmetry based on soft x-ray imaging of the re-emission of a high-Z sphere surrogate capsule. We will discuss the design of re-emit foot symmetry tuning measurements planned on NIF and their surrogacy for ignition experiments, including assessing the residual radiation asymmetry of the patches required for soft x-ray imaging. We will present the tuning strategy and expected accuracies based on calculations, analytical estimates and first results from scaled experiments performed at the Omega laser facility. [1] N. Delamater, G. Magelssen, A. Hauer, Phys. Rev. E 53, 5241 (1996.)

  20. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  1. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  2. Limitation on Pre-pulse Level for Cone-Guided Fast-Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A G; Akli, K U; Beg, F N; Chen, C D; Chen, H; Divol, L; Hey, D S; Freeman, R R; Henesian, M; Kemp, A J; Key, M H; Pape, S L; Link, A; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A J; Ovchinnikov, V M; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Stephens, R B; Tabak, M; Town, R; Van Woerkom, L D; Wei, M S; Wilks, S C

    2009-09-01

    The viability of fast-ignition (FI) inertial confinement fusion hinges on the efficient transfer of laser energy to the compressed fuel via multi-MeV electrons. Pre-formed plasma due to laser pre-pulse strongly influences ultra-intense laser plasma interactions and hot electron generation in the hollow cone of an FI target. We induced a prepulse and consequent preplasma in copper cone targets and measured the energy deposition zone of the main pulse by imaging the emitted K{sub {alpha}} radiation. An integrated simulation of radiation hydrodynamics for the pre-plasma and particle in cell for the main pulse interactions agree well with the measured deposition zones and provide an insight into the enrgy deposition mechanism and electron distribution. It was demonstrated that a under these conditions a 100mJ pre-pulse completely eliminates the forward going component of {approx}2-4MeV electrons. Consequences for cone-guided fast-ignition are discussed.

  3. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Design of a high-foot high-adiabat ICF capsule for the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, T R; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Milovich, J L; Moreno, J C; Patel, P K; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-01

    The National Ignition Campaign's [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] point design implosion has achieved DT neutron yields of 7.5×10(14) neutrons, inferred stagnation pressures of 103 Gbar, and inferred areal densities (ρR) of 0.90  g/cm2 (shot N111215), values that are lower than 1D expectations by factors of 10×, 3.3×, and 1.5×, respectively. In this Letter, we present the design basis for an inertial confinement fusion capsule using an alternate indirect-drive pulse shape that is less sensitive to issues that may be responsible for this lower than expected performance. This new implosion features a higher radiation temperature in the "foot" of the pulse, three-shock pulse shape resulting in an implosion that has less sensitivity to the predicted ionization state of carbon, modestly lower convergence ratio, and significantly lower ablation Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth than that of the NIC point design capsule. The trade-off with this new design is a higher fuel adiabat that limits both fuel compression and theoretical capsule yield. The purpose of designing this capsule is to recover a more ideal one-dimensional implosion that is in closer agreement to simulation predictions. Early experimental results support our assertions since as of this Letter, a high-foot implosion has obtained a record DT yield of 2.4×10(15) neutrons (within ∼70% of 1D simulation) with fuel ρR=0.84  g/cm2 and an estimated ∼1/3 of the yield coming from α-particle self-heating. PMID:24580604

  5. Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is the general administrative plan implemented by the Hanford Site contractor, ICF Kaiser Hanford Company. It describes the mission, administrative structure, projected staffing, to be provided by the contractor. The report breaks out the work responsibilities within the different units of the company, a baseline schedule for the different groups, and a cost summary for the different operating units.

  6. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  7. The Edward Teller medal lecture: The evolution toward Indirect Drive and two decades of progress toward ICF ignition and burn

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    In 1972, I joined the Livermore ICF Theory and Target Design group led by John Nuckolls, shortly after publication of John`s seminal Nature article on ICF. My primary role, working with others in the target design program including Mordy Rosen, Steve Haan, and Larry Suter, has been as a target designer and theorist who utilized the LASNEX code to perform numerical experiments, which along with analysis of laboratory and underground thermonuclear experiments allowed me to develop a series of models and physical insights which have been used to set the direction and priorities of the Livermore program. I have had the good fortune of working with an outstanding team of scientists who have established LLNL as the premier ICF laboratory in the world. John Emmett and the LLNL Laser Science team were responsible for developing a series of lasers from Janus to Nova which have given LLNL unequaled facilities. George Zimmerman and the LASNEX group developed the numerical models essential for projecting future performance and requirements as well as for designing and analyzing the experiments. Bill Kruer, Bruce Langdon and others in the plasma theory group developed the fundamental understanding of laser plasma interactions which have played such an important role in ICF. And a series of experiment program leaders including Mike Campbell and Joe Kilkenny and their laser experimental teams developed the experimental techniques and diagnostic capabilities which have allowed us to c increasingly complex and sophisticated experiments.

  8. Revision of Italian disability statistics according to the ICF conceptual and semantic framework.

    PubMed

    Solipaca, Alessandro; Battisti, Alessandra; De Palma, Elena; Sicuro, Lorella

    2009-01-01

    The new approach suggested by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides an opportunity to address the policies and actions in favour of people with a disability. From a statistics point of view, the ICF represents also a new tool to improve the harmonisation and the comparison between international data across populations and sectors. The Disability Information System (SID) Project started in 2000 following a convention between the current Ministry of Social Solidarity and Istat in implementation of article 41-bis of Law 162/98. The system provides statistical information on disability by integrating and coordinating data sources available on this matter in Italy and establishing new sources that are suitable for making up for the current information gaps. This System has made some steps forward to promote greater integration of the sources, but further efforts must be made in terms of the quality of the data gathered and on the reorganisation and integration of currently available informative flows. The purpose of this article is to analyse the work done in the last decade by the Italian National Institute of Statistics, at national and international level, to adapt the information produced to the developing information needs. PMID:19968531

  9. Simulations of laser imprint for Nova experiments and for ignition capsules. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.L.; Wolfrum, E.; Verdon, C.P.; Knauer, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    In direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called ``imprint``. These nonuniformities grow during the capsule implosion and, if initially large enough, can penetrate the capsule shell, impede ignition, or degrade burn. Imprint has been simulated for recent experiments performed on the Nova laser at LLNL examining a variety of beam smoothing conditions. Most used laser intensities similar to the early part of an ignition capsule pulse shape, 1 {approx_equal} 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} . The simulations matched most of the measurements of imprint modulation. The effect of imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules has also been simulated. Imprint is predicted to give modulation comparable to an intrinsic surface finish of {approximately}10 nm RMS. Modulation growth was examined using the Haan [Phys. Rev. A {bold 39}, 5812 (1989)] model, with linear growth factors as a function of spherical harmonic mode number obtained from an analytic dispersion relation. Ablation front amplitudes are predicted to become substantially nonlinear, so that saturation corrections are large. Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional multimode growth were also performed. The capsule shell is predicted to remain intact, which gives a basis for believing that ignition can be achieved. 27 refs., 10 figs.

  10. ICF Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    1998-06-01

    The continuing objective of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory and to support the nuclear weapons program in its use of ICF facilities. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). The mission of the US Inertial Fusion Program is twofold: (1) to address high-energy-density physics issues for the SSP and (2) to develop a laboratory microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. In pursuit of this mission, the ICF Program has developed a state-of-the-art capability to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory. The near-term goals pursued by the ICF Program in support of its mission are demonstrating fusion ignition in the laboratory and expanding the Program's capabilities in high-energy-density science. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is a cornerstone of this effort.

  11. 1996 ICF program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    1996-09-30

    The continuing objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Program. The extension of current program research capabilities in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is necessary for the ICF Program to satisfy its stewardship responsibilities. ICF resources (people and facilities) are increasingly being redirected in support of the performance, schedule, and cost goals of the NIF. One of the more important aspects of ICF research is the national nature of the program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) ICF Program falls within DOE's national ICF Program, which includes the Nova and Beamlet laser facilities at LLNL and the OMEGA, Nike, and Trident laser facilities at the University of Rochester (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR/LLE), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), respectively. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA) and Saturn pulsed-power facilities are at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). General Atomics, Inc. (GA) develops and provides many of the targets for the above experimental facilities. LLNL's ICF Program supports activities in two major interrelated areas: (1) target physics and technology (experimental, theoretical, and computational research); and (2) laser science and optics technology development. Experiments on LLNL's Nova laser primarily support ignition and weapons physics research. Experiments on LLNL's Beamlet laser support laser science and optics technology development. In addition, ICF sciences and technologies, developed as part of the DP mission goals, continue to support additional DOE objectives. These objectives are (1) to achieve diversity in energy sources

  12. Target Area design basis and system performance for the National Ignition Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M.; Karpenko, V.; Hagans, K.; Anderson, A.; Latkowski, J.; Warren, R.; Wavrik, R.; Garcia, R.; Boyes, J.

    1994-10-01

    The NIF Target Area is designed to confine the ICF target experiments leading up to and including fusion ignition and gain. The Target Area will provide appropriate in-chamber conditions before, during, and after each shot. The repeated introduction of large amounts of laser energy into the chamber and emission of fusion energy from targets represents a new challenge in ICF facility design. Prior to a shot, the facility provides proper illumination geometry, target chamber vacuum, and a stable platform for the target and its diagnostics. During a shot, the impact of the energy introduced into the chamber is minimized, and workers and the public are protected from excessive prompt radiation doses. After the shot, the residual radioactivation is managed to allow required accessibility. Tritium and other radioactive wastes are confined and disposed of. Diagnostic data is also retrieved, and the facility is readied for the next shot. The Target Area will accommodate yields up to 20 MJ, and its design lifetime is 30 years. The Target Area provides the personnel access needed to support the use precision diagnostics. The annual shot mix for design purposes is shown. Designing to this experimental envelope ensures the ability and flexibility to move through the experimental campaign to ignition efficiently.

  13. Implosion configurations for robust ignition using high- density carbon (diamond) ablator for indirect-drive ICF at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, D. D.-M.; Haan, S. W.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; Milovich, J. L.; Thomas, C. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    We present five ignition scale capsule designs using high-density carbon ablators with fuel adiabat (α) ranging from 1.5 to 4. All five have 1D yield > 1 MJ. The sensitivities of these capsules to surface roughness and P2 radiation asymmetries were studied. The most robust configuration with respect to surface roughness depends on the amplitude of the surface spectrum. The most robust configuration with respect to P2 asymmetry is the α = 1.5 configuration which has the highest 1D margin. We find that α = 2 and 2.5 configurations have the highest overall robustness. Further analysis is needed to study the effects of more complicated 3D behaviors.

  14. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  15. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; Landen, O. L.; Kline, J. L.; Glenn, S.; Jones, O.; Kalantar, D. H.; Pak, A.; Robey, H. F.; et al

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P2/P0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P2/P0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas when the LEH plasma is stillmore » dense and relatively cold.« less

  16. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; Landen, O. L.; Kline, J. L.; Glenn, S.; Jones, O.; Kalantar, D. H.; Pak, A.; Robey, H. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Divol, L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Holder, J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Döppner, T.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Ehrlich, B.; Thomas, C. A.; Shaw, M.; Widmayer, C.; Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hamza, A.; Dzenitis, B.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P2/P0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P2/P0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas when the LEH plasma is still dense and relatively cold.

  17. An antiproton driver for ICF propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Pi-Ren; Lewis, R. A.; Smith, G. A.; Gazze, C.; Higman, K.; Newton, R.; Chiaverini, M.; Dailey, J.; Surratt, M.; Werthman, W. Lance

    1993-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) utilizing an anitprotoncatalyzed target is discussed as a possible source of propulsion for rapid interplanetary manned space missions. The relevant compression, ignition, and thrust mechanisms are presented. Progress on an experiment presently in progress at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM to demonstrate proof-of-principle is reviewed.

  18. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  19. A technique for extending by ∼10(3) the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Sio, H; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D(3)He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10(2) for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10(3) for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10(8) and 10(9) cm(-2), respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10(8) and ∼10(12), respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm(2). PMID:25430298

  20. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H. Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Effects of the P2 M-band flux asymmetry of laser-driven gold Hohlraums on the implosion of ICF ignition capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Gu, Jianfa; Wu, Changshu; Song, Peng; Dai, Zhensheng; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Kang, Dongguo; Gu, Peijun; Zheng, Wudi; Zou, Shiyang; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    Low-mode asymmetries in the laser-indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] are deemed the main obstacles hindering further improvement of the nuclear performance of deuterium-tritium-layered capsules. The dominant seeds of these asymmetries include the P2 and P4 asymmetries of x-ray drives and P2 asymmetry introduced by the supporting "tent." Here, we explore the effects of another possible seed that can lead to low-mode asymmetric implosions, i.e., the M-band flux asymmetry (MFA) in laser-driven cylindrical gold Hohlraums. It is shown that the M-band flux facilitates the ablation and acceleration of the shell, and that positive P2 MFAs can result in negative P2 asymmetries of hot spots and positive P2 asymmetries of shell's ρR. An oblate or toroidal hot spot, depending on the P2 amplitude of MFA, forms at stagnation. The energy loss of such a hot spot via electron thermal conduction is seriously aggravated not only due to the enlarged hot spot surface but also due to the vortices that develop and help transferring thermal energy from the hotter center to the colder margin of such a hot spot. The cliffs of nuclear performance for the two methodologies of applying MFA (i.e., symmetric flux in the presence of MFA and MFA added for symmetric soft x-ray flux) are obtained locating at 9.5% and 5.0% of P2/P0 amplitudes, respectively.

  2. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  3. Contributions of the National Ignition Facility to the development of inertial fusion energy. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M.; Logan, G.; Diaz De La Rubia, T.; Schrock, V.; Schultz, K.; Tokheim, R.; Abdou, M.; Bangerter, R.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy is proposing to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to embark on a program to achieve ignition and modest gain in the laboratory early in the next century. The NM will use a {ge}1.8-MJ, 0.35-mm laser with 192 independent beams, a fifty-fold increase over the energy of the Nova laser. System performance analyses suggest yields as great as 20 MJ may be achievable. NIF will conduct more than 600 shots per year. The benefits of a micro-fusion capability in the laboratory include: Essential contributions to defense programs, resolution of important Inertial Fusion Energy issues, and unparalleled conditions of energy density for basic science and technology research. We have begun to consider the role the National Ignition Facility will fill in the development of Inertial Fusion Energy. While the achievement of ignition and gain speaks for itself in terms of its impact on developing IFE, we believe there are areas of IFE development, such as fusion power technology, IFE target design and fabrication, and understanding chamber dynamics, that would significantly benefit from NIF experiments. In the area of IFE target physics, ion targets will be designed using the NIF laser, and feasibility of high gain targets will be confirmed. Target chamber dynamics experiments will benefit from x-ray and debris energies that mimic in-IFE-chamber conditions. Fusion power technology will benefit from using single-shot neutron yields to measure spatial distribution of neutron heating, activation, and tritium breeding in relevant materials. IFE target systems will benefit from evaluating low-cost target fabrication techniques by testing such targets on NIF.

  4. A survey of pulse shape options for a revised plastic ablator ignition design

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-11-15

    Recent experimental results using the “high foot” pulse shape for inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] have shown encouraging progress compared to earlier “low foot” experiments. These results strongly suggest that controlling ablation front instability growth can significantly improve implosion performance even in the presence of persistent, large, low-mode distortions. Simultaneously, hydrodynamic growth radiography experiments have confirmed that ablation front instability growth is being modeled fairly well in NIF experiments. It is timely then to combine these two results and ask how current ignition pulse shapes could be modified to improve one-dimensional implosion performance while maintaining the stability properties demonstrated with the high foot. This paper presents such a survey of pulse shapes intermediate between the low and high foot extremes in search of an intermediate foot optimum. Of the design space surveyed, it is found that a higher picket version of the low foot pulse shape shows the most promise for improved compression without loss of stability.

  5. A survey of pulse shape options for a revised plastic ablator ignition design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Eder, David; Haan, Steven; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Ogden; Marinak, Michael; Milovich, Jose; Peterson, Jayson; Robey, Harold; Salmonson, Jay; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Weber, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Recent experimental results using the ``high foot'' pulse shape on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have shown encouraging progress compared to earlier ``low foot'' experiments. These results strongly suggest that controlling ablation front instability growth can dramatically improve implosion performance, even in the presence of persistent, large, low-mode distortions. In parallel, Hydro. Growth Radiography experiments have so far validated the techniques used for modeling ablation front growth in NIF experiments. It is timely then to combine these two results and ask how current ignition pulse shapes could be modified so as to improve implosion performance, namely fuel compressibility, while maintaining the stability properties demonstrated with the high foot. This talk presents a survey of pulse shapes intermediate between the low and high foot extremes in search of a more optimal design. From the database of pulse shapes surveyed, a higher picket version of the original low foot pulse shape shows the most promise for improved compression without loss of stability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. ICF quarterly report, October-December 1998, volume 8, number 4

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, B

    1998-09-30

    The ICF Quarterly Report is pub-lished four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility and High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (ICF/NIF/ HEDES) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The journal summarizes selected current research achievements of the LLNLICF/NIF/HEDES Program.

  7. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  8. The National Ignition Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-06-16

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in ICF targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effect testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule and costs associated with the construction project.

  9. Multiuser development scenario for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-10-01

    An outline is given of some of the various possible applications of ICF technology. Developmental paths for each application are briefly described. The implications on design and operation of the ICF facilities if multipurpose use is allowed are examined. (MOW)

  10. Contributions to the Genesis and Progress of ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J H

    2006-02-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has progressed from the detonation of large-scale fusion explosions initiated by atomic bombs in the early 1950s to final preparations for initiating small-scale fusion explosions with giant lasers. The next major step after ignition will be development of high performance targets that can be initiated with much smaller, lower cost lasers. In the 21st century and beyond, ICF's grand challenge is to develop practical power plants that generate low cost, clean, inexhaustible fusion energy. In this chapter, I first describe the origin in 1960-61 of ICF target concepts, early speculations on laser driven 'Thermonuclear Engines' for power production and rocket propulsion, and encouraging large-scale nuclear explosive experiments conducted in 1962. Next, I recall the 40-year, multi-billion dollar ignition campaign - to develop a matched combination of sufficiently high-performance implosion lasers and sufficiently stable targets capable of igniting small fusion explosions. I conclude with brief comments on the NIF ignition campaign and very high-performance targets, and speculations on ICF's potential in a centuries-long Darwinian competition of future energy systems. My perspectives in this chapter are those of a nuclear explosive designer, optimistic proponent of ICF energy, and Livermore Laboratory leader. The perspectives of Livermore's post 1970 laser experts and builders, and laser fusion experimentalists are provided in a chapter written by John Holzrichter, a leading scientist and leader in Livermore's second generation laser fusion program. In a third chapter, Ray Kidder, a theoretical physicist and early laser fusion pioneer, provides his perspectives including the history of the first generation laser fusion program he led from 1962-1972.

  11. Plasma photonics in ICF & HED conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Pierre; Turnbull, David; Divol, Laurent; Pollock, Bradley; Chen, Cecilia Y.; Tubman, Eleanor; Goyon, Clement S.; Moody, John D.

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between multiple high-energy laser beams and plasma can be used to imprint refractive micro-structures in plasmas via the lasers' ponderomotive force. For example, Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility already rely on the use of plasma gratings to redirect laser light inside an ICF target and tune the symmetry of the imploded core. More recently, we proposed new concepts of plasma polarizer and waveplate, based on two-wave mixing schemes and laser-induced plasma birefringence. In this talk, we will present new experimental results showing the first demonstration of a fully tunable plasma waveplate, which achieved near-perfect circular laser polarization. We will discuss further prospects for novel ``plasma photonics'' concepts based on two- and four-wave mixing, such as optical switches, bandpass filters, anti-reflection blockers etc. These might find applications in ICF and HED experiments by allowing to manipulate the lasers directly in-situ (i.e. inside the targets), as well as for the design of high power laser systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. ICF special studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W. R.

    1987-09-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed by W.J. Schafer Associates for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the area of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis Code for ICF Reactor Economics) code is one of the major tasks discussed.

  13. The physics of radiation driven ICF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1995-08-07

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we have recently demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next proposed laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The target uses the recently declassified indirect drive (sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}radiation drive{close_quotes}) approach which converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray {open_quotes}oven{close_quotes} (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we`ve demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In this lecture we briefly review the fundamentals of ICF, and describe the capsule implosion symmetry advantages of the hohlraum approach. We then concentrate on a quantitative understanding of the scaling of radiation drive with hohlraum size and wall material, and with laser pulse length and power. We demonstrate that coupling efficiency of x-ray drive to the capsule increases as we proceed from Nova to the NIF and eventually to a reactor, thus increasing the gain of the system.

  14. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2011-12-15

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  15. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  16. The computational optimization of indirect-driven ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, V.A.; Avrorin, E.N.; Karlykhanov, N.G.; Chernyakov, V.E.; Kozmanov, M.Y.; Murashkina, V.A.; Kandiev, Y.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The results of the ICF indirect-driven targets optimization performed by ZARYA/ERA code for a better insight into the requirements imposed on both target designs and hohlraum drive temperature to gain the ignition with laser of minimum power are presented. Two modification of cryogenic shell targets for hohlraum drive temperatures in the range of 0.25{endash}0.38 keV are proposed for the ignition. The 500 TW lasers are needed to perform such investigations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Plans for Ignition Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2007-07-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities and for producing and developing ICF. The ignition studies will be the next important step in developing inertial fusion energy.

  18. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the

  19. Design, Assembly, and Testing of the Neutron Imaging Lens for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R. M., Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world’s largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density science. Neutron imaging of ICF targets provides a powerful tool for understanding the implosion conditions of deuterium and tritium (DT) filled targets. The primary purpose of imaging ICF targets at NIF is to determine the symmetry of the fuel in an imploded ICF target. The image data are then combined with other nuclear information to gain insight into the drive laser and radiation conditions required to drive the targets to ignition.

  20. The ignition temperature of solid explosives with the boundary temperature increasing at a constant rate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    Goal was to determine variation of ignition temperature with heating rate for some common explosives. Numerical calculations for HMX and TATB are in agreement with experiment. Numerical results also fit a simple curve (single Arrhenius reaction). A simple modification to the One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTE) method would provide data matching the boundary conditions of this paper. A mathematical model is derived to explain this fitting function.

  1. 75 FR 47520 - Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition and Spark Ignition Internal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... rulemaking published in the Federal Register on June 8, 2010 (75 FR 32612). That notice proposed revisions to... Compression Ignition and Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the standards of performance for stationary compression ignition and spark ignition...

  2. Ignition experiment design based on γ-pumping gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonyushkin, E. K.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Morovov, A. P.; Pavlovskii, A. I.; Lazhintsev, B. V.; Basov, N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Rosanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    1996-05-01

    Comparative analysis of gas lasers pumped by γ-radiation for ignition experiment is carried out. The possibilities of frequency-time pulse shaping are discussed for these kinds of laser drivers. New type of ICF target (LIGHT-target), which is able to provide an uniform deposition of laser driver energy is proposed as a target for ignition experiment.

  3. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  4. ICF APPLICATIONS OF FAST IONS GENERATED BY FOCUSING SHORT LASER PULSES ON ULTRA-THIN CAUSALLY ISOLATED TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Strangio, C.; Caruso, A.

    2009-07-26

    MeV low-Z ions are expected to find application in starting ignition in high gain ICF targets. Quite stringent conditions in terms of power density and total energy are required to start fast ignition in a pre-compressed fuel by light-ion beams, this setting corresponding constraints on the design of adequate sources. In this paper are reported studies performed at ENEA (theory and experiments) on an ion source possibly suitable for fast ignition or entropy injection.

  5. A technique for extending by ~103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGAa)

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D3He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 102 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 103 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 108 and 109 cm-2, respectively. Finally, using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ~108 and ~1012, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±~10 mg/cm2.

  6. Hydrodynamick instabilities on ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.

    1991-06-07

    This article summarizes our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities as relevant to ICF. First we discuss classical, single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and nonlinear effects in the evolution of a single mode. Then we discuss multimode systems, considering: (1) the onset of nonlinearity; (2) a second order mode coupling theory for weakly nonlinear effects, and (3) the fully nonlinear regime. Two stabilization mechanisms relevant to ICF are described next: gradient scale length and convective stabilization. Then we describe a model which is meant to estimate the weakly nonlinear evolution of multi-mode systems as relevant to ICF, given the short-wavelength stabilization. Finally, we discuss the relevant code simulation capability, and experiments. At this time we are quite optimistic about our ability to estimate instability growth on ICF capsules, but further experiments and simulations are needed to verify the modeling. 52 refs.

  7. The ICF status and plans in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Miller, G. H.; Kauffman, R. L.

    2006-06-01

    The United States continues to maintain its leadership in ICF as it moves toward the goal of ignition. The flagship of the program is the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presently under construction at LLNL. Experiments had begun on the first four beams of the National Ignition Facility just at the time of the last IFSA Conference. Several new successful campaigns have been conducted since then in planar hydrodynamics and hohlraums as well as activating the VISAR diagnostic for equation of state experiments. Highlights of these results will be reviewed. Presently, the four beam experimental capability has been suspended while the first eight beams are being installed as the first step in building out the project. Meanwhile, much progress has been made in developing ignition designs for using NIF. An array of designs having several ablator materials have been shown computationally to ignite with energies ranging from the design energy to as low as 1 MJ of laser energy. Alternative direct drive designs in the NIF indirect drive configuration have been developed by LLE. This wide array of design choices has increased the chance of achieving ignition sooner on the facility. Plans are now being developed to begin an ignition experimental campaign on NIF in 2010, a little over a year after completion of the facility. Other US facilities are also implementing improved capabilities. Petawatt lasers are now under construction at the University of Rochester and Sandia National Laboratory. The Z pulsed power machine at Sandia National Laboratory is being refurbished to improve its performance. The ongoing research program at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester and the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratory as well as at the Nike, Trident and Janus lasers remain strong, performing experiments supporting the NIF ignition plan and direct drive ignition. There also is an active program in the broader field of high energy density science on these facilities. These

  8. The ICF Status and Plans in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E; Miller, G; Kauffman, R

    2005-10-12

    The United States continues to maintain its leadership in ICF as it moves toward the goal of ignition. The flagship of the program is the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presently under construction at LLNL. Experiments had begun on the first four beams of the National Ignition Facility just at the time of the last IFSA Conference. Several new successful campaigns have been conducted since then in planar hydrodynamics and hohlraums as well as activating the VISAR diagnostic for equation of state experiments. Highlights of these results will be reviewed. Presently, the four beam experimental capability has been suspended while the first eight beams are being installed as the first step in building out the project. Meanwhile, much progress has been made in developing ignition designs for using NIF. An array of designs having several ablator materials have been shown computationally to ignite with energies ranging from the design energy to as low as 1 MJ of laser energy. Alternative direct drive designs in the NIF indirect drive configuration have been developed by LLE. This wide array of design choices has increased the chance of achieving ignition sooner on the facility. Plans are now being developed to begin an ignition experimental campaign on NIF in 2010, a little over a year after completion of the facility. Other US facilities are also implementing improved capabilities. Petawatt lasers are now under construction at the University of Rochester and Sandia National Laboratory. The Z pulsed power machine at Sandia National Laboratory is being refurbished to improve its performance. The ongoing research program at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester and the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratory as well as at the Nike, Trident and Janus lasers remain strong, performing experiments supporting the NIF ignition plan and direct drive ignition. There also is an active program in the broader field of high energy density science on these facilities. These

  9. The Ignition Target for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Carlisle, K; Kilkenny, J

    2007-03-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10{sup 8} K), pressures (10-GBar) and matter densities (> 100 g/cm{sup 3}). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. An overview of the campaign for ignition will be presented, along with technologies for target fabrication, assembly and metrology and advances in growth and x-ray imaging of DT ice layers. The sum of these efforts represents a quantum leap in target precision, characterization, manufacturing rate and flexibility over current state-of-the-art.

  10. ICF quarterly report January - March 1997 volume 7, number 3

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J

    1998-04-09

    The National Ignition Facility Project The mission of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to produce ignition and modest energy gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Achieving these goals will maintain U.S. world leadership in ICF and will directly benefit the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) missions in national security, science and technology, energy resources, and industrial competitiveness. Development and operation of the NIF are consistent with DOE goals for environmental quality, openness to the community, and nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. Although the primary mission of inertial fusion is for defense applications, inertial fusion research will provide critical information for the development of inertial fusion energy. The NIF, under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is a cornerstone of the DOE's science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program for addressing high-energy-density physics issues in the absence of nuclear weapons testing. In pursuit of this mission, the DOE's Defense Programs has developed a state-of-the-art capability with the NIF to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory with a microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. As a Strategic System Acquisition, the NIF Project has a separate and disciplined reporting chain to DOE as shown below.

  11. Shock-Ignition Studies on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Casner, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2010-11-01

    Recent theoretical workootnotetextR. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007) has shown that the gain in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment can be significantly increased through separation of the compression and ignition stage by launching a strong, spherically convergent shock at the end of a compression pulse. This scheme, referred to as shock ignition, reduces the energy required for ignition compared to ``conventional'' ICF or fast ignition. Through potentially relaxed requirements for the ignitor-shock spherical symmetry, it can be carried out in a polar-drive configuration and is therefore applicable to the National Ignition Facility. The results of a series of spherical and planar-target experiments on OMEGA to study the shock-ignition technique and to infer the shock strength, hot-electron generation, and light reflectivity at the high intensities relevant to shock ignition will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  12. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Kim, Y H; Mc Evoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Langenbrunner, J R; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Batha, S H; Dauffy, L; Stoeffl, W; Malone, R; Kaufman, M I; Cox, B C; Tunnel, T W; Miller, E K; Rubery, M

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  13. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Tabak, Max

    2006-10-01

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hotspot ignition counterpart. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. By contrast, typical ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hotspot. To realize fully the advantages of FI, then, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hotspots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters, i.e., accessible peak pressures, shell aspect ratios, etc. An implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements, suggesting the possibility of genuinely isochoric implosions for FI.

  14. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Inertial confinement fusion: The quest for ignition and energy gain using indirect drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1999-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an alternative way to control fusion which is based on scaling down a thermonuclear explosion to a small size, applicable for power production, a kind of thermonuclear internal combustion engine. This book extends many interesting topics concerning the research and development on ICF of the last 25 years. It provides a systematic development of the physics basis and also various experimental data on radiation driven implosion. This is a landmark treatise presented at the right time. It is based on the article ``Development of the indirect-drive approach to inertial confinement fusion and the target physics basis for ignition and gain'' by J.D. Lindl, published in Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 2, November 1995, pp. 3933-4024. As is well known, in the United States of America research on the target physics basis for indirect drive remained largely classified until 1994. The indirect drive approaches were closely related to nuclear weapons research at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories. In Japan and other countries, inertial confinement fusion research for civil energy has been successfully performed to achieve DT fuel pellet compression up to 1000 times normal density, and indirect drive concepts, such as the `Cannon Ball' scheme, also prevailed at several international conferences. In these circumstances the international fusion community proposed the Madrid Manifesto in 1988, which urged openness of ICF information to promote international collaboration on civil energy research for the future resources of the human race. This proposal was also supported by some of the US scientists. The United States Department of Energy revised its classification guidelines for ICF six years after the Madrid Manifesto. This first book from the USA treating target physics issues, covering topics from implosion dynamics to hydrodynamic stability, ignition physics, high-gain target design and the scope for energy applications is

  17. Antiproton fast ignition for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1997-10-24

    With 180MJ/{micro}g, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. We investigate the use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an ICF capsule and seek high gains with only modest compression of the main fuel. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by an energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. In the first of two candidate fast ignition schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low energy external ion beam. In the second, ''autocatalytic'' scheme, the antiprotons are pre-emplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, we estimate that {approximately}3x10{sup 13} antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition in the igniter zone. In addition to obviating the need for a second energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or houlrahm debris. However, in addition to the unknowns involved in the storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in, an external, optimized facility.

  18. Low-pressure pseudospark switches for ICF pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K.; Bickes, Ch; Ernst, U.; Iberler, M.; Meier, J.; Prucker, U.; Schlaug, M.; Schwab, J.; Urban, J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    Hollow-electrode pseudospark switches are gas-filled, low-pressure, high-current plasma switches which are based on cold cathode emission. They have the capability to satisfy at least a part of switching requirements for different applications in ICF drivers. The main purpose of the submitted paper is therefore to discuss the following realistic ways for the use of pseudospark switches. There are intense international activities aimed at investigating different approaches for the ignition of an ICF capsule. Most of these efforts utilize lasers of varying wavelengths to deliver the energy to initiate the ablation of the target, the compression and ignition of the fuel, and the propagation of the fusion burn. One alternative to this scheme is to provide the drive energy in form of a light ion beam produced by an efficient pulse power accelerator. A related method uses beams of heavy ion beams from high intensity versions of traditional high-energy accelerators. Dependent on the ICF driver for the power conditioning unit (PCU) arise totally different demands. These extremely different requirements mainly rely on the very specific character of the load. Flashlamps, pumping high power lasers represent a non-linear, low-impedance load. Relatively low switching voltage is necessary, but a high charge-transfer capability. Induction cells or magnetic compression units have a high impedance. Consequently high voltage (up to several 100 kV) is required to feed the energy in Marx modules and the following voltage adders produce megavolt voltages, which determines likewise the specific data of the used switch.

  19. Precision Manufacturing of ICF Double Shell Laser Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbard, Robin; Bono, Matthew; Amendt, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The engineering and fabrication team at LLNL builds precision laser targets to meet physics requirements. ICF studies are interested in high-precision double-shell implosion targets for demonstrating thermonuclear ignition without the need for cryogenic preparation. Because the ignition tolerance to interface instabilities is rather low, the manufacturing requirements for smooth surface finishes and shell concentricity are particularly strict. As a prelude to ignition double-shell targets on NIF scaled ignition-like double-shells were built for Omega. These were composed of an inner 244 μ diameter capsule surrounded by foam and covered by a polystyrene ablator 52 μ thick, the outside diameter is 550 μ. This talk will describe a systematic, deterministic approach to reproducibly build these targets. By taking a rigorous approach to controlling all error sources during fabrication, the +/- 5 μ dimensional tolerance can be achieved with sub-micron surface flaws. This development process allows one to systematically study the manufacturing process and identify errors at each step. The manufacturing, assembly, and characterization of these targets is discussed to show how the +/- 5 μ concentricity requirement was met, providing physicists with a targets that may yield improved physics performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, by the UC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, under contract W-7405-ENG-48

  20. Ignition and burn of a small magnetized fuel target

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.

    2012-06-01

    The crucial step for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is ignition, which leads to sufficiently high gain to enable design of a power producing system. Thus far, this step has not been demonstrated. Magnetized targets may provide an alternative path to ignition. In addition, the 1-D calculations presented here suggest that this approach may provide the gain and other characteristics needed for a practical fusion reactor.

  1. Stuttering and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF): An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaruss, J. Scott; Quesal, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently presented a multidimensional classification scheme for describing health status and the experience of disablement. This new framework, the "International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health" (ICF; WHO, 2001), is a revision of WHO's prior framework for describing the consequences of…

  2. Drive Asymmetry and the Origin of Turbulence in an ICF Implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. A.; Kares, R. J.

    2012-08-01

    2D and 3D numerical simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian radiation-hydrocode RAGE at unprecedented spatial resolution are used to investigate the connection between drive asymmetry and the generation of turbulence in the DT fuel in a simplified inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) implosion. Long-wavelength deviations from spherical symmetry in the pressure drive lead to the generation of coherent vortical structures in the DT gas and it is the three-dimensional instability of these structures that in turn leads to turbulence and mix. The simulations suggest that this mechanism may be an additional important source of mix in ICF implosions. Applications to target ignition at the National Ignition Facility are briefly discussed.

  3. Drive asymmetry and the origin of turbulence in an ICF implosion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, V A; Kares, R J

    2012-08-17

    2D and 3D numerical simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian radiation-hydrocode RAGE at unprecedented spatial resolution are used to investigate the connection between drive asymmetry and the generation of turbulence in the DT fuel in a simplified inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) implosion. Long-wavelength deviations from spherical symmetry in the pressure drive lead to the generation of coherent vortical structures in the DT gas and it is the three-dimensional instability of these structures that in turn leads to turbulence and mix. The simulations suggest that this mechanism may be an additional important source of mix in ICF implosions. Applications to target ignition at the National Ignition Facility are briefly discussed. PMID:23006379

  4. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  5. Characteristics of ICF Relevant Hohlraums Driven by X-Rays from a Z-Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,R.L.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSKA,W.; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,RICHARD E.; PETERSON,D.L.; PETERSON,R.R.; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; RUIZ,CARLOS L.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-03

    Radiation environments characteristic of those encountered during the low-temperature foot pulse and subsequent higher-temperature early-step pulses (without the foot pulse) required for indirect-drive ICF ignition on the National ignition Facility have been produced in hohlraums driven by x-rays from a z-pinch. These environments provide a platform to better understand the dynamics of full-scale NIF hohlraums, ablator material, and capsules prior to NIF completion. Radiation temperature, plasma fill, and wall motion of these hohlraums are discussed.

  6. Backlighting prospects for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.; Matthews, D.; Ahlstrom, H.; Attwood, D.; Price, R.; Coleman, L.; Manes, K.; Slivinsky, V.

    1981-01-01

    High energy x-ray backlighters are necessary to diagnose the implosion symmetry and stability of intermediate and high density targets. Synchronization requirements between the target irradiating pulse and the radiograph place severe constraints on the type of x-ray sources which can be used and favors laser irradiated backlighters. Data gathered on line emitters as a function of laser pulselength, wavelength and intensity in the 5 to 10 keV region are used to determine which diagnostic instruments will be feasible for ICF target experiments, and the requirements for backlighter irradiation.

  7. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  8. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  9. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  10. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  11. Monte Carlo methods in ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1997-06-24

    Monte Carlo methods appropriate to simulate the transport of x-rays, neutrons, ion and electrons in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are described and analyzed. The Implicit Monte Carlo method of x-ray transport handles symmetry within indirect drive ICF hohlraums well, but can be improved 50X in efficiency by angular biasing the x-rays towards the fuel capsule. Accurate simulation of thermonuclear burns nd burn diagnostics involves detailed particle source spectra, charged particle ranges, inflight reaction kinematics, corrections for bulk and thermal Doppler effects and variance reduction to obtain adequate statistics for rare events. It is found that the effects of angular Coulomb scattering must be included in models of charged particle transport through heterogeneous materials.

  12. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R L

    2011-10-17

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger

  13. Thermal Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Philipp Andreas

    Accidental ignition of flammable gases is a critical safety concern in many industrial applications. Particularly in the aviation industry, the main areas of concern on an aircraft are the fuel tank and adjoining regions, where spilled fuel has a high likelihood of creating a flammable mixture. To this end, a fundamental understanding of the ignition phenomenon is necessary in order to develop more accurate test methods and standards as a means of designing safer air vehicles. The focus of this work is thermal ignition, particularly auto-ignition with emphasis on the effect of heating rate, hot surface ignition and flame propagation, and puffing flames. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is traditionally separated into slow reaction, cool flame, and ignition regimes based on pressure and temperature. Standard tests, such as the ASTM E659, are used to determine the lowest temperature required to ignite a specific fuel mixed with air at atmospheric pressure. It is expected that the initial pressure and the rate at which the mixture is heated also influences the limiting temperature and the type of combustion. This study investigates the effect of heating rate, between 4 and 15 K/min, and initial pressure, in the range of 25 to 100 kPa, on ignition of n-hexane air mixtures. Mixtures with equivalence ratio ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 were investigated. The problem is also modeled computationally using an extension of Semenov's classical auto-ignition theory with a detailed chemical mechanism. Experiments and simulations both show that in the same reactor either a slow reaction or an ignition event can take place depending on the heating rate. Analysis of the detailed chemistry demonstrates that a mixture which approaches the ignition region slowly undergoes a significant modification of its composition. This change in composition induces a progressive shift of the explosion limit until the mixture is no longer flammable. A mixture that approaches the ignition region

  14. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  15. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  16. Radiative properties in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Calisti, A.; Gilleron, F.; Mondet, G.; Pain, J.-C.

    2011-03-01

    We present new calculations on radiative power losses of carbon and gold. Both ions are involved in inertial confinement fusion. The first element could also be utilized in the walls of future TOKAMAK reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) while the second is present in holraums and its X-ray emission contributes to the heating in ICF. Because argon impurities may be used in the fusion core, in order to diagnose the electron temperature, we have calculated the intensities of the He-β line and the Li-like Ar satellite lines. In fact, the intensity ratio depends on electron temperature. The effect of the plasma electric field on the line intensities is discussed. Our approach is based on a detailed line calculation in which the atomic database is provided by the MCDF code. Then a lineshape code allowing for NLTE ionic populations was adapted to the calculation of RPL profiles. Because the calculation time is sometimes prohibitive, a second approach, based on the first moments of the RPL, is investigated. This approach was used for extensive calculations on germanium.

  17. The National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  18. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely

  19. Beryllium ignition target design for indirect drive NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Beryllium (Be) ablator offers multiple advantages over carbon based ablators for indirectly driven NIF ICF ignition targets. These are higher mass ablation rate, ablation pressure and ablation velocity, lower capsule albedo, and higher thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. Such advantages can be used to improve the target robustness and performance. While previous NIF Be target designs exist, they were obtained a long time ago and do not incorporate the latest improved physical understanding and models based upon NIF experiments. Herein, we propose a new NIF Be ignition target design at 1.45 MJ, 430 TW that takes all this knowledge into account.

  20. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  1. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  2. Nuclear diagnostics in support of ICF experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.J.; Hall, J.

    1996-06-05

    As the yields of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments increase to NIF levels new diagnostic techniques for studying details of fusion burn behavior will become feasible. The new techniques will provide improved measurements of fusion burn temperature and history. Improved temperature measurements might be achieved with magnetic spectroscopy of fusion neutrons. High-bandwidth fusion reaction history will be measured with fusion-specific {gamma}-ray diagnostics. Additional energy-resolved {gamma}-ray might be able to study a selection of specific behaviors during fusion burn. Present ICF yields greater than 10{sup 13} neutrons are sufficient to demonstrate the basic methods that underlie the new techniques. As ICF yields increase, the diagnostics designs adjusted accordingly in order to provide clear and specific data on fusion burn performance.

  3. Plasma viscosity in spherical ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E.; Joglekar, A.; Ortega, M.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2016-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hydrodynamic codes often ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates plasma viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. A Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport, and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation, is used to study differences between ICF implosions with and without plasma viscosity and to examine the role of artificial viscosity in a Lagrangian implosion simulation. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, fuel compression, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and this study suggests that artificial viscosity may provide an unphysical stability in implosion simulations.

  4. National Ignition Facility design, performance, and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.; Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1994-09-16

    A conceptual design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and its cost has been estimated by a multilaboratory team. To maximize the performance/cost ratio a compact, segmented amplifier is used in a multipass architecture. Many recent optical and laser technology developments have been incorporated into the final design. The Beamlet project has successfully demonstrated the new concept. The mission of ICF Program using the NEF is to achieve ignition and gain in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects experiments, and for civilian applications such as inertial fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high energy density.

  5. Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2009-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. The NIF project is scheduled for completion in March 2009. Currently, all 192 beams have been operationally qualified and have produced over 4.0 MJ of light at the fundamental wavelength of 1053 nm, making NIF the world's first megajoule laser. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader scientific applications. The plan is to begin 96-beam symmetric indirect-drive ICF experiments early in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). This national effort to achieve fusion ignition is coordinated through a detailed plan that includes the science, technology and equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for ignition experiments. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility soon after project completion and to conduct a credible ignition campaign in 2010. When the NIF is complete, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustaining nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory will be much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of inertial fusion energy (IFE) and will likely focus

  6. The ICF and Postsurgery Occupational Therapy after Traumatic Hand Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitinghoff, Helene; Lindqvist, Birgitta; Nygard, Louise; Ekholm, Jan; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of hand rehabilitation programmes and have linked the outcomes to the concept of ICF but not to specific ICF category codes. The objective of this study was to gain experience using ICF concepts to describe occupational therapy interventions during postsurgery hand rehabilitation, and to describe…

  7. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids in ICF reactors. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.; Hoover, W.G.

    1985-04-17

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate because increased surface area will enhance the cooling and condensation of coolant ablated by the fusion x rays. Relaxation from the suddenly (neutron) heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The resulting expansion in a diverging geometry will hydrodynamically force the liquid to fragment, with vapor then forming from the new surfaces to fill the cavities. An energy minimization model is used to determine the fragment size that produces the least amount of non-fragment-center-of-mass energy; i.e., the sum of the surface and dilational kinetic energies. This model predicts fragmentation dependence on original system size and amount of isochoric heating as well as liquid density, Grueneisen parameter, surface tension, and sound speed. A two dimensional molecular dynamics code was developed to test the model at a microscopic scale for the Lennard-Jones fluid with its two adjustable constants chosen to represent lithium.

  8. Compton Radiography of ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Riccardo

    2011-10-01

    Laser-produced, micro-wire backlighters in a point-projection geometry, generating X-ray photons with energies ranging from 50keV to 200 keV, have been used to record time-resolved 2D radiographs of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot of inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have spatial and temporal resolution of ~10 μm and ~10 ps, respectively, and allow localized measurements of areal mass densities with 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities. The areal density measurements from radiographs compare well to the values obtained from charged particle spectrometry. We are preparing similar experiments using this technique to obtain radiographs of cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. National Ignition Facility Project Execution Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2000-08-14

    The ''National Ignition Facility (NIF) Justification of Mission Need'', which was approved by the Secretary of Energy in January 1993, defines the mission of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program and discusses the specific mission of the NIF Project. The NIF experimental capability will allow nuclear-weapons scientists to assess stockpile problems, verify computational tools, test for nuclear-weapons effects, and increase their understanding of weapons physics. The three weapons laboratory directors and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs have reviewed the role of the NIT; in Stockpile Stewardship in a joint letter. Along with the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative numerical simulations and other aboveground experimental facilities, the NIF will provide critical data that will allow the United States to maintain its technical capabilities in nuclear weapons in the absence of underground testing. As a secondary objective, the NIF will advance our understanding of ICF and help to assess its potential as an energy source. Achieving fusion ignition in the NIF will advance both defense and energy objectives. In affirming the Project's Critical Decision 2,* ''Approval of New Start'', the Secretary of Energy verified the mission need and emphasized that the NIF has the potential to contribute significantly to the DOE missions.

  10. Accommodation Outcomes and the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreuer, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Accommodation of the environment and technology is one of the key mediators of adjustment to disability and participation in community. In this article, accommodations are tested empirically as facilitators of return to work and participation, as defined by the "International Classification of Disability, Function, and Health" (ICF) and the…

  11. ICF quarterly report October-December 1998 volume 8, number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M

    1998-09-08

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly Report focuses on the final section of the 192-arm, 1.8-MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF). We describe both technological advances necessary for optimal utilization of the delivered energy and the hohlraum physics resulting from extremely high energy densities. Two articles belong to the first category. The conversion of infrared light to ultraviolet occurs at the tripler in the NIF's Final Optics Assembly. It is then necessary to separate any unconverted (first- and second-harmonic) light from the tripled-frequency light passed to the target. Large-Aperture Color-Separation Gratings for Diverting Unconverted Light Away from the NIF Target describes the design and fabrication of novel diffraction gratings that fulfill this function. In both direct- and indirect-drive ICF, the symmetry of the capsule as it compresses is crucial. The NIF will have 48 clusters of four beams incident on targets. Optimization of Beam Angles for the National Ignition Facility (p. 15) presents the rationale used to assign beam angles for cylindrical indirect drive while still allowing direct-drive and tetrahedral indirect-drive experiments to be performed.

  12. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Application of the ICF in fluency disorders.

    PubMed

    Yaruss, J Scott

    2007-11-01

    Stuttering is a complicated communication disorder that can affect many aspects of a speaker's life. In addition to exhibiting observable disruptions in speech (e.g., part-word repetitions, prolongations, blocks), many people who stutter also experience broader consequences in their lives because of their stuttering. Examples include difficulty with social communication (e.g., speaking with other people, making introductions) and job-related tasks (e.g., talking on the phone, participating in meetings). Because it incorporates these types of daily experiences, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides an ideal framework for considering the overall experience of the stuttering disorder. The purpose of this article is to highlight the ways in which the ICF can help clinicians, people who stutter, and the general public understand the multifaceted nature of stuttering. The article will also describe how clinicians can use the ICF as a framework for developing comprehensive evaluations and providing individualized treatment plans for people who stutter. PMID:17935016

  14. Progress towards polar-drive ignition for the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, R. L.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Li, C. K.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Padalino, S. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    The University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) performs direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. LLE's Omega Laser Facility is used to study direct-drive ICF ignition concepts, developing an understanding of the underlying physics that feeds into the design of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The baseline symmetric-illumination, direct-drive-ignition target design consists of a 1.5 MJ multiple-picket laser pulse that generates four shock waves (similar to the NIF baseline indirect-drive design) and is predicted to produce a one-dimensional (1D) gain of 48. LLE has developed the polar-drive (PD) illumination concept (for NIF beams in the x-ray-drive configuration) to allow the pursuit of direct-drive ignition without significant reconfiguration of the beam paths on the NIF. Some less-invasive changes in the NIF infrastructure will be required, including new phase plates, polarization rotators, and a PD-specific beam-smoothing front end. A suite of PD ignition designs with implosion velocities from 3.5 to 4.3 × 107 cm s-1 are predicted to have significant 2D gains (Collins et al 2012 Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 57 155). Verification of the physics basis of these simulations is a major thrust of direct-drive implosion experiments on both OMEGA and the NIF. Many physics issues are being examined with symmetric beam irradiation on OMEGA, varying the implosion parameters over a wide region of design space. Cryogenic deuterium-tritium target experiments with symmetric irradiation have produced areal densities of ˜0.3 g cm-2, ion temperatures over 3 keV, and neutron yields in excess of 20% of the ‘clean’ 1D predicted value. The inferred Lawson criterion figure of merit (Betti R. et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17 058102) has increased from 1.7 atm s (IAEA 2010) to 2.6 atm s.

  15. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  16. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-11-01

    An optically thin p-11B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-11B, the minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-11B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.

  17. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-11-15

    An optically thin p-{sup 11}B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-{sup 11}B, the minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-{sup 11}B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.

  18. A model for degradation of indirectly driven ICF implosions by supra-thermal electron preheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kruer, W.; Lindl, J. D.; Marinak, M. M.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, M.; Patel, P. K.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Weber, C. R.; Shvarts, D.; Hohenberger, M.; Afeyan, B.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the performance of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results to date, however, have fallen short of the predicted neutron yield, the expected compression of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer, and the pressure and density achieved in the central hot spot. A numerical model is presented for the degradation of implosion performance due to preheat of the DT fuel layer by supra-thermal electrons. The model is benchmarked by comparison with focused experiments, which directly measure the expansion of a DT ice layer caused by preheat from a controlled, well-characterized flux of supra-thermal electrons. The same model applied to ignition implosions shows improved agreement with a wide range of experimental observables, and may help to provide an explanation for many of the features observed in ignition implosions on the NIF. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. ND:GLASS LASER DESIGN FOR LASER ICF FISSION ENERGY (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J A; Agrawal, V; Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Britten, J; Chen, D; Cross, R; Ebbers, C; Erlandson, A; Feit, M; Freitas, B; Ghosh, C; Haefner, C; Homoelle, D; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; Molander, W; Murray, J; Rubenchik, S; Schaffers, K; Siders, C W; Stappaerts, E; Sutton, S; Telford, S; Trenholme, J; Barty, C J

    2008-10-28

    We have developed preliminary conceptual laser system designs for the Laser ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Fission Energy (LIFE) application. Our approach leverages experience in high-energy Nd:glass laser technology developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), along with high-energy-class diode-pumped solid-state laser (HEC-DPSSL) technology developed for the DOE's High Average Power Laser (HAPL) Program and embodied in LLNL's Mercury laser system. We present laser system designs suitable for both indirect-drive, hot spot ignition and indirect-drive, fast ignition targets. Main amplifiers for both systems use laser-diode-pumped Nd:glass slabs oriented at Brewster's angle, as in NIF, but the slabs are much thinner to allow for cooling by high-velocity helium gas as in the Mercury laser system. We also describe a plan to mass-produce pump-diode lasers to bring diode costs down to the order of $0.01 per Watt of peak output power, as needed to make the LIFE application economically attractive.

  20. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI) was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0) minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned. PMID:21110871

  1. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Sater, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Ho, D.; LePape, S.; Meezan, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR∼15), but will become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.

  2. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Here, we are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR~15), but willmore » become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.« less

  3. Harmonizing WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF): importance and methods to link disease and functioning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To understand the full burden of a health condition, we need the information on the disease and the information on how that disease impacts the functioning of an individual. The ongoing revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) provides an opportunity to integrate functioning information through the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Discussion Part of the ICD revision process includes adding information from the ICF by way of “functioning properties” to capture the impact of the disease on functioning. The ICD content model was developed to provide the structure of information required for each ICD-11 disease entity and one component of this content model is functioning properties. The activities and participation domains from ICF are to be included as the value set for functioning properties in the ICD revision process. Summary The joint use of ICD and ICF could create an integrated health information system that would benefit the implementation of a standard language-based electronic health record to better capture and understand disease and functioning in healthcare. PMID:23938048

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Inertial confinement fusion: The quest for ignition and energy gain using indirect drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1999-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an alternative way to control fusion which is based on scaling down a thermonuclear explosion to a small size, applicable for power production, a kind of thermonuclear internal combustion engine. This book extends many interesting topics concerning the research and development on ICF of the last 25 years. It provides a systematic development of the physics basis and also various experimental data on radiation driven implosion. This is a landmark treatise presented at the right time. It is based on the article ``Development of the indirect-drive approach to inertial confinement fusion and the target physics basis for ignition and gain'' by J.D. Lindl, published in Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 2, November 1995, pp. 3933-4024. As is well known, in the United States of America research on the target physics basis for indirect drive remained largely classified until 1994. The indirect drive approaches were closely related to nuclear weapons research at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories. In Japan and other countries, inertial confinement fusion research for civil energy has been successfully performed to achieve DT fuel pellet compression up to 1000 times normal density, and indirect drive concepts, such as the `Cannon Ball' scheme, also prevailed at several international conferences. In these circumstances the international fusion community proposed the Madrid Manifesto in 1988, which urged openness of ICF information to promote international collaboration on civil energy research for the future resources of the human race. This proposal was also supported by some of the US scientists. The United States Department of Energy revised its classification guidelines for ICF six years after the Madrid Manifesto. This first book from the USA treating target physics issues, covering topics from implosion dynamics to hydrodynamic stability, ignition physics, high-gain target design and the scope for energy applications is

  5. Ignitability test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome serious weaknesses in determining the performance of initiating devices, a novel 'ignitability test method', representing actual design interfaces and ignition materials, has been developed. Ignition device output consists of heat, light, gas an burning particles. Past research methods have evaluated these parameters individually. This paper describes the development and demonstration of an ignitability test method combining all these parameters, and the quantitative assessment of the ignition performance of two widely used percussion primers, the M42C1-PA101 and the M42C2-793. The ignition materials used for this evaluation were several powder, granule and pellet sizes of black powder and boron-potassium nitrate. This test method should be useful for performance evaluation of all initiator types, quality assurance, evaluation of ignition interfaces, and service life studies of initiators and ignition materials.

  6. Overview of the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. The NIF is a 192-beam, Nd-glass laser facility that is capable of producing 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, and over 50 times more energetic than other existing ICF facilities. The NIF construction began in 1997, and the facility, which was completed in 2009, is now fully operational. The facility is capable of firing up to 192 laser beams onto a target placed at the center of a 10-m-diameter spherical target chamber. Experiments involving the use of tritium have been underway for some time. These experiments present radiological issues: prompt neutron/gamma radiation, neutron activation, fission product generation, and decay radiation. This paper provides an introduction to the NIF facility and its operation, describes plans for the experimental program, and discusses radiological issues associated with the NIF's operations. PMID:23629059

  7. How a Regression Artifact Makes ICFs/MR Look Ineffective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crinella, Francis M.; McCleary, Richard; Swanson, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Criticizes the research design in "The Small ICF/MR program: Dimensions of Quality and Cost" (Conroy), that found small Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF) for individuals with mental retardation are inferior to other community programs. Discusses the problem in selecting a control group on the basis of pretest matching. (CR)

  8. ICF-CY: A Universal Tool for Documentation of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Rune J.

    2009-01-01

    The "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health--ICF" (ICF-CY) conceptual framework offers a new paradigm and taxonomy of human functioning disability, which can be used to guide holistic and interdisciplinary approaches to assessment and intervention. In settings serving children, youth, or adults with disabilities, the…

  9. Electrostatic-discharge ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Electrode in cylinder permits charge to transfer during top dead center compression stroke in modified Otto-cycle engine. Charge transfer produces spark which causes ignition of droplets without resorting to other ignition devices which are incapable of igniting ultralean mixtures.

  10. The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J

    2012-09-20

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

  11. Conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Kumpan, S.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Boyes, J.D.; Sorem, M.

    1995-08-02

    DOE commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KDO), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, we completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994.2 Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. On October 21, 1994 the Secretary of Energy issued a Key Decision One (KD1) for the NIF, which approved the Project and authorized DOE to request Office of Management and Budget-approval for congressional line-item FY 1996 NIF funding for preliminary engineering design and for National Environmental Policy Act activities. In addition, the Secretary declared Livermore as the preferred site for constructing the NIF. The Project will cost approximately $1.1 billion and will be completed at the end of FY 2002.

  12. Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness

    SciTech Connect

    Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

  13. [Disease and disability. The ICF model].

    PubMed

    Linden, M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnoses alone, e.g. according to the international classification of diseases 10 (ICD-10), do not give information on the illness severity, treatment needs and consequences. This depends on the functional health status, e.g. according to the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) which discriminates between impairment of functions, limitations in activity and capacity and participation restrictions. The German social law (SGB IX) defines disability as a chronic health status which lasts longer than 6 months and which results in participation restrictions. Participation restrictions are impaired capacities which not allow context or role requirements to be fulfilled. There are many instruments to measure capacities, such as the Mini-ICF-APP which was especially developed for mental disorders. As most mental disorders are chronic illnesses which lead to participation restrictions they must be conceptualized as mental disabilities. The consequence is that they must be treated under a social psychiatric perspective focussing on functions, capacities and context alike. PMID:25575629

  14. Target Diagnostic Technology Research & Development for the LLNL ICF and HED Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, P; Landen, O; Weber, F; Lowry, M; Bennett, C; Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Holder, J; Lerche, R; Griffith, R; Park, H; Boni, R; Jaanimagi, P; Davies, T

    2004-04-13

    The National Ignition Facility is operational at LLNL. The ICF and HED programs at LLNL have formed diagnostic research and development groups to institute improvements outside the charter of core diagnostics. We will present data from instrumentation being developed. A major portion of our work is improvements to detectors and readout systems. We have efforts related to CCD device development. Work has been done in collaboration with the University of Arizona to back thin a large format CCD device. We have developed in collaboration with a commercial vendor a large format, compact CCD system. We have coupled large format CCD systems to our optical and x-ray streak cameras leading to improvements in resolution and dynamic range. We will discuss gate-width and uniformity improvements to MCP-based framing cameras. We will present data from single shot data link work and discuss technology aimed at improvements of dynamic range for high-speed transient measurements from remote locations.

  15. Studies of shock convergence in ICF implosions using nuclear burn history measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2005-10-01

    Ignition of ICF capsules on the NIF will be critically dependent on the quality of hot-spot heating due to converging shock waves. On OMEGA, the convergence of strong spherical shocks heats the inner gas sufficiently to induce nuclear fusion. Measurements of the time history of this nuclear burn show that the burn induced by shock convergence occurs several hundred picoseconds before the deceleration-phase compression burn. The nuclear burn history measurements of two distinct nuclear reactions will be compared to a Guderley self-similar imploding shock analysis, as well as to 1-D hydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, the Univ. of Rochester, and the N.Y.State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  16. Using gamma-ray emission to measure areal density of ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Nelson M; Wilson, Douglas C; Hermann, Hans W; Young, Carlton S

    2010-01-01

    Fusion neutrons streaming from a burning ICF capsule generate gamma rays via nuclear inelastic scattering in the ablator of the capsule. The intensity of gamma-ray emission is proportional to the product of the ablator areal density ('{rho}R') and the yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gamma rays we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of the capsule's total neutron yield. In plastic-shell capsules, for example, {sup 12}C nuclei emit gamma rays at 4.44 MeV after excitation by 14.1-MeV neutrons from D+T fusion. These gamma rays can be measured by the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) experiment being built at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A linear error analysis indicates the chief sources of uncertainty in inferred areal density.

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of uncertainties in NIF ICF implosions due to underlying microphysics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jim; Springer, Paul; Collins, Gilbert

    2014-10-01

    Design and analysis calculations for ICF implosions rely on a large number of physics models, which are extremely difficult to test in isolation. As a result, models are often run in regimes where physical models contain significant uncertainties. While efforts have been made to design ignition targets that are robust to physics uncertainties, the use of full-scale hydrodynamic simulations limit these studies to sparse, low dimensional grids. More lightweight models, while much simpler, have proven very useful in analyzing and understand experimental ICF data and play an essential role in moving the field forward. We will describe a thermodynamic hot spot model that includes all physical models, along with variations that are consistent with the expected uncertainties, that is fast and lightweight enough to perform studies consisting of a million simulation points or more. We will present results from a large number of calculations and discuss the use of these data in understanding experimental results, with particular emphasis on underlying microphysics models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-656773.

  18. Progress in laboratory high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion): Prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.; Lindl, J.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Bernat, T.P.; Coleman, L.W.; Emmett, J.L.; Hogan, W.J.; Hunt, J.T.; Krupke, W.F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a thermonuclear reaction in a small (/approximately/5 mm diameter) fuel capsule filled with a few milligrams of deuterium and tritium, has been the subject of very fruitful experimentation since the early 1970's. High gain ICF is now on the threshold of practical applications. With a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), these applications will have major implications for national defense, basic and applied science, and power production. With a driver capable of delivering about 10 MJ in a 10-ns pulse at an intensity of /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, an appropriately configured cryogenic capsule could be compressed to a density of about 200 g/cm/sup 3/ and a temperature of 3--5 keV. Under these conditions, up to 10 mg of DT could be ignited, and with a burn efficiency of about 30%, release up to 1000 MJ of fusion energy, an energy gain of about 100. A thousand megajoules is equivalent to about one quarter ton of TNT, or about 7 gallons of oil--an amount of energy tractable under laboratory conditions and potentially very useful for a variety of applications. 61 refs., 33 figs.

  19. X-ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography of ICF and HEDP Materials, Subassemblies and Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W D; Martz Jr., H E

    2006-05-31

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) research are being conducted at large laser facilities, such as the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). At such facilities, millimeter-sized targets with micrometer structures are studied in a variety of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, equation-of-state, inertial confinement fusion and high-energy density experiments. The extreme temperatures and pressures achieved in these experiments make the results susceptible to imperfections in the fabricated targets. Targets include materials varying widely in composition ({approx}3 < Z < {approx}82), density ({approx}0.03 to {approx}20 g/cm{sup 3}), geometry (planar to spherical) and embedded structures (joints to subassemblies). Fabricating these targets with structures to the tolerances required is a challenging engineering problem the ICF and HEDP community are currently undertaking. Nondestructive characterization (NDC) provides a valuable tool in material selection, component inspection, and the final pre-shot assemblies inspection. X-rays are a key method used to NDC these targets. In this paper we discuss X-ray attenuation, X-ray phase effects, and the X-ray system used, its performance and application to characterize low-temperature Raleigh-Taylor and non-cryogenic double-shell targets.

  20. The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

    2005-11-11

    A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

  1. Laser induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Geringer, B.; Graf, J.; Klawatsch, D.; Lenz, H. P.; Piock, W. F.; Jetzinger, M.; Kapus, P.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, combustion engines and other combustion processes play an overwhelming and important role in everyday life. As a result, ignition of combustion processes is of great importance, too. Usually, ignition of a combustible material is defined in such a way that an ignition initiates a self-sustained reaction which propagates through the inflammable material even in the case that the ignition source has been removed. In most cases, a well defined ignition location and ignition time is of crucial importance. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from some disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes or restricted positioning possibilities. In some cases, ignition of combustible materials by means of high power laser pulses could be beneficial. High power lasers offer several different possibilities to ignite combustible materials, like thermal ignition, resonant ignition or optical breakdown ignition. Since thermal and resonant ignitions are not well suited on the requirements mentioned previously, only optical breakdown ignition will be discussed further. Optical breakdown of a gas within the focal spot of a high power laser allows a very distinct localization of the ignition spot in a combustible material. Since pulse duration is usually in the range of several nanoseconds, requirements on the ignition time are fulfilled easily, too. Laser peak intensities required for such an optical breakdown are in the range of 10 11 W/cm2. The hot plasma which forms during this breakdown initiates the following self-propagating combustion process. It has been shown previously that laser ignition of direct injection engines improves the fuel consumption as well as the exhaust emissions of such engines significantly. The work presented here gives a brief overview on the basics of laser induced ignition. Flame propagation which follows a successful ignition event can be distinguished into two diffrent regimes. Combustion processes within an engine are usually

  2. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  3. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  4. A review of indirect-drive ignition design options for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Thomas R.

    1998-11-01

    As construction continues on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser at Livermore, ignition capsule design and fabrication efforts also continue at both LLNL and LANL. These efforts are directed toward finding the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule most likely to achieve ignition and propagated burn when imploded by x-rays obtained from the conversion of laser light in a gold hohlraum, i. e., the indirect drive method. At this time, copper doped beryllium (Be+Cu) and polyimide (C_22H_10N_2O_4) remain as possible capsule ablator material candidates. We choose these materials based on both successful implosion performance as predicted by one-, two-, and three dimensional numerical simulations and on suitable fabrication and material characteristics. These characteristics include attainable surface finishes, permeability, strength, radio frequency and/or infrared radiation transmission, thermal conductivity, and material homogeneity. Numerical simulations predict that capsules with either a Be+Cu or a polyimide ablator have less sensitivity to initial surface roughnesses than polystyrene (CH) ablator capsules. We have designed ignition capsules using these two ablator materials to operate at both low peak drive temperature (250 eV) and low total laser energy (900 kJ). These drive conditions are significantly less than NIF and fuel confinement time consistent with achieving ignition. Fabrication of Be+Cu shells appears feasible by two different methods: LANL has demonstrated shell assembly by brazing together machined hemispheres and LLNL has successfully sputter deposited Be on spherical mandrels. To enhance surface smoothness, this latter technique may require the addition of boron during the sputtering process. Polyimide material has the advantage of being transparent to optical, infrared, and radio frequency radiation. These properties will allow visual inspection of the DT ice layer formation, and enhancement of the ice surface smoothness once formed

  5. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  6. Report from the Integrated Modeling Panel at the Workshop on the Science of Ignition on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M; Lamb, D

    2012-07-03

    This section deals with multiphysics radiation hydrodynamics codes used to design and simulate targets in the ignition campaign. These topics encompass all the physical processes they model, and include consideration of any approximations necessary due to finite computer resources. The section focuses on what developments would have the highest impact on reducing uncertainties in modeling most relevant to experimental observations. It considers how the ICF codes should be employed in the ignition campaign. This includes a consideration of how the experiments can be best structured to test the physical models the codes employ.

  7. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  8. 42 CFR 440.150 - Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services. 440....150 Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services. (a) “ICF/MR services” means those items and services... level of room and board; (2) The primary purpose of the ICF/MR is to furnish health or...

  9. Analytical Dependence of the Ignition Dynamics Parameters on the Low-Z Impurity Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mohammad; Abedi, Sayed Ebrahim

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, thermonuclear burning of the deuterium-tritium (D/T) plasma of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target is studied in the presence of low-Z impurities (lithium, beryllium, and carbon) with arbitrary concentrations. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied. Also, the effect of impurity concentration on the plasma ignition parameters such as ignition temperature, confinement parameter ρR, and ignition energy are discussed. The models are constructed for an isobaric and an isochoric plasma for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagated into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. In ICF spherical implosions of the D/T fuel, the ignition parameters as ignition temperature and parameter ρR in the hot spot are approximately 7 - 10 keV and 0.2 - 0.4 g cm-2 respectively, and these values are increased by the presence of impurities.

  10. Fast Ignition Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Akli, K

    2006-10-20

    We are becoming dependent on energy more today than we were a century ago, and with increasing world population and booming economies, sooner or later our energy sources will be exhausted. Moreover, our economy and welfare strongly depends on foreign oil and in the shadow of political uncertainties, there is an urgent need for a reliable, safe, and cheap energy source. Thermonuclear fusion, if achieved, is that source of energy which not only will satisfy our demand for today but also for centuries to come. Today, there are two major approaches to achieve fusion: magnetic confinement fusion (MFE) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This dissertation explores the inertial confinement fusion using the fast ignition concept. Unlike the conventional approach where the same laser is used for compression and ignition, in fast ignition separate laser beams are used. This dissertation addresses three very important topics to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. These are laser-to-electron coupling efficiency, laser-generated electron beam transport, and the associated isochoric heating. First, an integrated fast ignition experiment is carried out with 0.9 kJ of energy in the compression beam and 70 J in the ignition beam. Measurements of absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield from the imploded core revealed that about 17% of the laser energy is coupled to the suprathermal electrons. Modeling of the transport of these electrons and the associated isochoric heating, with the previously determined laser-to-electron conversion efficiency, showed a maximum target temperature of 166 eV at the front where the electron flux is higher and the density is lower. The contribution of the potential, induced by charge separation, in opposing the motion of the electrons was moderate. Second, temperature sensitivity of Cu K{sub {alpha}} imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal is investigated. It was found that due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha

  11. Fast ignition experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akli, Kramer Ugerthen

    We are becoming dependent on energy more today than we were a century ago, and with increasing world population and booming economies, sooner or later our energy sources will be exhausted. Moreover, our economy and welfare strongly depends on foreign oil and in the shadow of political uncertainties, there is an urgent need for a reliable, safe, and cheap energy source. Thermonuclear fusion, if achieved, is that source of energy which not only will satisfy our demand for today but also for centuries to come. Today, there are two major approaches to achieve fusion: magnetic confinement fusion (MFE) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This dissertation explores inertial confinement fusion using the fast ignition concept. Unlike the conventional approach where the same laser is used for compression and ignition, in fast ignition separate laser beams are used. This dissertation addresses three important topics to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. These are laser-to-electron coupling efficiency, laser-generated electron beam transport, and the associated isochoric heating. First, an integrated fast ignition experiment is carried out with 0.9 kJ of energy in the compression beam and 70 J in the ignition beam. Measurements of absolute K-alpha yield from the imploded core revealed that 17% of the laser energy is coupled to the suprathermal electrons. Modeling of the transport of these electrons and the associated isochoric heating, with the previously determined laser-to-electron conversion efficiency, showed a maximum target temperature of 166 eV at the front where the electron flux is higher. The contribution of the potential, induced by charge separation, in opposing the motion of the electrons was moderate. Second, temperature sensitivity of Cu K-alpha imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal is investigated. It was found that due to the shifting and broadening of the K-alpha line, with increasing temperature, both the brightness and the

  12. Target technologies for indirect drive ignition on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, T P

    1999-09-09

    X-ray driven ignition targets for the NIF will include fuel capsule materials different from those used up to now in ICF experiments. They will contain cryogenic fuel layers, and will be enclosed in cryogenic hohlraums. These hohlraums must provide the thermal environment required to shape the fuel layers, and must be supported by cryogenic equipment in the NIF target chamber. The methods for filling and delivering the targets to the NIF chamber will combine high-temperature diffusion with cryogenic transport. A program is in place in the US to design and develop the ignition targets, and the cryogenic support and fill systems needed to field them. This program includes participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and General Atomics.

  13. Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, K.R.; Norimatsu, T.

    1994-12-01

    The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

  14. Self-similar Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. However, in conventional ICF implosions, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] and later Meyer-ter-Vehn & Schalk [Z. Naturforsch. 37a, 955 (1982).] may be employed to implode dense, uniform fuel assemblies with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. The connection to "realistic" (i.e., non-self-similar) implosion schemes using laser or X-ray drive is also investigated.

  15. Progress in the development of the MARBLE platform for studying thermonuclear burn in the presence of heterogeneous mix on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T. J.; Douglas, M. R.; Fincke, J. R.; Olson, R. E.; Cobble, J. A.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Parra-Vasquez, N. A. G.; Randolph, R. B.; Schmidt, D. W.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.; Tregillis, I. L.

    2016-05-01

    Mix of ablator material into fuel of an ICF capsule adds non-burning material, diluting the fuel and reducing burn. The amount of the reduction is dependent in part on the morphology of the mix. A probability distribution function (PDF) burn model has been developed [6] that utilizes the average concentration of mixed materials as well as the variance in this quantity across cells provided by the BHR turbulent transport model [3] and its revisions [4] to describe the mix in terms of a PDF of concentrations of fuel and ablator material, and provides the burn rate in mixed material. Work is underway to develop the MARBLE ICF platform for use on the National Ignition Facility in experiments to quantify the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. This platform consists of a plastic (CH) capsule filled with a deuterated plastic foam (CD) with a density of a few tens of milligrams per cubic centimeter, with tritium gas filling the voids in the foam. This capsule will be driven using x-ray drive on NIF, and the resulting shocks will induce turbulent mix that will result in the mixing of deuterium from the foam with the tritium gas. In order to affect the morphology of the mix, engineered foams with voids of diameter up to 100 microns will be utilized. The degree of mix will be determined from the ratio of DT to DD neutron yield. As the mix increases, the yield from reactions between the deuterium of the CD foam with tritium from the gas will increase. The ratio of DT to DD neutrons will be compared to a variation of the PDF burn model that quantifies reactions from initially separated reactants.

  16. Progress in the development of the MARBLE platform for studying thermonuclear burn in the presence of heterogeneous mix on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Murphy, T. J.; Douglas, M. R.; Fincke, J. R.; Olson, R. E.; Cobble, J. A.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Parra-Vasquez, N. A. G.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Mix of ablator material into fuel of an ICF capsule adds non-burning material, diluting the fuel and reducing burn. The amount of the reduction is dependent in part on the morphology of the mix. A probability distribution function (PDF) burn model has been developed [6] that utilizes the average concentration of mixed materials as well as the variance in this quantity across cells provided by the BHR turbulent transport model [3] and its revisions [4] to describe the mix in terms of a PDF of concentrations of fuel and ablator material, and provides the burn rate in mixed material. Workmore » is underway to develop the MARBLE ICF platform for use on the National Ignition Facility in experiments to quantify the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. This platform consists of a plastic (CH) capsule filled with a deuterated plastic foam (CD) with a density of a few tens of milligrams per cubic centimeter, with tritium gas filling the voids in the foam. This capsule will be driven using x-ray drive on NIF, and the resulting shocks will induce turbulent mix that will result in the mixing of deuterium from the foam with the tritium gas. In order to affect the morphology of the mix, engineered foams with voids of diameter up to 100 microns will be utilized. The degree of mix will be determined from the ratio of DT to DD neutron yield. As the mix increases, the yield from reactions between the deuterium of the CD foam with tritium from the gas will increase. Lastly, the ratio of DT to DD neutrons will be compared to a variation of the PDF burn model that quantifies reactions from initially separated reactants.« less

  17. BPS-ICF model, a tool to measure biopsychosocial functioning and disability within ICF concepts: theory and practice updated.

    PubMed

    Talo, Seija A; Rytökoski, Ulla M

    2016-03-01

    The transformation of International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps into International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) meant a lot for those needing to communicate in terms of functioning concept in their daily work. With ICF's commonly understood language, the decades' uncertainty on what concepts and terms describe functioning and disabilities seemed to be dispelled. Instead, operationalizing ICF to measure the level of functioning along with the new nomenclature has not been as unambiguous. Transforming linguistic terms into quantified functioning seems to need another type of theorizing. Irrespective of challenging tasks, numerous projects were formulated during the past decades to apply ICF for measurement purposes. This article updates one of them, the so-called biopsychosocial-ICF model, which uses all ICF categories but classifies them into more components than ICF for measurement purposes. The model suggests that both disabilities and functional resources should be described by collecting and organizing functional measurement data in a multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial data matrice. PMID:26756850

  18. The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2011-07-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

  19. Status of the National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Boyes, J.D.; Sorem, M.S.; Soures, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    The ultimate goal of worldwide research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to develop fusion as an inexhaustible, economic, environmentally safe source of electric power. Following nearly thirty years of laboratory and underground fusion experiments, the next step toward this goal is to demonstrate ignition and propagating burn of fusion fuel in the laboratory. The National Ignition Facility(NIF) Project is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), for just this purpose. NIF will use advanced Nd-glass laser technology to deliver 1.8 MJ of 0.35-um laser light in a shaped pulse, several nanoseconds in duration, achieving a peak power of 500 TW. A national community of U.S. laboratories is participating in this project, now in its final design phase. Franceand the United Kingdom are collaborating on development of required technology under bilateral agreements with the US. This paper presents thestatus of the laser design and development of its principal components and optical elements.

  20. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    SciTech Connect

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  1. Flare ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Sorelle, R.R.

    1984-05-22

    A flare ignition system is claimed for oil well flaring of combustible gases. It includes a central control unit, low voltage interconnect line and plural remote igniter units which include alternate first and second spark gaps coordinated in fail-safe operation. Coordination is carried out by pulse counting and validating circuitry which assures that one of the spark gaps will always be ignitable or alarm condition will exist.

  2. Health measurement using the ICF: Test-retest reliability study of ICF codes and qualifiers in geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    Okochi, Jiro; Utsunomiya, Sakiko; Takahashi, Tai

    2005-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was published by the World Health Organization (WHO) to standardize descriptions of health and disability. Little is known about the reliability and clinical relevance of measurements using the ICF and its qualifiers. This study examines the test-retest reliability of ICF codes, and the rate of immeasurability in long-term care settings of the elderly to evaluate the clinical applicability of the ICF and its qualifiers, and the ICF checklist. Methods Reliability of 85 body function (BF) items and 152 activity and participation (AP) items of the ICF was studied using a test-retest procedure with a sample of 742 elderly persons from 59 institutional and at home care service centers. Test-retest reliability was estimated using the weighted kappa statistic. The clinical relevance of the ICF was estimated by calculating immeasurability rate. The effect of the measurement settings and evaluators' experience was analyzed by stratification of these variables. The properties of each item were evaluated using both the kappa statistic and immeasurability rate to assess the clinical applicability of WHO's ICF checklist in the elderly care setting. Results The median of the weighted kappa statistics of 85 BF and 152 AP items were 0.46 and 0.55 respectively. The reproducibility statistics improved when the measurements were performed by experienced evaluators. Some chapters such as genitourinary and reproductive functions in the BF domain and major life area in the AP domain contained more items with lower test-retest reliability measures and rated as immeasurable than in the other chapters. Some items in the ICF checklist were rated as unreliable and immeasurable. Conclusion The reliability of the ICF codes when measured with the current ICF qualifiers is relatively low. The result in increase in reliability according to evaluators' experience suggests proper education will have positive

  3. ICF in the U. S. : Facilities and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, L.W.

    1988-08-01

    In the last few years there has been significant progress in ICF research in laboratories in the United States and elsewhere. These advances have occurred in areas that range from demonstrating an innovative laser beam smoothing techniques important for both directly and indirectly driven ICF, to achieving a more complete understanding of capsule implosions and related physics. This progress has been possible because of the capabilities provided by the ICF laser-target facilities currently in operation and the new developments in diagnostics, particularly for measurements of the implosion process and the conditions in the compressed capsule core. Both of these topics, facilities and selected new diagnostics capabilities in the US ICF Program, are summarized in this paper. 32 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. The Health and Functioning ICF-60: Development and Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tutelyan, V A; Chatterji, S; Baturin, A K; Pogozheva, A V; Kishko, O N; Akolzina, S E

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development and psychometric properties of the Health and Functioning ICF-60 (HF-ICF-60) measure, based on the World Health Organization (WHO) ‘International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: ICF’ (2001). The aims of the present study were to test psychometric properties of the HF-ICF-60, developed as a measure that would be responsive to change in functioning through changes in health and nutritional status, as a prospective measure to monitor health and nutritional status of populations and to explore the relationship of the HF-ICF-60 with quality of life measures such as the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment in relation to non-communicable diseases. Methods The HF-ICF-60 measure consists of 60 items selected from the ICF by an expert panel, which included 18 items that cover Body Functions, 21 items that cover Activities and Participation, rated on five-point scales, and 21 items that cover Environmental Factors (seven items cover Individual Environmental Factors and 14 items cover Societal Environmental Factors), rated on nine-point scales. The HF-ICF-60 measure was administered to the Russian nationally representative sample within the Russian National Population Quality of Life, Health and Nutrition Survey, in 2004 (n = 9807) and 2005 (n = 9560), as part of the two waves of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS). The statistical analyses were carried out with the use of both classical and modern psychometric methods, such as factor analysis, and based on Item Response Theory, respectively. Results The HF-ICF-60 questionnaire is a new measure derived directly from the ICF and covers the ICF components as follows: Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors (Individual Environmental Factors and Societal Environmental Factors). The results from the factor analyses (both Exploratory Factor Analyses and Confirmatory Factor

  5. Shock-Timing Measurements in ICF Targets Filled with Liquid Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehly, Thomas; Goncharov, Valeri; Barrios, Maria; Frantanduono, Dayne; Hu, Suxing; Collins, Timothy; Morozas, John; Sangster, Thomas; Meyerhofer, David; Celliers, Peter; Robey, Harry; Hicks, Damien; Collins, Gilbert

    2011-06-01

    High-performance ICF target designs use multiple shocks to condition the shell before it is imploded. Accurate timing of these shocks is critical to target performance. We report on experiments on the OMEGA Laser where up to four spherical shocks were observed in directly driven spherical targets filled with liquid deuterium. The measured shock velocity profiles exhibit the coalescence times of those shock and contain the first observations of convergence effect (pressure increase with decreasing radius) and the highest shock velocity observed in liquid deuterium (135 km/s). Simulations of these experiments accurately model the shock velocities and timing when a non-local electron transport model is used for heat conduction. These experiments are the basis for tuning campaigns performed on the National Ignition Facility to tune laser pulse shape to achieve the specifications for ignition targets. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  6. Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

    2010-11-22

    A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

  7. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition

  8. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-09-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres.

  9. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-06-01

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project. (MOW)

  10. NIF Project Quality Assurance Program Plan Revision E

    SciTech Connect

    Dun, C; Brereton, S; Yatabe, J; Moses, E I

    2001-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department Energy's (DOE's) Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets and will perform weapons physics, weapons effects, and high-energy-density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The primary mission of the NIF Project is the design and construction of the facility and equipment, acceptance testing, and activation. To accomplish this mission, the LLNL Director created the NIF Programs Directorate, and within that Directorate, the NIF Project Office to organize and manage the Project. The NIF Project Office establishes this QA Program to ensure its success. This QA Program Plan (QAPP) defines and describes the program--the management system--for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of LLNL and the NIF Programs Directorate.

  11. Hemispherical Capsule Implosions for Fast Ignition*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Adams, R. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.; Johnston, R. R.; Wenger, D. F.; Schroen, D. G.

    2003-10-01

    The fast ignitor approach to ICF ignition separates the fuel assembly and fast heating processes. After compressing the fuel with the main driver, the fuel is ignited using a focused electron or ion beam generated by a fast, ultra-high power laser pulse. This significantly relaxes the drive symmetry, energy, and shock timing requirements compared to hot spot ignition. A hemispherical capsule target is a fast ignitor geometry well-adapted to symmetric fuel compression by a single-ended z-pinch radiation drive. The hemispherical capsule implodes radially, constrained at its equator by a flat high-density surface (a special case of the spherical capsule "cone-focus" geometry). This glide plane is mounted on a hollow pedestal that provides a plasma-free, short-pulse laser path to the compressed fuel core region. In experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia, we are studying implosions of 2.0-mm-diameter, 60-micron-thick hemispherical capsules in cylindrical secondary hohlraums heated to 90-100 eV from one end by a 120 TW wire-array z-pinch. Analysis of ZBL 6.7 keV point-projection backlighter images of pole-hot implosions in a tall secondary and 6.18 keV monochromatic crystal backlighter images of more symmetric implosions in a short secondary will be presented. We will also discuss progress on the development of a cryogenic liquid fuel target for this fast ignitor compression geometry. * Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Dropwise ignition versus external ignition for multicomponent fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawid, M.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt has been made to identify conditions for dropwise ignition and spray ignition. Both pure as well as multicomponent fuels are considered. For dropwise ignition, an existing ignition criterion has been modified to account for the nonlinear dependence of reaction rate on fuel and oxygen concentrations and to account for the multicomponent nature of the fuel. The external or spray ignition is considered through the zero heat flux condition at the ignition source. The effect of chemical kinetics is examined by employing reaction schemes with unity as well as non-unity exponents of fuel and oxygen concentrations. Results indicate that for most of the conditions considered, the individual droplet ignition is favored over the external ignition. Only when the drop diameter is smaller than 30 microns, the spray ignites earlier than droplets. The addition of a small amount of a volatile component significantly enhances the ignitability of both modes. However, the effect is stronger for the dropwise ignition mode.

  13. Low profile thermite igniter

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1991-03-05

    A thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  14. Validation of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for rheumatoid arthritis: the perspective of psychologists.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Inge; Cieza, Alarcos; Stucki, Gerold

    2008-01-01

    The 'Comprehensive ICF Core Set for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)' is an application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and represents the typical spectrum of problems in functioning of patients with RA. The objective of this study was to validate this ICF Core Set from the perspective of psychologists. Psychologists experienced in RA treatment were asked about the problems of RA patients, treated by psychologists, in a three-round survey using the Delphi technique. Responses were linked to the ICF. Twenty psychologists in five countries gave a total of 303 responses that were linked to 65 different ICF categories. Fifteen responses were linked to the not yet developed ICF component personal factors and nine were not covered by ICF. Overall, 66% of the ICF categories linked to the responses of the psychologists were represented by the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for RA. Several responses that were not covered need to be investigated further. PMID:25160808

  15. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  16. PIC Simulation for ICF Plasma Sputter Coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Huang, H.; Parks, P. B.; Chan, V. S.; Walton, C. C.; Wilks, S. C.

    2010-11-01

    To satisfy mesh spacing constraint δ/λDebye<=1 particle In Cell (PIC) simulations at 25x reduced cathode currents levels are used to numerically model the distribution of currents, electrostatic potentials and particle kinetics in a Type II ``unbalanced'' cylindrically symmetric magnetron discharge used for Be sputter coating of ICF capsules. Simulation indicates a strong magnetic field confinement of the plasma in the closed field lines region adjacent to cathode, and accompanying cross-field line plasma diffusion into the open-field line region connected to wall/anode. A narrow Charles-Langmuir sheath and a pre-sheath that is ˜10x wider due to the existence of the B-field are observed. The effects of varying boundary conditions, e.g., the separation between the anode/cathode, the anode bias voltage, etc., are studied, which is expected to aid experimentalists in turning these ``knobs'' for better coating qualities. We also show that the etch rate due to sputtering of Be targets predicted by the results of our PIC simulations, after rescaling to experimental conditions, agrees with experiments.

  17. Predicted ICF Neutron Spectrum Corrections from Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Peterson, Luc; Brandon, Scott; Gaffney, Jim; Hammer, Jim; Kritcher, Andrea; Nora, Ryan; Springer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Produced neutron spectra have long been used as a diagnostic of ICF implosions. The neutron spectrum width is characteristic of the burn temperature as well as the variance of the burning region's fluid motion. Corrections to higher moments of the spectrum are thought to be diagnostic as well. Because of the large neutron fluxes at the NIF, we expect to have the opportunity to measure these corrections and compare with simulation. We will discuss a post-process platform that we have built for extracting these moment corrections as well as many other extensive quantities from the hydrodynamic simulations, and report on the predicted neutron spectrum corrections recently calculated for a large suite of implosion simulations in one, two, and three dimensions with varying drive symmetry and overall convergence ratio. We are particularly interested in the observable effects on the neutron spectrum along different lines of sight from the dimensional symmetry constraint in the simulated hydrodynamics. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  19. Progress in the CAEP ICF Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hansheng

    1997-04-01

    The ICF Program in China has made significant progress with multilabs' efforts in the past years. The eight-beam SG-II laser facility, upgraded from the two-beam SG-I facility, is nearly completed for 1.05 μm light output and is about to be operated for experiments. Some benchmark experiments have been conducted for disk targets. Advanced diagnostic techniques, such as an x-ray microscope with a 7-μm spatial resolution and x-ray framing cameras with a temporal resolution better than 65ps, have been developed. Lower energy pumping with prepulse technique for Ne-like Ti laser at 32.6nm has succeeded and shadowgraphy of a fine mesh has been demonstrated with the Ti laser beam. A national project, SG-III laser facility, has been proposed to produce 60 kJ blue light for target physics experiments and is being conceptually designed. New laser technology, including maltipass amplification, large aperture plasma electrode switches and laser glass with fewer platinum grains have been developed to meet the requirements of the SG-III Project. The Technical Integration Line (TIL) as a scientific prototype beamlet of SG-III will be first built in the next few years.

  20. Light ion beam approach to ICF ignition, gain, and energy production

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.; Allshouse, G.; Cook, D.; Lockner, T.; Mazarakis, M.; Olson, C.; Smith, D. ); Peterson, R.; Adler, D.; Bruggink, D.; Englestad, R.; Khater, H.; Kulcinski, G.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Morgahead, E.; Moses, G.; Rutledge, S.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslalvsky, I.; Wang, P.; Wittenberg, L. )

    1994-10-05

    A review of anticipated achievements in the light ion beam method of the inertial confinement fusion program is presented. They allow to estimate the cost of produced electric energy. It appears to be quite competitive to other fusion reactor designs at the 1000 MWe level and above. (AIP) [copyright] [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

  1. Tgermonuclear Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Comparison with Magnetic Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P.Y.; Spears, B.K.; Anderson, K.S.; Edwards, J.; Fatenejad, M.; Lindl, J.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Nora, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-04-23

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptau ~ 1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptau ~ 1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (T ~ 2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chi ~ 0.02–0.03 is ~5X lower than in JET (chi ~ 0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  2. Thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion and comparison with magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P. Y.; Anderson, K. S.; Nora, R.; Spears, B. K.; Edwards, J.; Lindl, J. D.; Fatenejad, M.; McCrory, R. L.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-05-15

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA[T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptauapprox1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptauapprox1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (Tapprox2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chiapprox0.02-0.03 is approx5x lower than in JET (chiapprox0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  3. The role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1996-06-01

    The authors have completed a conceptual design for a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, 0.35-{mu}m solid-state laser system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which will demonstrate inertial fusion ignition and gain for national security, energy, and science applications. The technical goal of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program as stated in the current ICF Five-Year Program Plan is {open_quotes}to produce pure fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, with fusion yields of 200 to 1000 MJ, in support of three missions: (1) to play an essential role in accessing physics regimes of interest in nuclear weapon design...; (2) to provide an above-ground simulation capability for nuclear weapon effects...; and (3) to develop inertial fusion energy for civilian power production.{close_quotes} This article addresses the third goal-- the development of inertial fusion energy (IFE). This article reports a variety of potential contributions the NIF could make to the development of IFE, drawn from a nationally attended workshop held at the University of California at Berkeley in Feb, 1994. In addition to demonstrating fusion ignition as a fundamental basis for IFE, the findings of the workshop, are that the NIF could also provide important data for target physics and fabrication technology, for IFE target chamber phenomena such as materials responses to target emissions, and for fusion power technology-relevant tests.

  4. Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

    1997-10-31

    We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

  5. Large-scale 3D simulations of ICF and HEDP targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, Michael M.

    2000-10-01

    The radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA continues to be developed and applied to 3D simulations of a variety of targets for both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics. Several packages have been added enabling this code to perform ICF target simulations with similar accuracy as two-dimensional codes of long-time historical use. These include a laser ray trace and deposition package, a heavy ion deposition package, implicit Monte Carlo photonics, and non-LTE opacities, derived from XSN or the linearized response matrix approach.(R. More, T. Kato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 814 (1998), S. Libby, F. Graziani, R. More, T. Kato, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Laser Interactions and Related Plasma Phenomena, (AIP, New York, 1997).) LTE opacities can also be calculated for arbitrary mixtures online by combining tabular values generated by different opacity codes. Thermonuclear burn, charged particle transport, neutron energy deposition, electron-ion coupling and conduction, and multigroup radiation diffusion packages are also installed. HYDRA can employ ALE hydrodynamics; a number of grid motion algorithms are available. Multi-material flows are resolved using material interface reconstruction. Results from large-scale simulations run on up to 1680 processors, using a combination of massively parallel processing and symmetric multiprocessing, will be described. A large solid angle simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a NIF ignition capsule has resolved simultaneously the full spectrum of the most dangerous modes that grow from surface roughness. Simulations of a NIF hohlraum illuminated with the initial 96 beam configuration have also been performed. The effect of the hohlraum’s 3D intrinsic drive asymmetry on the capsule implosion will be considered. We will also discuss results from a Nova experiment in which a copper sphere is crushed by a planar shock. Several interacting hydrodynamic instabilities, including

  6. Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2006-01-01

    A dual-pulse laser (DPL) technique has been demonstrated for generating laser-induced sparks (LIS) to ignite fuels. The technique was originally intended to be applied to the ignition of rocket propellants, but may also be applicable to ignition in terrestrial settings in which electric igniters may not be suitable.

  7. Microgravity ignition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid; Elliott, William; Garrant, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a flight ready apparatus of the microgravity ignition experiment for the GASCan 2 program. This involved redesigning, testing, and making final modifications to the existing apparatus. The microgravity ignition experiment is intended to test the effect of microgravity on the time to ignition of a sample of alpha-cellulose paper. An infrared heat lamp is used to heat the paper sample within a sealed canister. The interior of the canister was redesigned to increase stability and minimize conductive heat transfer to the sample. This design was fabricated and tested and a heat transfer model of the paper sample was developed.

  8. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  9. Conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Boyes, John D.; Kumpan, Steven A.; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Sorem, Michael S.

    1995-12-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a conceptual design report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a key decision zero (KD0), justification of mission need. Motivated by the progress to date by the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova technical contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 micrometer) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a memorandum of agreement in August 1993, and established a project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, we completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE defense program's site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a facilities requirements document, a conceptual design scope and plan, a target physics design document, a laser design cost basis document, a functional requirements document, an experimental plan for indirect drive ignition, and a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA) document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. On October 21, 1994 the Secretary of Energy issued a key decision one (KD1) for the NIF, which approved the project and authorized DOE to request Office of Management and Budget-approval for congressional line-item FY 1996 NIF funding for preliminary engineering design and for National Environmental Policy Act activities. In addition, the Secretary declared Livermore as the preferred site for constructing the NIF. In February 1995, the NIF Project was

  10. Hard X-ray Imaging for Measuring Laser Absorption Spatial Profiles on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Jones, O S; Landen, O L; Suter, L; Amendt, P; Turner, R E; Regan, S

    2006-04-25

    Hard x-ray (''Thin wall'') imaging will be employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to spatially locate laser beam energy deposition regions on the hohlraum walls in indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments, relevant for ICF symmetry tuning. Based on time resolved imaging of the hard x-ray emission of the laser spots, this method will be used to infer hohlraum wall motion due to x-ray and laser ablation and any beam refraction caused by plasma density gradients. In optimizing this measurement, issues that have to be addressed are hard x-ray visibility during the entire ignition laser pulse with intensities ranging from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, as well as simultaneous visibility of the inner and the outer laser drive cones. In this work we will compare the hard x-ray emission calculated by LASNEX and analytical modeling with thin wall imaging data recorded previously on Omega and during the first hohlraum experiments on NIF. Based on these calculations and comparisons the thin wall imaging will be optimized for ICF/NIF experiments.

  11. Progress on achieving the ICF conditions needed for high gain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J.D.

    1988-12-23

    Progress during the past two years has moved us much closer to demonstrating the scientific and technological requirements for high gain ICF in the laboratory. This progress has been made possible by operating at the third harmonic of 1..mu..m light which dramatically reduces concern about hot electrons and by advances in diagnostics such as 100 ps x-ray framing cameras which greatly increase the data available from each experiment. Making use of many of these new capabilities, major improvements in confinement conditions have been achieved for ICF implosions. In particular, in an optimized hohlraum on Nova, radiation driven implosions with convergence ratio in excess of 30 (volume compression /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 4/) have performed essentially as predicted by spherical implosion calculations. This paper presents these results as well as examples of advances in several other areas and discusses the implications for the future of ICF with lasers and heavy ion beam drivers. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Molded composite pyrogen igniter for rocket motors. [solid propellant ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.; Lucy, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A lightweight pyrogen igniter assembly including an elongated molded plastic tube adapted to contain a pyrogen charge was designed for insertion into a rocket motor casing for ignition of the rocket motor charge. A molded plastic closure cap provided for the elongated tube includes an ignition charge for igniting the pyrogen charge and an electrically actuated ignition squib for igniting the ignition charge. The ignition charge is contained within a portion of the closure cap, and it is retained therein by a noncorrosive ignition pellet retainer or screen which is adapted to rest on a shoulder of the elongated tube when the closure cap and tube are assembled together. A circumferentially disposed metal ring is provided along the external circumference of the closure cap and is molded or captured within the plastic cap in the molding process to provide, along with O-ring seals, a leakproof rotary joint.

  13. Direct spark ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, R.A.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a direct spark ignition system having a gas burner, an electrically operable valve connected to the burner to admit fuel thereto, a gated oscillator having a timing circuit for timing a trial ignition, a spark generator responsive to the oscillator for igniting fuel emanating from the burner, and a flame sensor for sustaining oscillations of the oscillator while a flame exists at the burner. The spark generator has an inverter connected to a low voltage dc source and responsive to the oscillator for converting the dc voltage to a high ac voltage, a means for rectifying the high ac voltage, a capacitor connected to the rectifying means for storing the rectified high voltage, an ignition coil in series between the storage capacitor and a switch, and a means for periodically turning on the switch to produce ignition pulses through the coil. The ignition system is powered from the dc source but controlled by the oscillator. An improvement described here is wherein the inverter is comprised of a step-up transformer having its primary winding connected in series with the dc source and a common emitter transistor having its collector connected to the primary winding. The transistor has its base connected to be controlled by the oscillator to chop the dc into ac in the primary winding, and a diode connected between the storage capacitor and the collector of the transistor, the diode being poled to couple into the capacitor back EMF energy when the transistor is turned off.

  14. 78 FR 26849 - Model Specifications for Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Devices (BAIIDs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... (BAIIDs). (57 FR 11772.) Ignition interlocks are alcohol breath-testing devices installed in motor... (71 FR 8047), NHTSA published a request for comments, explaining that the agency intended to revise... October 6, 2010 (75 FR 61820), NHTSA published a separate notice containing proposed revisions to the...

  15. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-12-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres. The preliminary data on the properties of a Au-Cu binary alloy system by SEM and STEM analysis is presented.

  16. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  17. 42 CFR 442.40 - Availability of FFP during appeals for ICFs/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an ICF/MR after its provider agreement has been terminated or has expired and not been renewed. (2... agreement when CMS in validating a State survey agency certification, determines that an ICF/MR does not.... (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section, FFP in payments to an ICF/MR...

  18. 42 CFR 442.118 - Denial of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Denial of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR... of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR. (a) Basis for denial of payments. The Medicaid agency may deny payment for new admissions to an ICF/MR that no longer meets the applicable conditions...

  19. 42 CFR 431.154 - Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR. 431.154 Section 431.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Process for NFs and ICFs/MR § 431.154 Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR. The informal...

  20. National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

  1. High-Density Carbon Ablator Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, James; Macphee, Andrew; McNaney, James; Doeppner, Tilo; Pak, Art; Rygg, Ryan; Benedetti, Robin; Town, Richard; Bradley, David; Dewald, Edward; Tommasini, Ricardo; Milovich, Jose; Berzak-Hopkins, Laura; Moody, John; Callahan, Debbi; Hamza, Alex; Biener, Juergen; Ho, Darwin; Storm, Eric; Kilkenny, Joe; Landen, Otto; Lindl, John; Edwards, John; Meezan, Nathan; Mackinno, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been preformed to measure high-density carbon (HDC) ablator performance for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The NIF laser was used to generate a shaped laser pulse with a peak power of 360 TW and a total energy of 1.3 MJ. The total neutron yield, ion temperature, neutron bang time and x-ray bang time were measured and compared to simulations. A deuterium-tritium filled HDC capsule recently produced a neutron yield of 1.6 × 1015, the current record for laser driven ICF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by LDRD-11-ERD-075.

  2. eHXI: a permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Huntington, C. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N.; Park, H.-S.; Thomas, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (>= 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. eHXI provides valuable information on hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.

  3. 2D X-ray radiography of imploding capsules at the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Jones, O S; Field, J E; Barrios, M A; Benedetti, L R; Collins, G W; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Kline, J L; Kroll, J J; Landen, O L; Ma, T; Pak, A; Peterson, J L; Raman, K; Town, R P J; Bradley, D K

    2014-05-16

    First measurements of the in-flight shape of imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were obtained by using two-dimensional x-ray radiography. The sequence of area-backlit, time-gated pinhole images is analyzed for implosion velocity, low-mode shape and density asymmetries, and the absolute offset and center-of-mass velocity of the capsule shell. The in-flight shell is often observed to be asymmetric even when the concomitant core self-emission is round. A ∼ 15 μm shell asymmetry amplitude of the Y(40) spherical harmonic mode was observed for standard NIF ICF hohlraums at a shell radius of ∼ 200 μm (capsule at ∼ 5× radial compression). This asymmetry is mitigated by a ∼ 10% increase in the hohlraum length. PMID:24877944

  4. eHXI: A permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; et al

    2016-06-14

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (≥ 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. Lastly, eHXI provides valuable information onmore » hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.« less

  5. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-19

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  6. Kinetic Effects at Material Interfaces in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, S. C.; Cabot, W.; Whitley, H.; Greenough, J.; Cohen, B. I.; Belof, J.; Zimmerman, G.; Amendt, P. A.; Lepape, S.; Divol, L.; Dimits, A.; Graziani, F.; Molvig, K.; Dodd, E.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Laffite, S.; Larroche, O.; Casanova, M.; Masse, L.

    2014-10-01

    The mixing of materials at an interface during an ICF implosion, for example the DT- Carbon interface in an ICF capsule, is a complex process. In general, rad-hydro codes do an excellent job of modeling the important processes during an ICF implosion. However, there are certain times during the implosion when kinetic effects of the ions may play a role in how two materials mix across the interface between them, even in the absence of shocks moving through them. The Knudsen layer effect is one such example. We will describe results of multi-ion species hybrid LSP simulations where the ions are treated kinetically and the electrons are treated as a fluid. We observe that the DT and carbon ions diffuse across the interface in a self-similar manner, at a rate proportional to the square root of time, in agreement with diffusion theory. The resulting ion distributions for each species (on both sides of the interface) will be presented, and the result of this mixing on the yield will be discussed for ICF capsules. Preliminary results of a related mixing that occurs at the gas-hohlraum wall interface will also be presented. Performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNS, LLC.

  7. Nuclear-data needs for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Motz, H.T.

    1983-05-09

    Our survey was limited to ICF programs in the United States. It included researchers in laser and heavy ion fusion, target design, target diagnostics, and conceptual reactor design. We asked each of these people to read the current data needs for magnetic fusion energy and to comment on additional data that they require.

  8. Ushering in A New Era in Lasers: The National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2008-04-01

    The world's largest ultraviolet laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF), under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is scheduled to be complete by March 2009. NIF focuses on three main missions: support of stockpile stewardship to ensure a safe and reliable nuclear stockpile, demonstrating the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a clean source of energy, and enabling high-energy-density (HED) science to help understand the physical processes that drive the cosmos. These three missions share the need to study materials at extreme conditions: temperatures up to 108 K, densities approaching 1000 grams per cc, and pressures up to 10^10 megapascals. Moreover, in fusion events NIF will produce, for a short time, a neutron density up to 10^21 cm-3. These conditions occur only in the interiors of stars, during thermonuclear burn, and in supernova events. NIF's next set of experiments, to study the systematics of ICF, is scheduled to begin in 2008 with the goal of conducting a credible ignition experiment by 2010. NIF will also conduct a variety of basic science experiments that will include laser-plasma interactions; solids at extremely high pressure leading to information about planetary interiors; hydrodynamic instabilities; and nuclear astrophysics. By 2010, NIF will be managed as a national user facility to best exploit its scientific potential. Users of NIF will include researchers from the Department of Energy national laboratories, scientists from academia, and other national and international users. Nuckolls, Wood, and Thiessen proposed ICF half a century ago, within weeks of the first demonstration of a working laser. Successive generations of lasers were built with the goal of achieving self-sustaining nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory for more than half a century. With the completion of NIF that long-sought goal will be much closer to realization. The talk will focus on NIF technical capabilities and the

  9. Ignition system monitoring assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brushwood, John Samuel

    2003-11-04

    An ignition system monitoring assembly for use in a combustion engine is disclosed. The assembly includes an igniter having at least one positioning guide with at least one transmittal member being maintained in a preferred orientation by one of the positioning guides. The transmittal member is in optical communication with a corresponding target region, and optical information about the target region is conveyed to the reception member via the transmittal member. The device allows real-time observation of optical characteristics of the target region. The target region may be the spark gap between the igniter electrodes, or other predetermined locations in optical communication with the transmittal member. The reception member may send an output signal to a processing member which, in turn, may produce a response to the output signal.

  10. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  11. First Beryllium Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, John

    2015-11-01

    The first implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to confirm the superior ablation properties and to elucidate possible Be-ablator issues. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs have measured the laser energy backscatter, shock velocities, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable, if not better, for Be than for plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results demonstrate good coupling of laser energy to the target and control over the implosion shape indicating the feasibility of Be capsule design opening up a larger design space for ICF. In addition, this data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicates that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules.

  12. Time-resolved Measurements of ICF Capsule Ablator Properties by Streaked X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Damien

    2008-11-01

    Determining the capsule ablator thickness and peak laser or x-ray drive pressure required to optimize fuel compression is a critical part of ensuring ICF ignition on the NIF. If too little ablator is burned off, the implosion velocity will be too low for adequate final compression; if too much ablator is burned off, the fuel will be preheated or the shell will be broken up by growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, again compromising compression. Avoiding such failure modes requires having an accurate, in-flight measure of the implosion velocity, areal density, and remaining mass of the ablator near peak velocity. We present a new technique which achieves simultaneous time-resolved measurements of all these parameters in a single, area-backlit, x-ray streaked radiograph. This is accomplished by tomographic inversion of the radiograph to determine the radial density profile at each time step; scalar quantities such as the average position, areal density, and mass of the ablator can then be calculated by taking moments of this density profile. Details of the successful demonstration of this technique using backlit Cu-doped Be capsule implosions at the Omega facility will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in collaboration with Brian Spears, David Braun, Peter Celliers, Gilbert Collins, and Otto Landen at LLNL and Rick Olson at SNL.

  13. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  14. Measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in OMEGA ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R.; Grabowski, P.; Mancini, R.; Regan, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in plasmas relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The energy loss of DD-tritons, DD-protons, D3He-alphas and D3He-protons, which are ideal particles for validating approximations to the ion-electron collision operator, have been measured in D3He gas-filled filled implosions. These experiments are relevant to alpha-particle transport and heating in hot-sport ignition experiments. As the DD and D3He fusion products span a large range of velocities, these measurements represent the first detailed experimental study of charged-particle stopping, ranging from linear low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping. The results are contrasted to commonly used theories, including the Brown-Preston-Singleton and Li-Petrasso formalisms. The data is also used to rule out theories that neglect quantum diffraction and dynamic screening. This work was supported in part by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE and GA.

  15. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alfonso, Noel; Carlson, Lane C.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-08-09

    Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its heightmore » is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.« less

  16. Studies of ion species separation in ICF-relevant plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, Hans; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Ross, Steve; Park, Hye-Sook; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; Rosenberg, Michael; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig; Zylstra, Alex; Hoffman, Nelson; Kwan, Tom; Larroche, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas produced in high-energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments generally contain multiple ion species, which allows for multiple-ion species dynamics that are not simulated in typical single-ion fluid hydro codes. In implosions of D3He-gas filled thin-glass spheres on the OMEGA laser facility, comprehensive nuclear diagnostics were used to infer the composition of the fuel during nuclear production, demonstrating that the deuterium fraction was reduced during the implosion of the fuel. Hydrodynamic simulations including an ion diffusion model indicate that pressure, temperature, and potential gradients drive diffusive separation of the ion species, producing better agreement with the experiments than standard hydrodynamic codes. The results of fully kinetic (Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and PIC) simulations confirm the importance of multi-species dynamics to the evolution of these experiments. Implications for multi-species (DT) cryogenic implosions on the National Ignition Facility will be addressed. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  17. Progress towards the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for neutron imaging of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Grim, Gary; Wilde, Carl; Wilke, Mark; Wilson, Doug; Morgan, George; Tregillis, Ian; Clark, David; Finch, Joshua; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-01-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding or high neutron yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. These methods, once developed, must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuel so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. We are currently considering multiple analysis pathways for obtaining this source distribution of neutrons given a measured pinhole image with a scintillator and camera system. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations [E. Loomis et al. IFSA 2009]. We are currently striving to apply the technique to real data by applying a series of realistic effects that will be present for experimental images. These include various sources of noise, misalignment uncertainties at both the source and image planes, as well as scintillator and camera blurring. Some tests on the quality of image reconstructions have also been performed based on point resolution and Legendre mode improvement of recorded images. So far, the method has proven sufficient to overcome most of these experimental effects with continued devlopment.

  18. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    PubMed Central

    Weemaes, Corry MR; van Tol, Maarten JD; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M; van Eggermond, Marja CJA; Thijssen, Peter E; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Meyn, Stephan; Powell, Cynthia; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Shugar, Andrea; van den Elsen, Peter J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype–phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mutations in DNMT3B (ICF1), 13 patients had mutations in ZBTB24 (ICF2), whereas for 8 patients, the gene defect has not yet been identified (ICFX). While at first sight these patients share the same immunological, morphological and epigenetic hallmarks of the disease, systematic evaluation of all reported informative cases shows that: (1) the humoral immunodeficiency is generally more pronounced in ICF1 patients, (2) B- and T-cell compartments are both involved in ICF1 and ICF2, (3) ICF2 patients have a significantly higher incidence of intellectual disability and (4) congenital malformations can be observed in some ICF1 and ICF2 cases. It is expected that these observations on prevalence and clinical presentation will facilitate mutation-screening strategies and help in diagnostic counseling. PMID:23486536

  19. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects.

    PubMed

    Weemaes, Corry M R; van Tol, Maarten J D; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; Thijssen, Peter E; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Meyn, Stephan; Powell, Cynthia; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Shugar, Andrea; van den Elsen, Peter J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-11-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype-phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mutations in DNMT3B (ICF1), 13 patients had mutations in ZBTB24 (ICF2), whereas for 8 patients, the gene defect has not yet been identified (ICFX). While at first sight these patients share the same immunological, morphological and epigenetic hallmarks of the disease, systematic evaluation of all reported informative cases shows that: (1) the humoral immunodeficiency is generally more pronounced in ICF1 patients, (2) B- and T-cell compartments are both involved in ICF1 and ICF2, (3) ICF2 patients have a significantly higher incidence of intellectual disability and (4) congenital malformations can be observed in some ICF1 and ICF2 cases. It is expected that these observations on prevalence and clinical presentation will facilitate mutation-screening strategies and help in diagnostic counseling. PMID:23486536

  20. 42 CFR 442.117 - Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose deficiencies pose immediate jeopardy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose... ICFs/MR § 442.117 Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose deficiencies pose immediate jeopardy... no longer meets conditions of participation for ICFs/MR as specified in subpart I of part 483 of...

  1. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  2. Ignitability test method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Bailey, James W. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for testing ignitability of an initiator includes a body having a central cavity, an initiator holder for holding the initiator over the central cavity of the body, an ignition material holder disposed in the central cavity of the body and having a cavity facing the initiator holder which receives a measured quantity of ignition material to be ignited by the initiator. It contains a chamber in communication with the cavity of the ignition material and the central cavity of the body, and a measuring system for analyzing pressure characteristics generated by ignition of the ignition material by the initiator. The measuring system includes at least one transducer coupled with an oscillograph for recording pressure traces generated by ignition.

  3. The Automotive Ignition Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darnell, T H

    1932-01-01

    This report gives the results of a series of measurements on the secondary voltage induced in an ignition coil of typical construction under a variety of operating conditions. These results show that the theoretical predictions hitherto made as to the behavior of this type of apparatus are in satisfactory agreement with the observed facts. The large mass of data obtained is here published both for the use of other investigators who may wish to compare them with other theoretical predictions and for the use of automotive engineers who will here find definite experimental results showing the effect of secondary capacity and resistance on the crest voltage produced by ignition apparatus.

  4. Next Generation Gamma Ray Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Hernandez, J. E.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Moy, K.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.

    Fusion reaction history and ablator areal density measurements based on gamma ray detection are an essential part of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Capability improvements are being implemented in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m). The ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will provide 200x more sensitivity, reduce the effective temporal resolution from 100 to 10 ps, and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) - a Compton spectrometer intended to provide true gamma energy resolution (<=5%) for isolation of specific lines such as t(d, γ) , D(n, γ) , 12C(n,n' γ) and energetic charged particle nuclear reactions indicative of ablator/fuel mix

  5. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  6. The National Ignition Facility Wavefront Requirements and Optical Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W; Whitman, P A; Henesian, M

    2004-01-05

    With the first four of its eventual 192 beams now executing shots, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is already the world's largest and most energetic laser. The optical system performance requirements that are in place for NIF are derived from the goals of the missions it is designed to serve. These missions include inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and the study of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. These mission requirements have led to a design strategy for achieving high quality focusable energy and power from the laser and to specifications on optics that are important for an ICF laser. The design of NIF utilizes a multipass architecture with a single large amplifier type that provides high gain, high extraction efficiency and high packing density. We have taken a systems engineering approach to the practical implementation of this design that specifies the wavefront parameters of individual optics in order to achieve the desired cumulative performance of the laser beamline. This presentation provides a detailed look at the causes and effects of performance degradation in large laser systems and how NIF has been designed to overcome these effects. We will also present results of spot size performance measurements that have validated many of the early design decisions that have been incorporated in the NIF laser architecture.

  7. The National Ignition Facility Wavefront Requirements and Optical Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W H; Whitman, P K; Henesian, M A; Stowers, I F; Honig, J

    2004-06-03

    With the first four of its eventual 192 beams now executing shots and generating more than 100 kilojoules of laser energy at its primary wavelength of 1.06 {micro}m, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is already the world's largest and most energetic laser. The optical system performance requirements that are in place for NIF are derived from the goals of the missions it is designed to serve. These missions include inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and the study of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. These mission requirements have led to a design strategy for achieving high quality focusable energy and power from the laser and to specifications on optics that are important for an ICF laser. The design of NIF utilizes a multipass architecture with a single large amplifier type that provides high gain, high extraction efficiency and high packing density. We have taken a systems engineering approach to the practical implementation of this design that specifies the wavefront parameters of individual optics in order to achieve the desired cumulative performance of the laser beamline. This presentation provides a detailed look at the causes and effects of performance degradation in large laser systems and how NIF has been designed to overcome these effects. We will also present results of spot size performance measurements that have validated many of the early design decisions that have been incorporated in the NIF laser architecture.

  8. Measurements of laser-plasma instability relevant to ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Bauer, B.S.; Cobble, J.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Kyrala, G.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Watt, R.G.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Wood, W.M.; Failor, B.H.; Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1997-05-01

    The potential for laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce x-rays for imploding a fusion capsule symmetrically. The speckled nature of laser beams used in ICF is an important factor in laser-plasma instability processes. For example, models which calculate the spatial growth of convective instability by properly accounting for the laser speckles successfully predict the observed onsets of backscattering due to stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering instabilities (SBS and SRS). Assuming pump depletion as the only saturation mechanism in these models results in very large predicted levels of SBS and SRS backscattering from the long-scale plasmas expected in ignition hohlraums. However, in the long-scale plasmas studied in the Nova and Trident lasers [E. M. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 57}, 2101 (1986) and N. K. Moncur {ital et al.}, Appl. Opt. {bold 34}, 4274 (1995)], SRS and SBS are observed to saturate much below the levels expected from pump depletion. While the mechanism of SBS saturation is not understood at present, the observations of SRS saturation are qualitatively understood. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Diagnosing implosions at the national ignition facility with X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.; Peterson, K. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Springer, P.; Town, R. P. J.

    2012-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to diagnose plasma conditions in the hot spot and the compressed shell of ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Ignition of an ICF target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. The concentric spherical layers of current NIF ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume. A fraction of the ablator has a Ge dopant to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive. This paper concentrates on three spectral features of the implosion: Ge Heα emission, Ge Kα emission, and the Ge K edge. Hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by highmode (50 < ℓ < 200) ablator-surface perturbations on ignition-scale targets can cause mixing of Ge-doped ablator into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The amount of hot-spot mix mass is estimated from the brightness and spectral line shape of the Ge Heα and satellite emission using a detailed atomic physics code. X-ray continuum from the hot spot is attenuated by the compressed shell, and the photoexcitation causes the shell to fluoresce in Ge Kα emission. The contrast at the Ge K edge and the brightness of Ge Kα emission are used to diagnose the shell areal density. The highlighted spectral features are presented.

  10. On thermonuclear ignition criterion at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-10-15

    Sustained thermonuclear fusion at the National Ignition Facility remains elusive. Although recent experiments approached or exceeded the anticipated ignition thresholds, the nuclear performance of the laser-driven capsules was well below predictions in terms of energy and neutron production. Such discrepancies between expectations and reality motivate a reassessment of the physics of ignition. We have developed a predictive analytical model from fundamental physics principles. Based on the model, we obtained a general thermonuclear ignition criterion in terms of the areal density and temperature of the hot fuel. This newly derived ignition threshold and its alternative forms explicitly show the minimum requirements of the hot fuel pressure, mass, areal density, and burn fraction for achieving ignition. Comparison of our criterion with existing theories, simulations, and the experimental data shows that our ignition threshold is more stringent than those in the existing literature and that our results are consistent with the experiments.

  11. Ignition timing control

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.E.; Bedross, G.M.

    1993-05-25

    An engine ignition control system for controlling the timing of the spark for initiating burning in the combustion chamber of a four stroke cycle, single cylinder, internal combustion engine is described; said engine having a cylinder, a piston in said cylinder, a crankshaft connected to said piston, said piston being adapted to reciprocate between a top dead center position and a bottom dead center position; a speed sensor means for developing periodic sensor voltage timing pulses, the cycle time between timing pulses being an indication of engine crankshaft speed; means for developing ignition timing pulses, each timing pulse having a leading edge corresponding to a voltage change in a timing voltage pulse and a trailing edge corresponding to an opposite voltage change in a timing voltage pulse; means for developing a spark voltage including an ignition coil and a source of ignition coil current, said spark voltage occurring at a coil primary current interrupt point; means for measuring in real-time, cycle time and a timing pulse time for one engine cycle; and means for computing an optimum delay time from the leading edge of a timing pulse for said one cycle to said interrupt point whereby combustion is initiated at a time in advance of the top dead center position.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory:. The National Ignition Facility, Inertial Fusion Energy, 100-1000 TW Lasers, and the Fast Igniter Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard Lowdermilk, W.

    The ultimate goal of worldwide research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to develop fusion as an inexhaustible, economic, environmentally safe source of electric power. Following nearly thirty years of laboratory and underground fusion experiments, the next step toward this goal is to demonstrate ignition and propagating burn of fusion fuel in the laboratory. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for just this purpose. NIF will use advanced Nd-glass laser technology to deliver 1.8 MJ of 0.35 μm laser light in a shaped pulse, several nanoseconds in duration, achieving a peak power of 500 TW. A national community of U.S. laboratories is participating in this project, now in its final design phase. France and the United Kingdom are collaborating on development of required technology under bilateral agreements with the US. This paper presents key aspects of the laser design, and descriptions of principal laser and optical components. Follow-on development of lasers to meet the demands of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant is reviewed. In parallel with the NIF Project and IFE developments, work is proceeding on ultrashort pulse lasers with peak power in the range of 100-1000 TW. A beamline on the Nova laser at LLNL recently delivered nearly 600 J of 1 μm light in a 0.5 ps duration pulse, for a peak power in excess of a petawatt (1015 W). This beamline, with advanced adaptive optics, will be capable of focused intensities in excess of 1021 W/cm2. Its primary purpose will be to test technological and scientific aspects of an alternate ignition concept, called the "Fast Igniter", that has the potential to produce higher fusion gain than conventional ICF.

  13. Simulations of laser imprint for Nova experiments and for ignition capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.E.; Wolfrum, E.; Verdon, C.P.; Knauer, J.P.

    1996-11-08

    In direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called imprint. These non nonuniformities grow during the capsule implosion and, if initially large enough, can penetrate the capsule shell, impede ignition, or degrade burn. Imprint has been simulated for recent experiments performed on the Nova laser at LLNL examining a variety of beam smoothing conditions. Most used laser intensities similar to the early part of an ignition capsule pulse shape, I=10X13 W/cm3. The simulations matched most of the measurements of imprint modulation. The effect of imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules has also been simulated. Imprint is predicted to give modulation comparable to an intrinsic surface finish of 10 nm RMS. Modulation growth was examined using the Haan model, with linear growth as a function of spherical harmonic mode number obtained from an analytic dispersion relation. Ablation front amplitudes are predicted to become substantially nonlinear, so that saturation corrections are large. Direct numerical simulations of two- dimensional multimode growth were also performed. The capsule shell is predicted to remain intact, which gives a basis for believing that ignition can be achieved.

  14. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, L J

    2007-09-07

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10{sup 8} K), pressures (10 GBar) and matter densities (>100 g/cm{sup 3}). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. The targets for the NIC are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. The DT fuel is contained in a 2-millimeter diameter graded copper/beryllium or CH shell. The 75mm thick cryogenic ice DT fuel layer is formed to sub-micron uniformity at a temperature of approximately 18 Kelvin. The capsule and its fuel layer sit at the center of a gold/depleted uranium 'cocktail' hohlraum. Researchers at LLNL have teamed with colleagues at General Atomics to lead the development of the technologies, engineering design and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to produce these demanding targets. We are also collaborating with colleagues at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester in DT layering, and at Fraunhofer in Germany in nano-crystalline diamond as an alternate ablator to Beryllium and CH. The Beryllium capsules and cocktail hohlraums are made by physical vapor deposition onto sacrificial mandrels. These coatings must have high density (low porosity), uniform microstructure, low oxygen content and low permeability

  15. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>108 K), pressures (10 GBar) and matter densities (>100 g/cm3). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. The targets for the NIC are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. The DT fuel is contained in a 2-millimeter-diameter graded copper/beryllium or CH shell. The 75-μm-thick cryogenic ice DT fuel layer is formed to sub-micron uniformity at a temperature of approximately 18 Kelvin. The capsule and its fuel layer sit at the center of a gold/depleted uranium 'cocktail' hohlraum. Researchers at LLNL have teamed with colleagues at General Atomics to lead the development of the technologies, engineering design and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to produce these demanding targets. We are also collaborating with colleagues at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester in DT layering, and at Fraunhofer in Germany in nano-crystalline diamond as an alternate ablator to Beryllium and CH. The Beryllium capsules and cocktail hohlraums are made by physical vapor deposition onto sacrificial mandrels. These coatings must have high density (low porosity), uniform microstructure, low oxygen content and low permeability. The ablator

  16. WHO's ICF and Functional Status Information in Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Üstün, T. Bedirhan; Chatterji, Somnath; Kostansjek, Nenad; Bickenbach, Jerome

    2003-01-01

    A common framework for describing functional status information (FSI) in health records is needed in order to make this information comparable and of value. The World Health Organization's (WHO's) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which has been approved by all its member States, provides this common language and framework. The biopsychosocial model of functioning and disability embodied in the ICF goes beyond disease and conceptualizes functioning from the individual's body, person, and lived experience vantage points, thereby allowing for planning interventions targeted at the individual's body, the individual as a whole or toward the environment. This framework then permits the evaluation of both the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of these different interventions in devising programs at the personal or societal level. PMID:12894636

  17. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  18. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-10-14

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems for ICF targets are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel. The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system, or by an ion beam system, that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion. 3 figs.

  19. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, James W.

    1988-08-02

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  20. Microwave Spectra, Molecular Structures and Internal Dynamics of H2S...ICF3 and H2O...ICF3 Revealed by Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Stephens, S. L.; Legon, A. C.

    2012-06-01

    The rotational spectra of three isotopologues of H2S...ICF3 and four isotopologues of H2O...ICF3 have been measured between 7 and 18.5 GHz by chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The rotational constant, B0, the centrifugal distortion constants, DJ and DJK, and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant of 127I, χaa(I), are precisely determined for H2S...ICF3 and H2O...ICF3 by fitting observed transitions to the Hamiltonians appropriate to symmetric tops. The measured rotational constants allow determination of the molecular geometries. The C2 axis of H2O / H2S intersects the C3 axis of the CF3I sub-unit at the oxygen atom. The r0 lengths of halogen bonds identified between iodine and sulphur, r{(S...I)}, and iodine and oxygen, r(O...I), are determined to be 3.5589(2) A and 3.0517(18) A respectively. The angle, φ, between the local C2 axis of the H2S / H2O sub-unit and the C3 axis of CF3I is found to be 93.7(2)° in H2S...ICF3 and 34.4(20)° in H2O...ICF3. The observed symmetric top spectra imply nearly free internal precession of the C2 axis of the hydrogen sulphide/water unit about the C3 axis of CF3I in each of these complexes. Additional transitions of H216O...ICF3, D216O...ICF3 and H218O...ICF3 can only be assigned using Hamiltonians appropriate to asymmetric tops, suggesting that the effective rigid-rotor fits employed do not completely represent the internal dynamics of H2O...ICF3.

  1. Burner ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  2. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  3. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Merrill, F. E.; Warrick, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2014-02-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (˜100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics.

  4. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Izumi, N; Ma, T; Merrill, F E; Warrick, A L; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C

    2014-02-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics. PMID:24593362

  5. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Warrick, A. L.

    2014-02-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics.

  6. 42 CFR 442.109 - Certification period for ICFs/MR: General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED Certification of ICFs/MR §...

  7. Characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets using PIXE, RBS, and STIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Xue; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yiyang; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Min; Shen, Hao

    2013-08-01

    Quality control of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target in the laser fusion program is vital to ensure that energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The technique of nuclear microscopy with ion beam analysis is a powerful method to provide characterization of ICF targets. Distribution of elements, depth profile, and density image of ICF targets can be identified by particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and scanning transmission ion microscopy. We present examples of ICF target characterization by nuclear microscopy at Fudan University in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes. PMID:23702102

  8. Ignition dynamics of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.N.; Son, S.F.; Sander, R.K.; Asay, B.W.; Brewster, M.Q.

    1999-04-01

    The laser ignition of the explosives HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine, C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8}), {delta}-phase HMX, PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% Estane, 2.5% BDNPA/BDNPF), TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}), and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and aged PBX 9502 has been conducted with the intent to compare the relative sensitivities of those explosives and to investigate the effect of beam profile, binder addition, and porosity. It has been found that there was little difference between a gaussian beam and a top hat profile on the laser ignition of HMX. The authors observe that the addition of binder in the amounts present in PBX 9501 resulted in longer ignition delays than that of HMX. In contrast to HMX, the addition of binder to TATB in PBX 9502 shows no measurable effect. Porosity effects were considered by comparing the ignition of granular HMX and pressed HMX pellets. Porosity appears to increase ignition delay due to an increased effective absorption scale and increased convective heat loss. This porosity effect also resulted in longer ignition delays for {delta}-phase HMX than for {beta}-phase HMX. In order to simulate ignition in voids or cracks, the standard ignition experiment was modified to include a NaCl window placed at variable distances above the sample surface. When ignition experiments were performed at 29 W/cm{sup 2} and 38 W/cm{sup 2} a critical gap distance was observed of 6 {+-} 0.4 mm below which ignition was severely inhibited. This result underscores the importance of gas phase processes in ignition and illustrates that conditions can exist where simple ignition criteria such as surface temperature is inadequate.

  9. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Mediating effects of the ICF domain of function and the gross motor function measure on the ICF domains of activity, and participation in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung-Hee; Kim, Yu-Mi; Jeong, Goo-Churl

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the mediating effect of gross motor function, measured using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and of general function, measured using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Child and Youth Check List (ICF-CY), on the ICF domains of activity and participation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects] Ninety-five children with CP, from Seoul, Korea, participated in the study. [Methods] The GMFM was administered in its entirety to patients without orthoses or mobility aids. The ICF-CY was used to evaluate the degree of disability and health of subjects. [Results] GMFM score and ICF-CY function were negatively correlated to ICF-CY activity and participation. ICF-CY partially mediated the effects of the GMFM on activity and participation. [Conclusion] When establishing a treatment plan for a child with CP, limitations in activity and participation, as described by the ICF-CY, should be considered in addition to the child’s physical abilities and development. In addition, the treatment plan should focus on increasing the child’s activity and participation level, as well as his/her physical level. PMID:26644643