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Sample records for icf program overview

  1. 1996 ICF program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    1996-09-30

    The continuing objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Program. The extension of current program research capabilities in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is necessary for the ICF Program to satisfy its stewardship responsibilities. ICF resources (people and facilities) are increasingly being redirected in support of the performance, schedule, and cost goals of the NIF. One of the more important aspects of ICF research is the national nature of the program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) ICF Program falls within DOE's national ICF Program, which includes the Nova and Beamlet laser facilities at LLNL and the OMEGA, Nike, and Trident laser facilities at the University of Rochester (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR/LLE), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), respectively. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA) and Saturn pulsed-power facilities are at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). General Atomics, Inc. (GA) develops and provides many of the targets for the above experimental facilities. LLNL's ICF Program supports activities in two major interrelated areas: (1) target physics and technology (experimental, theoretical, and computational research); and (2) laser science and optics technology development. Experiments on LLNL's Nova laser primarily support ignition and weapons physics research. Experiments on LLNL's Beamlet laser support laser science and optics technology development. In addition, ICF sciences and technologies, developed as part of the DP mission goals, continue to support additional DOE objectives. These objectives are (1) to achieve diversity in energy sources

  2. LANL HED Programs Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk Adler

    2015-04-23

    The Powerpoint presentation provides an overview of High-Energy Density (HED) Physis, ICF and Burning Plasma research programs at Los Alamos National Lab. in New Mexico. Work in nuclear diagnostics is also presented, along with a summary of collaborations and upcoming projects.

  3. Progress in the CAEP ICF Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hansheng

    1997-04-01

    The ICF Program in China has made significant progress with multilabs' efforts in the past years. The eight-beam SG-II laser facility, upgraded from the two-beam SG-I facility, is nearly completed for 1.05 μm light output and is about to be operated for experiments. Some benchmark experiments have been conducted for disk targets. Advanced diagnostic techniques, such as an x-ray microscope with a 7-μm spatial resolution and x-ray framing cameras with a temporal resolution better than 65ps, have been developed. Lower energy pumping with prepulse technique for Ne-like Ti laser at 32.6nm has succeeded and shadowgraphy of a fine mesh has been demonstrated with the Ti laser beam. A national project, SG-III laser facility, has been proposed to produce 60 kJ blue light for target physics experiments and is being conceptually designed. New laser technology, including maltipass amplification, large aperture plasma electrode switches and laser glass with fewer platinum grains have been developed to meet the requirements of the SG-III Project. The Technical Integration Line (TIL) as a scientific prototype beamlet of SG-III will be first built in the next few years.

  4. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-05

    Overview of the Vehicle Technologies Program including external assessment and market view; internal assessment, program history and progress; program justification and federal role; program vision, mission, approach, strategic goals, outputs, and outcomes; and performance goals.

  6. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  7. Overview of the solid state laser projects for ICF applications at CAEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hansheng; Zhang, Xiao Min; Wei, XiaoFeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Jing, Feng; Sui, Zhan; Yuan, Xiaodong

    1998-12-01

    The ICF Programs in China have made significant progress in solid state laser technology development and advanced laser facility designing with multilabs' efforts in the past years. The eight-beam SG-II laser facility is expected to complete for a 4.8-kJ output at 1.05 micrometers and to operate for target experiments in a few months. A national project, SG-II laser facility, has been proposed to produce 60-kJ blue light for target physics experiments and is being conceptually designed. New laser technologies, including multipass amplification, large aperture plasma electrode switches, fast growth of KDP, laser glass with fewer platinum grains, long flash lamps and precision manufacturing of large optical components are being developed to meet the requirements of the SG-III Project. In addition, numerical simulations are being conducted for the optical design of the new facility. The Technical Integration Line of 4 by 2 segmented array as a prototype module of SG-II with a chamber for laser beams measurements will be first built in the next few years.

  8. NREL biofuels program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Mielenz, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    The NREL Biofuels Program has been developing technology for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels with support from DOE Office of Transportation Technologies Biofuels System Program. This support has gone to both the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and over 100 subcontractors in universities and industry. This overview will outline the value of the Biofuels development program to the Nation, the current status of the technology development, and what research areas still need further support and progress for the development of a biofuels industry in the US.

  9. Progress in development of low density polymer foams for the ICF Program

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Lucht, L.M.; Morgan, R.J.; Cook, R.C.; Tillotson, T.M.; Mercer, M.B.; Miller, D.E.

    1985-06-10

    This report describes the status of CH foam development with densities of 50 mg/ccs and cell sizes of 1 ..mu..m for the ICF Program. Two approaches that both involve polymer phase separation are being investigated. The first involves a gelation-crystallization of high molecular weight polyethylene from solution, whereas the second approach involves the modification of the phase separation morphology of water-styrene emulsions by molecularly-tailored surfactants followed by polymerization of the continuous styrene phase.

  10. Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterle, S.E.

    1996-09-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 Inftastructure Program Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition.

  11. AMPED Program Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-04-02

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  12. AMPED Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-03-04

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  13. Identification of relevant ICF categories for indication, intervention planning and evaluation of health resort programs: a Delphi exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, E.; Weigl, M.; Schuh, A.; Stucki, G.

    2006-01-01

    Health resort programs have a long tradition, mainly in European countries and Japan. They rely on local resources and the physical environment, physical medicine interventions and traditional medicine to optimise functioning and health. Arguably because of the long tradition, there is only a limited number of high-quality studies that examine the effectiveness of health resort programs. Specific challenges to the evaluation of health resort programs are to randomise the holistic approach with a varying number of specific interventions but also the reliance on the effect of the physical environment. Reference standards for the planning and reporting of health resort studies would be highly beneficial. With the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF), we now have such a standard that allows us to describe body functions and structures, activities and participation and interaction with environmental factors. A major challenge when applying the ICF in practice is its length. Therefore, the objective of this project was to identify the ICF categories most relevant for health resort programs. We conducted a consensus-building, three-round, e-mail survey using the Delphi technique. Based on the consensus of the experts, it was possible to come up with an ICF Core Set that can serve as reference standards for the indication, intervention planning and evaluation of health resort programs. This preliminary ICF Core Set should be tested in different regions and in subsets of health resort visitors with varying conditions.

  14. An Overview of Raster Scanning for ICF-Class Laser Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Runkel, M J; Nostrand, M

    2002-10-30

    Recent work has shown that the damage resistance of both ICF-class (1600 cm') DKDP tripler crystals and SiO{sub 2} components (lenses, gratings and debris shields) benefits from laser raster scanning using pulsed lasers in the 350 nm range. For laser raster scanning to be a viable optical improvement tool for these large optics, damage improvement must be optimized while maintaining scan times of less than 8 hours/optic. In this paper we examine raster scanning with small beams from tabletop laser systems. We show that 120 Watts of average power is required for a tabletop scanning system at one optic/day. Next, we develop equations for total scan time for square and round top hat beams and round and rectangular Gaussian beams. We also consider the effect of packing geometry (square vs. hexagonal), examine the deviations from uniform coverage with each scan geometry and show that hexagonal packing yields lower scan times but is less efficient in coverage than square geometry. We also show that multiple passes at low packing densities are temporally equivalent to a single pass with higher packing density, and discuss the advantages of each method. In addition, we show that the differences between hexagonal and square scan geometries are negated when pointing errors and fluence fluctuations from the laser are considered.

  15. State School Facility Programs Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of General Services, Sacramento. Office of Public School Construction.

    This overview examines California's various State Allocation Board's funding programs for the construction, modernization, and maintenance of local school facilities. Funding information is provided for each program as are explanations of the school facility program construction process and the lease purchase program. The organizational chart for…

  16. Target Diagnostic Technology Research & Development for the LLNL ICF and HED Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, P; Landen, O; Weber, F; Lowry, M; Bennett, C; Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Holder, J; Lerche, R; Griffith, R; Park, H; Boni, R; Jaanimagi, P; Davies, T

    2004-04-13

    The National Ignition Facility is operational at LLNL. The ICF and HED programs at LLNL have formed diagnostic research and development groups to institute improvements outside the charter of core diagnostics. We will present data from instrumentation being developed. A major portion of our work is improvements to detectors and readout systems. We have efforts related to CCD device development. Work has been done in collaboration with the University of Arizona to back thin a large format CCD device. We have developed in collaboration with a commercial vendor a large format, compact CCD system. We have coupled large format CCD systems to our optical and x-ray streak cameras leading to improvements in resolution and dynamic range. We will discuss gate-width and uniformity improvements to MCP-based framing cameras. We will present data from single shot data link work and discuss technology aimed at improvements of dynamic range for high-speed transient measurements from remote locations.

  17. Thermionic reactor program - An overview.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, D. S.; Lynch, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the AEC/NASA thermionic reactor program is presented with emphasis on the latest progress in this technology. The possible applications for utilization of thermionic reactors are reviewed and the joint AEC/NASA program approach to demonstrate thermionic technology is outlined. The thermionic reactor technology programs of France, West Germany, and the Soviet Union are highlighted.

  18. The LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Program: Progress toward ignition in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bernat, T.P.; Bibeau, C.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Campbell, J.H.; Coleman, L.W.; Cook, R.C.; Correll, D.L.; Darrow, C.B.; Davis, J.I.; Drake, R.P.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Ellis, R.J.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Haendler, B.L.; Hatcher, C.W.; Hatchett, S.P.; Hermes, G.L.; Hunt, J.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Kruer, W.L.; Kyrazis, D.T.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann

    1990-10-02

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made substantial progress in target physics, target diagnostics, and laser science and technology. In each area, progress required the development of experimental techniques and computational modeling. The objectives of the target physics experiments in the Nova laser facility are to address and understand critical physics issues that determine the conditions required to achieve ignition and gain in an ICF capsule. The LLNL experimental program primarily addresses indirect-drive implosions, in which the capsule is driven by x rays produced by the interaction of the laser light with a high-Z plasma. Experiments address both the physics of generating the radiation environment in a laser-driven hohlraum and the physics associated with imploding ICF capsules to ignition and high-gain conditions in the absence of alpha deposition. Recent experiments and modeling have established much of the physics necessary to validate the basic concept of ignition and ICF target gain in the laboratory. The rapid progress made in the past several years, and in particular, recent results showing higher radiation drive temperatures and implosion velocities than previously obtained and assumed for high-gain target designs, has led LLNL to propose an upgrade of the Nova laser to 1.5 to 2 MJ (at 0.35 {mu}m) to demonstrate ignition and energy gains of 10 to 20 -- the Nova Upgrade.

  19. ICF Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    1998-06-01

    The continuing objective of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory and to support the nuclear weapons program in its use of ICF facilities. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). The mission of the US Inertial Fusion Program is twofold: (1) to address high-energy-density physics issues for the SSP and (2) to develop a laboratory microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. In pursuit of this mission, the ICF Program has developed a state-of-the-art capability to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory. The near-term goals pursued by the ICF Program in support of its mission are demonstrating fusion ignition in the laboratory and expanding the Program's capabilities in high-energy-density science. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is a cornerstone of this effort.

  20. Biomass Program Overview Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    This presentation is an interactive walk through of the Program's vision of advancing the biofuels and bioproducts industry and highlights the research and development activities that will help achieve it.

  1. Psychological screening program overview.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathleen M; Huffman, Ann H; Adler, Amy B; Castro, Carl A

    2002-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on health surveillance conducted during military deployments, focusing on models for assessing the impact of operational deployments on peacekeepers. A discussion of the stressors and potential mental health consequences of peacekeeping operations follows with relevant examples of findings from U.S. and international military forces. Psychological screening in different peacekeeping operations conducted in U.S. Army-Europe is reviewed. The review begins with the redeployment screening of military personnel deployed to Bosnia mandated under the Joint Medical Surveillance Program, and continues through the present screening of units deployed to Kosovo. The detailed description of the screening program includes a discussion of procedures and measures and demonstrates the evolution of the program. A summary of key findings from the screening program and a discussion of future research directions are provided. PMID:12392255

  2. 2007 Biomass Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Biomass Program is actively working with public and private partners to meet production and technology needs. With the corn ethanol market growing steadily, researchers are unlocking the potential of non-food biomass sources, such as switchgrass and forest and agricultural residues. In this way, the Program is helping to ensure that cost-effective technologies will be ready to support production goals for advanced biofuels.

  3. Advanced studies program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlf, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in view graph form and include the following: (1) Space Station Engineering; (2) level 1 engineering organization; (3) advanced studies program organization; (4) NASA Center support areas; (5) work breakdown; (6) Space Station Freedom (SSF) Program Phases; (7) distributed systems evolution; (8) Space Shuttle ET mating analogy to on-orbit tank mating; (9) reference growth concept; (10) technology assessment process; (11) SSF technology priorities; (12) accomplishments; and (13) near term direction.

  4. Robotics development programs overview

    SciTech Connect

    Heckendorn, F.M.

    1990-11-01

    This paper discusses the applications of robotics at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) continues to provide support to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many areas of Robotics and Remote Vision. An overview of the current and near term future developments are presented. The driving forces for Robotics and Vision developments at SRS include the classic reasons for industrial robotics installation (i.e. repetitive and undesirable jobs) and those reasons related to radioactive environments. Protection of personnel from both radiation and radioactive contamination benefit greatly from both Robotics and Telerobotics. Additionally, the quality of information available from remote locations benefits greatly from the ability to visually monitor and remotely sense. The systems discussed include a glovebox waste handling and bagout robot, a shielded cells robot for radioactive waste sample transfer, waste handling gantry robots, a two armed master/slave manipulator as an attachment to a gantry robot, navigation robot research/testing, demonstration of the mobile underwater remote cleaning and inspection device, a camera deployment robot to support remote crane operations and for deployment of radiation sensors directly over a hazardous site, and demonstration of a large mobile robot for high radiation environments. Development of specialized and limited life vision/viewing systems for hazardous environments is also discussed.

  5. Skylab medical program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The following major medical subsystems in Skylab are outlined: (1) operational equipment; (2) life science experiments; (3) medical operations; and (4) operational experience. Throughout the Skylab flight program, alterations in equipment and procedures were made for each succeeding mission to capitalize on the flight experience of the previous mission.

  6. Better Plants Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is a voluntary partnership initiative to drive significant energy efficiency improvement across energy intensive companies and organizations. 157 leading manufacturers and public water and wastewater treatment utilities are partnering with DOE through Better Plants to improve energy efficiency, slash carbon emissions, and cut energy costs.

  7. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  8. Mars base technology program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Chneg-Chih; Hayati, Samad A.; Udomkesmalee, Suraphol

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of the current technology portfolio for Mars Base Technology Program. Brief descriptions of the awarded technologies and the high-priority areas in both NRAs are provided to show the current focus of MTP. We also present the approach that MTP uses to evaluate technology maturity for each of the technology tasks.

  9. NASA Launch Services Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has need to procure a variety of launch vehicles and services for its unmanned spacecraft. The Launch Services Program (LSP) provides the Agency with a single focus for the acquisition and management of Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launch services. This presentation will provide an overview of the LSP and its organization, approach, and activities.

  10. COSAM program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The COSAM program for reduction of the use of strategic alloying elements in nickel-based superalloys for gas turbine engines was reviewed. Sources, consumption, and pricing of cobalt, tantalum, columbium, and chromium are surveyed. Research projects in strategic element substitution, advanced processing concepts, and the development of alternate materials (intermetallics and iron-base alloys) are listed and research plans for FY 1983 and FY 1984 summarized.

  11. Geothermal Energy Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  12. Geothermal energy program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained within the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost-effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy - the heat of the Earth - is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40 percent of the total U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma (the four types of geothermal energy), still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  13. ERC Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.; Farooque, M.; Carlson, G.; Patel, P.; Yuh, C.; Bentley, C.; Glenn, D.; Kush, A.

    1996-08-01

    The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective, environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. ERC has been engaged in the development of this unique technology since the late 1970s, primarily focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology [1-6] pioneered by ERC. The DFC design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach provides upgrading of waste heat to chemical energy; thereby, it contributing to higher overall efficiency for conversion of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, ERC has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR) - Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. ERC plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, initially focusing on the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged MW-scale DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale by the end of the decade. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, industrial cogeneration, and uninterrupted power for military bases. After gaining experience from the early MW-scale power plants, and with maturing of the technology, ERC expects to introduce larger power plants operating on natural gas and/or coal gas or other fuels in the beginning of the 21st century. ERC has completed a technology program for product design verification, a predecessor of the current program, where the power plant design as well as the technology development were carried out to support a full-size field demonstration. These activities culminated in 130 kW stack tests in ERC

  14. An ICF-Based Model for Implementing and Standardizing Multidisciplinary Obesity Rehabilitation Programs within the Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Brunani, Amelia; Raggi, Alberto; Sirtori, Anna; Berselli, Maria Elisa; Villa, Valentina; Ceriani, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Leonardi, Matilde; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction/Objective: In this study, we aimed to design an ICF-based individual rehabilitation project for obese patients with comorbidities (IRPOb) integrated into the Rehab-CYCLE to standardize rehabilitative programs. This might facilitate the different health professionals involved in the continuum of care of obese patients to standardize rehabilitation interventions. Methods: After training on the ICF and based on the relevant studies, ICF categories were identified in a formal consensus process by our multidisciplinary team. Thereafter, we defined an individual rehabilitation project based on a structured multi-disciplinary approach to obesity. Results: the proposed IRPOb model identified the specific intervention areas (nutritional, physiotherapy, psychology, nursing), the short-term goals, the intervention modalities, the professionals involved and the assessment of the outcomes. Information was shared with the patient who signed informed consent. Conclusions: The model proposed provides the following advantages: (1) standardizes rehabilitative procedures; (2) facilitates the flow of congruent and updated information from the hospital to outpatient facilities, relatives, and care givers; (3) addresses organizational issues; (4) might serve as a benchmark for professionals who have limited specific expertise in rehabilitation of comorbid obese patients. PMID:26035658

  15. Motor training programs of arm and hand in patients with MS according to different levels of the ICF: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The upper extremity plays an important role in daily functioning of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and strongly influences their quality of life. However, an explicit overview of arm-hand training programs is lacking. The present review aims to investigate the training components and the outcome of motor training programs for arm and hand in MS. Methods A computerized systematic literature search in 5 databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro and Cochrane) was performed using the following Mesh terms: Multiple Sclerosis, Rehabilitation, Physical Education and Training, Exercise, Patient-Centered Care, Upper Extremity, Activities of Daily Living, Motor Skills, Motor Activity, Intervention Studies and Clinical Trial. The methodological quality of the selected articles was scored with the Van Tulder Checklist. A descriptive analyses was performed using the PICO principle, including scoring of training components with the calculation of Hedges’g effect sizes. Results Eleven studies were eligible (mean Van Tulder-score = 10.82(SD2.96)). Most studies reported a specific improvement in arm hand performance at the ICF level that was trained at. The mean number of training components was 5.5(SD2.8) and a significant correlation (r = 0.67; p < 0.05) between the number of training components and effect sizes was found. The components ‘client-centered’ and ‘functional movement’ were most frequently used, whereas ‘distribution based practice’, ‘feedback’ and ‘random practice’ were never used. The component ‘exercise progression’ was only used in studies with single ICF body function training, with the exception of 1 study with activity level training. Studies including the component ‘client-centred’ demonstrated moderate to high effect sizes. Conclusion Motor training programs (both at the ICF body function and activity level) have shown to improve arm and hand performance in MS in which the value of the training

  16. Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is the general administrative plan implemented by the Hanford Site contractor, ICF Kaiser Hanford Company. It describes the mission, administrative structure, projected staffing, to be provided by the contractor. The report breaks out the work responsibilities within the different units of the company, a baseline schedule for the different groups, and a cost summary for the different operating units.

  17. Commercial Crew Development Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program is designed to stimulate efforts within the private sector that will aid in the development and demonstration of safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation capabilities. With the goal of delivery cargo and eventually crew to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) the program is designed to foster the development of new spacecraft and launch vehicles in the commercial sector. Through Space Act Agreements (SAAs) in 2011 NASA provided $50M of funding to four partners; Blue Origin, The Boeing Company, Sierra Nevada Corporation, and SpaceX. Additional, NASA has signed two unfunded SAAs with ATK and United Space Alliance. This paper will give a brief summary of these SAAs. Additionally, a brief overview will be provided of the released version of the Commercial Crew Development Program plans and requirements documents.

  18. Radioisotope Power Systems Program: A Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program continues to plan, mature research in energy conversion, and partners with the Department of Energy (DOE) to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. Recent programs responsibilities include providing investment recommendations to NASA stakeholders on emerging thermoelectric and Stirling energy conversion technologies and insight on NASA investments at DOE in readying a generator for the Mars 2020 mission. This presentation provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status and the approach used to maintain the readiness of RPS to support potential future NASA missions.

  19. Overview of the ACT program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Program (ACT) was initiated in 1988. A National Research Announcement was issued to solicit innovative ideas that could significantly contribute to development and demonstration of an integrated technology data base and confidence level that permits cost-effective use of composite primary structures in transport aircraft. Fifteen contracts were awarded by the Spring of 1989 and the participants include commercial and military airframe manufacturers, materials developers and suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. The program approach is to develop materials, structural mechanics methodology, design concepts, and fabrication procedures that offer the potential to make composite structures cost-effective compared to aluminum structure. Goals for the ACT program included 30-50 percent weight reduction, 20-25 percent acquisition cost reduction, and provided the scientific basis for predicting materials and structures performance. This paper provides an overview of the ACT program status, plans, and selected technical accomplishments. Sixteen additional papers, which provide more detailed information on the research and development accomplishments, are contained in this publication.

  20. Overview of the CAPTAIN program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuguang; CAPTAIN Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Liquid argon time projection chamber detectors are taking center stage for the next large projects that the high-energy physics society will pursue. A series of tens of kiloton liquid argon detectors are under development to be used to measure the neutrino oscillation parameters, the CP violation in the neutrino sector, and the neutrino mass hierarchy, while also for the opportunity to the search for proton decay and supernova measurement as part of the DUNE program. However, several smaller liquid argon detectors are needed to study cross-sections and perform studies at various energies. The CAPTAIN Collaboration is building a 10-ton liquid argon detector as well as a prototype detector to perform measurements that include neutron interactions in liquid argon using the beam at LANSCE and neutrino measurements using the beam at Fermilab. The prototype experiment, MiniCAPTAIN, has been commissioned and is successfully running with laser operations, cosmic rays, and recently with neutrons from LANSCE. I will present an overview and status of the CAPTAIN program.

  1. The NASA Geodynamics Program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This NASA Geodynamics Program overview collectively examines the history, scientific basis, status, and results of the NASA Program and outlines plans for the next five to eight years. It is intended as an informative nontechnical discussion of geodynamics research.

  2. Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

  3. Photovoltaic energy program overview: Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This is the 1994 overview for the Photovoltaic Energy Program. The topics of this overview include cooperative research projects to improve PV systems and develop pre-commercial prototypes of new PV products, expanding understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the formation and performance of PV materials, and helping US industry enhance its leadership position in the PV market.

  4. Overview of the Project Prometheus Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will give an overview of the Project Prometheus Program (PPP, formerly the Nuclear Systems Initiative, NSI) and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project (a component of PPP), a mission to the three icy Galilean moons of Jupiter.

  5. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008, including market overview and federal role, program vision, mission, design and structure, and goals and multi-year targets.

  6. Overview of NASA Cryocooler Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. F.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for NASA's Earth and Space Science Enterprises, as well as augmenting existing capabilities in space exploration. An over-view is presented of on-going efforts at the Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in support of current flight projects, near-term flight instruments, and long-term technology development.

  7. Glenn Research Center Human Research Program: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA-Glenn Research Centers Human Research Program office supports a wide range of technology development efforts aimed at enabling extended human presence in space. This presentation provides a brief overview of the historical successes, current 2013 activities and future projects of NASA-GRCs Human Research Program.

  8. Photovoltaics: Program overview fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This overview is divided into sections titled: 1993 PV program accomplishments, PV systems for today`s markets generate power and experience, systems development and testing prepares products for market, advances in manufacturing hasten availability of innovations, cooperative research improves PV technology, additional achievements in cooperative R&D, and summary of PV program services. Figs, tabs.

  9. Nuclear thermal propulsion program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion program is described. The following subject areas are covered: lunar and Mars missions; national space policy; international cooperation in space exploration; propulsion technology; nuclear rocket program; and budgeting.

  10. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, JoAnn

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  11. Geothermal energy: 1992 program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Geothermal energy is described in general terms with drawings illustrating the technology. A map of known and potential geothermal resources in the US is included. The 1992 program activities are described briefly. (MHR)

  12. Human Research Program (HRP) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Human Research Program (HRP) is a major part of the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). ...

  13. ETV PROGRAM OVERVIEW AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. As such, th...

  14. FEMP Renewable Energy Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-14

    Fact sheet describing how the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides Federal agencies with information, guidance, and assistance in using renewable energy.

  15. NASA New Millennium Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Christopher M.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the New Millennium Program (NMP) which was established in 1994 to revolutionize NASA's Space and Earth science programs to achieve more capable, less costly missions in th e 2lst Century by: 1. Developing and flight-validating revolutionary technologies; 2. Reducing development times and life cycle missi0n cost; 3. Enabling highly autonomous spacecraft and 4. Promoting nat ionwide teaming and coordination

  16. Phase 1 research program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, J. J.; Lebedev, O. N.

    2001-01-01

    The Phase 1 research program was unprecedented in its scope and ambitious in its objectives. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration committed to conducting a multidisciplinary long-duration research program on a platform whose capabilities were not well known, not to mention belonging to another country. For the United States, it provided the first opportunity to conduct research in a long-duration space flight environment since the Skylab program in the 1970's. Multiple technical as well as cultural challenges were successfully overcome through the dedicated efforts of a relatively small cadre of individuals. The program developed processes to successfully plan, train for and execute research in a long-duration environment, with significant differences identified from short-duration space flight science operations. Between August 1994 and June 1998, thousands of kilograms of research hardware was prepared and launched to Mir, and thousands of kilograms of hardware and data products were returned to Earth. More than 150 Principal Investigators from eight countries were involved in the program in seven major research disciplines: Advanced Technology; Earth Sciences; Fundamental Biology; Human Life Sciences; International Space Station Risk Mitigation; Microgravity; and Space Sciences. Approximately 75 long-duration investigations were completed on Mir, with additional investigations performed on the Shuttle flights that docked with Mir. The flight phase included the participation of seven US astronauts and 20 Russian cosmonauts. The successful completion of the Phase 1 research program not only resulted in high quality science return but also in numerous lessons learned to make the ISS experience more productive. The cooperation developed during the program was instrumental in its success. c2001 AIAA. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Phase 1 research program overview.

    PubMed

    Uri, J J; Lebedev, O N

    2001-01-01

    The Phase 1 research program was unprecedented in its scope and ambitious in its objectives. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration committed to conducting a multidisciplinary long-duration research program on a platform whose capabilities were not well known, not to mention belonging to another country. For the United States, it provided the first opportunity to conduct research in a long-duration space flight environment since the Skylab program in the 1970's. Multiple technical as well as cultural challenges were successfully overcome through the dedicated efforts of a relatively small cadre of individuals. The program developed processes to successfully plan, train for and execute research in a long-duration environment, with significant differences identified from short-duration space flight science operations. Between August 1994 and June 1998, thousands of kilograms of research hardware was prepared and launched to Mir, and thousands of kilograms of hardware and data products were returned to Earth. More than 150 Principal Investigators from eight countries were involved in the program in seven major research disciplines: Advanced Technology; Earth Sciences; Fundamental Biology; Human Life Sciences; International Space Station Risk Mitigation; Microgravity; and Space Sciences. Approximately 75 long-duration investigations were completed on Mir, with additional investigations performed on the Shuttle flights that docked with Mir. The flight phase included the participation of seven US astronauts and 20 Russian cosmonauts. The successful completion of the Phase 1 research program not only resulted in high quality science return but also in numerous lessons learned to make the ISS experience more productive. The cooperation developed during the program was instrumental in its success. PMID:11858276

  18. Phase 1 research program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uri, JohnJ.; Lebedev, OlegN.

    2001-03-01

    The Phase 1 research program was unprecedented in its scope and ambitious in its objectives. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration committed to conducting a multidisciplinary long-duration research program on a platform whose capabilities were not well known, not to mention belonging to another country. For the United States, it provided the first opportunity to conduct research in a long-duration space flight environment since the Skylab program in the 1970's. Multiple technical as well as cultural challenges were successfully overcome through the dedicated efforts of a relatively small cadre of individuals. The program developed processes to successfully plan, train for and execute research in a long-duration environment, with significant differences identified from short-duration space flight science operations. Between August 1994 and June 1998, thousands of kilograms of research hardware was prepared and launched to Mir, and thousands of kilograms of hardware and data products were returned to Earth. More than 150 Principal Investigators from eight countries were involved in the program in seven major research disciplines: Advanced Technology; Earth Sciences; Fundamental Biology; Human Life Sciences; International Space Station Risk Mitigation; Microgravity; and Space Sciences. Approximately 75 long-duration investigations were completed on Mir, with additional investigations performed on the Shuttle flights that docked with Mir. The flight phase included the participation of seven US astronauts and 20 Russian cosmonauts. The successful completion of the Phase 1 research program not only resulted in high quality science return but also in numerous lessons learned to make the ISS experience more productive. The cooperation developed during the program was instrumental in its success.

  19. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  20. A topaz international program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; Wyant, F.J.; McCarson, T.D. Jr.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.

    1995-01-20

    Little did these visionaries know that the formation of the ``TOPAZ II Program,`` using former military space power technology of the Soviet Union, would become the preeminent example of technology cooperation between two former adversaries. A unique teaming arrangement formed in New Mexico, called the New Mexico Strategic Alliance and consisting of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, and Los Alamos Nationalo Laboratory, was a key ingredient in making this program a success. A brief summary of some of the highlights of this technology partnership is given to explain how international patnerships of this type can enable commercialization and technology transfer.

  1. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the start up and take off portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the start up transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because of the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable, and also because the cyclic elastic viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies. One element of the structures program is developing improved time varying thermal mechanical load models for the entire engine mission cycle from start up to shutdown. Another major part of the program is the development of new and improved nonlinear 3-D finite elements and associated structural analysis programs, including the development of temporal elements with time dependent properties to account for creep effects in the materials and components.

  2. NASA Technology Utilization Program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogavero, L.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA aerospace technology transfer process is examined with attention given to the activities of the Technology Utilization Office. Industrial applications centers at universities, a center for the dissemination of computer programs, technology and biomedical application teams, and publications are considered.

  3. Overview of Responsive Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimnicht, Glen P.

    The Responsive Model program assumes that the school environment should be designed to respond to the learner, and that school activities should be autotelic, or self-rewarding, not dependent upon rewards or punishment unrelated to the activity. Developmental theory, certain ideas of operant conditioning, and flexible learning sequences are used…

  4. 40 CFR 49.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIR ACT AUTHORITY Tribal Authority § 49.1 Program overview. (a) The regulations in this part identify those provisions of the Clean Air Act (Act) for which Indian tribes are or may be treated in the same... responsibilities as States under the Clean Air Act and authorize EPA approval of tribal air quality...

  5. Overview of DOE space nuclear propulsion programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of Department of Energy space nuclear propulsion programs is presented in outline and graphic form. DOE's role in the development and safety assurance of space nuclear propulsion is addressed. Testing issues and facilities are discussed along with development needs and recent research activities.

  6. JSC ECLSS R/T Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Johnson Space Center Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) research and technology program overview are presented. Topics covered include: advancements in electrochemical CO2 removal; supercritical water waste oxidation; electrooxidation for post-treatment of reclaimed water; and photocatalytic post-treatment of reclaimed water.

  7. Historical overview of Intercosmos program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimsha, M. A.

    1986-02-01

    Fifteen years ago, on October 14, 1969, the artificial Earth satellite Intercosmos-1 was launched initiating joint satellite research conducted by scientists and specialists from friendly countries. A little more than 2 years were spent on the preparations for this launch. The first envoys of the Intercosmos program were comparatively small space vehicles. They consisted of three basic sections: a cylindrical middle section and two hemispheres. The first craft of the Intercosmos series achieved orientation on the Sun with an accuracy of a few angular degrees. The launch of the Intercosmos-1 satellite initiated one of the basic directions of research conducted in accordance with the program of space cooperation by the socialist countries--research on the solar-terrestrial ties using satellites.

  8. NASA remote sensing programs: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    In the Earth remote sensing area, NASA's three functions are to understand the basic mechanics and behavior of the Earth, evaluate what resources are available (in the way of minerals, and hydrocarbons on a general scale), and to arrange a scheme for managing our national assets. The capabilities offered by LANDSAT D and technology improvements needed are discussed. The French SPOT system, its orbits, possibilities for stereo imagery, and levels of preprocessing and processing with several degrees of radiometric and geometric corrections are examined. Progress in the AgRISTARS project is mentioned as well as future R & D programs in the use of fluorescence, microwave measurements, and synthetic aperture radar. Other areas of endeaver include studying man environment interactions and Earth radiation budgets, and the establishment of data systems programs.

  9. Space Propulsion Technology Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. Focused program elements are: (1) transportation systems, which include earth-to-orbit propulsion, commercial vehicle propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, advanced cryogenic engines, cryogenic fluid systems, nuclear thermal propulsion, and nuclear electric propulsion; (2) space platforms, which include spacecraft on-board propulsion, and station keeping propulsion; and (3) technology flight experiments, which include cryogenic orbital N2 experiment (CONE), SEPS flight experiment, and cryogenic orbital H2 experiment (COHE).

  10. Air Force Phillips Laboratory Battery Program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, Shaun

    1992-01-01

    Battery development and testing efforts at Phillips Laboratory fall into three main categories: nickel hydrogen, sodium sulfur, and solid state batteries. Nickel hydrogen work is broken down into a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Life Test Program, a LEO Pulse Test Program, and a Hydrogen Embrittlement Investigation. Sodium sulfur work is broken down into a Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Battery Flight Test and a Hot Launch Evaluation. Solid state polymer battery work consists of a GEO Battery Development Program, a Pulse Power Battery Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), and an in-house evaluation of current generation laboratory cells. An overview of the program is presented.

  11. NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Riley, James T.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tailplane icing were investigated in a four-year NASA/FAA Tailplane Icing, Program (TIP). This research program was developed to improve the understanding, of iced tailplane aeroperformance and aircraft aerodynamics, and to develop design and training aides to help reduce the number of incidents and accidents caused by tailplane icing. To do this, the TIP was constructed with elements that included icing, wind tunnel testing, dry-air aerodynamic wind tunnel testing, flight tests, and analytical code development. This paper provides an overview of the entire program demonstrating the interconnectivity of the program elements and reports on current accomplishments.

  12. PACOSS program overview and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, L. C.; Richards, K. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Many future civilian and military large space structures (LSS) will have as performance objectives stringent pointing accuracies, short settling times, relatively fast response requirements, or combinations thereof. Many of these structures will be large, light weight, and will exhibit high structural modal density at low frequency and within the control bandwidth. Although it is possible in principle to achieve structural vibration control through purely active means, experience with complex structures has shown that the realities of plant model inaccuracies and sensor/actuator dynamics frequently combine to produce substandard performance. A more desirable approach is to apply passive damping technology to reduce the active control burden. Development of the technology to apply this strategy is the objective of the PACOSS (Passive and Active Control OF Space Structures) program. A key element in the PACOSS program is the Representative System Article (RSA). The RSA is a generic paper system that serves as a testbed for damping and controls studies. It also serves as a basis for design of the smaller Dynamic Test Article (DTA), a hardware testbed for the laboratory validation of analysis and design practices developed under PACOSS.

  13. The ESCOMPTE program: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Cachier, H.; Drobinski, Ph.; Fréjafon, E.; Kottmeier, C.; Perros, P. E.; Peuch, V.-H.; Ponche, J.-L.; Robin, D.; Saı̈d, F.; Toupance, G.; Wortham, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the "Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emissions" (ESCOMPTE) program is presented. The ESCOMPTE program is used to produce a relevant set of data for testing and evaluating regional pollution models. It includes high-resolution (in space and time) atmospheric emission inventories and field experiments, and covers an area of 120×120 km, centered over the Marseilles-Berre area in the southeast of France during Summer 2001. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution events, which result from numerous industrial and urban sources of primary pollutants. From the dynamical characteristics of the area, sea-breeze circulation and channeling effects due to terrain features highly influence the location of the pollutant plumes. ESCOMPTE will provide a highly documented framework for dynamics and chemistry studies. Campaign strategies and experimental set up are described. During the planning phase, existing modeling results helped defining the experimental design. The campaign involved surface measurement networks, remote sensing, ship-borne, balloon-borne, and airplane measurements. Mean standard meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes, ozone, ozone precursors, photochemically active trace gases, and aerosols were measured. Five intensive observation periods (IOPs) were documented using a wide spectrum of instruments, involving aircraft (7) (one of them equipped with a Doppler lidar, the others for in situ meteorological and chemical measurements), constant volume balloons (33), ozone lidars (5), wind profilers (15 sodars and radars), Doppler scanning lidar (1), radiosonde systems (at 4 locations), instrumented ships (2). In addition to the air quality networks from environmental agencies, 15 supplementary ground stations equipped for chemistry and/or meteorology and/or surface flux measurements, were operational. All instruments were calibrated and compared during a

  14. Overview of the instrumentation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieberding, William C.

    1989-04-01

    This program is aimed at developing sensors and measurement systems capable of obtaining the data necessary for the verification of computational models of the structural behavior, the fatigue life, and the environmental conditions pertinent to advanced reusable space propulsion systems. One of the characteristics of measurement systems needed to verify codes is that the sensors must be nonintrusive or at least minimally intrusive so as not to significantly perturb the conditions being measured. This leads to a heavy emphasis on laser optical techniques and on thin-film sensors. Another characteristic of such instruments is that they must be highly accurate and produce very high spatial and temporal resolution of the parameter being measured. The measurement systems needed generally fall into a number of broad categories. First there are the measurements needed on the surfaces of components such as turbine blades and vanes. Some of the desired parameters are temperature, strain, and heat flux. Another broad category encompasses those measurements needed in the flow environment around these components. Here, the desired results are high resolution maps of such parameters as flow velocity, temperature, density, pressure, and species concentration. The remaining category deals with measurements necessary for monitoring the health of the engine. This category has loomed ever more important since the Challenger disaster. An optical method for determining the characteristics of the plume is presented. Holographic measurement of structural damage is also presented.

  15. Infrared imaging spectroradiometer program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Ronald J.; Register, Henry I.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Defense, through the US Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Armament Directorate is sponsoring the development of two types of IR imaging spectroradiometers (project name: IRIS) to measure the spatial/spectral characteristics of various military targets. Design and analysis of several technical approaches were conducted during an initial phase of the program. The technical approaches investigated included: a dispersive imaging spectrometer design utilizing a fiber-optic reformatter (contractor: ERIM); an imaging acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) design (contractor: Westinghouse); a spatial/spectral Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer (contractor: Bomem Inc./Canada); a spatially modulated imaging fourier transform spectrometer (contractor: Daedalus Enterprises); an imaging Fabry-Perot design (contractor: Physical Sciences Inc.). Two of these designs were selected for brass board prototype fabrication. An FTIR prototype being built by Bomem Inc., offers an instrument with high sensitivity and high spectral resolution with modest spatial performance. An imaging Fabry-Perot prototype being built by Physical Sciences Inc., offers high spatial resolution with moderate sensitivity and spectral resolution.

  16. Life sciences flight experiments program - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W. E.; Dant, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    The considered LSFE program focuses on Spacelab life sciences missions planned for the 1984-1985 time frame. Life Sciences Spacelab payloads, launched at approximately 18-months intervals, will enable scientists to test hypotheses from such disciplines as vestibular physiology, developmental biology, biochemistry, cell biology, plant physiology, and a variety of other life sciences. An overview is presented of the LSFE program that will take advantage of the unique opportunities for biological experimentation possible on Spacelab. Program structure, schedules, and status are considered along with questions of program selection, and the science investigator working groups. A description is presented of the life sciences laboratory equipment program, taking into account the general purpose work station, the research animal holding facility, and the plant growth unit.

  17. Supersonic STOVL propulsion technology program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, Bernard J.; Batterton, Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    Planning activities are continuing between NASA, the DoD, and two foreign governments to develop the technology and to show the design capability by the mid-1990's for advanced, supersonic, short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. Propulsion technology is the key to achieving viable STOVL aircraft, and NASA Lewis will play a lead role in the development of these required propulsion technologies. The initial research programs are focused on technologies common to two or more of the possible STOVL propulsion system concepts. An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis role in the overall program plan and recent results of the research program. The future research program will be focused on one or possibly two of the propulsion concepts seen as most likely to be successful in the post advanced tactical fighter time frame.

  18. Supersonic STOVL propulsion technology program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, Bernard J.; Batterton, Peter G.

    1987-01-01

    Planning activities are continuing between NASA, DOD, and two foreign governments to develop the technology and to demonstrate the design capability for advanced, supersonic, short-takeoff and vertical-landing (STOVL) aircraft by the mid-1990s. As a result, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was established by the United Kingdom to jointly pursue the required technology; and an MOU with Canada is expected to be signed shortly. The NASA Lewis Research Center will play a lead role in the development of the required propulsion technologies which were identified as being critical to achieve viable STOVL aircraft. These planning activities have already resulted in initial research programs focused on technologies common to two or more of the proposed propulsion system concepts. An overview of the Lewis Research Center's role in the overall program plan and recent results in the development of the required propulsion technologies is presented.

  19. How a Regression Artifact Makes ICFs/MR Look Ineffective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crinella, Francis M.; McCleary, Richard; Swanson, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Criticizes the research design in "The Small ICF/MR program: Dimensions of Quality and Cost" (Conroy), that found small Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF) for individuals with mental retardation are inferior to other community programs. Discusses the problem in selecting a control group on the basis of pretest matching. (CR)

  20. Overview of the Arizona Quiet Pavement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul; Scofield, Larry

    2005-09-01

    The Arizona Quiet Pavement Pilot Program (QP3) was initially implemented to reduce highway related traffic noise by overlaying most of the Phoenix metropolitan area Portland cement concrete pavement with a one inch thick asphalt rubber friction coarse. With FHWA support, this program represents the first time that pavement surface type has been allowed as a noise mitigation strategy on federally funded projects. As a condition of using pavement type as a noise mitigation strategy, ADOT developed a ten-year, $3.8 million research program to evaluate the noise reduction performance over time. Historically, pavement surface type was not considered a permanent solution. As a result, the research program was designed to specifically address this issue. Noise performance is being evaluated through three means: (1) conventional roadside testing within the roadway corridor (e.g., far field measurements within the right-of-way) (2) the use of near field measurements, both close proximity (CPX) and sound intensity (SI); and (3) far field measurements obtained beyond the noise barriers within the surrounding neighborhoods. This paper provides an overview of the program development, presents the research conducted to support the decision to overlay the urban freeway, and the status of current research.

  1. Photovoltaic energy: Program overview, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This summary is prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. The 1990 PV Program Achievements are listed. Launched the PV Manufacturing Technology initiative, designed to systematically lower PV module costs. Inaugurated the PV Concentrator Technologies Initiative by signing eight multiyear, cost-shared technology development subcontracts with concentrator companies. Established the PV Polycrystalline Thin-Film Initiative by signing six multiyear, cost-shared technology development subcontracts with six polycrystalline thin-film companies. Continued the Amorphous Silicon Project by awarding three new research and development contracts. Focused the resources of three program laboratories on finding solutions to industry's manufacturing problems: the Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories and the Module Failure Analysis Laboratory and the Encapsulant Research Laboratory at SERI. Established an ongoing program to assist utilities in using PV for cost-effective, high-value applications. Completed nearly all of the construction planned for the first phase of PVUSA at Davis, California. Worked with the crystalline silicon PV industry on novel, low-cost cell fabrication processes and on resolving encapsulant problems. Took part in the development of qualification procedures tests for thin- and thick-film flat-plate modules and concentrator modules.

  2. The NASA Aviation Safety Program: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, the United States set a national goal to reduce the fatal accident rate for aviation by 80% within ten years based on the recommendations by the Presidential Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. Achieving this goal will require the combined efforts of government, industry, and academia in the areas of technology research and development, implementation, and operations. To respond to the national goal, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed a program that will focus resources over a five year period on performing research and developing technologies that will enable improvements in many areas of aviation safety. The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) is organized into six research areas: Aviation System Modeling and Monitoring, System Wide Accident Prevention, Single Aircraft Accident Prevention, Weather Accident Prevention, Accident Mitigation, and Synthetic Vision. Specific project areas include Turbulence Detection and Mitigation, Aviation Weather Information, Weather Information Communications, Propulsion Systems Health Management, Control Upset Management, Human Error Modeling, Maintenance Human Factors, Fire Prevention, and Synthetic Vision Systems for Commercial, Business, and General Aviation aircraft. Research will be performed at all four NASA aeronautics centers and will be closely coordinated with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other government agencies, industry, academia, as well as the aviation user community. This paper provides an overview of the NASA Aviation Safety Program goals, structure, and integration with the rest of the aviation community.

  3. Cosmic Origins (COR) Technology Development Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werneth, Russell; Pham, B.; Clampin, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins (COR) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for COR Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the COR Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report includes a 4m-class UV/optical telescope that would conduct imaging and spectroscopy as a post-Hubble observatory with significantly improved sensitivity and capability, a near-term investigation of NASA participation in the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency/Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (JAXA/ISAS) Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) mission, and future Explorers.

  4. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Wilton T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Perez, Mario R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the development and execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in their Terms of Reference (TOR), which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  5. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael R.; Hudgins, D. M.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the developmentand execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in the Terms of Reference (TOR) which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  6. NASA Space Cryocooler Programs: A 2003 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.; Boyle, R. F.; Kittel, P.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for NASA's Earth and Space Science missions. An overview is presented of ongoing cryocooler activities within NASA in support of current flight projects, near-term flight instruments, and long-term technology development. NASA programs in Earth and space science observe a wide range of phenomena, from crop dynamics to stellar birth. Many of the instruments require cryogenic refrigeration to improve dynamic range, extend wavelength coverage, and enable the use of advanced detectors. Although, the largest utilization of coolers over the last decade has been for instruments operating at medium to high cryogenic temperatures (55 to 150 K), reflecting the relative maturity of the technology at these temperatures, important new developments are now focusing at the lower temperature range from 4 to 20 K in support of studies of the origin of the universe and the search for planets around distant stars. NASA's development of a 20K cryocooler for the European Planck spacecraft and its new Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) for 6-18 K coolers are examples of the thrust to provide low temperature cooling for this class of missions.

  7. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    , more than 70% of the TDM funds will be competitively awarded as a result of yearly calls for proposed flight demonstrators and selected based on possible payoff to NASA, technology maturity, customer interest, cost, and technical risk reduction. This paper will give an overview of the TDM Program s mission and organization, as well as its current status in delivering advanced space technologies that will enable more flexible and robust future missions. It also will provide several examples of missions that fit within these parameters and expected outcomes.

  8. Multiuser development scenario for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-10-01

    An outline is given of some of the various possible applications of ICF technology. Developmental paths for each application are briefly described. The implications on design and operation of the ICF facilities if multipurpose use is allowed are examined. (MOW)

  9. ICF special studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W. R.

    1987-09-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed by W.J. Schafer Associates for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the area of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis Code for ICF Reactor Economics) code is one of the major tasks discussed.

  10. DSN RFI susceptibility models development program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    The RFI model development described intended to provide an understanding of the interference susceptibility of DSN receivers. An overview of interference types and effects, analytic modelling and experimental verification is presented.

  11. Academic Programs in Alternative Education: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzzi, Betsy Brown; Kraemer, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This paper, second in a series of papers on alternative education, examines the academic programming in alternative education programs by reviewing the literature specifically focused on the academic programs in alternative education and summarizing a survey of fifteen alternative education programs. It suggests options for further research on…

  12. 42 CFR 442.109 - Certification period for ICFs/MR: General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED Certification of ICFs/MR §...

  13. An overview of the Department of Energy Geothermal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Overview of current emphases of the U. S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technology R&D program in reservoir technology, hard rock penetration, conversion technology, geopressured research, hot dry rock research, magma energy research; invitation to audience to participate in DoE Geothermal Program Review VI.

  14. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  15. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  16. Program Review Rating Scales: Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    "Safe and Sound: An Educational Leader's Guide to Evidence-Based Social and Emotional Learning Programs" introduces the concepts of SEL and comprehensive approaches to SEL, describes the value of such programming to the essential academic mission of schools, and suggests how to approach implementing such programming. This packet contains the…

  17. 40 CFR 70.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or modified in regulations promulgated under title IV of the Act (acid rain program). (e) Issuance of... electronic documents must satisfy the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3—(Electronic reporting) in their program....

  18. 40 CFR 70.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or modified in regulations promulgated under title IV of the Act (acid rain program). (e) Issuance of... electronic documents must satisfy the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3—(Electronic reporting) in their program....

  19. 40 CFR 70.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or modified in regulations promulgated under title IV of the Act (acid rain program). (e) Issuance of... electronic documents must satisfy the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3—(Electronic reporting) in their program....

  20. 40 CFR 70.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or modified in regulations promulgated under title IV of the Act (acid rain program). (e) Issuance of... electronic documents must satisfy the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3—(Electronic reporting) in their program....

  1. 40 CFR 70.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or modified in regulations promulgated under title IV of the Act (acid rain program). (e) Issuance of... electronic documents must satisfy the requirements of 40 CFR Part 3—(Electronic reporting) in their program....

  2. Overview of Federal wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancona, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives and strategies of the Federal wind energy program are described. Changes in the program structure and some of the additions to the program are included. Upcoming organizational changes and some budget items are discussed, with particular emphasis on recent significant events regarding new approvals.

  3. 40 CFR 49.166 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... areas in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.166 through 49.175. (b) What is the purpose of this program? This program has the following purposes: (1) It establishes a preconstruction permitting... major sources subject to this program comply with the provisions and requirements of part 51, Appendix...

  4. 40 CFR 49.166 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... areas in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.166 through 49.175. (b) What is the purpose of this program? This program has the following purposes: (1) It establishes a preconstruction permitting... major sources subject to this program comply with the provisions and requirements of part 51, Appendix...

  5. 40 CFR 49.166 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... areas in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.166 through 49.175. (b) What is the purpose of this program? This program has the following purposes: (1) It establishes a preconstruction permitting... major sources subject to this program comply with the provisions and requirements of part 51, appendix...

  6. 40 CFR 49.166 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... areas in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.166 through 49.175. (b) What is the purpose of this program? This program has the following purposes: (1) It establishes a preconstruction permitting... major sources subject to this program comply with the provisions and requirements of part 51, Appendix...

  7. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Photovoltaic Energy Program fosters the widespread acceptance of photovoltaic (PV) technology and accelerates commercial use of US PV products. The Program is founded on a collaborative strategy involving industry, the research and development community, potential users, utilities, and state and federal agencies. There are three main Program elements: Systems Engineering and Applications, Technology Development, and Research and Development.

  8. The Child Nutrition Labeling Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Cheryl; And Others

    This manual establishes policies and procedures for the Child Nutrition (CN) Labeling Program, a voluntary federal program run by the United States Department of Agriculture. The program is responsible for reviewing a product formulation to determine the contribution a single serving of that product makes toward the child nutrition meal pattern…

  9. Robotics development programs overview Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Veenema, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) continues to provide support to the Savannah River Plant (SRP) in many areas to Robotics and Vision. An overview of the current and near term future developments are presented. The driving forces for Robotics and Remote vision systems at SRP include both the classic reasons for industrial robotics installation (i.e., repetitive and undesirable jobs) and those reasons related to radioactive environments. Protection of personnel from both radiation and radioactive contamination benefit greatly from robotic and telerobotics. In addition the quality of the information available from a hazardous environment can be improved by the ability to visually linger and remotely sense.

  10. Overview: Western Regional applications Program (WRAP) status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Interactions with all 14 of the states in the Western Region over the past three years are reviewed from NASA's perspective. Outreach and training programs using the M mobile analysis and training extension van, the University Program, classes at the Ames Center, demonstration tests with state agencies, and surveying the needs of local governments are highlighted. Planned activities, the continuance of ASVT's, and the impact of the budget cuts on NASA'S technology program are also considered.

  11. SBIR and STTR Program for Assistive Technology Device Development: Evaluation of Impact Using an ICF-Based Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Arthanat, Sajay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the impact of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) grant programs of 5 federal agencies National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Education (USDE), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and…

  12. Quality Enhancement: An Overview. Program Services Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Partnership for Children, Raleigh.

    Leading a series of in-depth technical assistance papers on improving the quality in early care and education programs, this brochure is designed to help local communities consider the most effective strategies in designing and implementing programs that improve child care quality. A quality enhancement approach is taken whereby communities begin…

  13. Southern Rural Access Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachler, Michael; Holloman, Curtis; Herman, James

    2003-01-01

    The Southern Rural Access Program, a grant program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in eight southern states, funds projects that nurture rural and disadvantaged students in health-care fields; build state, regional, or community capacity to recruit and retain rural health professionals; support rural health networks; and provide loans to…

  14. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  15. Overview of Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, H. A.; Bajura, R. A.

    The US Department of Energy initiated a program to develop advanced gas turbine systems to serve both central power and industrial power generation markets. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will lead to commercial offerings by the private sector by 2002. ATS will be developed to fire natural gas but will be adaptable to coal and biomass firing. The systems will be: highly efficient (15 percent improvement over today's best systems); environmentally superior (10 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides over today's best systems); and cost competitive (10 percent reduction in cost of electricity). The ATS Program has five elements. Innovative cycle development will lead to the demonstration of systems with advanced gas turbine cycles using current gas turbine technology. High temperature development will lead to the increased firing temperatures needed to achieve ATS Program efficiency goals. Ceramic component development/demonstration will expand the current DOE/CE program to demonstrate industrial-scale turbines with ceramic components. Technology base will support the overall program by conducting research and development (R&D) on generic technology issues. Coal application studies will adapt technology developed in the ATS program to coal-fired systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  16. An overview of the Railroad Retirement program.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    In the 1930s, amidst concern about the ability of existing pension programs to provide former railroad workers with adequate assistance in old age, Congress established a national Railroad Retirement system. This system is primarily administered by the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), which is an independent federal agency charged with providing benefits to eligible employees of the railroad industry and their families. Today, the Railroad Retirement program is closely tied to the far better-known Social Security program, and although the Railroad Retirement program and Social Security share a number of common elements, key differences also exist between the two in areas such as funding and benefit structure. This article aims to increase awareness and understanding of the Railroad Retirement program and its relationship with Social Security by examining the parallel development of these two retirement programs while illuminating areas where the two diverge. The history of the Railroad Retirement program, the benefits provided by the program, and RRB's financial operations are reviewed, using elements of the Social Security system as points of reference. PMID:19102137

  17. Overview-absorption/Rankine solar cooling program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlig, M.; Heitz, A.; Boyce, B.

    1980-03-01

    The tasks being performed in the absorption and Rankine program areas run the gamut from basic work on fluids to development of chillers and chiller components, to field and reliability testing of complete cooling systems. In the absorption program, there are six current and five essentially completed projects. In the Rankine program, there are five current projects directly supported by DOE, and three projects funded through and managed by NASA/MSFC (Manned Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama). The basic features of these projects are discussed. The systems under development in five of these current projects were selected for field testing in the SOLERAS program, a joint US-Saudi Arabian enterprise. Some technical highlights of the program are presented.

  18. Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, Richard J.; Dahlberg, Richard C.; Dutt, Dale S.; Wood, John T.

    The Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification program was established in 1986 to resolve the technology concerns raised in Phase 1 of the SP-100 program, namely, the performance and lifetime of thermionic fuel elements in a fast spectrum reactor. The program builds directly on an extensive database developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA-sponsored program, when TFEs were developed and tested at design conditions for over 10,000 h. The current effort has reestablished that technology and is extending the lifetime up to 7 to 10 yr. A TFE lifetime of more than 2 yr has been demonstrated in the TRIGA reactor. Component lifetimes of more than 10 yr have been demonstrated in accelerated tests in the FFTF (Richland) and EBR-II (Idaho) test reactors. Program completion is scheduled for FY-95.

  19. Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

  20. Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

  1. Overview of the Telescience Testbed Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.; Mian, Arshad; Leiner, Barry M.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA's Telescience Testbed Program (TTP) conducted by the Ames Research Center is described with particular attention to the objectives, the approach used to achieve these objectives, and the expected benefits of the program. The goal of the TTP is to gain operational experience for the Space Station Freedom and the Earth Observing System programs, using ground testbeds, and to define the information and communication systems requirements for the development and operation of these programs. The results of TTP are expected to include the requirements for the remote coaching, command and control, monitoring and maintenance, payload design, and operations management. In addition, requirements for technologies such as workstations, software, video, automation, data management, and networking will be defined.

  2. Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

  3. 40 CFR 71.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permit applications, shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or as modified by title IV of the Act and 40 CFR parts 72 through 78....

  4. 40 CFR 71.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... permit applications, shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or as modified by title IV of the Act and 40 CFR parts 72 through 78....

  5. 40 CFR 71.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... permit applications, shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or as modified by title IV of the Act and 40 CFR parts 72 through 78....

  6. 40 CFR 71.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... permit applications, shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or as modified by title IV of the Act and 40 CFR parts 72 through 78....

  7. 40 CFR 71.1 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... permit applications, shall apply to the permitting of affected sources under the acid rain program, except as provided herein or as modified by title IV of the Act and 40 CFR parts 72 through 78....

  8. Renewable Energy Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Fact sheet describing how the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides Federal agencies with information, guidance, and assistance in using renewable energy.

  9. STS-121/Discovery Preflight Briefing Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Wayne Hale (Space Shuttle Program Manager) opens with a short video of the external tank operation and the Shuttle roll out to the launch pad. Kirk Shireman (International Space Station Program Deputy Manager) shows a video of International Space Station activities which included replacement of the remote power switch, unloading of cargo, Earth observation (over 23,000 photos taken), exercises, and replacement of the Camera during a spacewalk.

  10. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview Fiscal Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Significant activities in the National Photovoltaic Program are reported for each of the three main program elements. In Research and Development, advances in thin-film materials and crystalline silicon materials are described. The Technology Development report describes activities in photovoltaic manufacturing technology, industrial expansion, module and array development, and testing photovoltaic system components. Systems Engineering and Applications projects described include projects with government agencies, projects with utilities, documentation of performance for international applications, and product certification.

  11. Overview of NASA battery technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riebling, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's technology program in batteries for space applications are presented. Program elements include: (1) advanced ambient temperature alkaline secondaries, which are primarily nickel-cadmium cells in batteries; (2) a toroidal nickel cadmium secondaries with multi-kilowatt-hour storage capacity primarily for lower orbital applications; (3) ambient temperature lithium batteries, both primary and secondaries, primarily silver hydrogen and high-capacity nickel hydrogen.

  12. An overview of some monoplanar missile programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A historical review is presented of some monoplanar missile systems in which the vehicle flight control was similar to that for a conventional aircraft. The review is essentially chronological, beginning prior to World War I, and includes worldwise programs. Illustrative examples of aerodynamic research with monoplanar missiles are presented including some comparisons with cruciform missiles. Some examples of current programs are presented and some particular mission applications for monoplanar systems are discussed.

  13. Nasa's Planetary Geologic Mapping Program: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    NASA's Planetary Science Division supports the geologic mapping of planetary surfaces through a distinct organizational structure and a series of research and analysis (R&A) funding programs. Cartography and geologic mapping issues for NASA's planetary science programs are overseen by the Mapping and Planetary Spatial Infrastructure Team (MAPSIT), which is an assessment group for cartography similar to the Mars Exploration Program Assessment Group (MEPAG) for Mars exploration. MAPSIT's Steering Committee includes specialists in geological mapping, who make up the Geologic Mapping Subcommittee (GEMS). I am the GEMS Chair, and with a group of 3-4 community mappers we advise the U.S. Geological Survey Planetary Geologic Mapping Coordinator (Dr. James Skinner) and develop policy and procedures to aid the planetary geologic mapping community. GEMS meets twice a year, at the Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in March, and at the Annual Planetary Mappers' Meeting in June (attendance is required by all NASA-funded geologic mappers). Funding programs under NASA's current R&A structure to propose geological mapping projects include Mars Data Analysis (Mars), Lunar Data Analysis (Moon), Discovery Data Analysis (Mercury, Vesta, Ceres), Cassini Data Analysis (Saturn moons), Solar System Workings (Venus or Jupiter moons), and the Planetary Data Archiving, Restoration, and Tools (PDART) program. Current NASA policy requires all funded geologic mapping projects to be done digitally using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. In this presentation we will discuss details on how geologic mapping is done consistent with current NASA policy and USGS guidelines.

  14. ICF in the U. S. : Facilities and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, L.W.

    1988-08-01

    In the last few years there has been significant progress in ICF research in laboratories in the United States and elsewhere. These advances have occurred in areas that range from demonstrating an innovative laser beam smoothing techniques important for both directly and indirectly driven ICF, to achieving a more complete understanding of capsule implosions and related physics. This progress has been possible because of the capabilities provided by the ICF laser-target facilities currently in operation and the new developments in diagnostics, particularly for measurements of the implosion process and the conditions in the compressed capsule core. Both of these topics, facilities and selected new diagnostics capabilities in the US ICF Program, are summarized in this paper. 32 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with industry, has set new performance standards for industrial gas turbines through the creation of the Industrial Advanced Turbine System Program. Their leadership will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in this size class (3-to-20 MW). The DOE has already created a positive effect by encouraging gas turbine system manufacturers to reassess their product and technology plans using the new higher standards as the benchmark. Solar Turbines has been a leader in the industrial gas turbine business, and is delighted to have joined with the DOE in developing the goals and vision for this program. We welcome the opportunity to help the national goals of energy conservation and environmental enhancement. The results of this program should lead to the U.S. based gas turbine industry maintaining its international leadership and the creation of highly paid domestic jobs.

  16. Overview of Sandia's storage battery program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. P.; Grothaus, K. R.

    The primary mission of Sandia National Laboratories is the design and development of the non-nuclear components and systems for nuclear weapons. To a lesser degree, Sandia is also involved in a variety of other programs; such as, energy projects with the Department of Energy, conventional military projects with the Department of Defense, and nuclear waste management and reactor safety with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Over the years, Sandia has evolved a considerable expertise in the areas of specialty primary, reserve, and more recently, secondary battery systems. This paper focuses on the status of the storage or secondary battery programs. These programs are divided into those battery systems being developed for energy applications and those being developed for military applications.

  17. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    DOE`s ATS Program will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in the 3 to 20 MW class. Market studies were conducted for application of ATS to the dispersed/distributed electric power generation market. The technology studies have led to the design of a gas-fired, recuperated, industrial size gas turbine. The Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program continues. In the High Performance Steam Systems program, a 100 hour development test to prove the advanced 1500 F, 1500 psig system has been successfully completed. A market transformation will take place: the customer will be offered a choice of energy conversion technologies to meet heat and power generation needs into the next century.

  18. Heavy-Section Steel Technology program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a status review of ongoing HSST program tasks aimed at refining the technology used in analysis of reactor pressure vessel fracture margins under pressurized thermal-shock (PTS) loading. Specific fracture-technology issues addressed include vessel flaw density and distribution, shallow flaws, fracture-toughness data transfer, circumferential cracks, ductile tearing and the influence of low-tearing toughness in stainless steel cladding. Preliminary results from the analysis and test programs are presented, together with interim assessments of their potential impact on a reactor vessel PTS analysis. 31 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The NASA SETI program - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Bernard M.

    1986-01-01

    The development and objectives of the NASA SETI program are reviewed. The search strategy for the program is two phase, an all-sky survey and a targeted search; the capabilities and hardware for the searches are discussed. The use of a spectrum analyzer to search the GHz of the spectrum, and of a multichannel spectrum analyzer to detect pulses are examined; the designs and functions of the analyzers are described. A new method for detecting a drifting CW signal is proposed. A diagram of the automated SETI system is presented.

  20. Overview of NRC PRA research program

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.; Drouin, M.T.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; VanderMolen, M.T.

    1997-02-01

    The NRC`s research program in probabilistic risk analysis includes a set of closely-related elements, from basic research to regulatory applications. The elements of this program are as follows: (1) Development and demonstration of methods and advanced models and tools for use by the NRC staff and others performing risk assessments; (2) Support to agency staff on risk analysis and statistics issues; (3) Reviews of risk assessments submitted by licensees in support of regulatory applications, including the IPEs and IPEEEs. Each of these elements is discussed in the paper, providing highlights of work within an element, and, where appropriate, describing important support and feedback mechanisms among elements.

  1. Thermionic fuel element Verification Program - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, Richard J.; Dahlberg, Richard C.; Dutt, Dale S.; Wood, John T.

    The TFE Verification Program is in the sixth year of a program to demonstrate the performance and lifetime of thermionic fuel elements for high power space applications. Data from accelerated tests in FETF and EBR-II show component lifetimes longer than 7 yr. Alumina insulators have shown good performance at high fast fluence. Graphite-cesium reservoirs based on isotropic graphite also meet requirements. Three TFEs are currently operating in the TRIGA reactor, the oldest having accumulated 15,000 hr of irradiation as of 1 October 1990.

  2. Praxis: The programming language: An advanced overview

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.R.; Holloway, F.W.; Morgan, C.R.; Evans, A. Jr.

    1987-08-06

    Praxis is an Ada-like programming language developed for efficient programming of embedded control and systems applications. It is strongly typed, and block structured in the tradition of Pascal and Ada, with efficiency and control similar to C. Praxis supports the development of systems composed of separately compiled modules, user defined data types, exception handling, and detailed data storage and control mechanisms. Direct access to machine facilities, efficient bit manipulation, and interlocked critical regions are also provided in Praxis. Praxis has been in operational use since late 1980, and current implementations for the VAX, PDP and LSI-11 computers have been released into the public domain.

  3. CRITICAL OVERVIEW OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LAVATELLI, C.B.

    PRESENT PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS FOR DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN ARE OF 3 KINDS--(1) AN INVENTORY TYPE WHICH ATTEMPTS TO IDENTIFY DEFICITS WHICH WILL AFFECT SCHOOL LEARNING AND TO OVERCOME THESE THROUGH EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES, (2) A PLAN BASED ON A RECAPITULATION THEORY WHICH ATTEMPTS TO DESCRIBE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES AND TO COMPENSATE FOR THOSE WHICH A…

  4. Water Watch Program Overview. Background Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Div. of Water, Frankfort. Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet.

    Lakes, streams, and wetlands serve many purposes for the people of the state of Kentucky and are necessary and valued elements of its natural resources. The Water Watch program promotes individual responsibility for a common resource, educates people about the use and protection of local water resources, provides recreational opportunities through…

  5. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S ARSENIC TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary on the Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the history and the current status of the demonstration projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. The presentation m...

  6. Data systems and computer science programs: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.; Hunter, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An external review of the Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program is presented. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: onboard memory and storage technology; advanced flight computers; special purpose flight processors; onboard networking and testbeds; information archive, access, and retrieval; visualization; neural networks; software engineering; and flight control and operations.

  7. An Overview of the TICCIT Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitre Corp., McLean, VA.

    The MITRE Corporation is disseminating computer-assisted instruction (CAI) through a demonstration program funded by the National Science Foundation. The goal is to show that CAI can provide improved, cost-effective instruction in community colleges. Significant products include: two demonstration systems, each with 128 student terminals; four…

  8. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S LANDSCAPE SCIENCES PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory has expanded it's ecological research program to include the development of landscape metrics and indicators to assess ecological risk and...

  9. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S LANDSCAPE SCIENCE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory has expanded it's ecological research program to include the development of landscape metrics and indicators to assess ecological risk and...

  10. An Overview of the NASA Balloon Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program conducts a total of 16 to 20 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. The NASA Balloon Program continues a long tradition for support and advancement of scientific ballooning for attitudes up to 49 h. These missions support investigations sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. The long duration (weeks currently; with the real possibility of multi-month) and large area/mass payloads able to fly in near-space conditions offer exciting opportunities for both development and actual science for many of NASA's highest priority areas for current and future missions. These can typically be carried out at less than ten percent of the cost of a corresponding satellite mission, and on much shorter timescales. The Balloon Program is arguably the most scientifically compelling of the various NASA sub-orbital programs and provides the most complete and effective springboard for both scientists and engineers to go on to carry out the space-science missions of the future - as demonstrated by numerous successful missions and their Principal Investigators, as well as leaders in NASA space science, over the past three decades. Progress continues toward the development of the super pressure balloon and support systems for support of ultra-long duration, constant altitude missions from any latitude.

  11. 40 CFR 49.151 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 49.152(d)), you must register your source with your reviewing authority in your area... (FIP), the Federal minor NSR program in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.151 through 49...-approved implementation plan or FIP and any other requirements under applicable law. (5) Nothing in...

  12. 40 CFR 49.151 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 49.152(d)), you must register your source with your reviewing authority in your area... (FIP), the Federal minor NSR program in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.151 through 49...-approved implementation plan or FIP and any other requirements under applicable law. (5) Nothing in...

  13. 40 CFR 49.151 - Program overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 49.152(d)), you must register your source with your reviewing authority in your area... (FIP), the Federal minor NSR program in Indian country (or “program”) consists of §§ 49.151 through 49...-approved implementation plan or FIP and any other requirements under applicable law. (5) Nothing in...

  14. OVERVIEW OF MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) is an interagency agreement with the DOE and has partnerships with Universities, Forest Service, BLM, Industry and states. The mission of the MWTP is to provide engineering solutions to national environmental issues resulting from the past...

  15. An overview of NASA's space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    During the last several years, the NASA space program entered a new era. With the completion of the Apollo and Skylab programs, NASA places emphasis within its space effort on three main objectives: (1) improving the access to space and the ability to capitalize on this new capability; (2) developing the space and ground systems that will collect and interpret data related to the changing nature of the earth's natural and cultural resources to aid in solving resource and environmental problems facing the entire world; and (3) adding to the storehouse of knowledge through the continued exploration of our solar system and the universe. The paper discusses the importance of the joint USA/USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), describes the capability and status of the Space Shuttle, and outlines the important role that these two programs played in extending our ability to make more effective use of this space environment. It also summarizes the capability and the plans for satellites to monitor the earth's natural and cultural resources and to assess environmental quality. The NASA programs for exploring the solar system and the universe is reviewed.

  16. THE FLINT COMMUNITY SCHOOL PROGRAM, AN OVERVIEW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BATES, GUY J.; AND OTHERS

    THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HAD BECOME THE IDEAL CENTER FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION IN FLINT. IT WAS THE PRACTICAL PLACE FOR CARRYING THE CONSTANTLY CHANGING ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS OF THE COMMUNITY. THE APPROACH USED TO FACILITATE HUMAN UNDERSTANDING AND INTERACTION INCLUDED, FIRST, GETTING THE PEOPLE INTO THE SCHOOLS, WHERE THEY BECAME INTERESTED.…

  17. Subseabed Disposal Program Plan. Volume I. Overview

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The primary objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the scientific, environmental, and engineering feasibility of disposing of processed and packaged high-level nuclear waste in geologic formations beneath the world's oceans. High-level waste (HLW) is considered the most difficult of radioactive wastes to dispose of in oceanic geologic formations because of its heat and radiation output. From a scientific standpoint, the understanding developed for the disposal of such HLW can be used for other nuclear wastes (e.g., transuranic - TRU - or low-level) and materials from decommissioned facilities, since any set of barriers competent to contain the heat and radiation outputs of high-level waste will also contain such outputs from low-level waste. If subseabed disposal is found to be feasible for HLW, then other factors such as cost will become more important in considering subseabed emplacement for other nuclear wastes. A secondary objective of the SDP is to develop and maintain a capability to assess and cooperate with the seabed nuclear waste disposal programs of other nations. There are, of course, a number of nations with nuclear programs, and not all of these nations have convenient access to land-based repositories for nuclear waste. Many are attempting to develop legislative and scientific programs that will avoid potential hazards to man, threats to other ocean uses, and marine pollution, and they work together to such purpose in meetings of the international NEA/Seabed Working Group. The US SDP, as the first and most highly developed R and D program in the area, strongly influences the development of subseabed-disposal-related policy in such nations.

  18. Geothermal Program Overview: Fiscal Years 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-11-01

    Geothermal energy represents the largest U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. This overview looks at the basic science behind the various geothermal technologies and provides information on DOE Geothermal Energy Program activities and accomplishments.

  19. Overview of ARB's Greenhouse Gas Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, M.; Chen, Y.; Kuwayama, T.; Vijayan, A.; Herner, J.; Croes, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since the passage of the California Global Warming Solutions Act (or AB32) in 2006, California Air Resources Board (ARB) has established and implemented a comprehensive plan to understand, quantify, and mitigate the various greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source sectors in the state. ARB has also developed a robust and multi-tiered in-house research effort to investigate methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and fluorinated gas emission sources. This presentation will provide an overview of ARB's monitoring and measurement research efforts to study the regional and local emission sources of these pollutants in California. ARB initiated the first subnational GHG Research Monitoring Network in 2010 to study the regional GHG emissions throughout the state. The network operates several high precision analyzers to study CH4, N2O, CO and CO2 emissions at strategically selected regional sites throughout California, and the resulting data are used to study the statewide emission trends and evaluate regional sources using statistical analyses and inverse modeling efforts. ARB is also collaborating with leading scientists to study important emission sources including agriculture, waste, and oil and gas sectors, and to identify "hot spot" methane sources through aerial surveys of high methane emitters in California. At the source level, ARB deploys Mobile Measurement Platforms (MMP) and flux chambers to measure local and source specific emissions, and uses the information to understand source characteristics and inform emissions inventories. Collectively, all these efforts are offering a comprehensive view of regional and local emission sources, and are expected to help in developing effective mitigation strategies to reduce GHG emissions in California.

  20. A hollow clay tile wall seismic performance program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Jones, W.D.; Stoddart, W.C.T.

    1992-02-25

    An overview of a multiyear hollow clay tile wall (HCTW) program being conducted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, for the US Department of Energy is presented. The purpose of the HCTW program is to determine the load capacity of unreinforced infilled HCTW buildings when subjected to earthquakes. Progress to date tends to indicate that extensive retrofit of such structures may not be warranted in low-to-moderate seismic zones.

  1. Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

  2. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage: Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Smith, P. J.; Hanson, C. T.; Walker, T. H.; Metschan, S. L.; Mabson, G. E.; Wilden, K. S.; Flynn, B. W.; Scholz, D. B.; Polland, D. R.; Fredrikson, H. G.; Olson, J. T.; Backman, B. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program has studied transport fuselage structure with a large potential reduction in the total direct operating costs for wide-body commercial transports. The baseline fuselage section was divided into four 'quadrants', crown, keel, and sides, gaining the manufacturing cost advantage possible with larger panels. Key processes found to have savings potential include (1) skins laminated by automatic fiber placement, (2) braided frames using resin transfer molding, and (3) panel bond technology that minimized mechanical fastening. The cost and weight of the baseline fuselage barrel was updated to complete Phase B of the program. An assessment of the former, which included labor, material, and tooling costs, was performed with the help of design cost models. Crown, keel, and side quadrant cost distributions illustrate the importance of panel design configuration, area, and other structural details. Composite sandwich panel designs were found to have the greatest cost savings potential for most quadrants. Key technical findings are summarized as an introduction to the other contractor reports documenting Phase A and B work completed in functional areas. The current program status in resolving critical technical issues is also highlighted.

  3. US RERTR Program: overview, status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Travelli, A.

    1984-01-01

    The status of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief review of the accomplishments which the RERTR Program, in cooperation with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1983 in the area of LEU research reactor fuels development and application, emphasis is placed on the RERTR Program developments which took place during 1984 and on current plans and schedules. The RERTR progress in 1984 has been significant, with solid accomplishments and few surprises. Most LEU U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al irradiation tests with 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ have been successfully completed, and contract negotiations are under way for the procurement of a whole-core demonstration of this fuel in the ORR. The demonstration is to begin in mid-1985 and to last for approximately eighteen months. Qualification of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel with 7 g U/cm/sup 3/ is scheduled for 1989. International cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators has been essential to the progress which has been achieved. With continued international cooperation, it will be feasible to significantly reduce HEU usage in research reactors in the next few years.

  4. An overview of the SAFSIM computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-01-01

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program that provides engineering simulations of user-specified flow networks at the system level. It includes fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics capabilities. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the simulation of almost any flow system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary goals of SAFSIM development. The current capabilities of SAFSIM are summarized and some sample applications are presented. It is applied here to a nuclear thermal propulsion system and nuclear rocket engine test facility.

  5. Overview of Sandia's electric vehicle battery program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. P.

    1993-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc/air and sodium/sulfur battery technologies as well as double layer capacitor (DLC) R&D. Projects in the USABC funded work include lithium/polymer electrolyte (LPE) R&D, sodium/sulfur activities and battery test and evaluation.

  6. ICF quarterly report, October-December 1998, volume 8, number 4

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, B

    1998-09-30

    The ICF Quarterly Report is pub-lished four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility and High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (ICF/NIF/ HEDES) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The journal summarizes selected current research achievements of the LLNLICF/NIF/HEDES Program.

  7. M-C Power commercialization program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Camara, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    Competition in the electric generation market will increase, owing to unbundling and repackaging of electric energy services. One technology that will enable electric companies to expand their role in the energy services marketplace is the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Distributed power plants using MCFCs can fill the demand for localized, efficient, and environmentally friendly energy supplies at the lowest possible cost. This type of equipment will allow electric companies to supply the majority of a customer`s electric and thermal energy needs from small power plants located at the customer`s facilities. M-C Power`s mission is the development and commercialization of MCFC stacks. Advanced separator plates were designed, and cost of non-repeat hardware was reduced. In the technology development phase of the commercialization program, a 250 KW MCFC demonstration plant at the Naval Air Station Miramar in Sand Diego is the culminating event in the product development test project. Product requirements, economic analysis, and market entry are discussed. This is the 2nd year of a 5-year program.

  8. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, K.D.; Harness, J.L.; Kuhn, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Science and Technology (formerly the Office of Technology Development), as part of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites and wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety, and the environment and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with federal, state, and local regulations by the year 2019. The Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) is charged with developing and implementing new technologies that are safer, faster, more effective, and less expensive than current methods. To focus resources and address opportunities, EM-50 has targeted four major remediation and waste management problem areas within the DOE complex for action based on risk, prevalence, or need for technology development to meet environmental requirements and regulations. Other areas may be added or current areas further partitioned to ensure that research technology development programs remain focused on EM`s most pressing remediation and waste management needs. These major problem areas, called Focus Areas are: high-level waste tank remediation; mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal; subsurface contaminants; and facility transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition.

  9. Overview of Japanese Earth observation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2013-10-01

    Five programs, i.e. TRMM, AMSR-E, ASTER, GOSAT and GCOM-W1 are going on in Japanese Earth Observation programs. ASTER has lost its short wave infrared channels. AMSR-E stopped its operation, but it started its operation from Sep. 2012. GCOM-W1 was launched on 18, May, 2012 and is operating well as well as TRMM and GOSAT. ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) was successfully launched on 24th Jan. 2006. ALOS carries three instruments, i.e., PRISM (Panchromatic Remote Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping), AVNIR-2 (Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer), and PALSAR (Phased Array L band Synthetic Aperture Radar). Unfortunately, ALOS has stopped its operation on 22nd, April, 2011 by power loss. GOSAT (Greenhouse Gas Observation Satellite) was successfully launched on 29, January, 2009. GOSAT carries 2 instruments, i.e. a green house gas sensor (TANSOFTS) and a cloud/aerosol imager (TANSO-CAI). The main sensor is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and covers 0.76 to 15 μm region with 0.2 to 0.5 cm-1 resolution. SMILES (Super-conducting Millimeter wave Emission Spectrometer) was launched on September 2009 to ISS and started the observation, but stopped its operation on April 2010. After the unfortunate accident of ADEOS2, JAXA still have plans of Earth observation programs. Next generation satellites will be launched in 2012-2015 timeframe. They are, GCOM-C (ADEOS-2 follow on), and GPM (Global Precipitation Mission) core satellite. GPM is a joint project with NASA and will carry two instruments. JAXA will develop DPR (Dual frequency Precipitation Radar) which is a follow on of PR on TRMM. Another project is EarthCare. It is a joint project with ESA and JAXA is going to provide CPR (Cloud Profiling Radar). GCOM-C1 will be launched on fiscal 2016, GPM core satellite will be launched on 2014 and EarthCare will be launched on 2015. ALOS F/O satellites are divided into two satellites, i.e. SAR and optical satellites. The first one of ALOS F/O is called ALOS 2

  10. Systems overview of the subseabed disposal program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, R. D.; Brush, L. H.; Lipkin, J.; Percival, C. M.

    1982-09-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is considering high-level waste (HLW) disposal in the oceanic geologic formations as a possible longer term complement to mined geologic repositories. The approach to safety assessment is to compute occupational exposure for all processes, predict the consequences and probabilities of pre-emplacement accidents and controlled release from the sediments, and analyze of all pathways to man and resulting health effects. Models are being developed to form a physical/mathematical computer description of each process; to measure as well as possible associated phenomena and properties in the laboratory; to make predictions and run confirming in-situ experiments; and to modify predictive methods if required. Models have been developed to describe heat transfer, fluid flow, mechanical response of the sediment, nuclide migration in the sediment, physical and biologic oceanography, land transport accidents, dose to man, and health effects.

  11. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-11-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute (DOE/SERI) Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalgae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. A technical and economic analysis, Fuels from Microalgae, demonstrated that liquid fuels can be produced from mass-cultured microalgae at prices that will be competitive with those of conventional fuels by 2010. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable.

  12. Overview of Japanese Earth observation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2014-10-01

    Five programs, i.e. TRMM, AMSR-E, ASTER, GOSAT, GCOM-W1, GPM and ALOS-2 are going on in Japanese Earth Observation programs. ASTER has lost its short wave infrared channels. AMSR-E stopped its operation, but it started its operation from Sep. 2012. GCOM-W1 was launched on 18, May, 2012 and is operating well as well as TRMM and GOSAT. ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) was successfully launched on 24th Jan. 2006. ALOS carries three instruments, i.e., PRISM (Panchromatic Remote Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping), AVNIR-2 (Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer), and PALSAR (Phased Array L band Synthetic Aperture Radar). Unfortunately, ALOS has stopped its operation on 22nd, April, 2011 by power loss. GOSAT (Greenhouse Gas Observation Satellite) was successfully launched on 29, January, 2009. GOSAT carries 2 instruments, i.e. a green house gas sensor (TANSO-FTS) and a cloud/aerosol imager (TANSO-CAI). The main sensor is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and covers 0.76 to 15 μm region with 0.2 to 0.5 cm-1 resolution. SMILES (Super-conducting Millimeter wave Emission Spectrometer) was launched on September 2009 to ISS and started the observation, but stopped its operation on April 2010. GPM (Global Precipitation Mission) core satellite was launched on Feb. 2014. GPM is a joint project with NASA and carries two instruments. JAXA has developed DPR (Dual frequency Precipitation Radar) which is a follow on of PR on TRMM. ALOS F/O satellites are divided into two satellites, i.e. SAR and optical satellites. The first one of ALOS F/O is called ALOS 2 and carries L-band SAR. It was launched on May 2014. JAXA is planning to launch follow on of optical sensors. It is now called Advanced Optical Satellite and the planned launch date is fiscal 2019. Other future satellites are GCOM-C1 (ADEOS-2 follow on), GOSAT-2 and EarthCare. GCOM-C1 will be launched on 2016 and GOSAT-2 will be launched on 2017. Another project is EarthCare. It is a joint project with ESA

  13. Overview of Japanese Earth observation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2015-10-01

    Six programs, i.e. AMSR-E, ASTER, GOSAT, GCOM-W1, GPM and ALOS-2 are going on in Japanese Earth Observation programs. ASTER has lost its short wave infrared channels. AMSR-E stopped its operation, but it started its operation from Sep. 2012. GCOM-W1 was launched on 18, May, 2012 and is operating well as well as GOSAT. ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) was successfully launched on 24th Jan. 2006. ALOS carries three instruments, i.e., PRISM (Panchromatic Remote Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping), AVNIR-2 (Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer), and PALSAR (Phased Array L band Synthetic Aperture Radar). Unfortunately, ALOS has stopped its operation on 22nd, April, 2011 by power loss. GOSAT (Greenhouse Gas Observation Satellite) was successfully launched on 29, January, 2009. GOSAT carries 2 instruments, i.e. a green house gas sensor (TANSO-FTS) and a cloud/aerosol imager (TANSO-CAI). The main sensor is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and covers 0.76 to 15 μm region with 0.2 to 0.5 cm-1 resolution. SMILES (Super-conducting Millimeter wave Emission Spectrometer) was launched on September 2009 to ISS and started the observation, but stopped its operation on April 2010. GPM (Global Precipitation Mission) core satellite was launched on Feb. 2014. GPM is a joint project with NASA and carries two instruments. JAXA has developed DPR (Dual frequency Precipitation Radar) which is a follow on of PR on TRMM. ALOS F/O satellites are divided into two satellites, i.e. SAR and optical satellites. The first one of ALOS F/O is called ALOS 2 and carries L-band SAR. It was launched on May 2014. JAXA is planning to launch follow on of optical sensors. It is now called Advanced Optical Satellite and the planned launch date is fiscal 2019. Other future satellites are GCOM-C1 (ADEOS-2 follow on), GOSAT-2 and EarthCare. GCOM-C1 will be launched on 2016 and GOSAT-2 will be launched on 2017. Another project is EarthCare. It is a joint project with ESA and JAXA is

  14. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton; Grugel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The NASA microgravity materials program is dedicated to conducting microgravity experiments and related modeling efforts that will help us understand the processes associated with the formation of materials. This knowledge will help improve ground based industrial production of such materials. The currently funded investigations include research on the distribution of dopants and formation of defects in semiconductors, transitions between columnar and dendritic grain morphology, coarsening of phase boundaries, competition between thermally and kinetically favored phases, and the formation of glassy vs. crystalline material. NASA microgravity materials science investigators are selected for funding either through a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement or by participation in a team proposing to a foreign agency research announcement. In the latter case, a US investigator participating in a successful proposal to a foreign agency can then apply to NASA for funding of an unsolicited proposal. The program relies on cooperation with other aerospace partners from around the world. The ISS facilities used for these investigations are provided primarily by partnering with foreign agencies and in most cases the US investigators are working as a part of a larger team studying a specific area of materials science. The following facilities are to be utilized for the initial investigations. The ESA provided Low Gradient Facility and the Solidification and Quench Inserts to the Materials Research Rack/Materials Science Laboratory are to be used primarily for creating bulk samples that are directionally solidified or quenched from a high temperature melt. The CNES provided DECLIC facility is used to observe morphological development in transparent materials. The ESA provided Electro-Magnetic Levitator (EML) is designed to levitate, melt and then cool samples in order to study nucleation behavior. The facility provides conditions in which nucleation of the solid is

  15. Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4

  16. Overview of the NASA SETI Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Search of Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) program plan is to scan the microwave window from 1 to 10 GHz with existing radio telescopes and sophisticated signal processing equipment looking for narrow band features that might represent artificial signals. A microwave spectrometer was built and is being field tested. A pattern recognition computer to search for drifting continuous wave signals and pulse trains in the output spectra is being designed. Equipment to characterize the radio frequency interference environment was also built. The plan is to complete the hardware and software by FY-88. Then, with increased funding, this equipment will be replicated in Very Large Scale Integration form. Observations, both a complete sky survey and a search fo nearby solar type stars, will begin in about 1990. The hypothesis that very powerful signals exist or that signals are being beamed at us will be tested. To detect the kinds of signals radiated at distances of 100 light years will require a collecting area kilometers in diameter.

  17. X-38 Program Status/Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    The X-38 Project consists of a series of experimental vehicles designed to provide the technical "blueprint" for the International Space Station's (ISS) Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). There are three atmospheric vehicles and one space flight vehicle in the program. Each vehicle is designed as a technical stepping stone for the next vehicle, with each new vehicle being more complex and advanced than it's predecessor. The X-38 project began in 1995 at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas at the direction of the NASA administrator. From the beginning, the project has had the CRY design validation as its ultimate goal. The CRY has three basic missions that drive the design that must be proven during the course of the X-38 Project: a) Emergency return of an ill or injured crew member. b) Emergency return of an entire ISS crew due to the inability of ISS to sustain life c) Planned return of an entire ISS crew due to the inability to re-supply the ISS or return the crew. The X-38 project must provide the blueprint for a vehicle that provides the capability for human return from space for all three of these design missions.

  18. HSX Program Overview and Research Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Simon; HSX Group Team

    2015-11-01

    HSX is a neoclassical-transport optimized stellarator. Research has concentrated on neoclassical transport, turbulent transport and concept optimization, and the plasma edge. For neoclassical transport, an optimized diagnostic has improved equilibrium reconstruction. Counter-streaming Pfirsch-Schluter flow measurements have been made to examine the core electron-root Er . Turbulent transport studies have included heat transport stiffness and direct comparisons with non-linear GENE calculations. Optimization of the HSX magnetic configuration to turbulent transport has been initiated. Edge studies have concentrated on measurements of 2D edge profiles and comparison to EMC3-EIRENE. The HSX program will continue in these main areas, with extension into energetic ion confinement with DNB injection. Diagnostic upgrades will permit direct Er measurements through MSE, and improvements in density and temperature fluctuation measurements will improve understanding of turbulent transport and facilitate continued GENE modeling. Edge studies will be extended to measure neutral fueling and recycling, which will permit use of a single reservoir particle balance model to provide a complete particle inventory. This work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  19. Overview of the NASA Space Radiation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Nelson, Greg; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation environment in space poses significant challenges to human health and is a major concern for long-duration, manned space missions. Outside the Earth’s protective magnetosphere, astronauts are exposed to galactic cosmic rays, whose physical characteristics are distinct from terrestrial sources of radiation such as x-rays and gamma-rays. Galactic cosmic rays consist of high-energy, high-charge (HZE) particles as well as high-energy protons; they impart unique biological damage as they traverse through tissue with impacts on human health that are largely unknown. Understanding the quantitative and qualitative differences in biological responses produced by galactic cosmic radiation compared to Earth-based radiation is imperative for accurate risk mitigation and is a major focus of the NASA Space Radiation Program’s research strategy. The main health risks of concern are epithelial carcinogenesis and leukemias, central nervous system effects that may result in acute (in-flight) cognitive impairment and/or late neurological disorders, degenerative tissue effects including circulatory and heart disease, and the possibility of acute radiation syndromes resulting from an unshielded exposure to a large solar particle event. The NASA Space Radiation Program is focused on the characterization and mitigation of these health risks and understanding possible interactions with other biological stressors found in the space environment. In this presentation, evidence for health risks associated with heavy ion exposure will be presented.

  20. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity materials program was nearly eliminated in the middle of the aughts due to budget constraints. Hardware developments were eliminated. Some investigators with experiments that could be performed using ISS partner hardware received continued funding. Partnerships were established between US investigators and ESA science teams for several investigations. ESA conducted peer reviews on the proposals of various science teams as part of an ESA AO process. Assuming he or she was part of a science team that was selected by the ESA process, a US investigator would submit a proposal to NASA for grant funding to support their part of the science team effort. In a similar manner, a US materials investigator (Dr. Rohit Trivedi) is working as a part of a CNES selected science team. As funding began to increase another seven materials investigators were selected in 2010 through an NRA mechanism to perform research related to development of Materials Science Research Rack investigations. One of these has since been converted to a Glovebox investigation.

  1. Overview of the Initial HSX Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Probert, P. H.; Sakaguchi, V.; Shafii, J.; Shohet, J. L.; Talmadge, J. N.; Kitajima, S.

    1998-11-01

    HSX is in the final assembly and commissioning process at the UW-Madison. Its primary goal is to test the improved neoclassical confinement predicted for quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) magnetic fields. HSX will use 200 kW of 28 GHz ECH to produce currentless hot electron (1 keV) plasmas at densities < 10^13 cm-3 to test low-collisionality electron transport. HSX has a high effective transform, ι_eff=N-mι of 3; giving neoclassical transport equivalent to a q=1/3 tokamak and the possibilty of reduced anomalous transport. Auxiliary coils can change the spectrum from a QHS field structure to that similar to a conventional stellarator. Second harmonic ECH at B=0.5T will be used to produce high-energy trapped electron populations to examine direct particle loss in conventional and QHS field structures. Diagnostics needed to carry out this initial program comprise SX arrays, a PHA Si(Li) system and Doppler spectroscopy. Those developed in collaboration with other institutions include a multi-chord interferometer(UCLA), Thomson scattering(PPPL), and ECEI(UC-Davis).

  2. Mars Exploration Rover thermal test program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Kinsella, Gary; Novak, Keith; Tsuyuki, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landed on the surface of Mars to begin their mission as robotic geologists. A year prior to these historic landings, both rovers and the spacecraft that delivered them to Mars, were completing a series of environmental tests in facilities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper describes the test program undertaken to validate the thermal design and verify the workmanship integrity of both rovers and the spacecraft. The spacecraft, which contained the rover within the aeroshell, were tested in a 7.5 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber. Thermal balance was performed for the near earth (hot case) condition and for the near Mars (cold case) condition. A solar simulator was used to provide the solar boundary condition on the solar array. IR lamps were used to simulate the solar heat load on the aeroshell for the off-sun attitudes experienced by the spacecraft during its cruise to Mars. Each rover was tested separately in a 3.0 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber over conditions simulating the warmest and coldest expected Mars diurnal temperature cycles. The environmental tests were conducted in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 8 to 10 Torr. In addition to thermal balance testing, the science instruments on board the rovers were tested successfully in the extreme environmental conditions anticipated for the mission. A solar simulator was not used in these tests.

  3. Hydrodynamick instabilities on ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.

    1991-06-07

    This article summarizes our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities as relevant to ICF. First we discuss classical, single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and nonlinear effects in the evolution of a single mode. Then we discuss multimode systems, considering: (1) the onset of nonlinearity; (2) a second order mode coupling theory for weakly nonlinear effects, and (3) the fully nonlinear regime. Two stabilization mechanisms relevant to ICF are described next: gradient scale length and convective stabilization. Then we describe a model which is meant to estimate the weakly nonlinear evolution of multi-mode systems as relevant to ICF, given the short-wavelength stabilization. Finally, we discuss the relevant code simulation capability, and experiments. At this time we are quite optimistic about our ability to estimate instability growth on ICF capsules, but further experiments and simulations are needed to verify the modeling. 52 refs.

  4. Testing program overview: What does a good program look like

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, A.S. )

    1992-01-01

    A good testing program is vital to the safe, reliable, and efficient operation of a nuclear facility. A testing program consists of more than scheduling, performing, and reviewing results. It includes seven interrelated critical elements, all of which are necessary to provide complete control over a station's testing program. The personnel at Peach Bottom atomic power station wanted to evaluate their testing program. The result was a report that described the framework for a complete testing program. Once the framework was developed, an implementation team was formed to develop the specific plan and schedule for modifying the existing program to conform to the framework.

  5. National solar optical materials program plan: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Masterson, K.D.

    1980-03-01

    A coordinated national program is being formulated to adapt and develop optical materials to support a goal of meeting 20% of our national energy needs with solar by the year 2000. The program contains elements covering absorber, reflector, and transmitter materials but no photovoltaic materials. These elements include research on glass and polymer materials for glazing and reflector components, environmental testing, and long-term reliability modeling. Program subelements that support R and D and encourage commercialization of new products are also discussed. An overview of the proposed funding levels is presented.

  6. Overview of the Novel Intelligent JAXA Active Rotor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada; Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Young, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    The Novel Intelligent JAXA Active Rotor (NINJA Rotor) program is a cooperative effort between JAXA and NASA, involving a test of a JAXA pressure-instrumented, active-flap rotor in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The objectives of the program are to obtain an experimental database of a rotor with active flaps and blade pressure instrumentation, and to use that data to develop analyses to predict the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance of rotors with active flaps. An overview of the program is presented, including a description of the rotor and preliminary pretest calculations.

  7. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Peters, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program has been in operation for 30 years. The program`s main goal is to report ambient penetrating radiation levels at specified locations on the Hanford Site and at nearby and distant communities. Dosimeter processing, dose calculation, and dose-reporting functions are provided by the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry section of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Health Physics Department. This presentation provides a brief historical overview of dosimeter designs, processing procedures, dose-calculation methodologies, calibration techniques, and quality control.

  8. Overview of the NASA Suborbital Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    2014-08-01

    The NASA Suborbital Program consists of Sounding Rocket and Balloon Projects managed, respectively, by the Heliophysics and Astrophysics Divisions of the Science Mission Directorate, which maintains “Program” Offices at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Suborbital missions have for several decades enabled investigations with significant results from relatively modest investments. Some have been competitive with orbital missions, while others have enabled orbital missions. NASA launches suborbital missions from sites established in the U.S. and around the world to meet investigators’ needs. A sea change in scientific ballooning occurred with the inauguration of 8 - 20 day flights around Antarctica in the early 1990’s. The U.S. National Science Foundation supports these circumpolar flights, which have been spectacularly successful with many investigations utilizing multiple flights of payloads that are recovered, refurbished, and reused to minimize life-cycle costs. The attainment of 25 - 32 day and 35 - 55 day flights in two and three circumnavigations, respectively, of the Antarctic continent has greatly increased expectations of scientific users. The 55-day Super-TIGER flight over Antarctica during the 2012-13 season broke the 42-day CREAM record during the 2004-05 season, as well as the 54-day super pressure balloon test flight in 2008-09. Qualification of super pressure flights to support 1000 kg science instruments for up to 100 days at 33 km have proceeded in parallel with plans to increase the altitude for less massive instruments requiring less atmospheric overburden. The nearly constant volume of super-pressure balloons allows stable altitude flights at non-polar latitudes. Long-duration flights in both polar and non-polar regions will confirm the important contributions that ballooning can make in traditional Astrophysics, Solar and Heliophysics, and Earth Science disciplines. With two comets approaching the sun in 2013-14, the Planetary Science

  9. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This documents presents a programmatic overview and program element plan summaries for conceptual design and assessment; physics; computation and modeling; system engineering science and technology; electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components; chemistry and materials; special nuclear materials, tritium, and explosives.

  10. Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. Stephen

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor 2001 mission to Mars was initially a key element in the Mars sample return sequence of missions. A capable rover, carrying the Cornell Athena instruments would be placed on Mars to roam over several kilometers, select samples, and place them in a cache for return by a subsequent mission. Inevitably, budget constraints forced descopes. At one critical point, the landed payload consisted only of the HEDS (Human Exploration and Development of Space) payloads selected for testing environmental properties of the surface for future human exploration. Then Congress intervened and put back some of the funding that had been deleted. NASA next redefined the payload to include as many of the Athena instruments as possible, to be distributed between the lander deck and a Sojourner class rover. This payload would then be placed on a modified version of the Mars Polar Lander rather than on the much larger, and more expensive, lander that had been originally designed for the mission. With this functionality restored the '01 mission remains an important and pivotal element of the Mars Surveyor program. It completes the Mars Observer objectives with the gamma ray spectrometer mapping. This mission will largely complete the global characterization phase of Mars exploration and mark the beginning of focused surface exploration leading to return of the first samples and the search for evidence of past Martian life. MSP'01 also is the first mission in the combined Mars exploration strategy of the HEDS and Space Science Enterprises of NASA. This mission, and those to follow, will demonstrate technologies and collect environmental data that will provide the basis for a decision to send humans to Mars. The NASA exploration strategy for Mars includes orbiters, landers and rovers launched in 2001 and 2003 and a sample return mission to be launched in 2005, returning a sample by 2008. The purpose of the rovers is to explore and characterize sites on Mars. The 2003 and 2005

  11. Characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets using PIXE, RBS, and STIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Xue; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yiyang; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Min; Shen, Hao

    2013-08-01

    Quality control of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target in the laser fusion program is vital to ensure that energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The technique of nuclear microscopy with ion beam analysis is a powerful method to provide characterization of ICF targets. Distribution of elements, depth profile, and density image of ICF targets can be identified by particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and scanning transmission ion microscopy. We present examples of ICF target characterization by nuclear microscopy at Fudan University in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes. PMID:23702102

  12. Family Support Programs and Comprehensive Collaborative Services: Overview of Family Support Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, John A.

    This fact sheet begins with an overview of family support programs, which includes a discussion of the premises of family support programs and a list of typical program components. The remainder of the fact sheet focuses on one approach to family support, comprehensive and collaborative (C&C) services. The fact sheet underscores the need for…

  13. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  14. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  15. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Peters, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Program has been in operation for 30 years. The program's main goal is to report ambient penetrating radiation levels at specified locations on the Hanford Site and at nearby and distant communities. Dosimeter processing, dose calculation, and dose-reporting functions are provided by the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry section of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Health Physics Department. This presentation provides a brief historical overview of dosimeter designs, processing procedures, dose-calculation methodologies, calibration techniques, and quality control.

  16. An Overview-NASA LeRC Structures Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1997-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center has its genesis dating back to 1943. It has been an independent Division at Lewis since 1979. Its two primary capabilities are performance and life analysis of static and dynamic systems such as those found in aircraft and spacecraft propulsion systems and experimental verification of these analyses. Research is conducted in-house, through university grants and contracts, and through cooperative programs with industry. Our work directly supports NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST), Smart Green Engine, Fast Quiet Engine, High-Temperature Materials and Processing (HiTEMP), Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion, Rotorcraft, High-Speed Research (HSR), and Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). A general overview is given discussing these programs and other technologies that are being developed at NASA LeRC.

  17. An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, D.

    2001-05-21

    This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

  18. Overview of integrated programs for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of a joint industry/government project, denoted Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD), which focuses on development of technology and associated software for integrated company-wide management of engineering information is presented. Results to date are summarized and include an in-depth documentation of a representative design process for a large engineering project, the definition and design of computer-aided design software needed to support that process, and the release of prototype software to integrated selected design functions.

  19. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  20. An overview of the NASA rotary engine research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview and technical highlights of the research efforts and studies on rotary engines over the last several years at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The test results obtained from turbocharged rotary engines and preliminary results from a high performance single rotor engine were discussed. Combustion modeling studies of the rotary engine and the use of a Laser Doppler Velocimeter to confirm the studies were examined. An in-house program in which a turbocharged rotary engine was installed in a Cessna Skymaster for ground test studies was reviewed. Details are presented on single rotor stratified charge rotary engine research efforts, both in-house and on contract.

  1. A Pre-College Orientation Program for Visually Impaired Students. [Overview and Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queensborough Community Coll., Bayside, NY.

    Two documents, an overview and a more in-depth report, examine Queensborough Community College's pre-college orientation program for visually impaired students. The overview, by Patricia J. Evanoski, describes the program's rationale and procedures. The second document focuses on the 1980 summer program, and examines the following program aspects:…

  2. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Bobby J.; Needleman, Harvey C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a combined total of approximately fifty to sixty missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions are provided in support of investigations sponsored by NASA'S Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program has continued to su,pport the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payload and providing the rocket vehicle and launch operations necessary to provide the altitude/time required obtain the science objectives. The sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface, which is physically inaccessible to either balloons or satellites. A new architecture for providing this support has been introduced this year with the establishment of the NASA Sounding Rockets Contract. The Program has continued to introduce improvements into their operations and ground and flight systems. An overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets Program with special emphasis on the new support contract will be presented. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. Long duration balloon (LDB) is a prominent aspect of the program with two campaigns scheduled for this calendar year. Two flights are scheduled in the Northern Hemisphere from Fairbanks, Alaska, in June and two flights are scheduled from McMurdo, Antarctica, in the Southern Hemisphere in December. The comprehensive balloon research and development (R&D) effort has continued with advances being made across the

  3. Nuclear-data needs for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Motz, H.T.

    1983-05-09

    Our survey was limited to ICF programs in the United States. It included researchers in laser and heavy ion fusion, target design, target diagnostics, and conceptual reactor design. We asked each of these people to read the current data needs for magnetic fusion energy and to comment on additional data that they require.

  4. Overview of Energy Systems' safety analysis report programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The primary purpose of an Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is to provide a basis for judging the adequacy of a facility's safety. The SAR documents the safety analyses that systematically identify the hazards posed by the facility, analyze the consequences and risk of potential accidents, and describe hazard control measures that protect the health and safety of the public and employees. In addition, some SARs document, as Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs, which include Technical Specifications and Operational Safety Requirements), technical and administrative requirements that ensure the facility is operated within prescribed safety limits. SARs also provide conveniently summarized information that may be used to support procedure development, training, inspections, and other activities necessary to facility operation. This Overview of Energy Systems Safety Analysis Report Programs'' Provides an introduction to the programs and processes used in the development and maintenance of the SARs. It also summarizes some of the uses of the SARs within Energy Systems and DOE.

  5. An overview of the NASA satellite communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    This overview sets the framework for five descriptive papers from NASA Field Centers where satellite communications research and development is being conducted. A review of events of 1973-78 in the Federal Government, in industry, and in professional organizations are shown to have contributed to the formulation of new policy supporting the establishment of renewed efforts within NASA toward improved use of the spectrum and orbit for communications. The work will focus on the development of 'frequency re-use' technology, including multi-beam antennas and on-board switching for future spacecraft. This paper treats the planning issues and the approaches taken toward forming a coherent program from the sustaining efforts of the recent past. Companion papers highlight the methods, the technology, and the activities that are assisting in the transition to a new program.

  6. Overview of NASA HSR high-lift program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) Program being conducted to develop the technologies essential for the successful U.S. development of a commercial supersonic air transport in the 2005 timeframe are provided. The HSR program is being conducted in two phases, with the first phase stressing technology to ensure environmental acceptability and the second phase stressing technology to make the vehicle economically viable (in contrast to the current Concorde design). During Phase 1 of the program, a key element of the environmental emphases is minimization of community noise through effective engine nozzle noise suppression technology and through improving the performance of high-lift systems. An overview of the current Phase 1 High-Lift Program, directed at technology for community noise reduction, is presented. The total target for takeoff engine noise reduction to meet expected regulations is believed to be about 20 EPNdB. The high-lift research is stressing the exploration of innovative high-lift concepts and advanced flight operations procedures to achieve a substantial (approximately 6 EPNdB) reduction in community noise to supplement the reductions expected from engine nozzle noise suppression concepts; primary concern is focused on the takeoff and climbout operations where very high engine power settings are used. Significant reductions in aerodynamic drag in this regime will allow substantial reductions in the required engine thrust levels and therefore reductions in the noise generated.

  7. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R.; Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  8. Overview of the EUROfusion Medium Size Tokamak program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Piero; Beurskens, Marc; Coda, Stefano; Eich, Thomas; Meyer, Hendrik; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-11-01

    As a result of the new organization of the European fusion programme, now under the umbrella of the EUROfusion Consortium, the MST (Medium Size Tokamaks) task force is in charge of executing the European science programme in the ASDEX Upgrade, TCV and MAST-U tokamaks. This paper will present an overview of the main results obtained in the 2014 campaign-where only ASDEX upgrade was operating-and the preliminary achievements of the recently started 2015/16 campaign, where also TCV will contribute. The main subjects of the experimental campaigns are (i) the development of scenarios relevant for the ITER Q=10 goal, in an all metal wall device (ii) the understanding of ELM mitigation/suppression with pellets and resonant magnetic perturbations, and in particular the effect of density versus collisionality, (iii) the understanding and optimization of methods for disruption mitigation or avoidance and runaway electrons control and (iv) the exploration of ITER and DEMO relevant scenarios with high normalized separatrix power flux, Psep / R , (Psep is the power through the separatrix, R the major radius) and tolerable target heat loads. The overview of the future programs in MST will be given. http://www.euro-fusionscipub.org/mst1

  9. Overview of the University of Wyoming's hexapod program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInroy, John

    2003-10-01

    For the past eight years, the University of Wyoming (UW) has been developing parallel kinematics machines to perform fault tolerant precision pointing and vibration isolation. These machines have been predominantly of the Stewart platform, or hexapod, type although other configurations including redundant fast steering mirrors have been considered. A brief history of the program will be followed by an overview of the experimental hardware. Then, UW's technical contributions will be summarized. These include the following: (1) dynamic modeling of flexure jointed hexapods, (2) decoupled control, (3) fault tolerant pointing and isolation, (4) adaptive cancellation of repetitive vibrations, (5) division of labor among fine and very fine actuators, and (6) geometric design of Stewart platforms and optimization.

  10. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.; Becker, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The U.S. Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration{close_quote}s Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent major changes in the U.S. Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, John C.; Becker, David L.

    1996-03-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The U.S. Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent major changes in the U.S. Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined.

  12. NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program's technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in - spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer.tethers, aeroassist and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA's plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  13. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals ase the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  14. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy; Bonometti, Joe; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie; Montgomery, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5 - 10 kW range, to advanced cryogenic propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, and NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the $60M per year In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  15. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The US Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent ma or changes in the US Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined.

  16. Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Technology Development Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, B. Thai; Clampin, M.; Werneth, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for PCOS Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the PCOS Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report include science missions and technology development for dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray, and inflation probe science.

  17. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  18. An Overview of the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program is an agency-wide effort aimed at ensuring the quality, safety, reliability and performance of flight battery systems for NASA applications. The program provides for the validation of primary and secondary cell and battery level technology advances to ensure their availability and readiness for use in NASA missions. It serves to bridge the gap between the development of technology advances and the realization and incorporation of these advances into mission applications. The program is led by the Glenn Research Center and involves funded task activities at each of the NASA mission centers and JPL. The overall products are safe, reliable, high quality batteries for mission applications. The products are defined along three product lines: 1. Battery Systems Technology - Elements of this task area cover the systems aspects of battery operation and generally apply across chemistries. This includes the development of guidelines documents, the establishment and maintenance of a central battery database that serves a central repository for battery characterization and verification test data from tests performed under the support of this program, the NASA Battery Workshop, and general test facility support. 2. Secondary Battery Technology - l h s task area focuses on the validation of battery technology for nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, nickel-metal-hydride and lithium-ion secondary battery systems. Standardized test regimes are used to validate the quality of a cell lot or cell design for flight applications. In this area, efforts are now concentrated on the validation and verification of lithium-ion battery technology for aerospace applications. 3. Primary Battery Technology - The safety and reliability aspects for primary lithium battery systems that are used in manned operations on the Shuttle and International Space Station are addressed in the primary battery technology task area. An overview of the task areas

  19. [Functioning and disability: the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)].

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Fidalgo, María; Geoffrey, Reed; Stucki, Gerold; Cieza, Alarcos

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has provided a new foundation for our understanding of health, functioning, and disability. It covers most of the health and health-related domains that make up the human experience, and the most environmental factors that influence that experience of functioning and disability. With the exhaustive ICF, patients' functioning -including its components body functions and structures and activities and participation-, becomes a central perspective in medicine. To implement the ICF in medicine and other fields, practical tools (= ICF Core Sets) have been developed. They are selected sets of categories out of the whole classification which serve as minimal standards for the assessment and reporting of functioning and health for clinical studies and clinical encounters (Brief ICF Core Set) or as standards for multiprofessional comprehensive assessment (Comprehensive ICF Core Set). Different from generic and condition-specific health-status measures, the ICF Core Sets include important body functions and structures and contextual factors. The use of the ICF Core Sets provides an important step towards improved communications between healthcare providers and professionals, and will enable patients and their families to understand and communicate with health professionals about their functioning and treatment goals. Specific applications include multi- and interdisciplinary assessment in clinical settings and in legal expert evaluations and use in disease or functioning-management programs. The ICF has also a potential as a conceptual framework to clarify an interrelated universe of health-related concepts which can be elucidated based on the ICF and therefore will be an ideal tool for teaching students in all medical fields and may open doors to multi-professional learning. PMID:20111826

  20. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotope Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, J.

    2004-10-05

    This presentation provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotopes Program. The charter of the Isotope Programs covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services.

  1. 75 FR 10225 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Language Resource Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Language Resource Centers Program; Notice... Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish... learning foreign languages. Priorities: This notice contains one competitive preference priority and...

  2. Contributions to the Genesis and Progress of ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J H

    2006-02-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has progressed from the detonation of large-scale fusion explosions initiated by atomic bombs in the early 1950s to final preparations for initiating small-scale fusion explosions with giant lasers. The next major step after ignition will be development of high performance targets that can be initiated with much smaller, lower cost lasers. In the 21st century and beyond, ICF's grand challenge is to develop practical power plants that generate low cost, clean, inexhaustible fusion energy. In this chapter, I first describe the origin in 1960-61 of ICF target concepts, early speculations on laser driven 'Thermonuclear Engines' for power production and rocket propulsion, and encouraging large-scale nuclear explosive experiments conducted in 1962. Next, I recall the 40-year, multi-billion dollar ignition campaign - to develop a matched combination of sufficiently high-performance implosion lasers and sufficiently stable targets capable of igniting small fusion explosions. I conclude with brief comments on the NIF ignition campaign and very high-performance targets, and speculations on ICF's potential in a centuries-long Darwinian competition of future energy systems. My perspectives in this chapter are those of a nuclear explosive designer, optimistic proponent of ICF energy, and Livermore Laboratory leader. The perspectives of Livermore's post 1970 laser experts and builders, and laser fusion experimentalists are provided in a chapter written by John Holzrichter, a leading scientist and leader in Livermore's second generation laser fusion program. In a third chapter, Ray Kidder, a theoretical physicist and early laser fusion pioneer, provides his perspectives including the history of the first generation laser fusion program he led from 1962-1972.

  3. Origins and Overview of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlowski, Joseph W.; Graham, David H.; Boccadoro, Charles H.; Coen, Peter G.; Maglieri, Domenic J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the DARPA Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) Program was to demonstrate for the first time in flight that sonic booms can be substantially reduced by incorporating specialized aircraft shaping techniques. Although mitigation of the sonic boom via specialized shaping techniques was theorized decades ago, until now, this theory had never been tested with a flight vehicle subjected to actual flight conditions in a real atmosphere. The demonstrative success, which occurred on 27 August 2003 with repeat flights in the supersonic corridor at Edwards Air Force Base, is a critical milestone in the development of next generation supersonic aircraft that could one day fly unrestricted over land and help usher in a new era of time-critical air transport. Pressure measurements obtained on the ground and in the air confirmed that the specific modifications made to a Northrop Grumman F-5E aircraft not only changed the shape of the shock wave signature emanating from the aircraft, but also produced a flat-top signature whose shape persisted, as predicted, as the pressure waves propagated through the atmosphere to the ground. This accomplishment represents a major advance towards reducing the startling and potentially damaging noise of a sonic boom. This paper describes the evolution of the SSBD program, including the rationale for test article selection, and provides an overview of the history making accomplishments achieved during the SSBD effort, as well as, the follow-on NASA Shaped Sonic Boom Experiment (SSBE) Program, whose goal was to further evaluate the characteristics and robustness of shaped boom signatures.

  4. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Fellowship Grants Program. 3402.5 Section 3402.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.5 Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. (a) The program will provide funds for a...

  5. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Fellowship Grants Program. 3402.5 Section 3402.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.5 Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. (a) The program will provide funds for a...

  6. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Fellowship Grants Program. 3402.5 Section 3402.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.5 Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. (a) The program will provide funds for a...

  7. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Fellowship Grants Program. 3402.5 Section 3402.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.5 Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. (a) The program will provide funds for a...

  8. 75 FR 37415 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Training Program for Federal TRIO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Training Program for Federal TRIO Programs (Training Program) Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2010. Catalog of Federal... Purpose of Program: The Training Program provides grants to train the staff and leadership...

  9. Low-gravity fluid physics: A program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of the microgravity fluid physics program at Lewis Research Center. One of the main reasons for conducting low gravity research in fluid physics is to study phenomena such as surface tension, interfacial contact angles, and diffusion independent of such gravitationally induced effects as buoyant convection. Fluid physics is at the heart of many space-based technologies including power systems, thermal control systems, and life support systems. Fundamental understanding of fluid physics is a key ingredient to successful space systems design. In addition to describing ground-based and space-based low-gravity facilities, selected experiments are presented which highlight Lewis work in fluid physics. These experiments can be categorized into five theme areas which summarize the work being conducted at Lewis for OSSA: (1) isothermal/iso-solutal capillary phenomena; (2) capillary phenomena with thermal/solutal gradients; (3) thermal-solutal convection; (4) first- and second-order phase transitions in a static fluid; and (5) multiphase flow.

  10. Yucca Mountain Project - Science & Technology Radionuclide Absorbers Development Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-Nian Jow; R.C. Moore; K.B. Helean; S. Mattigod; M. Hochella; A.R. Felmy; J. Liu; K. Rosso; G. Fryxell; J. Krumhansl; Y. Wang

    2005-01-14

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository is anticipated to be the first facility for long-term disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The facility, located in the southern Nevada desert, is currently in the planning stages with initial exploratory excavations completed. It is an underground facility mined into the tuffaceous volcanic rocks that sit above the local water table. The focus of the work described in this paper is the development of radionuclide absorbers or ''getter'' materials for neptunium (Np), iodine (I), and technetium (Tc) for potential deployment in the repository. ''Getter'' materials retard the migration of radionuclides through sorption, reduction, or other chemical and physical processes, thereby slowing or preventing the release and transport of radionuclides. An overview of the objectives and approaches utilized in this work with respect to materials selection and modeling of ion ''getters'' is presented. The benefits of the ''getter'' development program to the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) are outlined.

  11. Backlighting prospects for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.; Matthews, D.; Ahlstrom, H.; Attwood, D.; Price, R.; Coleman, L.; Manes, K.; Slivinsky, V.

    1981-01-01

    High energy x-ray backlighters are necessary to diagnose the implosion symmetry and stability of intermediate and high density targets. Synchronization requirements between the target irradiating pulse and the radiograph place severe constraints on the type of x-ray sources which can be used and favors laser irradiated backlighters. Data gathered on line emitters as a function of laser pulselength, wavelength and intensity in the 5 to 10 keV region are used to determine which diagnostic instruments will be feasible for ICF target experiments, and the requirements for backlighter irradiation.

  12. Canada and the International Space Station Program: Overview and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Savi

    2002-01-01

    The twelve months since IAC 2001 have been some of the most exciting and rewarding with regards to Canada's participation in the International Space Station Program. Canada's contribution to the ISS is the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), the external robotic system that is key to the successful assembly of the Space Station, the maintenance of its external systems, astronaut EVA support, and the servicing of external science payloads. Between April and July 2001 the first flight-element,Canadarm2 (Space Station Remote Manipulator System), of Canada's contribution to the ISS was the successfully launched, checked out and then used for assembly of the Station's Airlock. In April 2002 the US supplied MSS Mobile Transporter was positioned on-orbit paving the way for the launch, in June, of the next element of Canada's Mobile Servicing System, the MSC Base System. During the June mission a roll wrist joint on Canadarm2 was also replaced - a first ever EVA repair of this type. The paper provides an overview of Canada's on-orbit and ground segment contributions to the International Space Station and describes the on-orbit assembly and operations to date of the flight elements. The MSS ground segment that supports MSS operations, training, sustaining engineering, and logistics activities has reached maturity. The ongoing activities involving the MSS ground segment as well as the Canadian Payloads Telescience Operations Center are outlined. The paper includes an account of the Canadian astronaut and utilization ISS activities. The paper concludes with Canada's views and participation in the NASA activities to bring its portion of the program back within budget. "Copyright 2002 by Graham Gibbs (Canadian Space Agency). Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., with permission. Released to IAF/IAA/AIAA to publish in all forms."

  13. Overview of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Environmental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgave, John C.; Man, Kin F.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) program. The engineering objectives of the program are to create a Mobile Science Laboratory capable of one Mars Year surface operational lifetime (670 Martian sols = 687 Earth days). It will be able to land and operation over wide range of latitudes, altitudes and seasons It must have controlled propulsive landing and demonstrate improved landing precision via guided entry The general science objectives are to perform science that will focus on Mars habitability, perform next generation analytical laboratory science investigations, perform remote sensing/contact investigations and carry a suite of environmental monitoring instruments. Specific scientific objectives of the MSL are: (1) Characterization of geological features, contributing to deciphering geological history and the processes that have modified rocks and regolith, including the role of water. (2) Determination of the mineralogy and chemical composition (including an inventory of elements such as C, H, N, O, P, S, etc. known to be building blocks for life) of surface and near-surface materials. (3) Determination of energy sources that could be used to sustain biological processes. (4) Characterization of organic compounds and potential biomarkers in representative regolith, rocks, and ices. (5) Determination the stable isotopic and noble gas composition of the present-day bulk atmosphere. (6) Identification potential bio-signatures (chemical, textural, isotopic) in rocks and regolith. (7) Characterization of the broad spectrum of surface radiation, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. (8) Characterization of the local environment, including basic meteorology, the state and cycling of water and C02, and the near-surface distribution of hydrogen. Several views of the planned MSL and the rover are shown. The MSL environmental program is to: (1) Ensure the flight hardware design is

  14. Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Craig D.; And Others

    This document consists of the first section of a book written to educate and inform those in the helping professions on how to deal with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The two chapters in this first section present an overview of the AIDS crisis and provide a foundation for the rest of the book. "Emerging Trends: AIDS Today and in the…

  15. Overviews of the Apollo Program and Its Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This special bibliography includes items individually selected by scientific and technical information professionals that provide an overview of the history, events, and results of the Apollo missions. Planning, scheduling, and management are also included.

  16. Whole-House Approach Benefits Builders, Buyers, and the Environment Building America Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2001-05-01

    This document provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. Building America works with the residential building industry to develop and implement innovative building processes and technologies.

  17. WHO's ICF and Functional Status Information in Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Üstün, T. Bedirhan; Chatterji, Somnath; Kostansjek, Nenad; Bickenbach, Jerome

    2003-01-01

    A common framework for describing functional status information (FSI) in health records is needed in order to make this information comparable and of value. The World Health Organization's (WHO's) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which has been approved by all its member States, provides this common language and framework. The biopsychosocial model of functioning and disability embodied in the ICF goes beyond disease and conceptualizes functioning from the individual's body, person, and lived experience vantage points, thereby allowing for planning interventions targeted at the individual's body, the individual as a whole or toward the environment. This framework then permits the evaluation of both the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of these different interventions in devising programs at the personal or societal level. PMID:12894636

  18. Monte Carlo methods in ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1997-06-24

    Monte Carlo methods appropriate to simulate the transport of x-rays, neutrons, ion and electrons in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are described and analyzed. The Implicit Monte Carlo method of x-ray transport handles symmetry within indirect drive ICF hohlraums well, but can be improved 50X in efficiency by angular biasing the x-rays towards the fuel capsule. Accurate simulation of thermonuclear burns nd burn diagnostics involves detailed particle source spectra, charged particle ranges, inflight reaction kinematics, corrections for bulk and thermal Doppler effects and variance reduction to obtain adequate statistics for rare events. It is found that the effects of angular Coulomb scattering must be included in models of charged particle transport through heterogeneous materials.

  19. Which Study Designs Are Capable of Producing Valid Evidence about a Program's Effectiveness? A Brief Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This guide is addressed to policy officials, program providers, and researchers who are seeking to: (1) identify and implement social programs backed by valid evidence of effectiveness; or (2) sponsor or conduct an evaluation to determine whether a program is effective. The guide provides a brief overview of which studies can produce valid…

  20. An overview of the F-117A avionics flight test program

    SciTech Connect

    Silz, R. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper is an overview of the history of the F-117A avionics flight test program. System design concepts and equipment selections are explored followed by a review of full scale development and full capability development testing. Flight testing the Weapon System Computational Subsystem upgrade and the Offensive Combat Improvement Program are reviewed. Current flight test programs and future system updates are highlighted.

  1. The Noises of Literacy: An Overview of Intergenerational and Family Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickse, Ruth S.

    This overview of intergenerational and family literacy programs in the United States consists of five sections, a bibliography, and four appendices. Section 1 presents background information and expectations for programs and describes the target populations and program designs and administration. Section 2 describes the research base and the…

  2. Overview of Energy Systems` safety analysis report programs. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The primary purpose of an Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is to provide a basis for judging the adequacy of a facility`s safety. The SAR documents the safety analyses that systematically identify the hazards posed by the facility, analyze the consequences and risk of potential accidents, and describe hazard control measures that protect the health and safety of the public and employees. In addition, some SARs document, as Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs, which include Technical Specifications and Operational Safety Requirements), technical and administrative requirements that ensure the facility is operated within prescribed safety limits. SARs also provide conveniently summarized information that may be used to support procedure development, training, inspections, and other activities necessary to facility operation. This ``Overview of Energy Systems Safety Analysis Report Programs`` Provides an introduction to the programs and processes used in the development and maintenance of the SARs. It also summarizes some of the uses of the SARs within Energy Systems and DOE.

  3. Overview of national bird population monitoring programs and databases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butcher, G.S.; Peterjohn, B.; Ralph, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A number of programs have been set up to monitor populations of nongame migratory birds. We review these programs and their purposes and provide information on obtaining data or results from these programs. In addition, we review recommendations for improving these programs.

  4. A Brief Overview of the Mountain-Plains Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Rowan W.

    This report discusses the five-year history of the Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program. In broad terms, the program is viewed as a human development program and not simply as a technical training program. The adult population it serves is defined as rural disadvantaged, and the primary selection criterion is…

  5. Overview of an Advanced Hypersonic Structural Concept Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hudson, Larry D.; Piazza, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of hypersonics M&S advanced structural concepts development and experimental methods. The discussion on concepts development includes the background, task objectives, test plan, and current status of the C/SiC Ruddervator Subcomponent Test Article (RSTA). The discussion of experimental methods examines instrumentation needs, sensors of interest, and examples of ongoing efforts in the development of extreme environment sensors.

  6. The Magnetically Driven Direct Drive Approach to Ignition: Responses to Questions by Panel 1 of the FY15 ICF Program Review.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinars, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The long-term goal of the pulsed-­power based, magnetically driven target approach is to achieve high single­shot yields (0.5-­1 GJ per shot). This goal may take decades to achieve, but if successful we believe it would be a key capability for the Stockpile Stewardship program, as noted as far back as 1988 in the Laboratory Microfusion Capability Phase 1 (U) study. If this approach is successful, it may be possible to achieve these yields from targets absorbing up to 10 MJ in a laboratory pulsed power facility with a stored energy of roughly 130 MJ. Such a facility would be substantially cheaper, and not as complex, than the corresponding pulsed power facility required for producing comparable yields from x-ray driven capsule targets.

  7. Radiative properties in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Calisti, A.; Gilleron, F.; Mondet, G.; Pain, J.-C.

    2011-03-01

    We present new calculations on radiative power losses of carbon and gold. Both ions are involved in inertial confinement fusion. The first element could also be utilized in the walls of future TOKAMAK reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) while the second is present in holraums and its X-ray emission contributes to the heating in ICF. Because argon impurities may be used in the fusion core, in order to diagnose the electron temperature, we have calculated the intensities of the He-β line and the Li-like Ar satellite lines. In fact, the intensity ratio depends on electron temperature. The effect of the plasma electric field on the line intensities is discussed. Our approach is based on a detailed line calculation in which the atomic database is provided by the MCDF code. Then a lineshape code allowing for NLTE ionic populations was adapted to the calculation of RPL profiles. Because the calculation time is sometimes prohibitive, a second approach, based on the first moments of the RPL, is investigated. This approach was used for extensive calculations on germanium.

  8. JSC, NASA Lead Center: Overview of Human Space Life Sciences Programs Office (HSLSPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegemoeller, Charles

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Human Space Life Sciences Programs Office (HSLSPO) presents the following topics in viewgraph form: Agency structure, objectives of the HSLSPO lead center implementation plan, HSLSPO relationship to Johnson Space Center (JSC) as lead center, HSLSPO programs and projects, biomedical research and countermeasures, HSLSPO relationship to the International Space Station (ISS), and BR&C ISS flight research content.

  9. 75 FR 18171 - Overview Information; Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program; Notice Inviting Applications for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... public provided input in response to questions, published in the Federal Register (see 74 FR 54795-54800... Overview Information; Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards... Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), the Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program provides...

  10. 76 FR 4322 - Charter Schools Program (CSP); Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Charter Schools Program (CSP); Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Charter Schools Program (CSP): State Educational Agencies Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Catalog of Federal...

  11. Human Research Program Science Management: Overview of Research and Development Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of NASA's Human Research Science Management Program is presented. The topics include: 1) Human Research Program Goals; 2) Elements and Projects within HRP; 3) Development and Maintenance of Priorities; 4) Acquisition and Evaluation of Research and Technology Proposals; and 5) Annual Reviews

  12. Resource Recovery Overview [Teacher's Guide]; Resource Recovery and You [Student Book]. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Resource Recovery Education Program contains a variety of ideas, approaches, and learning aids for teaching about solid waste disposal at the secondary level. The program kit consists of a teacher's guide which provides an overview; separate teacher's guides for social studies, science, and industrial arts; a student booklet of readings; and a…

  13. Reducing the Risk: Unemployed Migrant Youth and Labour Market Programs. Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Inst. of Multicultural Affairs, Melbourne (Australia).

    This booklet is an overview and summary of the publication "Reducing the Risk: Unemployed Migrant Youth and Labour Market Programs" which reviews programs and services for migrant and refugee youth in Australia. The unemployment rate for this group is higher than for their Australian-born peers, and their participation in governmental labor market…

  14. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Overview of the NASA high power laser program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundholm, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The overall objectives of the NASA High Power Laser Program are reviewed along with their structure and center responsibilities. Present and future funding, laser power transmission in space, selected program highlights, the research and technology schedule, and the expected pace of the program are briefly considered.

  16. Overview of NASA's Pulsed Plasma Thruster Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Arrington, Lynn A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Pulsed Plasma Thruster Program consists of flight demonstration experiments, base research, and development efforts being conducted through a combination of in-house work, contracts, and collaborative programs. The program receives sponsorship from Energetics Project, the New Millennium Program, and the Small Business Innovative Research Program. The Energetics Project sponsors basic and fundamental research to increase thruster life, improve thruster performance, and reduce system mass. The New Millennium Program sponsors the in-orbit operation of the Pulsed Plasma Thruster experiment on the Earth Observing 1 spacecraft. The Small Business Innovative Research Program sponsors the development of innovative diamond-film capacitors, piezoelectric ignitors, and advanced fuels. Programmatic background, recent technical accomplishments, and future activities for each programmatic element are provided.

  17. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: A government overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1993-01-01

    NASA-Langley, under the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program, set out in 1984 to establish the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Considerable work has been done by the industry participants in the program since that time. Because the DAMVIBS Program is being phased out, a government/industry assessment of the program has been made to identify those accomplishments and contributions which may be ascribed to the program. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the program and its accomplishments and contributions from the perspective of the government sponsoring organization.

  18. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program: A government overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    LaRC, under the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program, set out in 1984 to establish the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Considerable work was performed by the industry participants in the program since that time. Because the DAMVIBS Program is being phased out, a government/industry assessment of the program was made to identify those accomplishments and contributions which may be ascribed to the program. The purpose is to provide an overview of the program and its accomplishments and contributions from the perspective of the government sponsoring organization.

  19. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  20. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. Overview of the CLAS/JLAB physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan

    2006-08-28

    The CLAS collaboration has developed a broad program for studying electromagnetically induced processes with both electron and photon beams. This program includes topics such as excited baryon resonances, meson production, hadron structure, search for pentaquarks, and the structure of nuclei. In this report, highlights of recent CLAS results will be presented.

  2. Overview of FIREMEN program at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Ames Firemen Program is described. The key elements of the program include: (1) the development and evaluation of aircraft interior composite panels; (2) the thermochemical and flammability characterization of thermoset and thermoplastic resins; and (3) the evolution of fire resist aircraft seat components. The first two elements are presented.

  3. Overview of Practical Issues in a CAT Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has become increasingly common in large-scale testing programs. This paper considers relevant practical issues that are likely to be faced by the developers and managers of a CAT program. The first cluster of issues is that of item pool development and maintenance. It includes such considerations as item pool…

  4. The Teaching American History Program: An Introduction and Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The Teaching American History (TAH) program began in 2001 as a bold new idea: that history content could be delivered directly to United States history teachers through ongoing partnerships with providers of history expertise. The program awards three-year federal education grants for up to $1 million to develop and carry out these professional…

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  6. First Steps: An Early Intervention Program for Antisocial Kindergartners. Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hill M.; And Others

    This report describes an early intervention program for at-risk kindergartners who show the early signs of antisocial behavior patterns. The "First Steps" program consists of three modules that are designed to be used in concert with each other. These modules are: (1) a universal screening procedure that affords each kindergarten child an equal…

  7. Technology transfer and the NASA Technology Utilization Program - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarks, Henry J.; Rose, James T.; Mangum, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Technology Utilization (TU) Program is to broaden and accelerate the transfer of aerospace technology and to develop new commercial products and processes that represent additional return on the national investment in the U.S. space programs. The mechanisms established by the TU Program includes TU offices, publications, the information retrieval, software dissemination, and the NASA Applications Engineering Program. These mechanisms are implemented through a nationwide NASA TU Network, working closely with industry and public sector organizations to encourage and facilitate their access and utilization of the results of the U.S space programs. Examples of TU are described, including a method for the reduction of metal fatigue in textile equipment and a method for the management of wandering behavior in Alzheimer's patients.

  8. An Overview of an Experimental Demonstration Aerotow Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Bowers, Albion H.; Lokos, William A.; Peters, Todd L.; Gera, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An overview of an experimental demonstration of aerotowing a delta-wing airplane with low-aspect ratio and relatively high wing loading is presented. Aerotowing of future space launch configurations is a new concept, and the objective of the work described herein is to demonstrate the aerotow operation using an airplane configuration similar to conceptual space launch vehicles. Background information on the use of aerotow for a space launch vehicle is presented, and the aerotow system used in this demonstration is described. The ground tests, analytical studies, and flight planning used to predict system behavior and to enhance flight safety are detailed. The instrumentation suite and flight test maneuvers flown are discussed, preliminary performance is assessed, and flight test results are compared with the preflight predictions.

  9. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  10. Overview and Experiences of a Nursing e-Mentorship Program

    PubMed Central

    Faiman, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Little is known regarding the feasibility and efficacy of an online continuing education program for oncology nurses. The Multiple Myeloma Mentorship Program, a quality improvement project for the Institute for Medical Education and Research, was designed to meet the educational needs of oncology nurses caring for patients with multiple myeloma. Twenty-five expert nurses with expertise in multiple myeloma from 23 cancer centers in the United States partnered with 50 oncology nurses in an electronic format from July 2009 to January 2010. The purpose of the program was to educate oncology nurses about the latest treatments and strategies for optimal side-effect management for patients with multiple myeloma. Nurse mentees selected their preferred form of learning—webcast, in-person speaker, or monograph. Two live webcasts allowed for didactic discussion between mentors and mentees. During and after the program, mentors conducted informal, unscripted interviews with nurse participants to determine preferred learning format, challenges, and implications for practice. Twelve nurses preferred Web-based learning to in-person presentations, citing flexibility and convenience as reasons for that choice. Time constraints with Web-based and in-person learning were a barrier to nurse mentees completing assigned modules. Several nurses implemented practice changes as a result of the program. Nurses who participated in the mentorship program were satisfied with the content. Learning styles and format should be considered in future mentorship programs. PMID:21810575

  11. Compressed-air energy-storage technology: Program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, L. D.

    1981-07-01

    A new technology designed to reduce the consumption of oil in the generation of electric power was developed. The program has two major elements: reservoir stability studies and second generation concepts studies. The reservoir stability studies are aimed at developing stability criteria for long term operation of large underground reservoirs used for compressed air storage. The second generation concepts studies are aimed at developing new concepts that will require little or no petroleum fuels for operation. The program efforts are outlined and major accomplishments towards the objectives of the program are identified.

  12. Overview of Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Joe

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the work done at NASA's Glenn Research Center on the ultra-efficient engine technology (UEET) program. The intent at the program's outset in 1998 was to establish a foundation for the next generation of aircraft engines for both commercial and military applications. A primary focus of this program was to be the development and utilization of technologies which would improve both subsonic and high-speed flight capabilities. Included in the presentation are details on the development of propulsion systems for varied types of aircraft, and results from attempts at reduction of emissions.

  13. Overview of the DOE/SERI Biochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J D

    1986-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute manages a program of research and development on the biochemical conversion of renewable lignocellulosic materials to liquid fuels for the Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division. The Biochemical Conversion Program is mission oriented so effort is concentrated on technologies which appear to have the greatest potential for being adopted by the private sector to economically convert lignocellulosic materials into high value liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol. The program is structured to supply the technology for such fuels to compete economically first as an octane booster or fuel additive, and, with additional improvements, as a neat fuel. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Overview of the large space systems technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guastaferro, A.

    1978-01-01

    A multicenter management approach which provides the opportunity to work across many disciplines and match the roles and expertise of various NASA facilities is described for the large space system technology (LSST) program which was established to define, develop, and verify structural concepts, analyses, and design procedures for a range of sizes and configurations to be deployed, erected, or fabricated in orbit during projected space missions utilizing shuttle in the 1985 to 2000 time period. Benefits from the program include reduced costs for transporting structures having low mass, high packageability, and multimission capabilities. Technologies identified by the LSST program will contribute to the solutions of problems in other sectors of the economy.

  15. Automotive Stirling engine development program - Overview and status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nightingale, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of the automotive-Stirling-engine development program being undertaken by DOE and NASA Lewis is reviewed. The program goals and the reference-engine design are explained, and the modifications introduced to improve performance and lower manufacturing costs are discussed and illustrated, including part-power optimization; increased operating temperature (from 720 to 820 C); 45.4-kg weight reduction; elimination of Co and reduction of Cr used; and improved seals, ceramic components, and high-temperature alloys. The test program, some difficulties encountered, and results after 2042 h are summarized.

  16. Nuclear diagnostics in support of ICF experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M.J.; Hall, J.

    1996-06-05

    As the yields of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments increase to NIF levels new diagnostic techniques for studying details of fusion burn behavior will become feasible. The new techniques will provide improved measurements of fusion burn temperature and history. Improved temperature measurements might be achieved with magnetic spectroscopy of fusion neutrons. High-bandwidth fusion reaction history will be measured with fusion-specific {gamma}-ray diagnostics. Additional energy-resolved {gamma}-ray might be able to study a selection of specific behaviors during fusion burn. Present ICF yields greater than 10{sup 13} neutrons are sufficient to demonstrate the basic methods that underlie the new techniques. As ICF yields increase, the diagnostics designs adjusted accordingly in order to provide clear and specific data on fusion burn performance.

  17. Plasma viscosity in spherical ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E.; Joglekar, A.; Ortega, M.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2016-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hydrodynamic codes often ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates plasma viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. A Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport, and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation, is used to study differences between ICF implosions with and without plasma viscosity and to examine the role of artificial viscosity in a Lagrangian implosion simulation. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, fuel compression, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and this study suggests that artificial viscosity may provide an unphysical stability in implosion simulations.

  18. The Northwest Regional Program in Veterinary Medical Education: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustad, L. K.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results of a four-year cooperative effort to develop the Washington-Oregon-Idaho Regional Program in Veterinary Medicine (WOI) are summarized. Special admissions policies, curriculum, administrative procedures, and funding approaches are reviewed. (LBH)

  19. SPS microwave health and ecological effects: Program area overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    The potential microwave health and ecological effects due to the operations of the Satellite Power System are discussed. An outline of the research needed to insure public acceptance of the program is presented.

  20. Overview of NASA aeronautical propulsion research and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The program discussed is aimed at improving performance within an extended operating range, reducing weight, increasing service life, achieving greater cost effectiveness, reducing noise and exhaust pollution, and improving means of energy conservation. The program places emphasis on basic research in numerous related technical disciplines, system analysis, component technology, full scale propulsion system studies, and technology demonstrations. Much attention in the discussion is given to noise and pollution minimization research.

  1. An overview of DOE's wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A.S.; Hock, S.M.; Musial, W.D. ); Goldman, P.R. )

    1992-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation at $0.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s, and with fossil-fuel-based generators $0.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine (VET) Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. These value-engineered turbines will stem from units with known and well-documented records of performance. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate advanced technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near term (1993--1995), and to develop a new generation of innovative turbines for the year 2000. The Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program, a collaborative agreement between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments to provide a bridge from development programs currently under way to commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines.

  2. Marshall Island radioassay quality assurance program an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Conrado, C.L.; Hamilton, T.F.; Kehl, S.R.; Robison, W.L.; Stoker, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed an extensive quality assurance program to provide high quality data and assessments in support of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Program. Our quality assurance objectives begin with the premise of providing integrated and cost-effective program support (to meet wide-ranging programmatic needs, scientific peer review, litigation defense, and build public confidence) and continue through from design and implementation of large-scale field programs, sampling and sample preparation, radiometric and chemical analyses, documentation of quality assurance/quality control practices, exposure assessments, and dose/risk assessments until publication. The basic structure of our radioassay quality assurance/quality control program can be divided into four essential elements; (1) sample and data integrity control; (2) instrument validation and calibration; (3) method performance testing, validation, development and documentation; and (4) periodic peer review and on-site assessments. While our quality assurance objectives are tailored towards a single research program and the evaluation of major exposure pathways/critical radionuclides pertinent to the Marshall Islands, we have attempted to develop quality assurance practices that are consistent with proposed criteria designed for laboratory accre

  3. An overview of DOE's wind turbine development programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxson, A. S.; Hock, S. M.; Musial, W. D.; Goldman, P. R.

    1992-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation at $0.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s, and with fossil-fuel-based generators $0.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine (VET) Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. These value-engineered turbines will stem from units with known and well-documented records of performance. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate advanced technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near term (1993-1995), and to develop a new generation of innovative turbines for the year 2000. The Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program, a collaborative agreement between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments to provide a bridge from development programs currently under way to commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines.

  4. Overview of the space-based laser (SBL) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, James F.

    2002-06-01

    The Space Based Laser (SBL) program is concerned with both near-term feasibility of space lasers and also the desired operational capability for a robust SBL constellation. For the near term system, we have defined an Integrated Flight Experiment (IFX) that will integrate a high power laser device, a beam control system, and a large beam director, performing a lethal engagement against a boosting missile in the 2010-2014 time period. For the operational system, the program was conducted its Affordability and Architecture Study (AAS) for Dr. Jacques Gansler (former USD(AT&L)). We arrived at a particular set of solutions for a prescribed threat. These solutions include both pure SBL constellations and also combinations of SBL satellites and space-based relay mirrors (SBM). We also considered Air Borne Lasers (ABL) and Ground Based lasers (GBL) as complements to the SBL and SBM. In this paper, we describe the current status of both the IFX program, which is the principal recipient of current funding, and also a nascent SBL Technology program to address the needs of the operational system. For the technology program, we analyzed the specific technology areas we need to develop in order to realize the most pay off for operational SBL systems.

  5. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip J.; Smith, Ira S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 50 to 60 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions support investigations sponsored by NASA's Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program provides the science community with payload development support, environmental testing, launch vehicles, and launch operations from fixed and mobile launch ranges. Sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface. New technology efforts include GPS payload event triggering, tailored trajectories, new vehicle configuration development to expand current capabilities, and the feasibility assessment of an ultra high altitude sounding rocket vehicle. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. The Long Duration Balloon (LDB) is capable of providing flight durations in excess of two weeks and has had many successful flights since its development. The NASA Balloon Program is currently engaged in the development of the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB), which will be capable of providing flight times up to 100-days. Additional development efforts are focusing on ultra high altitude balloons, station keeping techniques and planetary balloon technologies.

  6. An Overview: NASA LeRC Structures Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1998-01-01

    A workshop on National Structures Programs was held, jointly sponsored by the AIAA Structures Technical Committee, the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. The Objectives of the Workshop were to: provide a forum for discussion of current Government-sponsored programs in the structures area; identify high potential research areas for future aerospace systems; and initiate suitable interaction mechanisms with the managers of structures programs. The presentations covered structures programs at NASA, DOD (AFOSR, ONR, ARO and DARPA), and DOE. This publication is the presentation of the Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Structures and Acoustics Division has its genesis dating back to 1943. It is responsible for NASA research related to rotating structures and structural hot sections of both airbreathing and rocket engines. The work of the division encompasses but is not limited to aeroelasticity, structural life prediction and reliability, fatigue and fracture, mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals, and aeroacoustics. These programs are discussed and the names of responsible individuals are provided for future reference.

  7. Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth's surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans' waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

  8. Ocean Energy Program overview, fiscal years 1990-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-05-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71 percent of the earth's surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans' waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

  9. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program: A Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The realization of low-cost assess to space is one of NASA's three principal goals or "pillars" under the Office of Aero-Space Technology. In accordance with the goals of this pillar, NASA's primary space transportation technology role is to develop and demonstrate next-generation technologies to enable the commercial launch industry to develop full-scale, low cost, highly reliable space launchers. The approach involves both ground-based technology demonstrations and flight demonstrators, including the X-33, X-34, Bantam, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), and future experimental vehicles. Next generation space transportation vehicles and propulsion systems will require the development and implementation of advanced materials and processes. This presentation will provide an overview of advanced materials efforts which are focused on the needs of next generation space transportation systems. Applications described will include ceramic matrix composite (CMC) integrally bladed turbine disk (blisk); actively cooled CMC nozzle ramp for the aerospike engine; ablative thrust chamber/nozzle; and metal matrix composite turbomachinery housings.

  10. Concentrating Solar Program; Session: Thermal Storage - Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Glatzmaier, G.; Mehos, M.; Mancini, T.

    2008-04-01

    The project overview of this presentation is: (1) description--(a) laboratory R and D in advanced heat transfer fluids (HTF) and thermal storage systems; (b) FOA activities in solar collector and component development for use of molten salt as a heat transfer and storage fluid; (c) applications for all activities include line focus and point focus solar concentrating technologies; (2) Major FY08 Activities--(a) advanced HTF development with novel molten salt compositions with low freezing temperatures, nanofluids molecular modeling and experimental studies, and use with molten salt HTF in solar collector field; (b) thermal storage systems--cost analysis and updates for 2-tank and thermocline storage and model development and analysis to support near-term trought deployment; (c) thermal storage components--facility upgrade to support molten salt component testing for freeze-thaw receiver testing, long-shafted molten salt pump for parabolic trough and power tower thermal storage systems; (d) CSP FOA support--testing and evaluation support for molten salt component and field testing work, advanced fluids and storage solicitation preparation, and proposal evaluation for new advanced HTF and thermal storage FOA.

  11. Overview of the NASA program in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, Murray

    1989-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated needs in modeling and analysis of advanced aerospace structures, NASA has developed a program focused on computational structural mechanics. The objective of this program is to advance the state-of-the-art in computational analysis to make accurate analysis of very large and complex structural problems routine. This will be accomplished by emphasizing two key areas: (1) the development of advanced analytical methods, extending beyond traditional approaches and, (2) the exploitation of the newest and most powerful parallel/multiprocessor computers available. Computational testbeds will be developed to serve as technology integrators and to promote/accelerate methodology research and development. An additional, and highly desirable, effect of the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) program would be to influence the design of future hardware and software systems to reflect the needs of structural analysis.

  12. The ICF and Postsurgery Occupational Therapy after Traumatic Hand Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitinghoff, Helene; Lindqvist, Birgitta; Nygard, Louise; Ekholm, Jan; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of hand rehabilitation programmes and have linked the outcomes to the concept of ICF but not to specific ICF category codes. The objective of this study was to gain experience using ICF concepts to describe occupational therapy interventions during postsurgery hand rehabilitation, and to describe…

  13. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L; Loose, R; Goldman, P

    1993-09-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  14. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  15. Overview of the EPA quality system for environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.

    1993-12-31

    Formalized quality assurance program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than a decade. During this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. Many issues, such as ozone depletion and global climate warming, have become international concerns among the world environmental community. Other issues, such as hazardous waste cleanup and clean air, remain a focus of national environmental concerns. As the environmental issues of the 1980`s evolved, the traditional quality assurance (QA) program was transformed through the use of quality management principles into a Quality System to help managers meet the needs of the 1990`s and beyond.

  16. Overview of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wiffen, F.W. ); Dowling, R.J.; Marton, W.A.; Eckstrand, S.A. . Office of Fusion Energy)

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1988 Symposium on Fusion Technology, steady progress has been made in the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. The large US tokamaks have reached new levels of plasma performance with associated improvements in the understanding of transport. The technology support for ongoing and future devices is similarly advancing with notable advances in magnetic, rf heating tubes, pellet injector, plasma interactive materials, tritium handling, structural materials, and system studies. Currently, a high level DOE review of the program is underway to provide recommendations for a strategic plan.

  17. Overview of the TFTR Lithium Blanket Module program

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The LBM (Lithium Blanket Module) is an approximately cubic module, about 80 cm on each side, with construction representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module. Measurements of neutron transport and tritium breeding in the LBM will be made in irradiation programs first with a point-neutron source, and subsequently with the D-D and D-T fusion-neutron sources of the TFTR. This paper summarizes the objectives of the LBM program, the design, development and construction of the LBM, and progress in the experimental tests.

  18. High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Smith, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA High-Speed Research program developed the High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) program to demonstrate satisfactory interaction between the jet noise suppressor and high-lift system of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration at takeoff, climb, approach and landing conditions. One scheme for reducing jet exhaust noise generated by an HSCT is the use of a mixer-ejector system which would entrain large quantities of ambient air into the nozzle exhaust flow through secondary inlets in order to cool and slow the jet exhaust before it exits the nozzle. The effectiveness of such a noise suppression device must be evaluated in the presence of an HSCT wing high-lift system before definitive assessments can be made concerning its acoustic performance. In addition, these noise suppressors must provide the required acoustic attenuation while not degrading the thrust efficiency of the propulsion system or the aerodynamic performance of the high-lift devices on the wing. Therefore, the main objective of the HEAT program is to demonstrate these technologies and understand their interactions on a large-scale HSCT model. The HEAT program is a collaborative effort between NASA-Ames, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Douglas Aircraft Corp., Lockheed-Georgia, General Electric and NASA - Lewis. The suppressor nozzles used in the tests were Generation 1 2-D mixer-ejector nozzles made by General Electric. The model used was a 13.5%-scale semi-span model of a Boeing Reference H configuration.

  19. Biomass Power: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Biomass Power Program and industry are developing technologies to expand the use of biomass that include methods of feedstock production and the equipment to convert feedstocks into electric power or process heat. With the help of advanced biomass power technologies and new feedstock supply systems, as much as 50,000 megawatts (MW) of biomass power capacity will be in place by the year 2010. The Biomass Power Program supports the development of three technologies--gasification, pyrolysis, and direct combustion--from the laboratory bench scale to the prototype commercial scale. Gasification equipment produces biogas that is burned in high-efficiency turbine-generators developed for the electric power industry. Pyrolysis processes produce oils from renewable biomass that burn like petroleum to generate electricity. In direct combustion technology, power plants today burn bulk biomass directly to generate electricity. Improving the direct combustion technology of these plants increases efficiency and reduces emissions. In addition to developing these three technologies, the Biomass Power Program supports joint ventures to plan and construct facilities that demonstrate the benefits of biomass power. The Program is supporting joint ventures to conduct 10 case studies of dedicated feedstock supply systems.

  20. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST). Overview and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST) is a geographical partnership of six of the nation's best two-year colleges located in the six states that have about one-third of the density of metals-related industries in the United States. The purpose of the MAST grant is to develop and implement a national training model to overcome…

  1. OVERVIEW OF THE INTRAMURAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide a summary of the risk management portion of ORD's endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) research program, including its motivation, goals, planning efforts and resulting research areas.

    In an emerging research area like EDCs, risk management ...

  2. Energy-Related Inventions Program: an overview of the evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.J.; Bronfman, L.M.; Rorke, M.G.

    1983-09-01

    The Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) is jointly administered by the US Departments of Energy and Commerce. Grants were awarded for 165 of 208 inventions recommended by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Of the 165 inventions, 46 have been able to acquire follow-on financing from a variety of sources. Further, 35 of the inventions have reached the marketplace, and their cumulative sales to date total $178 million. An additional 10 inventions are now starting into production. Jobs that have been created directly by production related to the inventions total 756; additional spin-off jobs attributable to the inventions include component and material suppliers, jobbers, franchisees, and distributors. The program was recently evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the following conclusions: (1) the evaluation process at NBS has been successful in identifying technically and economically feasible inventions, (2) the success rate for the program is about equivalent to the reported success rates of private venture capital firms, (3) the program is supporting inventions at a point in their development where they are supported by neither the venture capital community nor industry, and (4) the one-time DOE grants and the associated ERIP support to inventors have been successful in readying inventors for follow-on financing from the private sector.

  3. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  4. OVERVIEW AND STATUS OF THE PM SUPERSITES PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PM Supersites program was first conceived as a set of special studies extending beyond the national regulatory networks for particulate matter (PM) to elucidate source-receptor relationships and atmospheric processes in support of State implementation plans (SIP's). The pr...

  5. Biomass Power: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    The Biomass Power Program and industry are developing technologies to expand the use of biomass that include methods of feedstock production and the equipment to convert feedstocks into electric power or process heat. With the help of advanced biomass power technologies and new feedstock supply systems, as much as 50,000 megawatts (MW) of biomass power capacity will be in place by the year 2010. The Biomass Power Program supports the development of three technologies -- gasification, pyrolysis, and direct combustion -- from the laboratory bench scale to the prototype commercial scale. Gasification equipment produces biogas that is burned in high-efficiency turbine-generators developed for the electric power industry. Pyrolysis processes produce oils from renewable biomass that burn like petroleum to generate electricity. In direct combustion technology, power plants today burn bulk biomass directly to generate electricity. Improving the direct combustion technology of these plants increases efficiency and reduces emissions. In addition to developing these three technologies, the Biomass Power Program supports joint ventures to plan and construct facilities that demonstrate the benefits of biomass power. The program is supporting joint ventures to conduct 10 case studies of dedicated feedstock supply systems.

  6. AN OVERVIEW OF THE MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) is an interagency agreement with the DOE and has partnerships with Universities, Forest Service, BLM, Industry and states. The mission of the MWTP is to provide engineering solutions to national environmental issues resulting from the past...

  7. Overview of the TFTB lithium blanket module program

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) is an approx. 80-cm/sup 3/ module, representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module. This paper summarizes the design, development, and construction of the LBM, and indicates the present status of the LBM program.

  8. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P. D.; Dong, R. G.; Bernreuter, D. L.; Bohn, M. P.; Chuang, T. Y.; Cummings, G. E.; Johnson, J. J.; Mensing, R. W.; Wells, J. E.

    1981-03-06

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. The materials processing program of NASA - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The current and future NASA programs on materials processing in the microgravity environment of space are discussed. Work is now being done on convection in closed tube vapor crystal growth, solidification of monotectic alloys, levitation technology, and continuous flow electrophoresis. Experimental projects being performed aboard the Space Shuttle are mentioned, and general priorities for future microgravity research are stated.

  10. Overview of the Illinois small operator assistance program

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, A.H.

    1984-12-01

    The Small Operator Assistance Program (SOAP) is a federally funded program mandated by the Federal Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Its function is to provide technical assistance to coal mine operators who mine less than 100,000 tons of coal a year in preparing the Statement of the Test Borings and Prediction of the Probable Hydrologic Consequences of Mining, which are required as a part of an application to mine coal or recover carbon. In Illinois the SOAP program is administered by the Illinois Department of Mines and Minerals (IDMM). The data collection, analysis, and hydrologic impact assessments have been conducted by the Coal Extraction and Utilization Research Center (CEURC) of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Illinois. Despite several stumblingblocks confronted by the SOAP program in its early stages of operation, the CEURC and IDMM have developed a method of operation which has adapted to the changes in the law and is geared toward the small coal mine industry in Illinois. Since the beginning of the program, 17 small operators have been assisted in preparing their permit applications. These were operators of surface mines, carbon recovery mines, and coal waste disposal sites. The data collected at each site generally consisted of six months of surface and groundwater monitoring and a chemical analysis of the overburden or other material to the disturbed during the operation. With the vast amount of data collected, the CEURC and IDMM are in a position to compile an extensive data base which could be used in determinations of the probable hydrologic consequences of future mining operations.

  11. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) PROGRAM FOR RETROFIT SORBENT INJECTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview is given of EPA's research program to develop improved control technologies for emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from the combustion of fossil fuels. Analysis indicates that low capital cost technology for retrofit to existing boilers would ...

  12. 24 CFR 291.510 - Overview of the GNND Sales Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Overview of the GNND Sales Program. 291.510 Section 291.510 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT...

  13. SEWER-SEDIMENT CONTROL: OVERVIEW OF AN EPA WET-WEATHER FLOW RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a historical overview of the sewer sediment control projects conducted by the Wet-Weather Flow Research Program of the USEPA. Research presented includes studies of the causes of sewer solids deposition and development/evaluation of control methods that can pr...

  14. OVERVIEW OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PARTICULATE TECHNOLOGY R AND D PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives an overview of a number of key projects in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) particulate research and development program having applicability to industry. For electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), it gives results of work on large-diameter discharge ele...

  15. 75 FR 67705 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Talent Search (TS) Program; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Talent Search (TS) Program; Notice Inviting... services to students enrolled in schools that are not currently being served by a Talent Search project... information on the implementation of their Talent Search projects and their participants'...

  16. A Fifty-State Survey of School Finance Policies and Programs: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.; Jordan, Teresa S.

    2009-01-01

    This overview provides a synthesis of a comprehensive survey of school finance programs in the 50 states conducted in 2006-07. Information was provided by chief state school finance officers or persons with expertise in a state's public school funding-allocation system. Brief descriptions of the major Pre-K-12 funding formulae, district-based…

  17. 75 FR 39923 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Pilot Program for Course Material Rental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Pilot Program for Course Material Rental; Notice... that expand the services of bookstores to provide the option for students to rent course materials...

  18. Aviation Safety Program: Weather Accident Prevention (WxAP) Project Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a project overview and status for the Weather Accident Prevention (WxAP) aviation safety program. The topics include: 1) Weather Accident Prevention Project Background/History; 2) Project Modifications; 3) Project Accomplishments; and 4) Project's Next Steps.

  19. Human interferon and its inducers: clinical program overview at Roswell Park Memorial Institute.

    PubMed

    Carter, W A; Horoszewicz, J S

    1978-11-01

    An overview of the clinical interferon program at Roswell Park Memorial Institute is presented. Purified fibroblast interferon and a novel inducer of human interferon [rIn-r(C12,U)n] are being evaluated for possible antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities in patients with cancer. PMID:728908

  20. SEWER SEDIMENT CONTROL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE EPA WET WEATHER FLOW (WWF) RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an overview of EPA WWF Research Program projects related to causes of sewer solids deposition and control methods that can prevent accumulation of sewer sediments. In particular, discussion will focus on the relationship of wastewater characteristics to flow ...

  1. 7 CFR 3402.5 - Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overview of National Needs Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowship Grants Program. 3402.5 Section 3402.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES...

  2. Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program: Program Overview and Philadelphia Project Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Case Study with WIPP program overview, information regarding eligibility, and successes from Pennsylvania's Commission on Economic Opportunity (CEO) that demonstrate innovative approaches that maximize the benefit of the program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recently launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of homes of low-income families. Since 2010, WIPP has helped weatherization service providers as well as new and nontraditional partners leverage non-federal financial resources to supplement federal grants, saving taxpayer money. WIPP complements the Weatherization Assistance program (WAP), which operates nation-wide, in U.S. territories and in three Native American tribes. 16 grantees are implementing weatherization innovation projects using experimental approaches to find new and better ways to weatherize homes. They are using approaches such as: (1) Financial tools - by understanding a diverse range of financing mechanisms, grantees can maximize the impact of the federal grant dollars while providing high-quality work and benefits to eligible low-income clients; (2) Green and healthy homes - in addition to helping families reduce their energy costs, grantees can protect their health and safety. Two WIPP projects (Connecticut and Maryland) will augment standard weatherization services with a comprehensive green and healthy homes approach; (3) New technologies and techniques - following the model of continuous improvement in weatherization, WIPP grantees will continue to use new and better technologies and techniques to improve the quality of work; (4) Residential energy behavior change - Two grantees are rigorously testing home energy monitors (HEMs) that display energy used in kilowatt-hours, allowing residents to monitor and reduce their energy

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Clouse, C. J.; Edwards, M. J.; McCoy, M. G.; Marinak, M. M.; Verdon, C. P.

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  4. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stan R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program is provided with a summary of lessons learned since the first test firing in 1977. Fifteen different lessons learned are discussed that fundamentally changed the motor's design, processing, and RSRM program risk management systems. The evolution of the rocket motor design is presented including the baseline or High Performance Solid Rocket Motor (HPM), the Filament Wound Case (FWC), the RSRM, and the proposed Five-Segment Booster (FSB).

  5. US Department of Energy Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. An overview presentation, August 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G W

    1980-06-01

    Intended as both a position paper and a progress report to industry, this document provides a comprehensive overview of the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program. Cost goals, systems design parameters, applications considerations, and the potential for industry involvement in solar thermal development and commercialization are described in detail. Decentralized management of R and D functions is linked to priorities and strategies of the evolving program.

  6. Storm and combined sewer overflow: An overview of EPA's Research Program. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.

    1993-01-01

    The report represents an overview of the EPA's Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control Research Program performed over a 20-year period beginning with the mid-1960s. It covers Program involvements in the development of a diverse technology including pollution-problem assessment/solution methodology and associated instrumentation and stormwater management models, best management practices, erosion control, infiltration/inflow, control, control-treatment technology and the associated sludge and solids residuals handling and many others.

  7. Overview of the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, M.

    1981-03-01

    The program promotes energy savings and fuel substitution by developing and helping to commercialize technologies for storing heat or cold, with shot investment payback periods as a cost goal. The sources of energy include industrial and utility waste heat as well as primary sources such as solar, geothermal, nuclear and fossil fuels. The primary source of "cold" for seasonal storage is winter chilled air. The program emphasizes near-term (1980's) approaches to energy conservation and displacement of natural gas and oil. It also provides for development of technologies which will allow use of renewable resources such as solar-thermal energy during the mid-term (1990's) and advanced energy storage and transport techniques for the far-term (beyond 2000).

  8. Overview of DOE's large stationary Stirling engine development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherka, K. L.; Holtz, R. E.; Bunker, W.

    This paper summarizes the results to date of a program, sponsored by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, to develop large stationary Stirling engine power systems. Primary applications for such power plants include cogeneration and total energy systems, with a major advantage being their ability to employ solid coal and other non-scarce fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. The major effort in the Stirling engine development program was an industry-based design competition, involving three independent contractual teams. Conceptual designs for state-of-the-art coal-fired Stirling engine systems were developed and all three design teams recommended development of 373 kW modules as base units, which can be coupled together to form individual Stirling engines up to 2238 kW in size. Heat transport system design concepts were also developed for integrating engine hot-end sections with coal combustors.

  9. Overview of the NASA balloon R&D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. Steve, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The catastrophic balloon failure during the first half of the 1980's identified the need for a comprehensive and continuing balloon research and development (R&D) commitment by NASA. Technical understanding was lacking in many of the disciplines and processes associated with scientific ballooning. A comprehensive balloon R&D plan was developed in 1986 and implemented in 1987. The objectives were to develop the understanding of balloon system performance, limitations, and failure mechanisms. The program consisted of five major technical areas: structures, performance and analysis, materials, chemistry and processing, and quality control. Research activitites have been conducted at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)-Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), other NASA centers and government facilities, universities, and the balloon manufacturers. Several new and increased capabilities and resources have resulted from this activity. The findings, capabilities, and plan of the balloon R&D program are presented.

  10. Overview of Spin Structure Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    An extensive experimental program to study spin physics at low and moderate four - momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, has been pursued by Jefferson Lab during the last 15 years, with complementary measurements taking place in all 3 experimental halls. Our inclusive data with high statistical precision and extensive kinematic coverage allow us to better constrain the polarized parton distributions, to accurately determine various moments of spin structure functions, to test the spin content of valent quarks, and to investigate the effects of resonance excitations and higher twist, dominant in this kinematic regime. Our recent semi-inclusive and exclusive measurements have given us new avenues of exploration, and inspired a new generation of experiments planned with 12 GeV beam. Highlights from 6 GeV experimental program are discussed, along with the 12 GeV data projections, and expected impact on the NLO global fits and phenomenological models of valent spin structure.

  11. Overview of the NASA Systems Approach to Crashworthiness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Program was developed in response to the federal government's goal to reduce the fatal accident rate for aviation by 80% within 10 years. Accident Mitigation is a primary element of the Aviation Safety Program. The overall Accident Mitigation goal is to provide technology to the air transport industry to enable a decrease in the rate of fatalities and injury from crash loads and from in-flight and post-crash explosion and/or fire. Accident Mitigation is divided into two main elements - Fire Prevention and Systems Approach to Crashworthiness. The Systems Approach to Crashworthiness goal is to develop and promote technology that will increase the human survival rate or reduce the fatality rate in survivable accidents. The technical background and planning, selected technical activities, and summary of future efforts will be presented in this paper.

  12. An overview of the Stirling engine heat pump program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes the recent developments in the Stirling engine-driven heat pump program activities sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This technology has displayed its ability to meet the thermal performance objectives. Enhance technology options guided by value engineering principles are being pursued toward the development of an economically viable household engine-driven heat pump. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The National Launch System Advanced Development Program: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battenburg, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A broad-based Advanced Development Program is being conducted to modernize the technological base and support the systems design of the National Launch System. While the principal concentration of efforts has been in propulsion, significant work is being accomplished in all of the disciplinary areas associated with space launch. Tasks are selected that offer reduced costs, increased reliability, and enhanced operability with anticipated task completion times which are consistent with NLS development.

  14. National Student Aid Profile: Overview of 2012 Federal Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    From 2000-2001 to 2010-2011, the total amount of federal financial aid awarded to students under Title IV of the Higher Education Act (HEA) jumped from $64.0 billion to an estimated $169.1 billion, a 10-year increase of 164%. For 2010-2011, the Title IV programs accounted for 72% of the $235 billion in total financial aid received by college…

  15. Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

  16. An overview of the DIII-D program

    SciTech Connect

    Luxon, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The DIII-D program focuses on developing fusion physics in an integrated program of tokamak concept improvement. The intent is both to support the present ITER physics R and D and to develop more efficient concepts for the later phases of ITER and eventual power plants. Progress in this effort can be best summarized by recent results for a diverted deuterium discharge with negative central shear which reached a performance level of Q{sub DT} = 0.32. The ongoing development of the tools needed to carry out this program of understanding and optimization continues to be crucial to its success. Control of the plasma cross-sectional shape and the internal distributions of plasma current, density, and rotation has been essential to optimizing plasma performance. Advanced divertor concepts provide edge power and particle control for future devices such as ITER and provide techniques to help manage the edge power and particle flows for advanced tokamak concepts. New divertor diagnostics and improved modeling are developing excellent divertor understanding. Many of the plasma physics issues being posed by ITER are being addressed. Scrapeoff layer power flow is being characterized to provide an accurate basis for the design of reactor devices. Ongoing studies of the density limit focus on identifying ways in which ITER can achieve the required densities in excess of the Greenwald limit. Better understanding of disruptions is crucial to the design of future reactors.

  17. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  18. Overview of the NASA tropospheric environmental quality remote sensing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Ayers, W. G.; Hoell, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper will summarize the current NASA Tropospheric Environmental Quality Remote Sensing Program for studying the global and regional troposphere from space, airborne and ground-based platforms. As part of the program to develop remote sensors for utilization from space, NASA has developed a series of passive and active remote sensors which have undergone field test measurements from airborne and ground platforms. Recent measurements with active lidar and passive gas filter correlation and infrared heterodyne techniques will be summarized for measurements of atmospheric aerosols, CO, SO2, O3, and NH3. These measurements provide the data base required to assess the sensitivity of remote sensors for applications to urban and regional field measurement programs. Studies of Earth Observation Satellite Systems are currently being performed by the scientific community to assess the capability of satellite imagery to detect regions of elevated pollution in the troposphere. The status of NASA sponsored research efforts in interpreting satellite imagery for determining aerosol loadings over land and inland bodies of water will be presented, and comments on the potential of these measurements to supplement in situ and airborne remote sensors in detecting regional haze will be made.

  19. Accommodation Outcomes and the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreuer, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Accommodation of the environment and technology is one of the key mediators of adjustment to disability and participation in community. In this article, accommodations are tested empirically as facilitators of return to work and participation, as defined by the "International Classification of Disability, Function, and Health" (ICF) and the…

  20. An antiproton driver for ICF propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Pi-Ren; Lewis, R. A.; Smith, G. A.; Gazze, C.; Higman, K.; Newton, R.; Chiaverini, M.; Dailey, J.; Surratt, M.; Werthman, W. Lance

    1993-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) utilizing an anitprotoncatalyzed target is discussed as a possible source of propulsion for rapid interplanetary manned space missions. The relevant compression, ignition, and thrust mechanisms are presented. Progress on an experiment presently in progress at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM to demonstrate proof-of-principle is reviewed.

  1. 42 CFR 442.15 - Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs. 442.15 Section 442.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE...

  2. 42 CFR 442.15 - Duration of agreement for ICFs/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duration of agreement for ICFs/MR. 442.15 Section 442.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE...

  3. 42 CFR 442.15 - Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs. 442.15 Section 442.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE...

  4. 42 CFR 442.15 - Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Duration of agreement for ICF/IIDs. 442.15 Section 442.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE...

  5. 42 CFR 442.110 - Certification period for ICFs/MR with standard-level deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification period for ICFs/MR with standard-level deficiencies. 442.110 Section 442.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE...

  6. 42 CFR 442.105 - Certification of ICFs/MR with deficiencies: General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification of ICFs/MR with deficiencies: General provisions. 442.105 Section 442.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STANDARDS FOR PAYMENT TO NURSING FACILITIES AND INTERMEDIATE CARE...

  7. An overview of DARPA's advanced space technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastri, E.; Dodd, J.

    1993-02-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is the central research and development organization of the DoD and, as such, has the primary responsibility for the maintenance of U.S. technological superiority over potential adversaries. DARPA's programs focus on technology development and proof-of-concept demonstrations of both evolutionary and revolutionary approaches for improved strategic, conventional, rapid deployment and sea power forces, and on the scientific investigation into advanced basic technologies of the future. DARPA can move quickly to exploit new ideas and concepts by working directly with industry and universities. For four years, DARPA's Advanced Space Technology Program (ASTP) has addressed various ways to improve the performance of small satellites and launch vehicles. The advanced technologies that are being and will be developed by DARPA for small satellites can be used just as easily on large satellites. The primary objective of the ASTP is to enhance support to operational commanders by developing and applying advanced technologies that will provide cost-effective, timely, flexible, and responsive space systems. Fundamental to the ASTP effort is finding new ways to do business with the goal of quickly inserting new technologies into DoD space systems while reducing cost. In our view, these methods are prime examples of what may be termed 'technology leveraging.' The ASTP has initiated over 50 technology projects, many of which were completed and transitioned to users. The objectives are to quickly qualify these higher risk technologies for use on future programs and reduce the risk of inserting these technologies into major systems, and to provide the miniaturized systems that would enable smaller satellites to have significant - rather than limited - capability. Only a few of the advanced technologies are described, the majority of which are applicable to both large and small satellites.

  8. Overview of the Savannah River reactor surveillance program

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Thomas, J.K.; Baumann, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary radiation effects studies, now nearing completion, are based upon short-term irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR). The purpose of these studies is to assess the impact of radiation effects on the performance and service life of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor components. The SRS reactor surveillance program was simultaneously established in order to validate the results of these short-term irradiations under conditions more applicable to the SRS reactor components. The main conditions of interest include: temperature, moderator chemistry and neutron spectrum. The materials employed in both the surveillance and short-term irradiation programs were taken from the SRS R-reactor process piping and included base, weld, and heat-effected zone metal samples in both the C-L and L-C orientations. Test specimen types include tensile, Charpy V-notch, compact tension, constant extension rate test, and wedge-opening-load. A program schedule has been established for the irradiation and testing of surveillance specimens. The surveillance capsules are currently undergoing irradiation near the center of the SRS K-rector core and will remain in this location until their total fast fluence is equal to the current maximum reactor tank wall exposure. The bulk of the specimens will then be moved to blanket capsules at the edge of the core in order to track the wall exposure. A small portion of the specimens will be removed and tested, and a third group of specimens will be removed from the central core position after they have accumulated a thermal fluence 50% greater than the current maximum tank wall exposure. Specimen groups will be removed from the blanket capsules and tested periodically. Additional capsules may be inserted in order to generate flow fluence or high thermal to fast flux ratio data. 17 refs.

  9. Overview of the Savannah River reactor surveillance program

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Thomas, J.K.; Baumann, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Preliminary radiation effects studies, now nearing completion, are based upon short-term irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR). The purpose of these studies is to assess the impact of radiation effects on the performance and service life of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor components. The SRS reactor surveillance program was simultaneously established in order to validate the results of these short-term irradiations under conditions more applicable to the SRS reactor components. The main conditions of interest include: temperature, moderator chemistry and neutron spectrum. The materials employed in both the surveillance and short-term irradiation programs were taken from the SRS R-reactor process piping and included base, weld, and heat-effected zone metal samples in both the C-L and L-C orientations. Test specimen types include tensile, Charpy V-notch, compact tension, constant extension rate test, and wedge-opening-load. A program schedule has been established for the irradiation and testing of surveillance specimens. The surveillance capsules are currently undergoing irradiation near the center of the SRS K-rector core and will remain in this location until their total fast fluence is equal to the current maximum reactor tank wall exposure. The bulk of the specimens will then be moved to blanket capsules at the edge of the core in order to track the wall exposure. A small portion of the specimens will be removed and tested, and a third group of specimens will be removed from the central core position after they have accumulated a thermal fluence 50% greater than the current maximum tank wall exposure. Specimen groups will be removed from the blanket capsules and tested periodically. Additional capsules may be inserted in order to generate flow fluence or high thermal to fast flux ratio data. 17 refs.

  10. Structural dynamics: Probabilistic structural analysis methods. Program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    A brief description is provided of the fundamental aspects of a quantification process. Progress since the last structural durability conference in 1989 is summarized. The methodology to date and that to be developed during the life of the program is presented. The uncertain factors are presented. The approach is outlined that is required to achieve component and/or system certification in the shortest possible time for affordable reliability risk. Two new elements appear in a block diagram: (1) uncertainties in human factor, and (2) uncertainties in the computer code. Research to quantify the uncertainties in the human factor was initiated and is discussed.

  11. Rover nuclear rocket engine program: Overview of rover engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finseth, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The results of nuclear rocket development activities from the inception of the ROVER program in 1955 through the termination of activities on January 5, 1973 are summarized. This report discusses the nuclear reactor test configurations (non cold flow) along with the nuclear furnace demonstrated during this time frame. Included in the report are brief descriptions of the propulsion systems, test objectives, accomplishments, technical issues, and relevant test results for the various reactor tests. Additionally, this document is specifically aimed at reporting performance data and their relationship to fuel element development with little or no emphasis on other (important) items.

  12. Overview of Sandia`s Electric Vehicle Battery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.P.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc/air and sodium/sulfur battery technologies as well as double layer capacitor (DLC) R&D. Projects in the USABC funded work include lithium/polymer electrolyte (LPE) R&D, sodium/sulfur activities and battery test and evaluation.

  13. An overview of the NASA textile composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structures. In addition to in-house research, the program includes major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house research is focused on science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of innovative design concepts, cost-effective fabrication, and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3-D weaving, 2-D and 3-D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile

  14. NASA Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Technology Program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Pedro; Frost, Cynthia; Garrett, Henry; Kinard, William

    1997-01-01

    The growth of the near-earth meteoroid and orbital debris environment and the potentially damaging interplanetary meteoroid and meteoroid streams present hypervelocity impact threats to spacecraft. In relation to these threats, NASA established the meteoroid and orbital debris technology program with the aim of: providing the technologies required to support the development of cost-effective spacecraft with high survivability in the presence of these environments; increasing the understanding of the effects of these environments on spacecraft; and minimizing the human contribution to these environments. The critical technologies and the technological requirements are reviewed together with NASA's capabilities in this domain.

  15. An overview of the NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts program

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, F.M.; Bennett, G.L.; Frisbee, R.H.; Sercel, J.C.; Lapointe, M.R. JPL, Pasadena, CA Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH )

    1992-07-01

    NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) program for the development of long-term space propulsion system schemes is managed by both NASA-Lewis and the JPL and is tasked with the identification and conceptual development of high-risk/high-payoff configurations. Both theoretical and experimental investigations have been undertaken in technology areas deemed essential to the implementation of candidate concepts. These APC candidates encompass very high energy density chemical propulsion systems, advanced electric propulsion systems, and an antiproton-catalyzed nuclear propulsion concept. A development status evaluation is presented for these systems. 45 refs.

  16. An overview of the NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Bennett, Gary L.; Frisbee, Robert H.; Sercel, Joel C.; Lapointe, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) program for the development of long-term space propulsion system schemes is managed by both NASA-Lewis and the JPL and is tasked with the identification and conceptual development of high-risk/high-payoff configurations. Both theoretical and experimental investigations have been undertaken in technology areas deemed essential to the implementation of candidate concepts. These APC candidates encompass very high energy density chemical propulsion systems, advanced electric propulsion systems, and an antiproton-catalyzed nuclear propulsion concept. A development status evaluation is presented for these systems.

  17. Health monitoring system for the SSME - Program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawman, Michael W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers the design of a health management system (HMS) program for enhancement of the safety of SSME operations during ground tests and space missions. The fault detection techniques based on time series, nonlinear regression, and clustering algorithms were developed and were demonstrated based on data from SSME ground test failures. The fault detection algorithms of the HMS system exhibited 100 percent detection of faults and an extremely low fault alarm rate, and were robust to sensor loss. A preliminary design of hardware architecture capable of supporting real-time operation of the HMS functions is described.

  18. Overview of Laser-Plasma Acceleration Programs in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2010-11-04

    With many high power laser systems ranging from a few TW to multi-100 TW installed in some laboratories in Asia, significant progress on laser-driven wakefield acceleration of electrons has been achieved. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from tens of MeV to nearly GeV has been demonstrated. Several programs for ion/proton acceleration aiming at potential medical applications are running or planned based upon their significant theoretical and numerical findings. There are quite a few collaborations existing among Asian research groups.

  19. Overview of NASA PTA propfan flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, Edwin J.

    1990-01-01

    The progress is covered of the NASA sponsored Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) flight test program. In PTA, a 9 ft. diameter propfan was installed on the left wing of a Gulfstream GII executive jet and is undergoing extensive flight testing to evaluate propfan structural integrity, near and far field noise, and cabin interior noise characteristics. This research testing includes variations in propeller tip speed and power loading, nacelle tilt angle, and aircraft Mach number and altitude. As a result, extensive parametric data will be obtained to verify and improve computer codes for predicting propfan aeroelastic, aerodynamic, and aeroacoustic characteristics. Over 600 measurements are being recorded for each of approx. 600 flight test conditions.

  20. Severe accident sequence assessment for boiling water reactors: program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, M. H.

    1980-10-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Assessment (SASA) Program was started at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in June 1980. This report documents the initial planning, specification of objectives, potential uses of the results, plan of attack, and preliminary results. ORNL was assigned the Brown's Ferry Unit 1 Plant with the station blackout being the initial sequence set to be addressed. This set includes: (1) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with no coolant injection; and (2) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with high pressure coolant injection (HPCI) and reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) as long as dc power supply lasts. This report includes representative preliminary results for the former case.

  1. ICF quarterly report January - March 1997 volume 7, number 3

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J

    1998-04-09

    The National Ignition Facility Project The mission of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to produce ignition and modest energy gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Achieving these goals will maintain U.S. world leadership in ICF and will directly benefit the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) missions in national security, science and technology, energy resources, and industrial competitiveness. Development and operation of the NIF are consistent with DOE goals for environmental quality, openness to the community, and nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. Although the primary mission of inertial fusion is for defense applications, inertial fusion research will provide critical information for the development of inertial fusion energy. The NIF, under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is a cornerstone of the DOE's science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program for addressing high-energy-density physics issues in the absence of nuclear weapons testing. In pursuit of this mission, the DOE's Defense Programs has developed a state-of-the-art capability with the NIF to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory with a microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. As a Strategic System Acquisition, the NIF Project has a separate and disciplined reporting chain to DOE as shown below.

  2. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    PubMed

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes. PMID:24956589

  3. An Overview of SIMBIOS Program Activities and Accomplishments. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The SIMBIOS Program was conceived in 1994 as a result of a NASA management review of the agency's strategy for monitoring the bio-optical properties of the global ocean through space-based ocean color remote sensing. At that time, the NASA ocean color flight manifest included two data buy missions, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Color, and three sensors, two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), scheduled for flight on the EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua satellites. The review led to a decision that the international assemblage of ocean color satellite systems provided ample redundancy to assure continuous global coverage, with no need for the EOS Color mission. At the same time, it was noted that non-trivial technical difficulties attended the challenge (and opportunity) of combining ocean color data from this array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. Thus, it was announced at the October 1994 EOS Interdisciplinary Working Group meeting that some of the resources budgeted for EOS Color should be redirected into an intercalibration and validation program (McClain et al., 2002).

  4. Overview of NASA PTA propfan flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    During the last several years high-speed propellers have made the transition from a wind tunnel curiosity to a very likely near-term, fuel-efficient propulsion system that could revolutionize the subsonic commercial air transport industry. A key ingredient in this remarkable progress is the advanced turboprop industry. Working together, NASA and industry have developed and flight tested two propeller propulsion systems to provide answers to key technical questions and concerns. An industry team is currently developing a third propeller propulsion system for flight testing late this year. The progress of one of the NASA-industry flight test programs, called the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program is reported. In PTA, a 9 foot diameter propfan was installed on the left wing of a Gulfstream GII executive jet and is undergoing extensive flight testing at Dobbins Air Force Base to evaluate propfan structural integrity, near and far field noise, and cabin interior noise characteristics. This research testing includes variations in propeller tip speed and power loading, nacelle tilt angle, and aircraft Mach number and altitude. As a result, extensive parametric data will be obtained to verify and improve computer codes for predicting propeller structural aeroelastic, aerodynamic, and acoustic characteristics. Over 600 measurements are being recorded for each of approximately 600 flight test conditions.

  5. Performance seeking control: Program overview and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A flight test evaluation of the performance-seeking control (PSC) algorithm on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control research aircraft was conducted for single-engine operation at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The model-based PSC system was developed with three optimization modes: minimum fuel flow at constant thrust, minimum turbine temperature at constant thrust, and maximum thrust at maximum dry and full afterburner throttle settings. Subsonic and supersonic flight testing were conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility covering the three PSC optimization modes and over the full throttle range. Flight results show substantial benefits. In the maximum thrust mode, thrust increased up to 15 percent at subsonic and 10 percent at supersonic flight conditions. The minimum fan turbine inlet temperature mode reduced temperatures by more than 100 F at high altitudes. The minimum fuel flow mode results decreased fuel consumption up to 2 percent in the subsonic regime and almost 10 percent supersonically. These results demonstrate that PSC technology can benefit the next generation of fighter or transport aircraft. NASA Dryden is developing an adaptive aircraft performance technology system that is measurement based and uses feedback to ensure optimality. This program will address the technical weaknesses identified in the PSC program and will increase performance gains.

  6. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori; Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja; Gladders, Mike; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  7. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  8. Overview of Reclamation's geothermal program in Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulcher, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation is presently involved in a unique Geothermal Resource Development Program in Imperial Valley, California. The main purpose of the investigations is to determine the feasibility of providing a source of fresh water through desalting geothermal fluids stored in the aquifers underlying the valley. Significant progress in this research and development stage to date includes extensive geophysical investigations and the drilling of five geothermal wells on the Mesa anomaly. Four of the wells are for production and monitoring the anomaly, and one will be used for reinjection of waste brines from the desalting units. Two desalting units, a multistage flash unit and a vertical tube evaporator unit, have been erected at the East Mesa test site. The units have been operated on shakedown and continuous runs and have produced substantial quantities of high-quality water.

  9. Overview of the US industrial thermal energy storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, M.

    1981-02-01

    Thermal energy storage can contribute to industrial conservation efforts directed at saving premium (gas and oil) fuels, which is a priority national need. This can be done by using storage to allow the recycling of industrial reject heat to reduce primary energy consumption or to allow alternate fuels to replace gas and oil. Industrial thermal energy storage efforts include three major areas: in-plant reuse of industrial reject heat; external reuse of industrial reject heat for applications in the industrial or buildings sector; and use of alternate fuels to replace gas and oil. The program currently includes engineering field tests in the brick and aluminum industries. In addition, technology transfer activities are underway in the pulp and paper industry.

  10. Overview of the TFTR Lithium Blanket Module Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) is an {approximately}80-cm{sup 3} module, representative of a helium-cooled lithium oxide fusion reactor blanket module. This paper summarizes the design, development, and construction of the LBM, and indicates the present status of the LBM program. Construction of the LBM provided unique development and manufacturing experience with the mass production of reactor-representative lithium oxide pellets and fuel rods. Neutron activation and tritium assay data from present irradiation experiments with a point-neutron source and future experiments with the TFTR geometrically extended neutron source will reveal the ability to neutronics codes and models to characterize individual blanket module performance in a fusion device assembly.

  11. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

  12. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6 percent of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the U.S. public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99 percent of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98 percent. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future U.S. energy markets.

  13. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah

    2011-10-12

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  14. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  15. Contamination control program for the Cosmic Background Explorer: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    Each of the three state of the art instruments flown aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) were designed, fabricated, and integrated using unique contamination control procedures to ensure accurate characterization of the diffuse radiation in the universe. The most stringent surface level cleanliness specifications ever attempted by NASA were required by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DRIBE) which is located inside a liquid helium cooled dewar along with the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). The DRIBE instrument required complex stray radiation suppression that defined a cold primary optical baffle system surface cleanliness level of 100A. The cleanliness levels of the cryogenic FIRAS instrument and the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) which were positioned symmetrically around the dewar were less stringent ranging from 300 to 500A. To achieve these instrument cleanliness levels, the entire flight spacecraft was maintained at level 500A throughout each phase of development. The COBE contamination control program is described along with the difficulties experienced in maintaining the cleanliness quality of personnel and flight hardware throughout instrument assembly.

  16. Overview of NASA human response to sonic boom program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1992-01-01

    For some routes the ability to fly at supersonic speeds over land as well as over water would greatly enhance the time benefit to the passenger. It would also increase the productivity and economic viability of the aircraft. There are no reliable guidelines which can be used to determine a sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable for overland supersonic flight. In addition to the peak pressure of the sonic boom, the detailed shape of the signature will also influence the perception, and therefore the community response, to sonic boom exposures. Initially, the program aims to develop the capability to predict human response to individual sonic booms. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the benefit of 'low boom' aircraft configurations and will also serve to guide the design of the aircraft and its operating conditions. This capability will form the foundation of studies to determine the relationship between sonic boom exposure and community response. Only then will it be possible to assess the feasibility of acceptable overland supersonic flight.

  17. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  18. Overview and Experimental Program of the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.; Ellsworth, J.; Grulke, O.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Minervini, J.; Michael, P.; Zhukovsky, A.

    2003-10-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment to investigate the behavior of high-temperature plasma confined by a levitated magnetic dipole. LDX consists of a large, high-field, superconducting coil magnetically levitated within a large vacuum vessel. Since field lines pass through the inner bore of the floating coil, the plasma is not lost to the poles. High-temperature plasma having pressure comparable to the confining magnetic pressure β ˜ 1 can be produced and studied. LDX will test recent theories showing unique equilibrium and stability properties of confined plasma with stationary profiles. The LDX physics plan includes the study of high-β plasma, investigation of dipole confinement characteristics, the formation of convective cells within the closed field line geometry, and the possibility of non-local transport. With its three superconducting magnets, LDX highlights the role of innovative magnetic technology that makes possible explorations of entirely new confinement concepts. We describe the project goals, overall program plan, and current status of the experiment.

  19. An Overview of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's Aging Aircraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter has well exceeded its original design life of 10 years or 100 missions. The Orbiter Project Office (OPO) has sponsored several activities to address aging vehicle concerns, including a Corrosion Control Review Board (CCRB), a mid-life certification program, and most recently the formation of the Aging Orbiter Working Group (AOWG). The AOWG was chartered in 2004 as a proactive group which provides the OPO oversight for aging issues such as corrosion, non-destructive inspection, non-metallics, wiring and subsystems. The core team consists of mainly representatives from the Materials and Processes Problem Resolution Team (M&P PRT) and Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA). Subsystem engineers and subject matter experts are called in as required. The AOWG has functioned by forming issues based sub-teams. Examples of completed sub-teams include adhesives, wiring and wing leading edge metallic materials. Current sub-teams include Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV), elastomeric materials and mechanisms.

  20. 2003 Biology and Biotechnology Research Program Overview and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Prange, C

    2003-03-01

    LLNL conducts multidisciplinary bioscience to fill national needs. Our primary roles are to: develop knowledge and tools which enhance national security, including biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities, and energy and environmental security; develop understanding of genetic and biochemical processes to enhance disease prevention, detection and treatment; develop unique biochemical measurement and computational modeling capabilities which enable understanding of biological processes; and develop technology and tools which enhance healthcare. We execute our roles through integrated multidisciplinary programs that apply our competencies in: microbial and mammalian genomics--the characterization of DNA, the genes it encodes, their regulation and function and their role in living systems; protein function and biochemistry - the structure, function, and interaction of proteins and other molecules involved in the integrated biochemical function of the processes of life; computational modeling and understanding of biochemical systems--the application of high-speed computing technology to simulate and visualize complex, integrated biological processes; bioinformatics--databasing, networking, and analysis of biological data; and bioinstrumentation--the application of physical and engineering technologies to novel biological and biochemical measurements, laboratory automation, medical device development, and healthcare technologies. We leverage the Laboratory's exceptional capabilities in the physical, computational, chemical, environmental and engineering sciences. We partner with industry and universities to utilize their state-of-the art technology and science and to make our capabilities and discoveries available to the broader research community.

  1. An Overview of Recent PISCES Program PMI Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George; Doerner, Russell; Abe, Shota; Baldwin, Matthew; Barton, Joseph; Chen, Renkun; Gosselin, Jordan; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Simmonds, Michael; Wang, Yong; Yu, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The PISCES Program is focused on fundamental PMI studies of Be and W-based solid plasma facing components under steady-state and transient conditions. We will show results from studies in W, Be and mixed W-Be material systems. Topics of investigation include formation of near-surface nanobubbles from He plasma ion implantation, growth of W-fuzz from these bubbles in steady-state and transient conditions, D retention in Be and W and development of a D-retention model for both H/D isotope exchange and displacement damage experiments. Initial studies of PMI in displacement damaged W are also presented, showing the effect of damage and exposure temperature on D retention, D diffusion, W thermal conductivity. Be-based results include morphology evolution under high plasma flux exposure, Be erosion mechanisms, and retention in Be-based materials. Future plans and connections to fusion energy system requirements will be discussed. This work supported by grant DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  2. An overview of the quiet short-haul research aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shovlin, M. D.; Cochrane, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) Program is presented, with special emphasis on its propulsion and acoustic aspects. A description of the NASA technical participation in the program including wind tunnel testing, engine ground tests, and advanced aircraft simulation is given. The aircraft and its systems are described and, measured performance, where available, is compared to program goals. Preliminary data indicate that additional research and development are needed in some areas of which acoustics is an example. Some of these additional research areas and potential experiments using the QSRA to develop the technology are discussed. The concept of the QSRA as a national flight research facility is explained.

  3. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Overview - A Focus on RPS Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS technologies and RPS system development, working closely with the Department of Energy. This paper provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status, its collaborations with potential RPS users, and the approach employed to maintain the readiness of RPS to support future NASA mission concepts.

  4. Laser program annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  5. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  6. Canada and the International Space Station program: Overview and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Graham; Sachdev, Savi

    2002-07-01

    The twelve months since IAF 2000 have been perhaps the most exciting, challenging and rewarding months for Canada since the beginning of our participation in the International Space Station program in 1984. The highlight was the successful launch, on-orbit check out, and the first operational use of Canadarm2, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System, between April and July 2001. The anomalies encountered and the solutions found to achieve this success are described in the paper. The paper describes, also, the substantial progress that has been made, during the twelve months since IAF 2000, by Canada as it continues to complete work on all flight-elements of its contribution to the International Space Station and as we transition into real-time Space Station operations support and Canadian utilization. Canada's contribution to the International Space Station is the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), the external robotic system that is key to the successful assembly of the Space Station, the maintenance of its external systems, astronaut EVA support, and the servicing of external science payloads. The MSS ground segment that supports MSS operations, training, sustaining engineering, and logistics activities is reaching maturity. The MSS Engineering Support Center and the MSS Sustaining Engineering Facility are providing real-time support for on-orbit operations, and a Canadian Payloads Telescience Operations Center is now in place. Mission Controllers, astronauts and cosmonauts from all Space Station Partners continue to receive training at the Canadian Space Agency. The Remote Multi Purpose Room, one element of the MSS Operations Complex, will be ready to assume backroom support in 2002. Canada has completed work on identifying its Space Station utilization activities for the period 2000 through 2004. Also during the past twelve months the CSA drafted and is proceeding with the approval of a Canadian Space Station Commercialization Policy. Canadian astronauts have

  7. Overview of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, Version 2. 1D

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E.; Winkelmann, F.C.

    1990-02-01

    The DOE-2 building energy analysis program was designed to assist engineers and architects in the performance of design studies of whole-building energy use under actual weather conditions. Program development was guided by several objectives: (1) that the description of the building entered by the user be readily understood by non-computer scientists; (2) that the calculations be based upon well-established algorithms; (3) that the program permit the simulation of commonly available heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment; (4) that the costs of running the program be minimal; and (5) that the predicted energy use of a building be acceptably close to measured values. These objectives have been met. We present here an overview of the DOE-21D version of the program. An annotated example of DOE-2 input and output is shown in the Appendix. 9 refs., 12 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Administrative Policy Analysis, Budgeting, Implementation, and Evaluation: An Overview to Policy/Program Analysis and Evaluation Techniques, Package VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneke, Gregory A.; Steiss, Alan Walter

    This overview serves as an introduction to a series of ten curriculum modules that comprise a portion of the National Training and Development Service Urban Management Curriculum Development Project. The overview was designed to provide a generalized discussion of the field of government policy/program analysis and evaluation. The training program…

  9. Plasma photonics in ICF & HED conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Pierre; Turnbull, David; Divol, Laurent; Pollock, Bradley; Chen, Cecilia Y.; Tubman, Eleanor; Goyon, Clement S.; Moody, John D.

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between multiple high-energy laser beams and plasma can be used to imprint refractive micro-structures in plasmas via the lasers' ponderomotive force. For example, Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility already rely on the use of plasma gratings to redirect laser light inside an ICF target and tune the symmetry of the imploded core. More recently, we proposed new concepts of plasma polarizer and waveplate, based on two-wave mixing schemes and laser-induced plasma birefringence. In this talk, we will present new experimental results showing the first demonstration of a fully tunable plasma waveplate, which achieved near-perfect circular laser polarization. We will discuss further prospects for novel ``plasma photonics'' concepts based on two- and four-wave mixing, such as optical switches, bandpass filters, anti-reflection blockers etc. These might find applications in ICF and HED experiments by allowing to manipulate the lasers directly in-situ (i.e. inside the targets), as well as for the design of high power laser systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Application of the ICF in fluency disorders.

    PubMed

    Yaruss, J Scott

    2007-11-01

    Stuttering is a complicated communication disorder that can affect many aspects of a speaker's life. In addition to exhibiting observable disruptions in speech (e.g., part-word repetitions, prolongations, blocks), many people who stutter also experience broader consequences in their lives because of their stuttering. Examples include difficulty with social communication (e.g., speaking with other people, making introductions) and job-related tasks (e.g., talking on the phone, participating in meetings). Because it incorporates these types of daily experiences, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides an ideal framework for considering the overall experience of the stuttering disorder. The purpose of this article is to highlight the ways in which the ICF can help clinicians, people who stutter, and the general public understand the multifaceted nature of stuttering. The article will also describe how clinicians can use the ICF as a framework for developing comprehensive evaluations and providing individualized treatment plans for people who stutter. PMID:17935016

  11. Overview and status of the witchweed (striga asiatica) eradication program in the Carolinas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard D.; Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.; Tasker, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Witchweed [(Striga asiatica (L.) O. Kuntze)] is a parasitic weed from Asia and Africa that attaches to the roots of grasses and grass crops such as corn and sorghum. Witchweed was first detected in the western hemisphere in a corn field in Columbus County, North Carolina, in July, 1956. Since that time, a federal/state cooperative program has eliminated over 99% of the 432,000+ acres that have been found infested with witchweed in the eastern Carolinas. This chapter provides an overview of the USDA-Carolinas Witchweed Eradication Program, as well as the methods and procedures that have been employed to achieve this remarkable level of success.

  12. Overview of the Icing and Flow Quality Improvements Program for the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.; Kevdzija, Susan L.; Sheldon, David W.; Spera, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Major upgrades were made in 1999 to the 6- by 9-Foot (1.8- by 2.7-m) Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These included replacement of the electronic controls for the variable-speed drive motor, replacement of the heat exchanger, complete replacement and enlargement of the leg of the tunnel containing the new heat-exchanger, the addition of flow-expanding and flow-contracting turning vanes upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, respectively, and the addition of fan outlet guide vanes (OGV's). This paper describes the rationale behind this latest program of IRT upgrades and the program's requirements and goals. An overview is given of the scope of work undertaken by the design and construction contractors, the scale-model IRT (SMIRT) design verification program, the comprehensive reactivation test program initiated upon completion of construction, and the overall management approach followed.

  13. 12-Step Interventions and Mutual Support Programs for Substance Use Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Ingalsbe, Michelle H.; Benbow, James; Daley, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Social workers and other behavioral health professionals are likely to encounter individuals with substance use disorders in a variety of practice settings outside of specialty treatment. 12-Step mutual support programs represent readily available, no cost community-based resources for such individuals; however, practitioners are often unfamiliar with such programs. The present article provides a brief overview of 12-Step programs, the positive substance use and psychosocial outcomes associated with active 12-Step involvement, and approaches ranging from ones that can be utilized by social workers in any practice setting to those developed for specialty treatment programs to facilitate engagement in 12-Step meetings and recovery activities. The goal is to familiarize social workers with 12-Step approaches so that they are better able to make informed referrals that match clients to mutual support groups that best meet the individual’s needs and maximize the likelihood of engagement and positive outcomes. PMID:23731422

  14. Environmental effects monitoring at the Terra Nova offshore oil development (Newfoundland, Canada): Program design and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Tracy, Ellen; Janes, G. Gregory; Crowley, Roger D.; Wells, Trudy A.; Williams, Urban P.; Paine, Michael D.; Mathieu, Anne; Kilgour, Bruce W.

    2014-12-01

    An environmental effects monitoring (EEM) program was developed by Suncor (formerly Petro-Canada) in 1997/98 to assess effects of the Terra Nova offshore oil and gas development on the receiving environment. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada), at approximately 100 m water depth. The EEM program was developed with guidance from experts in government, academia and elsewhere, and with input from the public. The EEM program proposed by Suncor was accepted by Canadian regulatory agencies and the program was implemented in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010, with pre-development sampling in 1997. The program continues to be implemented every two years. EEM includes an assessment of alterations in sediment quality through examination of changes in sediment chemistry, particle size, toxicity and benthic invertebrate community structure. A second component of the program examines potential effects on two species of commercial fishing interest: Iceland scallop (Chlamys islandica) and American plaice (Hippoglossoides platessoides). Chemical body burden for these two species is examined and taste tests are performed to assess the presence of taint in edible tissues. Effects on American plaice bioindicators are also examined. A final component of the program assesses potential effects of the Terra Nova development on water quality and examines water column chemistry, chlorophyll concentration and physical properties. The papers presented in this collection focus on effects of drill cuttings and drilling muds on the seafloor environment and, as such, report results on sediment quality and bioaccumulation of drilling mud components in Iceland scallop and American plaice. This paper provides information on drilling discharges, an overview of the physical oceanography at the Terra Nova Field, and an overview of the field program designed to assess environmental effects of drilling at Terra Nova.

  15. Resolving a central ICF issue for ignition: Implosion symmertry

    SciTech Connect

    Cray, M.; Delamater, N.D.; Fernandez, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program focuses on resolving key target-physics issues and developing technology needed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This work is being performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A major requirement for the indirect-drive NIF ignition target is to achieve the irradiation uniformity on the capsule surface needed for a symmetrical high-convergence implosion. Los Alamos employed an integrated modeling technique using the Lasnex radiation-hydrodynamics code to design two different targets that achieve ignition and moderate gain. Los Alamos is performing experiments on the Nova Laser at LLNL in order to validate our NIF ignition calculations.

  16. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    The pages that follow contain summaries of the nine R&TD Program Element Plans for Fiscal Year 1993 that were completed in the Spring of 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: Design Sciences and Advanced Computation; Advanced Manufacturing Technologies and Capabilities; and Advanced Materials Sciences and Technology.

  17. Overview of the Science Program at the LANL Ultracold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takeyasu; LANL Area B UCN Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) currently operates a proton-beam-driven solid-deuterium-based ultracold neutron (UCN) source. It was originally built to provide UCN to the UCNA experiment, an experiment to measure the angular correlation between the neutron spin and electron emission in polarized beta decay of free neutrons. The science program at the LANL UCN source has since significantly grown. It now provides UCN to various activities including a suite of neutron beta decay experiments, R&D for the SNS nEDM experiment, detector development for the Nab experiment at the SNS, development of a new nEDM experiment at LANL, and a study of material damage due to neutron induced fission fragments. In addition, the UCN source is in the process of being upgraded and an active research program on UCN source and guide technology is taking place. In this talk, an overview of the science program at the LANL UCN source will be given.

  18. Agent oriented programming: An overview of the framework and summary of recent research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1993-01-01

    This is a short overview of the agent-oriented programming (AOP) framework. AOP can be viewed as an specialization of object-oriented programming. The state of an agent consists of components called beliefs, choices, capabilities, commitments, and possibly others; for this reason the state of an agent is called its mental state. The mental state of agents is captured formally in an extension of standard epistemic logics: beside temporalizing the knowledge and belief operators, AOP introduces operators for commitment, choice and capability. Agents are controlled by agent programs, which include primitives for communicating with other agents. In the spirit of speech-act theory, each communication primitive is of a certain type: informing, requesting, offering, etc. This document describes these features in more detail and summarizes recent results and ongoing AOP-related work.

  19. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Here, we are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR~15), but willmore » become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.« less

  20. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Sater, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Ho, D.; LePape, S.; Meezan, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR∼15), but will become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.

  1. Eligibility, the ICF and the UN Convention: Australian perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, in Australia, acts as a philosophical and moral statement and framework guiding integrated and strategic policy across the nation. Broad policy agreement has been reached by governments, and both the government and non-government sectors are developing strategies for implementation or evaluation. There is however a need for a more integrated approach to disability policy and information, reflecting all three components of the Italian project: • legislation and a high level philosophical framework and policy guide; • a technical framework that can underpin specific policies and programs aiming to achieve the major goals; and , • a language and set of tools, relating to both the above, that provide infrastructure for assessment methods and information systems. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is the ideal tool to support the latter two components, consistent with the UN Convention. While the ICF has been used as the basis for national data standards, in population surveys and in the national data collection on disability support services, there is considerable scope for greater use of it, including using all domains of the Activities and Participation and the Environmental Factors component for policy, information and service provision, to advance a disability-inclusive society. Information available from the income support system and from generic services could be enhanced by reference to the ICF components. It would be of significant national value in Australia, especially as a ‘continuum of care’ is desired, if consistency of concepts and information were expanded across health and social welfare sectors. It would then be possible to obtain consistent data from health, aged care, disability and community services systems about key aspects of health and functioning, building a consolidated picture of access and experience across these sectors. Without

  2. An Overview of the Experimental 50-cm Laser Ramjet (X-50LR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B.; Larson, C. William; Knecht, Sean D.

    2006-05-01

    In January 2001, the X-50LR program was initiated to scale the Lightcraft concept ultimately to a 50-cm focal diameter, and to launch a 50 cm, fully functional vehicle, into space in either a sounding rocket or suborbital trajectory by the end of FY 2009. The current work involves scaling from the 10-cm aluminum Lightcraft to a fully composite 25-cm laser ramjet vehicle (X-25LR). An overview and status of this program will be given in terms of the various efforts that support this development. These efforts will include testing at the High Energy Laser System Test Facility (HELSTF), New Mexico; some results of the laser launch system study by Flight Unlimited; supporting research by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR); the different facets of attitude control in a small business program with Polaris Sensors Technology; continuing development of a launch model at The Pennsylvania State University; and, the development of a thrust measurement technique, and the use of a "mini-thruster" for research with The University of Alabama, Huntsville in collaboration with the AFRL. This paper will be followed by a number of papers giving additional details of the efforts briefly overviewed in this presentation.

  3. A brief overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    An overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods is presented. The major goal of this work is to bring formal methods technology to a sufficiently mature level for use by the United States aerospace industry. Towards this goal, work is underway to design and formally verify a fault-tolerant computing platform suitable for advanced flight control applications. Also, several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of six NASA civil servants and contractors from Boeing Military Aircraft Company, Computational Logic Inc., Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, University of California at Davis, and Vigyan Inc.

  4. ICF-CY: A Universal Tool for Documentation of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Rune J.

    2009-01-01

    The "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health--ICF" (ICF-CY) conceptual framework offers a new paradigm and taxonomy of human functioning disability, which can be used to guide holistic and interdisciplinary approaches to assessment and intervention. In settings serving children, youth, or adults with disabilities, the…

  5. Photovoltaic energy program overview, fiscal year 1991. Programs in utility technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991--FY 1995 builds on the accomplishments of the past 5 years and broadens the scope of program activities for the future. The previous plan emphasized materials and PV cell research. Under the balanced new plan, the PV Program continues its commitment to strategic research and development (R&D) into PV materials and processes, while also beginning work on PV systems and helping the PV industry encourage new markets for photovoltaics. A major challenge for the program is to assist the US PV industry in laying the foundation for at least 1000 MW of installed PV capacity in the United States and 500 MW internationally by 2000. As part of the new plan, the program expanded the scope of its activities in 1991. The PV Program is now addressing many new aspects of developing and commercializing photovoltaics. It is expanding activities with the US PV industry through the PV Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, designed to address US manufacturers` immediate problems; providing technical assistance to potential end users such as electric utilities; and the program is turning its attention to encouraging new markets for PV. In 1991, for example, the PV Program initiated a new project with the PV industry to encourage a domestic market for PV applications in buildings and began cooperative ventures to support other countries such as Mexico to use PV in their rural electrification programs. This report reviews some of the development, fabrication and manufacturing advances in photovoltaics this year.

  6. An overview of U.S. predoctoral dental implant programs and their directors.

    PubMed

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Tamegnon, Monelle; Hoogeveen, Kaitlin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of current predoctoral implant programs in the United States, including curricular characteristics and clinical practices regarding implant therapy education and program directors' characteristics. An electronic survey was sent to predoctoral implant program directors of all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools; 52 of the 60 eligible programs responded, for a response rate of 87%. The responding program directors were primarily affiliated with either prosthodontics departments (44%) or restorative dentistry departments (40%). Structurally, 80.8% of the responding schools integrate their implant programs into the third year of the curriculum. Clinical implant therapy exercises reported were simulation exercises without direct patient care (90.4% of responding schools) and direct patient care under supervision (94.2%). The most frequently taught restorative modalities are posterior single-tooth implant crown (96.2%), mandibular implant-retained overdenture (88.5%), and anterior implant-supported single crown (61.5%). A majority (74.5%) of responding programs utilize analog surgical guide planning, while 25.5% reported use of digital guided surgery planning software. All schools in the Northwest and 66.7% in the South Central regions utilize custom abutments as the primary abutment design, while a majority of schools in the North Central (62.5%), Northeast (53.8%), Southwest (66.7%), and Southeast (80%) regions use stock abutments (p=0.02). Regional differences were significant with regard to fixation modality, with all the Northwest programs using screw retention and 90% of Southeast and 87.5% of North Central programs using cement retention (p=0.002). This study demonstrated that while institutions share program director and curricular similarities, clinical practices and modalities vary significantly by region. PMID:25729020

  7. Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness

    SciTech Connect

    Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

  8. What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. SAVEnergy program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The SAVEnergy Program provides direct assistance to Federal agencies in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and water conservation measures. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) and Executive Order 12902 require that Federal agencies reduce the energy consumed in Federal buildings. The Executive Order increases the goal to a 30% reduction, compared with 1985, by 2005. In addition, agencies are required, to the maximum extent possible, to install all energy and water conservation measures with paybacks of less than 10 years. To help meet these goals, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy management Program (FEMP) recently initiated the SAVEnergy Program. The SAVEnergy approach has three key elements: The Action Plan with recommended conservation actions and complete proposals on how the agency can implement them; The Action Team to implement the SAVEnergy Action Plan; The FEMPTracks database to evaluate the SAVEnergy Program (and all other FEMP programs) and record progress toward conservation goals.

  9. [Disease and disability. The ICF model].

    PubMed

    Linden, M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnoses alone, e.g. according to the international classification of diseases 10 (ICD-10), do not give information on the illness severity, treatment needs and consequences. This depends on the functional health status, e.g. according to the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) which discriminates between impairment of functions, limitations in activity and capacity and participation restrictions. The German social law (SGB IX) defines disability as a chronic health status which lasts longer than 6 months and which results in participation restrictions. Participation restrictions are impaired capacities which not allow context or role requirements to be fulfilled. There are many instruments to measure capacities, such as the Mini-ICF-APP which was especially developed for mental disorders. As most mental disorders are chronic illnesses which lead to participation restrictions they must be conceptualized as mental disabilities. The consequence is that they must be treated under a social psychiatric perspective focussing on functions, capacities and context alike. PMID:25575629

  10. The physics of radiation driven ICF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1995-08-07

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we have recently demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next proposed laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The target uses the recently declassified indirect drive (sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}radiation drive{close_quotes}) approach which converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray {open_quotes}oven{close_quotes} (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we`ve demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In this lecture we briefly review the fundamentals of ICF, and describe the capsule implosion symmetry advantages of the hohlraum approach. We then concentrate on a quantitative understanding of the scaling of radiation drive with hohlraum size and wall material, and with laser pulse length and power. We demonstrate that coupling efficiency of x-ray drive to the capsule increases as we proceed from Nova to the NIF and eventually to a reactor, thus increasing the gain of the system.

  11. A base-line model for direct-drive ICF implosions in the xRAGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Schmidt, J. H.; Cooley, J. H.

    2013-10-01

    xRAGE is a radiation-hydrodynamics code using a Godunov solver on an Eulerian mesh with an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm, and a radiation diffusion algorithm. It has been used to study fluid flow in highly distorted systems, where arbitrary Langrian Eulerian (ALE) methods are not the method of choice, which can include ICF. A version of the code, called CASSIO, uses an implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method for radiation transport. However, specific physics packages relevant to ICF have not been available in the past, and which include laser propagation, three-temperature plasma physics and non-LTE opacity calculations. As these physics packages become available and undergo testing, a suite of validation problems is being developed to test the code under conditions relevant to ICF. The direct-drive ICF capsules fielded for the High-Z project will be used as the initial suite of validation problems. This presentation will discuss the capsule experiments and the physics used in the modeling, as well as a brief overview of the software framework used to standardize the verification and validation process. Supported under the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-13-25068.

  12. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  13. Hanford Dose Overview Program: standardized methods and data for Hanford environmental dose calculations. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, W.D.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Napier, B.A.

    1984-05-01

    This document serves as a guide to Hanford contractors for obtaining or performing Hanford-related environmental dose calculations. Because environmental dose estimation techniques are state-of-the-art and are continually evolving, the data and standard methods presented herein will require periodic revision. This document is scheduled to be updated annually, but actual changes to the program will be made more frequently if required. For this reason, PNL's Occupational and Environmental Protection Department should be contacted before any Hanford-related environmental dose calculation is performed. This revision of the Hanford Dose Overview Program Report primarily reflects changes made to the data and models used in calculating atmospheric dispersion of airborne effluents at Hanford. The modified data and models are described in detail. In addition, discussions of dose calculation methods and the review of calculation results have been expanded to provide more explicit guidance to the Hanford contractors. 19 references, 30 tables.

  14. Reducing Youth Gun Violence. Part One--An Overview [and] Part Two--Prevention and Intervention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Alan, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains two issues of a journal on reducing youth gun violence, reprinted from a report by the U.S. Department of Justice. The first issue, part one, provides an overview of programs and initiatives. The second issue, part two, describes prevention and intervention programs. To reduce violence and build healthy communities requires…

  15. STORM AND COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW: AN OVERVIEW OF EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM (EPA/600/8-89/054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents an overview of the EPA's Storm & Combined Sewer Pollution Control Research Program performed over a 20-year period beginning with the mid-1960s. It covers program involvements in the development of a diverse technology including pollution-problem assessment...

  16. Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991. Programs in utility technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The oceans are the world`s largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth`s surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans` waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

  17. Reducing Youth Gun Violence: An Overview of Programs and Initiatives. Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    This report discusses a wide array of violence prevention strategies used across the United States, ranging from school-based prevention to gun market interception. Relevant research, evaluation, and legislation are included to ground these programs and provide a context for their successful implementation. The first section of the report is an…

  18. An Overview of Program Development for NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Jody L.; Newton, Robby

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes many of the changes affecting NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program since the initiation of the Vision for Space Exploration. Programmatic and procedural changes are discussed, six new technical tasks applicable to any return to the Moon or onward towards Mars are highlighted, and personnel changes and new contact information is given.

  19. USEPA REGION 10 REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: PROGRAM OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA designed and implemented the Environmental Assessment Program (EMAP) to determine the current status, extent, changes, and trends in indicators of the condition of the Nations ecological resources on regional and national scales with known confidence. USEPA Region 10s ...

  20. 42 CFR 440.150 - Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services. 440....150 Intermediate care facility (ICF/MR) services. (a) “ICF/MR services” means those items and services... level of room and board; (2) The primary purpose of the ICF/MR is to furnish health or...

  1. Overview of GNSS-R Research Program for Ocean Observations at Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kaoru; Ebinuma, Takuji; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Kitazawa, Yukihito

    2015-04-01

    GNSS-R is a new remote-sensing method which uses reflected GNSS signals. Since no transmitters are required, it is suitable for small satellites. Constellations of GNSS-R small satellites have abilities on revolutionary progress on 'all-time observable' remote-sensing methods . We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under a contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) as a'Space science research base formation program'. The duration of research program is 3 years (2015-2017). The one of important focuses of this program is creation of a new community to merge space engineering and marine science through establishment on application plans of GNSS-R. Actual GNSS-R data acquisition experiments using multi-copters, ships, and/or towers are planned, together with in-situ sea truth data such as wave spectrum, wind speed profiles and sea surface height. These data are compared to determine the accuracy and resolution of the estimates based on GNSS-R observations. Meanwhile, preparation of a ground station for receiving GNSS-R satellite data will be also established. Whole those data obtained in this project will be distributed for public. This paper introduces the overview of research plan..

  2. AUTOMATED BATCH CHARACTERIZATION OF ICF SHELLS WITH VISION-ENABLED OPTICAL MICROSCOPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H; STEPHENS,R.B; HILL,D.W; LYON,C; NIKROO,A; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) shells are mesoscale objects with nano-scale dimensional and nano-surface finish requirements. Currently, the shell dimensions are measured by white-light interferometry and an image analysis method. These two methods complement each other and give a rather complete data set on a single shell. The process is, however, labor intensive. They have developed an automation routine to fully characterize a shell in one shot and perform unattended batch measurements. The method is useful to the ICF program both for production screening and for full characterization. It also has potential for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant where half a million shells need to be processed daily.

  3. Westinghouse Hanford Company Native American Employment Program: 1992 program overview and year-end summary

    SciTech Connect

    Azure, G.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Native American Employment Program (NAEP) is an aggressive, innovative approach to employment outreach and training. It is designed to address the diverse needs of Native American communities through recognition of their unique culture. Through training and employment, Native Americans have first-hand involvement in the important task of environmental restoration at the Hanford Site. Participants have the opportunity to embark on careers that offer tremendous pathing potential while fulfilling vital Hanford staffing needs.

  4. NASA High Energy Space Science E/PO at SSU: Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.; Cominsky, L.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Group at Sonoma State University is the lead institution for the E/PO of three high-energy space science missions: Swift, GLAST, and XMM-Newton. We have developed award-winning standards-based formal and informal educational activities (classroom exercises, inquiry-driven games, posters, etc.) for these missions, with many more coming soon. Our primary goal is to teach students about the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the astrophysical objects which emit in that energy range. We will present an overview of our group and our work. This includes our collaborations with other groups, getting mission scientists' input on the projects, and the lessons learned in making effective E/PO products that actually get used by teachers. We will also include a brief overview of the NASA Educator Ambassador program, a new highly-effective effort we have initiated to train top-notch educators from across the country to help us develop, test, and disseminate our products.

  5. The Edward Teller medal lecture: The evolution toward Indirect Drive and two decades of progress toward ICF ignition and burn

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    In 1972, I joined the Livermore ICF Theory and Target Design group led by John Nuckolls, shortly after publication of John`s seminal Nature article on ICF. My primary role, working with others in the target design program including Mordy Rosen, Steve Haan, and Larry Suter, has been as a target designer and theorist who utilized the LASNEX code to perform numerical experiments, which along with analysis of laboratory and underground thermonuclear experiments allowed me to develop a series of models and physical insights which have been used to set the direction and priorities of the Livermore program. I have had the good fortune of working with an outstanding team of scientists who have established LLNL as the premier ICF laboratory in the world. John Emmett and the LLNL Laser Science team were responsible for developing a series of lasers from Janus to Nova which have given LLNL unequaled facilities. George Zimmerman and the LASNEX group developed the numerical models essential for projecting future performance and requirements as well as for designing and analyzing the experiments. Bill Kruer, Bruce Langdon and others in the plasma theory group developed the fundamental understanding of laser plasma interactions which have played such an important role in ICF. And a series of experiment program leaders including Mike Campbell and Joe Kilkenny and their laser experimental teams developed the experimental techniques and diagnostic capabilities which have allowed us to c increasingly complex and sophisticated experiments.

  6. BPS-ICF model, a tool to measure biopsychosocial functioning and disability within ICF concepts: theory and practice updated.

    PubMed

    Talo, Seija A; Rytökoski, Ulla M

    2016-03-01

    The transformation of International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps into International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) meant a lot for those needing to communicate in terms of functioning concept in their daily work. With ICF's commonly understood language, the decades' uncertainty on what concepts and terms describe functioning and disabilities seemed to be dispelled. Instead, operationalizing ICF to measure the level of functioning along with the new nomenclature has not been as unambiguous. Transforming linguistic terms into quantified functioning seems to need another type of theorizing. Irrespective of challenging tasks, numerous projects were formulated during the past decades to apply ICF for measurement purposes. This article updates one of them, the so-called biopsychosocial-ICF model, which uses all ICF categories but classifies them into more components than ICF for measurement purposes. The model suggests that both disabilities and functional resources should be described by collecting and organizing functional measurement data in a multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial data matrice. PMID:26756850

  7. Early childhood caries and the impact of current u.s. Medicaid program: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bugis, Bussma Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental caries is the most common chronic disease among children. Above 40% of the U.S. children aged 2-11 years have dental caries; more than 50% of them come from low-income families. Under dental services of the Medicaid program, children enrolled in Medicaid must receive preventive dental services. However, only 1/5 of them utilize preventive dental services. The purpose of this overview is to measure the impact of Medicaid dental benefits on reducing oral health disparities among Medicaid-eligible children. This paper explains the importance of preventive dental care, children at high risk of dental caries, Medicaid dental benefits, utilization of dental preventive services by Medicaid-eligible children, dental utilization influencing factors, and outcome evaluation of Medicaid in preventing dental caries among children. In conclusion, despite the recent increase of children enrolled in Medicaid, utilizing preventive dental care is still a real challenge that faces Medicaid. PMID:22496690

  8. Telecommunications, navigation and information management concept overview for the Space Exploration Initiative program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jerome A.; Stephens, Elaine; Barton, Gregg

    1991-01-01

    An overview is provided of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts for telecommunications, information systems, and navigation (TISN), and engineering and architecture issues are discussed. The SEI program data system is reviewed to identify mission TISN interfaces, and reference TISN concepts are described for nominal, degraded, and mission-critical data services. The infrastructures reviewed include telecommunications for robotics support, autonomous navigation without earth-based support, and information networks for tracking and data acquisition. Four options for TISN support architectures are examined which relate to unique SEI exploration strategies. Detailed support estimates are given for: (1) a manned stay on Mars; (2) permanent lunar and Martian settlements; short-duration missions; and (4) systematic exploration of the moon and Mars.

  9. Overview of the Integrated Programs for Aerospace Vehicle Design (IPAD) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, S. L.

    1983-01-01

    To respond to national needs for improved productivity in engineering design and manufacturing, a NASA supported joint industry/government project is underway denoted Integrated Programs for Aerospace Vehicle Design (IPAD). The objective is to improve engineering productivity through better use of computer technology. It focuses on development of data base management technology and associated software for integrated company wide management of engineering and manufacturing information. Results to date on the IPAD project include an in depth documentation of a representative design process for a large engineering project, the definition and design of computer aided design software needed to support that process, and the release of prototype software to manage engineering information. This paper provides an overview of the IPAD project and summarizes progress to date and future plans.

  10. Mirror test for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor at the JET tokamak: An overview of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, M. J.; De Temmerman, G.; Coad, J. P.; Vince, J.; Drake, J. R.; Le Guern, F.; Murari, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Walker, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2006-06-15

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for plasma diagnosis that will be used at the next-step magnetic fusion experiment, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Any change of the mirror performance, in particular, reflectivity, will influence the quality and reliability of detected signals. At the instigation of the ITER Design Team, a dedicated technical and experimental activity aiming at the assessment of mirror surface degradation as a result of exposure to the plasma has been initiated on the JET tokamak. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the mirror test program, including design details of the mirror samples and their supports, their locations within JET, and the issue of optical characterization of the mirrors both before and after exposure. The postexposure characterization is particularly challenging in JET as a consequence of an environment in which both tritium and beryllium are present.

  11. Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center Programs in Aero-Heat Transfer and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, Raymond E.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation concentrates on an overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center and the projects that are supporting Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Research. The principal areas include the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project, the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA) Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) project, and the Propulsion & Power Base R&T - Smart Efficient Components (SEC), and Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Projects. In addition, highlights are presented of the turbine aero-heat transfer work currently underway at NASA Glenn, focusing on the use of the Glenn-HT Navier- Stokes code as the vehicle for research in turbulence & transition modeling, grid topology generation, unsteady effects, and conjugate heat transfer.

  12. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  13. Health measurement using the ICF: Test-retest reliability study of ICF codes and qualifiers in geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    Okochi, Jiro; Utsunomiya, Sakiko; Takahashi, Tai

    2005-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was published by the World Health Organization (WHO) to standardize descriptions of health and disability. Little is known about the reliability and clinical relevance of measurements using the ICF and its qualifiers. This study examines the test-retest reliability of ICF codes, and the rate of immeasurability in long-term care settings of the elderly to evaluate the clinical applicability of the ICF and its qualifiers, and the ICF checklist. Methods Reliability of 85 body function (BF) items and 152 activity and participation (AP) items of the ICF was studied using a test-retest procedure with a sample of 742 elderly persons from 59 institutional and at home care service centers. Test-retest reliability was estimated using the weighted kappa statistic. The clinical relevance of the ICF was estimated by calculating immeasurability rate. The effect of the measurement settings and evaluators' experience was analyzed by stratification of these variables. The properties of each item were evaluated using both the kappa statistic and immeasurability rate to assess the clinical applicability of WHO's ICF checklist in the elderly care setting. Results The median of the weighted kappa statistics of 85 BF and 152 AP items were 0.46 and 0.55 respectively. The reproducibility statistics improved when the measurements were performed by experienced evaluators. Some chapters such as genitourinary and reproductive functions in the BF domain and major life area in the AP domain contained more items with lower test-retest reliability measures and rated as immeasurable than in the other chapters. Some items in the ICF checklist were rated as unreliable and immeasurable. Conclusion The reliability of the ICF codes when measured with the current ICF qualifiers is relatively low. The result in increase in reliability according to evaluators' experience suggests proper education will have positive

  14. An overview of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-06-01

    Early in 1992 the idea of purchasing a Russian designed and fabricated space reactor power system and integrating it with a US designed satellite went from fiction to reality with the purchase of the first two Topaz II reactors by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (now the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO). The New Mexico Alliance was formed to establish a ground test facility in which to perform nonnuclear systems testing of the Topaz II, and to evaluate the Topaz 11 system for flight testing with respect to safety, performance, and operability. In conjunction, SDIO requested that the Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, MD propose a mission and design a satellite in which the Topaz II could be used as the power source. The outcome of these two activities was the design of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) satellite which combines a modified Russian Topaz II power system with a US designed satellite to achieve a specified mission. Due to funding reduction within the SDIO, the Topaz II flight program was postponed indefinitely at the end of Fiscal Year 1993. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the NEPSTP mission and the satellite design at the time the flight program ended.

  15. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  16. The Health and Functioning ICF-60: Development and Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tutelyan, V A; Chatterji, S; Baturin, A K; Pogozheva, A V; Kishko, O N; Akolzina, S E

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development and psychometric properties of the Health and Functioning ICF-60 (HF-ICF-60) measure, based on the World Health Organization (WHO) ‘International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: ICF’ (2001). The aims of the present study were to test psychometric properties of the HF-ICF-60, developed as a measure that would be responsive to change in functioning through changes in health and nutritional status, as a prospective measure to monitor health and nutritional status of populations and to explore the relationship of the HF-ICF-60 with quality of life measures such as the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment in relation to non-communicable diseases. Methods The HF-ICF-60 measure consists of 60 items selected from the ICF by an expert panel, which included 18 items that cover Body Functions, 21 items that cover Activities and Participation, rated on five-point scales, and 21 items that cover Environmental Factors (seven items cover Individual Environmental Factors and 14 items cover Societal Environmental Factors), rated on nine-point scales. The HF-ICF-60 measure was administered to the Russian nationally representative sample within the Russian National Population Quality of Life, Health and Nutrition Survey, in 2004 (n = 9807) and 2005 (n = 9560), as part of the two waves of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS). The statistical analyses were carried out with the use of both classical and modern psychometric methods, such as factor analysis, and based on Item Response Theory, respectively. Results The HF-ICF-60 questionnaire is a new measure derived directly from the ICF and covers the ICF components as follows: Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors (Individual Environmental Factors and Societal Environmental Factors). The results from the factor analyses (both Exploratory Factor Analyses and Confirmatory Factor

  17. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle First Stage Roll Control System Cold Flow Development Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Christopher G.; Holt, Kimberly A.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle is the selected design, chosen to return humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It is configured in two inline stages: the First Stage is a Space Shuttle derived five-segment Solid Rocket Booster and the Upper Stage is powered by a Saturn V derived J-2X engine. During launch, roll control for the First Stage (FS) is handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS) located on the connecting Interstage. That system will provide the Ares I with the ability to counteract induced roll torque while any induced yaw or pitch moments are handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. This paper provides an overview of NASA s Ares I FS RoCS cold flow development test program including detailed test objectives, types of tests run to meet those objectives, an overview of the results, and applicable lessons learned. The test article was built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. The FS RoCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) is a full scale, flight representative water flow test article whose primary objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate integrated system level performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Development testing and model correlation was deemed necessary as there is little historical precedent for similar large flow, pulsing systems such as the FS RoCS. The cold flow development test program consisted of flight-similar tanks, pressure regulators, and thruster valves, as well as plumbing simulating flight geometries, combined with other facility grade components and structure. Orifices downstream of the thruster valves were used to simulate the pressure drop through the thrusters. Additional primary objectives of this test program were to: evaluate system surge pressure (waterhammer) characteristics due to thruster valve operation over a range of mission duty cycles at various feed system pressures, evaluate temperature transients and heat transfer in the

  18. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-09-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres.

  19. Overview of the joint US/Russia surety program in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Vorontsova, O.S.; Blinov, I.M.

    1998-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated many joint research and development projects with the two premier Russian nuclear laboratories, VNIIEF and VNIITF, (historically known as Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70) in a wide spectrum of areas. One of the areas in which critical dialogue and technical exchange is continuing to take place is in the realm of system surety. Activities primarily include either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analyses and testing, accident data-bases, assessments, and product design. Furthermore, a continuing dialog has been established between the organizations with regard to developing a better understanding of how risk is perceived and analyzed in Russia versus that in the US. The result of such efforts could reduce the risk of systems to incur accidents or incidents resulting in high consequences to the public. The purpose of this paper is to provide a current overview of the Sandia surety program and its various initiatives with the Russian institutes, with an emphasis on the program scope and rationale. The historical scope of projects will be indicated. A few specific projects will be discussed, along with results to date. The extension of the joint surety initiatives to other government and industry organizations will be described. This will include the current status of a joint Sandia/VNIIEF initiative to establish an International Surety Center for Energy Intensive and High Consequence Systems and Infrastructures.

  20. Nova Upgrade: A proposed ICF facility to demonstrate ignition and gain, revision 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    The present objective of the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is to determine the scientific feasibility of compressing and heating a small mass of mixed deuterium and tritium (DT) to conditions at which fusion occurs and significant energy is released. The potential applications of ICF will be determined by the resulting fusion energy yield (amount of energy produced) and gain (ratio of energy released to energy required to heat and compress the DT fuel). Important defense and civilian applications, including weapons physics, weapons effects simulation, and ultimately the generation of electric power will become possible if yields of 100 to 1,000 MJ and gains exceeding approximately 50 can be achieved. Once ignition and propagating bum producing modest gain (2 to 10) at moderate drive energy (1 to 2 MJ) has been achieved, the extension to high gain (greater than 50) is straightforward. Therefore, the demonstration of ignition and modest gain is the final step in establishing the scientific feasibility of ICF. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes the Nova Upgrade Facility to achieve this demonstration by the end of the decade. This facility would be constructed within the existing Nova building at LLNL for a total cost of approximately $400 M over the proposed FY 1995-1999 construction period. This report discusses this facility.

  1. Outcomes of early rheumatoid arthritis--the WHO ICF framework.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2013-08-01

    With the establishment of the new American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) 2010 criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to diagnose patients earlier and with the introduction of early and aggressive treatment, the current aim is remission resulting in less functional disability, halting of radiographic damage, less pain, less fatigue and no loss of employment. These outcomes can be related to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (the WHO ICF framework). This framework includes the component body functions, body structures, activities and participation related to the disease. These components are related to each other in a bidirectional way and can be influenced by contextual factors including environmental and personal factors. This framework can be used to describe trends in RA outcomes and the impact of contextual factors on these outcomes. Despite aggressive treatment strategies, patients with RA still experience loss of function, pain and fatigue, and a relatively high proportion of patients have to take sick leave or become work disabled within the first few years of the disease. There is evidence that more stringent definitions of remission lead to greater improvement of outcomes and that the aim should be sustained remission and not just remission. There is, however, a need for a better understanding of the relation between contextual factors and activity and participation outcomes to better guide therapy decisions by rheumatologists and provide information to patients, families and policymakers about the impact of RA on their lives and to the society. The overall aim of this overview is to highlight the important contextual factors and consequences that relate to outcomes typically measured in RA studies and to demonstrate the additional benefits that can be achieved with remission and sustained remission. PMID:24315054

  2. Overview of U.S. EPA Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program - Interfacing with the Water Industry on Technology Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This slide presentation summarizes key elements of the EPA Office of Research and Development’s (ORD) Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) Research program. An overview of the national problems posed by aging water infrastructure is followed by a brief description of EPA’s overall r...

  3. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 1: Overview and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    Constituting an overview of a 10-volume report on the historical development and contemporary activities (1966-1973) of each of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this volume includes: the methods used for data collection (personal interviews with both past and present IHS key officials,…

  4. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the

  5. Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Office of Safety and Mission Assurance sponsors an Agency-wide NDE Program that supports Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology, Human Exploration and Development of Space, Earth Science, and Space Science Enterprises. For each of these Enterprises, safety is the number one priority. Development of the next generation aero-space launch and transportation vehicles, satellites, and deep space probes have highlighted the enabling role that NDE plays in these advanced technology systems. Specific areas of advanced component development, component integrity, and structural heath management are critically supported by NDE technologies. The simultaneous goals of assuring safety, maintaining overall operational efficiency, and developing and utilizing revolutionary technologies to expand human activity and space-based commerce in the frontiers of air and space places increasing demands on the Agencies NDE infrastructure and resources. In this presentation, an overview of NASA's NDE Program will be presented, that includes a background and status of current Enterprise NDE issues, and the NDE investment areas being developed to meet Enterprise safety and mission assurance needs through the year 2009 and beyond.

  6. An overview of the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay E.; Goebel, Don; Brophy, John R.; Beatty, John; Monheiser, J.; Giles, D.; Hobson, D.; Wilson, F.; Christensen, J.; De Pano, M.; Hart, S.; Ohlinger, W.; Hill, D. N.; Williams, J.; Wilbur, P.; Laufer, D. M.; Farnell, C.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is investigating high power, high specific impulse propulsion technologies that could enable ambitious flights such as multi-body rendezvous missions, outer planet orbiters and interstellar precursor missions. The requirements for these missions are much more demanding than those for state-of-the-art solar-powered ion propulsion applications. The purpose of the NEXIS program is to develop advanced ion thruster technologies that satisfy the requirements for high power, high specific impulse operation, high efficiency and long thruster life. The nominal design point for the NEXIS thruster is 20 kWe at a specific impulse of 7500 s with an efficiency over 78% and a xenon throughput capability of greater than 2000 kg. These performance and throughput goals will be achieved by applying a combination of advanced technologies including a large discharge chamber, erosion resistant carbon-carbon grids, an advanced reservoir hollow cathode and techniques for increasing propellant efficiency such as grid masking and accelerator grid aperture diameter tailoring. This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with these requirements and how they are being addressed in the NEXIS program.

  7. Validation of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for rheumatoid arthritis: the perspective of psychologists.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Inge; Cieza, Alarcos; Stucki, Gerold

    2008-01-01

    The 'Comprehensive ICF Core Set for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)' is an application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and represents the typical spectrum of problems in functioning of patients with RA. The objective of this study was to validate this ICF Core Set from the perspective of psychologists. Psychologists experienced in RA treatment were asked about the problems of RA patients, treated by psychologists, in a three-round survey using the Delphi technique. Responses were linked to the ICF. Twenty psychologists in five countries gave a total of 303 responses that were linked to 65 different ICF categories. Fifteen responses were linked to the not yet developed ICF component personal factors and nine were not covered by ICF. Overall, 66% of the ICF categories linked to the responses of the psychologists were represented by the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for RA. Several responses that were not covered need to be investigated further. PMID:25160808

  8. PIC Simulation for ICF Plasma Sputter Coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Huang, H.; Parks, P. B.; Chan, V. S.; Walton, C. C.; Wilks, S. C.

    2010-11-01

    To satisfy mesh spacing constraint δ/λDebye<=1 particle In Cell (PIC) simulations at 25x reduced cathode currents levels are used to numerically model the distribution of currents, electrostatic potentials and particle kinetics in a Type II ``unbalanced'' cylindrically symmetric magnetron discharge used for Be sputter coating of ICF capsules. Simulation indicates a strong magnetic field confinement of the plasma in the closed field lines region adjacent to cathode, and accompanying cross-field line plasma diffusion into the open-field line region connected to wall/anode. A narrow Charles-Langmuir sheath and a pre-sheath that is ˜10x wider due to the existence of the B-field are observed. The effects of varying boundary conditions, e.g., the separation between the anode/cathode, the anode bias voltage, etc., are studied, which is expected to aid experimentalists in turning these ``knobs'' for better coating qualities. We also show that the etch rate due to sputtering of Be targets predicted by the results of our PIC simulations, after rescaling to experimental conditions, agrees with experiments.

  9. Predicted ICF Neutron Spectrum Corrections from Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Peterson, Luc; Brandon, Scott; Gaffney, Jim; Hammer, Jim; Kritcher, Andrea; Nora, Ryan; Springer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Produced neutron spectra have long been used as a diagnostic of ICF implosions. The neutron spectrum width is characteristic of the burn temperature as well as the variance of the burning region's fluid motion. Corrections to higher moments of the spectrum are thought to be diagnostic as well. Because of the large neutron fluxes at the NIF, we expect to have the opportunity to measure these corrections and compare with simulation. We will discuss a post-process platform that we have built for extracting these moment corrections as well as many other extensive quantities from the hydrodynamic simulations, and report on the predicted neutron spectrum corrections recently calculated for a large suite of implosion simulations in one, two, and three dimensions with varying drive symmetry and overall convergence ratio. We are particularly interested in the observable effects on the neutron spectrum along different lines of sight from the dimensional symmetry constraint in the simulated hydrodynamics. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  11. The ICF status and plans in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Miller, G. H.; Kauffman, R. L.

    2006-06-01

    The United States continues to maintain its leadership in ICF as it moves toward the goal of ignition. The flagship of the program is the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presently under construction at LLNL. Experiments had begun on the first four beams of the National Ignition Facility just at the time of the last IFSA Conference. Several new successful campaigns have been conducted since then in planar hydrodynamics and hohlraums as well as activating the VISAR diagnostic for equation of state experiments. Highlights of these results will be reviewed. Presently, the four beam experimental capability has been suspended while the first eight beams are being installed as the first step in building out the project. Meanwhile, much progress has been made in developing ignition designs for using NIF. An array of designs having several ablator materials have been shown computationally to ignite with energies ranging from the design energy to as low as 1 MJ of laser energy. Alternative direct drive designs in the NIF indirect drive configuration have been developed by LLE. This wide array of design choices has increased the chance of achieving ignition sooner on the facility. Plans are now being developed to begin an ignition experimental campaign on NIF in 2010, a little over a year after completion of the facility. Other US facilities are also implementing improved capabilities. Petawatt lasers are now under construction at the University of Rochester and Sandia National Laboratory. The Z pulsed power machine at Sandia National Laboratory is being refurbished to improve its performance. The ongoing research program at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester and the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratory as well as at the Nike, Trident and Janus lasers remain strong, performing experiments supporting the NIF ignition plan and direct drive ignition. There also is an active program in the broader field of high energy density science on these facilities. These

  12. The ICF Status and Plans in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E; Miller, G; Kauffman, R

    2005-10-12

    The United States continues to maintain its leadership in ICF as it moves toward the goal of ignition. The flagship of the program is the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presently under construction at LLNL. Experiments had begun on the first four beams of the National Ignition Facility just at the time of the last IFSA Conference. Several new successful campaigns have been conducted since then in planar hydrodynamics and hohlraums as well as activating the VISAR diagnostic for equation of state experiments. Highlights of these results will be reviewed. Presently, the four beam experimental capability has been suspended while the first eight beams are being installed as the first step in building out the project. Meanwhile, much progress has been made in developing ignition designs for using NIF. An array of designs having several ablator materials have been shown computationally to ignite with energies ranging from the design energy to as low as 1 MJ of laser energy. Alternative direct drive designs in the NIF indirect drive configuration have been developed by LLE. This wide array of design choices has increased the chance of achieving ignition sooner on the facility. Plans are now being developed to begin an ignition experimental campaign on NIF in 2010, a little over a year after completion of the facility. Other US facilities are also implementing improved capabilities. Petawatt lasers are now under construction at the University of Rochester and Sandia National Laboratory. The Z pulsed power machine at Sandia National Laboratory is being refurbished to improve its performance. The ongoing research program at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester and the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratory as well as at the Nike, Trident and Janus lasers remain strong, performing experiments supporting the NIF ignition plan and direct drive ignition. There also is an active program in the broader field of high energy density science on these facilities. These

  13. The program plan: An overview of the development and implementation of the International Asteroid Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The program plan presents an overview of the development and implementation of the International Asteroid Mission. The final mission scenario was determined following an examination of over 20 different possibilities. Criteria, including delta V costs, round-trip mission opportunities, mass requirements, and cargo delivery requirements were compared. The candidate asteroid is 3361 Orpheus (1982 HR). Orpheus is believed to be carbonaceous and hydrous, and is 800 meters in diameter. The asteroid lies in an orbit inclined 2.69 degrees to the ecliptic with a semi-major axis of 1.21 astronomical units. The synodic period of the orbit is four years, assuming constant orbital elements. However, reasonable round-trip mission opportunities occur every 3.4 years, on the average. This feature of the orbit permits the crew and cargo vehicles to be cycled, thus extending the economic return time for the deliverable products. The time-table for the nominal first mission is shown and the delta V costs associated with the trips to and from Orpheus are presented.

  14. An Overview of the NASA Aviation Safety Program Propulsion Health Monitoring Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has been initiated with aggressive goals to reduce the civil aviation accident rate, To meet these goals, several technology investment areas have been identified including a sub-element in propulsion health monitoring (PHM). Specific AvSP PHM objectives are to develop and validate propulsion system health monitoring technologies designed to prevent engine malfunctions from occurring in flight, and to mitigate detrimental effects in the event an in-flight malfunction does occur. A review of available propulsion system safety information was conducted to help prioritize PHM areas to focus on under the AvSP. It is noted that when a propulsion malfunction is involved in an aviation accident or incident, it is often a contributing factor rather than the sole cause for the event. Challenging aspects of the development and implementation of PHM technology such as cost, weight, robustness, and reliability are discussed. Specific technology plans are overviewed including vibration diagnostics, model-based controls and diagnostics, advanced instrumentation, and general aviation propulsion system health monitoring technology. Propulsion system health monitoring, in addition to engine design, inspection, maintenance, and pilot training and awareness, is intrinsic to enhancing aviation propulsion system safety.

  15. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Project Work in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA?s Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2011) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  16. Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

  17. Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

  18. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a voluntary national scoring system for commercial buildings to help building owners and managers assess a building’s energy-related systems independent of operations. The goal of the score is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system, known as the Commercial Building Energy Asset Score, will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrades over time. The system will also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building investors, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset scoring tool. The alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach are described in the Program Overview and Technical Protocol Version 1.0.

  19. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Propulsion Work in the Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Technical Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2012) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  20. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize, and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cow-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale, risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  1. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize. and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cowl-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale. risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  2. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Kim, Y H; Mc Evoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Langenbrunner, J R; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Batha, S H; Dauffy, L; Stoeffl, W; Malone, R; Kaufman, M I; Cox, B C; Tunnel, T W; Miller, E K; Rubery, M

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  3. An overview of a 5-year research program on acid deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; He, K.; Xu, X.; Zhang, P.; Bai, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Duan, L.; Li, W.; Chai, F.

    2011-12-01

    Despite concerted research and regulative control of sulfur dioxide in China, acid rain remained a serious environmental issue, due to a sharp increase in the combustion of fossil fuel in the 2000s. In 2005, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China funded a five-year comprehensive research program on acid deposition. This talk will give an overview of the activities and the key findings from this study, covering emission, atmospheric processes, and deposition, effects on soil and stream waters, and impact on typical trees/plants in China. The main results include (1) China still experiences acidic rainfalls in southern and eastern regions, although the situation has stabilized after 2006 due to stringent control of SO2 by the Chinese Government; (2) Sulfate is the dominant acidic compound, but the contribution of nitrate has increased; (3) cloud-water composition in eastern China is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions; (4) the persistent fall of acid rain in the 30 years has lead to acidification of some streams/rivers and soils in southern China; (5) the studied plants have shown varying response to acid rain; (6) some new insights have been obtained on atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric transport, soil chemistry, and ecological impacts, some of which will be discussed in this talk. Compared to the situation in North America and Europe, China's acid deposition is still serious, and continued control of sulfur and nitrogen emission is required. There is an urgent need to establish a long-term observation network/program to monitor the impact of acid deposition on soil, streams/rivers/lakes, and forests.

  4. Overview of space power electronic's technology under the CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a NASA Program targeted at the development of specific technologies in the areas of transportation, operations and science. Each of these three areas consists of major elements and one of the operation's elements is the High Capacity Power element. The goal of this element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA initiatives. The High Capacity Power element is broken down into several subelements that includes energy conversion in the areas of the free piston Stirling power converter and thermoelectrics, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental compatibility and system's lifetime. A recent overview of the CSTI High capacity Power element and a description of each of the program's subelements is given by Winter (1989). The goals of the Power Management subelement are twofold. The first is to develop, test, and demonstrate high temperature, radiation-resistant power and control components and circuits that will be needed in the Power Conditioning, Control and Transmission (PCCT) subsystem of a space nuclear power system. The results obtained under this goal will also be applicable to the instrumentation and control subsystem of a space nuclear reactor. These components and circuits must perform reliably for lifetimes of 7-10 years. The second goal is to develop analytical models for use in computer simulations of candidate PCCT subsystems. Circuits which will be required for a specific PCCT subsystem will be designed and built to demonstrate their performance and, also, to validate the analytical models and simulations. The tasks under the Power Management subelement will now be described in terms of objectives, approach and present status of work.

  5. A freshman orientation program to provide an overview of the medical learning roadmap.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Terumichi; Nemoto, Takehiro; Takayanagi, Kazue; Kashimura, Masami; Hayasaka, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    International accreditation of medical education was introduced in Japan in 2013 and is planning to be applied in late 2014 or 2015. Students will need to cope with the resulting changes and to recognize by what route they will learn medicine. Therefore, a freshman orientation course, which was based on problem-based learning (PBL) and had been held for first-year students, was modified as an awareness reform program in which students would learn "how to learn medicine." We investigated whether this program has led to useful changes in students' recognition of the way of learning in medical school and their directions as learners. The program was held for 114 first-year medical school students in 2013 and consisted of PBL tutorials, large-classroom lectures, simulation learning using role-play with simulated patients, and team-based learning (TBL), presented in this order. Learning modules that is made with an integration of the clinical sciences with the basic biomedical and the behavioral and social sciences were provided. A nonanonymous questionnaire survey asking" what learning methods are effective for you?" was conducted before and after completion of the course. Furthermore, group answers obtained in TBL were investigated. The score for the question" To what extent can you imagine your route of learning during your 6 years?" significantly increased from 3.1±0.99 (mean±SD) before the course to 3.5±0.88 (p<0.01) after the course. The score for the question" To what extent is the small-group learning, such as PBL, useful for you?" significantly increased from 3.9±0.73 to 4.2±0.71 (p<0.05). Group responses in TBL sessions indicated that students desired classes that presented tasks and regarded" emphasis on reflection" and" observation of senior physicians as role models" as the most important methods for learning interview skills. We believe students should acquire active learning attitudes as adults early in their 6 years of medical school. The level of

  6. Progress on achieving the ICF conditions needed for high gain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J.D.

    1988-12-23

    Progress during the past two years has moved us much closer to demonstrating the scientific and technological requirements for high gain ICF in the laboratory. This progress has been made possible by operating at the third harmonic of 1..mu..m light which dramatically reduces concern about hot electrons and by advances in diagnostics such as 100 ps x-ray framing cameras which greatly increase the data available from each experiment. Making use of many of these new capabilities, major improvements in confinement conditions have been achieved for ICF implosions. In particular, in an optimized hohlraum on Nova, radiation driven implosions with convergence ratio in excess of 30 (volume compression /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 4/) have performed essentially as predicted by spherical implosion calculations. This paper presents these results as well as examples of advances in several other areas and discusses the implications for the future of ICF with lasers and heavy ion beam drivers. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-12-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres. The preliminary data on the properties of a Au-Cu binary alloy system by SEM and STEM analysis is presented.

  8. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  9. Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes. Part 1; Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean; Bond, Thomas; Sheldon, David; Wright, William; Langhals, Tammy; Al-Khalil, Kamel; Broughton, Howard

    1996-01-01

    The Icing Technology Branch at NASA Lewis has been involved in an effort to validate two thermal ice protection codes developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. LEWICE/Thermal (electrothermal deicing & anti-icing), and ANTICE (hot-gas & electrothermal anti-icing). The Thermal Code Validation effort was designated as a priority during a 1994 'peer review' of the NASA Lewis Icing program, and was implemented as a cooperative effort with industry. During April 1996, the first of a series of experimental validation tests was conducted in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel(IRT). The purpose of the April 96 test was to validate the electrothermal predictive capabilities of both LEWICE/Thermal, and ANTICE. A heavily instrumented test article was designed and fabricated for this test, with the capability of simulating electrothermal de-icing and anti-icing modes of operation. Thermal measurements were then obtained over a range of test conditions, for comparison with analytical predictions. This paper will present an overview of the test, including a detailed description of: (1) the validation process; (2) test article design; (3) test matrix development; and (4) test procedures. Selected experimental results will be presented for de-icing and anti-icing modes of operation. Finally, the status of the validation effort at this point will be summarized. Detailed comparisons between analytical predictions and experimental results are contained in the following two papers: 'Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes: Part 2- The Validation of LEWICE/Thermal' and 'Validation of NASA Thermal Ice Protection Computer Codes: Part 3-The Validation of ANTICE'

  10. Forty-Year Analysis of Colonoscopic Surveillance Program for Neoplasia in Ulcerative Colitis: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Ho Ryan; Rutter, Matthew D; Askari, Alan; Lee, Gui Han; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Moorghen, Morgan; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Saunders, Brian P; Graham, Trevor A; Hart, Ailsa L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study provides an overview of the largest and longest-running colonoscopic surveillance program for colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Data were obtained from medical records, endoscopy, and histology reports. Primary end points were defined as death, colectomy, withdrawal from surveillance, or censor date (1 January 2013). Results: A total of 1,375 UC patients were followed up for 15,234 patient-years (median, 11 years per patient). CRC was detected in 72 patients (incidence rate (IR), 4.7 per 1,000 patient-years). Time-trend analysis revealed that although there was significant decrease in incidence of colectomy performed for dysplasia (linear regression, R=−0.43; P=0.007), IR of advanced CRC and interval CRC have steadily decreased over past four decades (Pearson's correlation, −0.99; P=0.01 for both trends). The IR of early CRC has increased 2.5-fold in the current decade compared with past decade (χ2, P=0.045); however, its 10-year survival rate was high (79.6%). The IR of dysplasia has similarly increased (χ2, P=0.01), potentially attributable to the recent use of chromoendoscopy that was twice more effective at detecting dysplasia compared with white-light endoscopy (χ2, P<0.001). CRCs were frequently accompanied by synchronous CRC or spatially distinct dysplasia (37.5%). Finally, the risk of CRC was not significantly different between “indefinite” or low-grade dysplasia (log-rank, P=0.78). Conclusions: Colonoscopic surveillance may have a significant role in reducing the risk of advanced and interval CRC while allowing more patients to retain their colon for longer. Given the ongoing risk of early CRC, patients with any grade of dysplasia who are managed endoscopically should be monitored closely with advanced techniques. PMID:25823771

  11. Overview and current status of DOE/UPVG`s TEAM-UP Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, S.

    1995-11-01

    An overview is given of the Utility Photovoltaic Group. The mission is to accelerate the use of small-scale and large scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of the electric utilities and their customers.

  12. 42 CFR 431.154 - Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR. 431.154 Section 431.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Process for NFs and ICFs/MR § 431.154 Informal reconsideration for ICFs/MR. The informal...

  13. 42 CFR 442.40 - Availability of FFP during appeals for ICFs/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an ICF/MR after its provider agreement has been terminated or has expired and not been renewed. (2... agreement when CMS in validating a State survey agency certification, determines that an ICF/MR does not.... (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section, FFP in payments to an ICF/MR...

  14. 42 CFR 442.118 - Denial of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Denial of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR... of payments for new admissions to an ICF/MR. (a) Basis for denial of payments. The Medicaid agency may deny payment for new admissions to an ICF/MR that no longer meets the applicable conditions...

  15. Overview of the U.S. DOE Accident Tolerant Fuel Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Lance L. Snead

    2013-09-01

    The United States Fuel Cycle Research and Development Advanced Fuels Campaign has been given the responsibility to conduct research and development on enhanced accident tolerant fuels with the goal of performing a lead test assembly or lead test rod irradiation in a commercial reactor by 2022. The Advanced Fuels Campaign has defined fuels with enhanced accident tolerance as those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. This paper provides an overview of the FCRD Accident Tolerant Fuel program. The ATF attributes will be presented and discussed. Attributes identified as potentially important to enhance accident tolerance include reduced hydrogen generation (resulting from cladding oxidation), enhanced fission product retention under severe accident conditions, reduced cladding reaction with high-temperature steam, and improved fuel-cladding interaction for enhanced performance under extreme conditions. To demonstrate the enhanced accident tolerance of candidate fuel designs, metrics must be developed and evaluated using a combination of design features for a given LWR design, potential improvements to that design, and the design of an advanced fuel/cladding system. The aforementioned attributes provide qualitative guidance for parameters that will be considered for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. It may be unnecessary to improve in all attributes and it is likely that some attributes or combination of attributes provide meaningful gains in accident tolerance, while others may provide only marginal benefits. Thus, an initial step in program implementation will be the development of quantitative

  16. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,KH

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  17. An Overview of the VHITAL Program: A Two-Stage Bismuth Fed Very High Specific Impulse Thruster with Anode Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Capelli, Mark; Scharfe, David; Tverdokhlebov, Sergey; Semenkin, Sasha; Tverdokhlebov, Oleg; Boyd, Ian; Keidar, Michael; Yalin, Azer; Markusic, Tom; Polzin, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL) is a two stage Hall thruster program that is a part of NASA's Prometheus Program in NASA's New Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). It is a potentially viable low-cost alternative to ion engines for near-term NEP applications with the growth potential to support mid-term and far-term NEP missions... This paper will present an overview of the thruster fabrication, pre-existing TAL 160 demonstration, feed system development, lifetime assessment, contamination assessment, and mission study activities performed to date.

  18. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  19. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  20. Practical Recommendations for Robot-Assisted Treadmill Therapy (Lokomat) in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Indications, Goal Setting, and Clinical Implementation within the WHO-ICF Framework.

    PubMed

    Aurich-Schuler, Tabea; Warken, Birgit; Graser, Judith V; Ulrich, Thilo; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Meyer-Heim, Andreas; van Hedel, Hubertus J A; Schroeder, A Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Active participation and the highest level of independence during daily living are primary goals in neurorehabilitation. Therefore, standing and walking are key factors in many rehabilitation programs. Despite inconclusive evidence considering the best application and efficacy of robotic tools in the field of pediatric neurorehabilitation, robotic technologies have been implemented to complement conventional therapies in recent years. A group of experienced therapists and physicians joined in an "expert panel." They compared their clinical application protocols, discussed recurring open questions, and developed experience-based recommendations for robot-assisted treadmill therapy (exemplified by the Lokomat, Hocoma, Volketswil, Switzerland) with a focus on children with cerebral palsy. Specific indications and therapeutic goals were defined considering the severity of motor impairments and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework (ICF). After five meetings, consensus was found and recommendations for the implementation of robot-assisted treadmill therapy including postsurgery rehabilitation were proposed. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview on therapeutical applications in a fast developing field of medicine, where scientific evidence is still scarce. These recommendations can help physicians and therapists to plan the child's individual therapy protocol of robot-assisted treadmill therapy. PMID:26011438

  1. Kinetic Effects at Material Interfaces in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, S. C.; Cabot, W.; Whitley, H.; Greenough, J.; Cohen, B. I.; Belof, J.; Zimmerman, G.; Amendt, P. A.; Lepape, S.; Divol, L.; Dimits, A.; Graziani, F.; Molvig, K.; Dodd, E.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Laffite, S.; Larroche, O.; Casanova, M.; Masse, L.

    2014-10-01

    The mixing of materials at an interface during an ICF implosion, for example the DT- Carbon interface in an ICF capsule, is a complex process. In general, rad-hydro codes do an excellent job of modeling the important processes during an ICF implosion. However, there are certain times during the implosion when kinetic effects of the ions may play a role in how two materials mix across the interface between them, even in the absence of shocks moving through them. The Knudsen layer effect is one such example. We will describe results of multi-ion species hybrid LSP simulations where the ions are treated kinetically and the electrons are treated as a fluid. We observe that the DT and carbon ions diffuse across the interface in a self-similar manner, at a rate proportional to the square root of time, in agreement with diffusion theory. The resulting ion distributions for each species (on both sides of the interface) will be presented, and the result of this mixing on the yield will be discussed for ICF capsules. Preliminary results of a related mixing that occurs at the gas-hohlraum wall interface will also be presented. Performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNS, LLC.

  2. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of...

  3. Resource Guide to the Evaluation of the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. Part I: Overview of the Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Walnut Creek, CA.

    This is an overview of an evaluation model developed to be used with the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse clinical training program for professional school faculty in medicine, nursing and social work. The evaluation model is in two major parts, a national evaluation which examines program process and outcome across all…

  4. 42 CFR 442.117 - Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose deficiencies pose immediate jeopardy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose... ICFs/MR § 442.117 Termination of certification for ICFs/MR whose deficiencies pose immediate jeopardy... no longer meets conditions of participation for ICFs/MR as specified in subpart I of part 483 of...

  5. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  6. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    PubMed Central

    Weemaes, Corry MR; van Tol, Maarten JD; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M; van Eggermond, Marja CJA; Thijssen, Peter E; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Meyn, Stephan; Powell, Cynthia; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Shugar, Andrea; van den Elsen, Peter J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype–phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mutations in DNMT3B (ICF1), 13 patients had mutations in ZBTB24 (ICF2), whereas for 8 patients, the gene defect has not yet been identified (ICFX). While at first sight these patients share the same immunological, morphological and epigenetic hallmarks of the disease, systematic evaluation of all reported informative cases shows that: (1) the humoral immunodeficiency is generally more pronounced in ICF1 patients, (2) B- and T-cell compartments are both involved in ICF1 and ICF2, (3) ICF2 patients have a significantly higher incidence of intellectual disability and (4) congenital malformations can be observed in some ICF1 and ICF2 cases. It is expected that these observations on prevalence and clinical presentation will facilitate mutation-screening strategies and help in diagnostic counseling. PMID:23486536

  7. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects.

    PubMed

    Weemaes, Corry M R; van Tol, Maarten J D; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; Thijssen, Peter E; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Meyn, Stephan; Powell, Cynthia; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Shugar, Andrea; van den Elsen, Peter J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-11-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype-phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mutations in DNMT3B (ICF1), 13 patients had mutations in ZBTB24 (ICF2), whereas for 8 patients, the gene defect has not yet been identified (ICFX). While at first sight these patients share the same immunological, morphological and epigenetic hallmarks of the disease, systematic evaluation of all reported informative cases shows that: (1) the humoral immunodeficiency is generally more pronounced in ICF1 patients, (2) B- and T-cell compartments are both involved in ICF1 and ICF2, (3) ICF2 patients have a significantly higher incidence of intellectual disability and (4) congenital malformations can be observed in some ICF1 and ICF2 cases. It is expected that these observations on prevalence and clinical presentation will facilitate mutation-screening strategies and help in diagnostic counseling. PMID:23486536

  8. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  9. An Overview of the WIN Program: Its Objectives, Accomplishments, and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Work Incentive (WIN) program is supposed to help recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) to get jobs through a program of training, work experience, and employment while reducing the cost of the AFDC program. Because of concerns raised about the program, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) assessed the program to…

  10. An Overview of the Growth and Development of the U.S. Migrant Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Helen J.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a broad, historical overview of federal legislation and agencies created to improve the health situation of migrant farm workers. Focuses particularly on the Migrant Health Act (of 1962) and its subsequent revisions. Asserts that a need still exists for special arrangements for health care for migrants and other seasonal farm workers. (KH)

  11. Federal Programs Supporting Multicounty Substate Regional Activities: An Overview. Rural Development Research Report No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stam, Jerome M; Reid, J. Norman

    Substate regional organizations (defined as those public bodies that provide planning, economic development, and service coordination for local governments) are discussed, and the major issues pertaining to substate regionalism are explored in this overview. The background and setting of the substate regional movement is traced, from its inception…

  12. 75 FR 6007 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; School Leadership Grant Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Stabilization Fund Program (74 FR 58436, 58487), School Improvement Grants (74 FR 65618, 65652), and Race to the... principals) prepared through this program on student learning and for continuous program improvement. Note... serve and for continuous program improvement. ] For the purpose of these invitational priorities,...

  13. A systematic review of measures of shoulder pain and functioning using the International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common condition with prevalence estimates of 7–26% and the associated disability is multi-faceted. For functional assessments in clinic and research, a number of condition-specific and generic measures are available. With the approval of the ICF, a system is now available for the analysis of health status measures. The aims of this systematic literature review were to identify the most frequently addressed aspects of functioning in assessments of shoulder pain and provide an overview of the content of frequently used measures. Methods Meaningful concepts of the identified measures were extracted and linked to the most precise ICF categories. Second-level categories with a relative frequency above 1% and the content of measures with at least 5 citations were reported. Results A set of 40 second-level ICF categories were identified in 370 single-item measures and 105 multi-item measures, of these, 28 belonged to activities and participation, 11 to body functions and structures and 1 to environmental factors. The most frequently addressed concepts were: pain; movement-related body functions and structures; sleep, hand and arm use, self-care, household tasks, work and employment, and leisure. Concepts of psycho-social functions and environmental factors were less frequently included. The content overview of commonly used condition-specific and generic measures displayed large variations in the number of included concepts. The most wide-ranging measures, the DASH and ASES were linked to 23 and 16 second-level ICF categories, respectively, whereas the Constant were linked to 7 categories and the SST and the SPADI to 6 categories each. Conclusions This systematic review displayed that measures used for shoulder pain included more than twice as many concepts of activities and participation than concepts of body functions and structures. Environmental factors were scarcely addressed. The huge differences in the content of the condition

  14. EDITORIAL: Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010) Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-09-01

    -U tokamak in China. Other MCF Overview of results from the Large Helical Device; Overview of TJ-II experiments; Overview of the RFX fusion science program. ICF Progress toward ignition on the National Ignition Facility; Studying ignition schemes on European laser facilities; Cross device or cross programme topical overviews Effects of 3D magnetic perturbations on toroidal plasmas; Toroidal momentum transport. We trust that, as usual, this issue will be a useful resource for the community and we thank all of the authors and referees for their hard work in preparing the papers for publication. Whilst the number of overview reports is the same as for the Geneva FEC special issue (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 100201), we are pleased to note that we have a complete set of summaries in this issue.

  15. Overview Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  16. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2011-12-15

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  17. A National Overview of Staff and Program Characteristics 1984-1985. HEP/CAMP National Evaluation Project. Research Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Gary L.

    One of four products of the 1984-85 National Evaluation Project to compile baseline data on characteristics and impacts of High School Equivalency Programs (HEP) and College Assistance for Migrants Programs (CAMP), this report presents a brief overview of the goals, basic research design, and summary of the evaluation project products and a…

  18. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  19. 75 FR 5296 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; National Resource Centers (NRC) Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Foreign Language and Area Studies or Foreign Language and International Studies Program and Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for... of institutions of higher education to establish or strengthen nationally recognized foreign...

  20. 75 FR 37771 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Transition Programs for Students with...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Intellectual Disabilities Into Higher Education (TPSID)--Model Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students With Intellectual Disabilities; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for... and postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities. Priorities: This...