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Sample records for icp atomic emission

  1. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in support of nuclear waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Edmund A.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    Simulated complex nuclear waste solutions are characterized by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Simultaneous and sequential measurements are made of liquid extraction distribution coefficients needed in the development of process flow sheets for component separations. This paper describes the determination of 19 elements, comprised of process contaminants (Al, Cr, Fe, Ni) and nuclear fission products (Ba, Cd, Ce, Eu, La, Mo, Nd, Pd, Pr, Rh, Ru, Sm, Sr, Y, Zr), in diverse aqueous streams. The concentrations determined vary from 0.04 to 4000μg ml -1 with dilutions being used to bring analytical measurements into the range of calibration standards. The estimated precision and accuracy of the method are 1-5 %. Data are presented on recoveries and material balances for extraction systems that can be used for the implementation of actinide (III)-fission product separation schemes.

  2. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Determination of barium, chromium, cadmium, manganese, lead and zinc in atmospheric particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boevski, I. V.; Daskalova, N.; Havezov, I.

    2000-11-01

    The present paper has shown that the Q concept, as proposed by P.W.J.M. Boumans, J.J.A.M. Vrakking, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 43 (1988) 69, can be used as a basic methodology in the determination of Ba, Cr, Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in pairs of atmospheric particles by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The data base of Q values for line interference [ QIj(λ a)] and Q values for wing background interference [ QWJ(Δλ a)] were obtained in our former work [N. Daskalova, Iv. Boevski, Spectral interferences in the determination of trace elements in environmental materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 54 (1999) 1099-1122]. The samples of atmospheric particles were collected by the Bergerhoff method. The ICP-AES determination was performed after sample digestion with aqua regia. Q values were used for the calculation of both the total interfering signal under the analysis lines and the true detection limits, depending on the matrix constituents in the different samples. Comparative data for the concentration of analytes were obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and direct current arc atomic emission spectrographic method (dc arc-AES).

  4. Simultaneous determination of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) by flow injection-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with ultrasonic nebulization.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Sathrugnan; Hirata, Shizuko

    2003-01-01

    A dual-column protocol for the sequential determination of As(III) and As(V) is described using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with ultrasonic nebulization (USN). This procedure employed a 16-way valve containing two different homemade mini columns for selective preconcentration of As(III) and As(V). One column was filled with Muromac A-1, which selectively preconcentrated As(III) at pH 3 after complexation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC, 0.05%). The effluent of the first column was then passed through the second column, which was filled with an anion-exchange resin to collect As(V). By using 0.6 M sodium hydroxide, both species were eluted sequentially and measured by ICP-AES. Enrichment factors of 136 (17 for micro column x8 for USN) for As(V) and 160 (20 for micro column x8 for USN) for As(III) were achieved with 4 min preconcentration. With the proposed procedure, the detection limits were calculated to be 0.7 micro g L(-1) for As(V) and 0.8 micro g L(-1) for As(III) based on (3 sigma) blank determination ( N=10). The relative standard deviations for 20 micro g L(-1) of As(V) and As(III) were 5.8% and 6.5%, respectively. The recovery for spiked water samples was in the range of 85-112%. PMID:12520450

  5. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in support of nuclear waste management. [HHDECMP (hexyl hexyl-N,N diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate) and n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, E.A.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Simulated complex nuclear waste solutions are characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AEC). The system uses and ICP source focused on both a polychromator and a computer-controlled scanning monochromator for intensity measurements. This instrumentation allows for simultaneous and sequential measurements of liquid extraction distribution coefficients needed in the development of process flow sheets for component separations. A large number of elements are determined rapidly with adequate sensitivity and accuracy. The focus of this investigation centers on the analysis of nuclear fission products. 13 references, 13 tables.

  6. Determination of heavy metals in bee honey with connected and not connected metal wires using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Al Juhaimi, Fahad Y

    2012-04-01

    Two honey samples are taken from two parts of the same honeycomb: one that contacts to the surface of the wire and the other taken from the surface that does not contact the wires. Heavy metal contents of these two samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The Mo, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn contents of the honey in contact with wire is higher when compared to the other. Especially, Fe and Zn contents of honey in contact with wire is much higher than the non-contact one. These values are, respectively, 190.21 and 112.76 ppm. Besides, Ni content of honey in contact with wire is approximately 50% higher. PMID:21573852

  7. Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, David L.

    2012-06-13

    The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

  8. Use of a solution cathode glow discharge for cold vapor generation of mercury with determination by ICP-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-09-15

    A novel vapor-generation technique is described for mercury determination in aqueous solutions. Without need for a chemical reducing agent, dissolved mercury species are converted to volatile Hg vapor in a solution cathode glow discharge. The generated Hg vapor is then transported to an inductively coupled plasma for determination by atomic emission spectrometry. Mercury vapor is readily generated from a background electrolyte containing 0.1 M HNO 3. Vapor generation efficiency was found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (formic or acetic acids) or alcohols (ethanol). Optimal conditions for discharge-induced vapor generation and reduced interference from concomitant inorganic ions were also identified. However, the presence of chloride ion reduces the efficiency of Hg-vapor generation. In the continuous sample introduction mode, the detection limit was found to be 0.7 microg L (-1), and repeatability was 1.2% RSD ( n = 11) for a 20 microg L (-1) standard. In comparison with other vapor generation methods, it offers several advantages: First, it is applicable to both inorganic and organic Hg determination; organic mercury (thiomersal) can be directly transformed into volatile Hg species without the need for prior oxidation. Second, the vapor-generation efficiency is high; the efficiency (with formic acid as a promoter) is superior to that of conventional SnCl 2-HCl reduction. Third, the vapor generation is extremely rapid and therefore is easy to couple with flow injection. The method is sensitive and simple in operation, requires no auxiliary reagents, and serves as a useful alternative to conventional vapor generation for ultratrace Hg determination. PMID:18710258

  9. A study on the determination of major, minor and trace constituents in meteorites by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Bear, B. R.; Fassel, V. A.

    A study on the ICP-AES determination of 42 major and trace elements in meteorites was described. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of aqua regia and HF in a sealed Teflon bomb and boric acid is added after dissolution to complex the excess HF. The final solution is transformed into an aerosol via ultrasonic nebulization. The reference solutions employed for calibrating the spectrometers contained only the HF-aqua regia-HS3BO3 matrix. A polychromator and a programmable scanning monochromator interfaced to the same plasma excitation source provided the spectroscopic data. The accuracy of the determination was assessed by: (1) comparing our results with those obtained by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence; and (2) by analyzing several geological references samples (US Geological Survey and Canadian Certified Reference Materials). The analytical results showed good agreement. The relative standard deviation of the determination of the major elements ranged from 0.5 to 2%, and of the minor and trace elements from 0.5 to 8%.

  10. Study on the determination of major, minor, and trace constituents in meteorites by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Bear, B.R.; Fassel, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study on the ICP-AES determination of 42 major and trace elements in meteorites was described. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of aqua regia and HF in a sealed Teflon bomb and boric acid is added after dissolution to complex the excess HF. The final solution is transformed into an aerosol via ultrasonic nebulization. The reference solutions employed for calibrating the spectrometers contained only the HF-aqua regia-HS/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ matrix. A polychromator and a programmable scanning monochromator interfaced to the same plasma excitation source provided the spectroscopic data. The accuracy of the determination was assessed by: (a) comparing our results with those obtained by neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence; and (b) by analyzing several geological reference samples (US Geological Survey and Canadian Certified Reference Materials). The analytical results showed good agreement. The relative standard deviation of the determination of the major elements ranged from 0.5 to 2%, and of the minor and trace elements from 0.5 to 8%.

  11. A continuous sampling air-ICP for metals emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.; Eckels, D.E.; Miller, G.P.

    1999-09-19

    An air-inductively coupled plasma (air-ICP) system has been developed for continuous sampling and monitoring of metals as a continuous emission monitor (CEM). The plasma is contained in a metal enclosure to allow reduced-pressure operation. The enclosure and plasma are operated at a pressure slightly less than atmospheric using a Roots blower, so that sample gas is continuously drawn into the plasma. A Teflon sampling chamber, equipped with a sampling pump, is connected to the stack that is to be monitored to isokinetically sample gas from the exhaust line and introduce the sample into the air-ICP. Optical emission from metals in the sampled gas stream is detected and monitored using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)--echelle spectrometer system. A description of the continuous sampling air-ICP system is given, along with some preliminary laboratory data for continuous monitoring of metals.

  12. Continuous sampling air-ICP for metals emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, David P.; Zamzow, Daniel S.; Eckels, David E.; Miller, George P.

    1999-12-01

    An air-inductively coupled plasma (air-ICP) system has been developed for continuous sampling and monitoring of metals as a continuous emission monitor (CEM). The plasma is contained in a metal enclosure to allow reduced-pressure operation. The enclosure and plasma are operated at a pressure slightly less than atmospheric using a Roots blower, so that sample gas is continuously drawn into the plasma. A Teflon sampling chamber, equipped with a sampling pump, is connected to the stack that is to be monitored to isokinetically sample gas from the exhaust line and introduce the sample into the air-ICP. Optical emission from metals in the sampled gas stream is detected and monitored using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-echelle spectrometer system. A description of the continuous sampling air-ICP system is given, along with some preliminary laboratory data for continuous monitoring of metals.

  13. Quality assurance in operating a multielement ICP emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botto, Robert I.

    In the industrial laboratory environment, quality assurance in the operation of a multielement inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICPES) must often be entrusted to laboratory technicians with little or no technical background in spectrochemical analysis. Therefore, to be successful, a quality assurance program must be reduced to a simple, routine practice. Essential components of the quality assurance program described in this paper are (1) An atom-to-ion emission intensity ratio for multielement optimization and for reproducing optimum analysis conditions. (2) A concise, easily applied specification for sensitivity and for precision. (3) A regimen for monitoring of, and correcting for, calibration and background drift. (4) A set of comprehensive spectral interference calibrations maintained using the emission intensity ratio. (5) A high resolution spectrometer for minimizing spectral interferences. (6) A program of long term performance monitoring and maintenance/record keeping. Each of these components is described in detail. Adherence to this program enhances analytical reliability by helping to ensure that raw concentrations are generated consistently under optimum instrumental conditions, and that corrections for spectral interferences are applied accurately even though interference calibrations may be several months old. The importance of adequate resolution and the proper choice of positions for off-line background measurements is borne out by a detailed study of the determination of toxic trace elements in National Bureau of Standards fly ash samples. As, Be, Cd, Pb, Sb, and Se were determined accurately without isolation/preconcentration from the aluminosilicate matrix. Several determinations required corrections for residual spectral interferences amounting to 100-500% of the resultant concentration, underscoring the accuracy of the interference correction procedures.

  14. Correlation of laser ablation plasma emission with ICP-AES signal intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.J.; Mao, X.L.; Shannon, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Laser ablation offers many favorable characteristics for direct solid sample chemical analysis. However, the technique usually provides poor precision in comparison to solution nebulization. The primary contributor to this imprecision is the irreproducibility of the laser material interaction. This paper describes a technique for monitoring changes in the laser material interaction directly, and using these data to improve inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Simultaneous measurements of the spectral emission intensity in the laser-induced plasma (LIP) and the ICP-AES were made under different power density conditions. The LIP spatial profile and excitation temperature was measured. The data from the LIP show a strong correlation with ICP-AES signal intensity. Both emission signals increase linearly with the laser power density (log-log) and show a change in the slope for different spot sizes and laser powers. These results support the occurrence of two different ablation mechanisms, a less efficient interaction dominating at the higher power densities (> 1 GW/cm2) and a more efficient interaction in the lower power density regimes. The benefits of using simultaneous monitoring of the laser induced plasma for chemical analysis by ICP-AES will be discussed.

  15. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  16. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonic and pneumatic nebulizers used in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) are compared in the analysis of standard materials and environmental samples. Results verify that ICP-AES with ultrasonic nebulization is capable of lower detection limit...

  17. Atomic squeezing under collective emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yukalov, V.I.; Yukalova, E.P.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic squeezing is studied for the case of large systems of radiating atoms, when collective effects are well developed. All temporal stages are analyzed, starting with the quantum stage of spontaneous emission, passing through the coherent stage of superradiant emission, and going to the relaxation stage ending with stationary solutions. A method of governing the temporal behavior of the squeezing factor is suggested. The influence of a squeezed effective vacuum on the characteristics of collective emission is also investigated.

  18. Preconcentration of trace multi-elements in water samples using Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomngongo, Philiswa N.; Catherine Ngila, J.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Moodley, Brenda

    This work presents a solid phase extraction (SPE) method for simultaneous preconcentration of trace elements in water samples prior to their ICP-OES determination. Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins were used as SPE sorbent materials for preconcentration of trace Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn. The optimum sample pH, eluent concentration and sample flow rates were found to 6, 3.0 mol L-1 and 3.0 mL min-1, respectively. In terms of multi-element preconcentration capabilities, Dowex 50W-x8 appeared to be a better sorbent. The recoveries for all the tested analytes were >95%. However, Chelex-100 showed a better performance in terms of recovery (>95%) towards Cu, Fe and Zn. Under optimized conditions using Dowex 50W-x8, the relative standard deviations for different metals were <3%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification ranged from 0.01-0.39 μg L-1 and 0.05-0.1.3 μg L-1, respectively. The accuracy of the preconcentration method was confirmed by spike recovery test and the analysis of certified reference materials. The SPE method was applied for preconcentration of the analyte ions in tap water, bottled water and wastewater samples.

  19. Statistical evaluation of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric method for routine water quality testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Jones, B.E.; Stein, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    In an interlaboratory test, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was compared with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of 17 major and trace elements in 100 filtered natural water samples. No unacceptable biases were detected. The analysis precision of ICP-AES was found to be equal to or better than alternative methods. Known-addition recovery experiments demonstrated that the ICP-AES determinations are accurate to between plus or minus 2 and plus or minus 10 percent; four-fifths of the tests yielded average recoveries of 95-105 percent, with an average relative standard deviation of about 5 percent.

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  2. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  3. Testing of Continuous Sampling Air-ICP and Mercury Systems as Continuous Emission Monitors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Baldwin; S.J. Bajic; D.E. Eckels; D.S. Zamzow; G.P. Miller; S. Tao; C.A. Waggoner

    2001-03-15

    This report has been prepared to document the performance of the continuous sampling reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy) and mercury-monitor systems developed by Ames Laboratory for use as continuous emission monitors (CEM). This work was funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology, through the Mixed Waste Focus Area. The purpose of the project is to develop instrumentation and methods for spectroscopic field monitoring applications. During FY00 this included continued work on the development of the continuous sample introduction system and the multi-frequency AOTF-echelle spectrometer, used in conjunction with the reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES system as a multi-metal CEM. The assembly, development, and testing of an echelle spectrometer system for the detection of mercury (Hg) by atomic absorption was also completed during FY00. The continuous sampling system and the multi-metal air-ICP and mercury-monitor CEM systems were tested at Mississippi State University at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at the end of FY00. This report describes the characteristics and performance of these systems, and the results of the field tests performed at DIAL.

  4. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motooka, J.M.; Adrian, B.M.; Church, S.E.; McDougal, C.M.; Fife, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska.

  5. Elemental profiling and geographical differentiation of Ethiopian coffee samples through inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and direct mercury analyzer (DMA).

    PubMed

    Habte, Girum; Hwang, In Min; Kim, Jae Sung; Hong, Joon Ho; Hong, Young Sin; Choi, Ji Yeon; Nho, Eun Yeong; Jamila, Nargis; Khan, Naeem; Kim, Kyong Su

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed to establish the elemental profiling and provenance of coffee samples collected from eleven major coffee producing regions of Ethiopia. A total of 129 samples were analyzed for forty-five elements using inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-optical emission spectroscopy (OES), ICP-mass spectrometry (MS) and direct mercury analyzer (DMA). Among the macro elements, K showed the highest levels whereas Fe was found to have the lowest concentration values. In all the samples, Ca, K, Mg, P and S contents were statistically significant (p<0.05). Micro elements showed the concentrations order of: Mn>Cu>Sr>Zn>Rb>Ni>B. Contents of the trace elements were lower than the permissible standard values. Inter-regions differentiation by cluster analysis (CA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that micro and trace elements are the best chemical descriptors of the analyzed coffee samples. PMID:27374562

  6. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Trace elemental composition of curry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Armenta, S; De La Guardia, M

    2008-01-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion was developed to determine the content of traces elements in curry samples from the Spanish market. The methodology was validated in terms of accuracy by the analysis of citrus and tomato leaf reference materials achieving comparable results with the certified values. The trace metal content of curry samples was compared with data available from previously published reports concerning Indian samples, especially in terms of heavy metal composition, in order to guarantee the quality of the commercially available spices in the European countries. Values found for the analysis of arsenic, lead and cadmium were significantly lower than the maximum limit allowed by European Union statutory limits for heavy metals and lower than those obtained for Indian curry leaves reported by Indian research teams by using neutron activation and γ-ray analysis. PMID:24784807

  8. Comparative complexity of emission spectra from ICP, dc, Arc, and spark excitation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; DeKalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-07-01

    A comparison of atomic emission spectra excited in high voltage spark and dc are discharges and in an inductively coupled plasma revealed that the most complex spectra were emitted by the high voltage spark. The dc arc and the inductively coupled plasma yielded spectra of approximately equivalent complexity. These observations are not in accord with the impressions conveyed in the literature.

  9. Elemental analysis of glass by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Emily R; Almirall, José R

    2012-04-10

    The elemental analysis of glass evidence has been established as a powerful discrimination tool for forensic analysts. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) has been compared to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and energy dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF/EDS) as competing instrumentation for the elemental analysis of glass. The development of a method for the forensic analysis of glass coupling laser ablation to ICP-OES is presented for the first time. LA-ICP-OES has demonstrated comparable analytical performance to LA-ICP-MS based on the use of the element menu, Al (Al I 396.15 nm), Ba (Ba II 455.40 nm), Ca (Ca II 315.88 nm), Fe (Fe II 238.20 nm), Li (Li I 670.78 nm), Mg (Mg I 285.21 nm), Sr (Sr II 407.77 nm), Ti (Ti II 368.51 nm), and Zr (Zr II 343.82 nm). The relevant figures of merit, such as precision, accuracy and sensitivity, are presented and compared to LA-ICP-MS. A set of 41 glass samples was used to assess the discrimination power of the LA-ICP-OES method in comparison to other elemental analysis techniques. This sample set consisted of several vehicle glass samples that originated from the same source (inside and outside windshield panes) and several glass samples that originated from different vehicles. Different match criteria were used and compared to determine the potential for Type I and Type II errors. It was determined that broader match criteria is more applicable to the forensic comparison of glass analysis because it can reduce the affect that micro-heterogeneity inherent in the glass fragments and a less than ideal sampling strategy can have on the interpretation of the results. Based on the test set reported here, a plus or minus four standard deviation (± 4s) match criterion yielded the lowest possibility of Type I and Type II errors. The developed LA-ICP-OES method has been shown to perform similarly to LA-ICP-MS in the

  10. An argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor for hazardous air pollutant metals: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, M.D.; Mayer, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    A fully-operational, argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor (CEM) for hazardous air pollutant (HAP) metals has recently been demonstrated. The CEM has undergone extensive field evaluation in conjunction with a variety of combustor configurations including coal-fired power plants, waste incinerators, and ordnance deactivation furnaces. The CEM has been successfully demonstrated to provide both speed and sensitivity for simultaneous, multielement detection of HAP metals while exhibiting considerable tolerance for both particulate and moisture loading in sample air streams. The CEM employs a state-of-the-art argon inductively coupled plasma spectrometer as an elemental analyzer. Stack air, continuously extracted under strictly isokinetic conditions, is transported to the CEM through heated sample lines. A sampling interface of novel design permits extraction of air at the high, often variable flow rates required for isokinetic sampling while at the same time, provides aliquots of sample air to the plasma spectrometer at the relatively low but constant analytical flow rates that are appropriate for plasma injection. The CEM is automated to high degree and can operate unattended for several hours at a time. CEM calibration is accomplished using precision-generated metal aerosols. Provision is made for correction of spectral interferences from concomitant metals and molecular species in stack gases. The prototype instrumentation described here is presently considered to be the leading candidate for multimetals CEM application. While specifically designed and implemented to monitor metal emissions from military furnaces used for ordnance deactivation, the CEM has exhibited versatility that makes it well-suited for numerous compliance and process control applications. Results of field testing under various conditions and relative accuracy assessments will be presented.

  11. Determination of argon resonance line emission in an ICP hitting a biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, P.; Bibinov, N.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo model for the calculation of argon resonance line photon trapping in a double inductively coupled plasma is presented. Different probabilities of photon behaviour are calculated and the flux of photons hitting a target placed in the middle of the chamber is determined by simulation. Different gas admixtures or gas impurities can absorb photons or quench excited argon atoms, which is considered in the simulation. Electron energy distribution function and electron density are measured with a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Nitrogen impurities, due to opening of the chamber, are measured using OES. These measured values and other additional input values such as gas temperature are used for simulation.

  12. AOTF-echelle spectrometer for air-ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals and actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, David P.; Zamzow, Daniel S.; Eckels, David E.; Miller, George P.

    1999-02-01

    A spectrometer system consisting of a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and an echelle grating has been assembled and tested for ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metal and actinide elements in stack exhaust offgases introduced into an air plasma. The AOTF is a rapidly tunable bandpass filter that is used to select a small wavelength range (0.1 to 0.6 nm) of optical emission from the air plasma; the echelle grating provides high dispersion, yielding a spectral resolution of approximately 0.004 to 0.008 nm from 200 to 425 nm. The AOTF-echelle spectrometer, equipped with a photodiode array or CCD, provides rapid sequential multielement analysis capabilities. It is much more compact and portable than commercial ICP-AES echelle spectrometers, allowing use of the system in field and on-line process monitoring applications. Data will be presented that detail the resolution, detection limits, capabilities, and performance of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer for continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals (As, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) and actinides (including U isotopes). The potential use of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer with other emission sources and for other monitoring applications will be discussed.

  13. Determination of Sulfur in High-Level Waste Sludge by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    COLEMAN, CJ

    2004-04-22

    Significant differences (approximately 30 percent) have been observed in the sulfur measurements in high-level waste sludge by the Analytical Development Section (ADS) using the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) method compared with the ADS ion chromatography (IC) method. Since the measured concentrations of sulfur in the sludge approached the maximum concentration that can be processed in the DWPF, experiments were performed to determine the source of the differences and assess the true accuracy of sulfur measurements.

  14. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  15. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  16. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  17. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  18. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  19. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  20. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions for resolution of atomic isobars: AMS and ICP-MS perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Dmitry R.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Litherland, A. E.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2006-09-01

    Ion-molecule reactions that can be used for resolution of spectral overlaps of long-lived or stable (T1/2 > 100 years) atomic isobars on the long-lived radio-isotopes (100 < T1/2 < 1012 years) in mass spectrometry are considered. Results for the separations of isobaric overlaps via cation reactions with NO, N2O, O2, CO2, C2H2, CH3F studied with the Inductively Coupled Plasma Dynamic Reaction Cell(TM) Mass Spectrometer (ICP-DRC(TM)-MS) with use of stable isotopes are presented. Overview of potential and reported reactions for separation of 35 isobars is given. Potential for the following isobaric pairs separation is shown (reaction gas and the extent of separation achieved to date in parenthesis): 32Si+/32S+(NO, 5 x 104), 40K+/40Ar+(N2O, 1.9 x 103), 40K+/40Ca+(N2O, 50), 59Ni+/59Co+(N2O, 6), 79Se+/79Br+(O2, 7.2 x 103), 81Kr+/81Br+(C2H2, 1.5 x 104), 93Mo+/93Nb+(N2O, 100), 93Mo+/93Zr+(N2O, 150), 135Cs+/135Ba+(N2O, 8 x 104), 137,138La+/137,138Ba+(O2, 40), 146Sm+/146Nd+(CO2, 1.5 x 105), 176Lu+/176Hf+(NO, 2.8 x 103), 187Re+/187Os+(N2O, 2.8 x 104). Effect of instrumental parameters on reactivity is discussed. The relevance of this work to accelerator mass spectrometry is discussed briefly.

  1. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  2. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  3. Spectral interferences in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjov, Metody; Velitchkova, Nikolaya; Veleva, Olga; Velichkov, Serafim; Markov, Pavel; Daskalova, Nonka

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with spectral interferences of complex matrix containing Mo, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca and Cu in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). By radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP equipped with a high resolution spectrometer (spectral bandwidth = 5 pm) the hyperfine structure (HFS) of the most prominent lines of rhenium (Re II 197.248 nm, Re II 221.426 nm and Re II 227.525 nm) was registered. The HFS components under high resolution conditions were used as separate prominent line in order to circumvent spectral interferences. The Q-concept was applied for quantification of spectral interferences. The quantitative databases for the type and the magnitude of the spectral interferences in the presence of above mentioned matrix constituents were obtained by using a radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP with high resolution and an axial viewing 27.12 MHz ICP with middle resolution. The data for the both ICP-OES systems were collected chiefly with a view to spectrochemical analysis for comparing the magnitude of line and wing (background) spectral interference and the true detection limits with spectroscopic apparatus with different spectral resolution.

  4. Direct detection of vacuum ultraviolet radiation through an optical sampling orifice: determination of nonmetals in gaseous samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, B.R.; Houk, R.S.; Wiederin, D.R.; Fassel, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A copper cone with a sampling orifice is attached to the entrance slit chamber or a monochromator and inserted directly into an inductively couples plasma (ICP) to sample vacuum ultraviolet (vacuum UV) radiation emitted by the plasma. A unique interface with low dead volume (<40 ..mu..L) is used for introduction of gaseous samples directly into the axial channel of the ICP. Injection of a gaseous mixture of compounds containing the elements Br, C, Cl, and S results in detection limits of 50, 30, 80 and 20 pg, respectively. These detection limits are by far the best obtained for these elements by ICP atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) and are comparable to those obtained by AES with He plasmas. Precision of the analyte emission intensities is 2% relative standard deviation or better.

  5. Emission Characteristics of High Color Rendering Index Low-Pressure Xe and CO ICP's Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Ahmad; Kondo, Akira; Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    High color rendering index (CRI) has been obtained from mercury-free ICP’s lamp. Due to the strong demand on the development of mercury-free light sources, the authors investigated xenon and CO as an alternative element. These rare (Xe) and molecule (CO) gases have been used as a substitute for mercury as the environmental problems related necessitate the development of new type of light sources. The target of this study is to develop a new type of mercury-free lamp without using a phosphor where the authors concentrate on how to obtain a strong visible light instead of UV. In this paper, the colors, luminance and emission characteristics of these types of mercury-free ICP’s lamp is discussed. Without the use of phosphor, the authors obtained a good color rendering from xenon and CO ICP’s lamp where their CRI’s above 90. A strong continuum emission in visible region is obtained where luminance are ranged from 2000 to 25000 cd/m2 at 100 W of input power. Spectral distribution shows the continuum emissions are similar to the daylight distribution and chromaticity diagrams shows they are close to white region in color coordinates and color temperatures bringing a high index of the lamp’s color rendering.

  6. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  7. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  8. In situ digestion for the determination of Ca in beverages by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luana N; Gonzalez, Mário H; Moura, Monise F; Donati, George L; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2012-08-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) is employed for the determination of calcium in juice, mineral and coconut water samples. A sample aliquot of 20 μL is placed directly on the coil and a constant-voltage power source is used to dry and atomize the sample, as well as to promote Ca atomic emission. Analytical signals are resolved and detected using a Czerny-Turner spectrometer and a charge coupled device detector. Some experimental parameters such as coil position related to the spectrometer entrance slit and integration time are critically evaluated. A heating program with relatively constant drying temperatures is used in all measurements. An in situ digestion procedure is used to partially decompose organic matrices and improve WCAES precision and accuracy. By adding an oxidizing mixture to the sample and including a digestion step in the heating cycle, no statistical difference was observed between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in juice and coconut water samples. Mineral water samples were simply diluted with 1% vv(-1) HNO(3) before analysis and no significant interference was observed for concomitants such as Na and K. Despite severe positive interference caused by Mg, good agreement was obtained between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in several mineral water samples. Limits of detection and quantification obtained were 0.02 and 0.07 mg L(-1), respectively. The method precision, calculated as the relative standard deviation for 10 consecutive measurements of a 2.5 mg L(-1) Ca solution, is 3.8%. PMID:22841081

  9. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  10. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Hopper, Dale E.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-12-03

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C{sub 60}.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  12. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  13. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  14. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  15. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations. PMID:27030025

  16. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  17. Direct determination of metals in organics by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiebang; Jia, Xiujuan; Wu, Jane

    2003-11-24

    A simple method for the simultaneous determination of up to 21 elements in organic matrices is proposed. Organic samples are simply dispersed in concentrated nitric acid by sonication, and the resulting emulsions/suspensions are directly aspirated into an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) calibrated with aqueous standards for analysis. Proof of concept was provided by the excellent recoveries for the analysis of a 21-element metallo-organic standard. In addition, the results obtained using this method for a waste oil sample compared favorably with those from a method that utilized microwave digestion for sample preparation. Comparable results were also obtained by dilution in an organic solvent followed by ICP-AES analysis with an ultrasonic nebulizer equipped with a membrane desolvator. Furthermore, the viability and validity of this method were confirmed by the analysis of the National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material 1084a Wear-Metals in Lubricating Oil. Spike recoveries ranged from 83 to 105% and the limits of quantitation were 6 microg g(-1) or less for all the elements analyzed. PMID:14623589

  18. Development of Desolvation System for Single-cell Analysis Using Droplet Injection Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yukiko; Aida, Mari; Nomura, Akito; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Hokura, Akiko; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    With a view to enhance the sensitivity of analytical instruments used in the measurement of trace elements contained in a single cell, we have now equipped the previously reported micro-droplet injection system (M-DIS) with a desolvation system. This modified M-DIS was coupled to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and evaluated for its ability to measure trace elements. A flow rate of 100 mL/min for the additional gas and a measurement point -7.5 mm above the load coil (ALC) have been determined to be the optimal parameters for recording the emission intensity of the Ca(II) spectral lines. To evaluate the influence of the desolvation system, we recorded the emission intensities of the Ca(I), Ca(II), and H-β spectral lines with and without inclusion of the desolvation system. The emission intensity of the H-β spectral line reduces and the magnitude of the Ca(II)/Ca(I) emission intensity ratio increases four-fold with inclusion of the desolvation system. Finally, the elements Ca, Mg, and Fe present in a single cell of Pseudococcomyxa simplex are simultaneously determined by coupling the M-DIS equipped with the desolvation system to ICP-AES. PMID:26256601

  19. Development of a partial least-squares calibration model for simultaneous determination of elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chaloosi, Marzieh; Asadollahi, Seyed Azadeh; Khanchi, Ali Reza; FirozZare, Mahmoud; Mahani, Mohamad Khayatzadeh

    2009-01-01

    A partial least-squares (PLS) calibration model was developed for simultaneous multicomponent elemental analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in the presence of spectral interference. The best calibration model was obtained using a PLS2 algorithm. Validation was performed with an artificial test set. Multivariate calibration models were constructed using 2 series of synthetic mixtures (Zn, Cu, Fe, and U, V). Accuracy of the method was evaluated with unknown synthetic and real samples. PMID:19382589

  20. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  1. Two-atom spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ujihara, Kikuo; Dung, Ho Trung

    2002-11-01

    Spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity by two identical and spatially separated two-level atoms, both of them initially excited, is considered under fourth-order perturbation approximation in atom-field coupling constants. A delay-differential equation with proper retardation times for the probability of both atoms in the upper state is derived and expressions for the emitted-light intensity and spectrum are given. It is numerically shown that, while two-atom cooperation is enhanced for small interatomic distances, the two-atom vacuum Rabi oscillation is somewhat suppressed compared to the single-atom oscillation level when the interatomic separation is close to the cavity transverse coherence length.

  2. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2670 A and 3040 A was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter UV spectrometer operating at 3.5 A resolution viewed the earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2852 A is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2972 A line from O(1S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O(1S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5577 A emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  3. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, biomedicine and nutrition. Emphasis is being placed on: generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; development and characterization of new sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples, and investigation of new membrane separators for striping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity in plasma spectrometry.

  4. Exploration geochemical technique for the determination of preconcentrated organometallic halides by ICP-AES

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Motooka, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    An atomic absorption extraction technique which is widely used in geochemical exploration for the determination of Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn has been modified and adapted to a simultaneous inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission instrument. the experimental and operating parameters are described for the preconcentration of the metals into their organometallic halides and for the determination of the metals. Lower limits of determination are equal to or improved over those for flame atomic absorption (except Au) and ICP results are very similar to the accepted AA values, with precision for the ICP data in excess of that necessary for exploration purposes.

  5. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.E.; Siskind, D.E. )

    1989-12-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2,670 {angstrom} and 3,040 {angstrom} was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter uv spectrometer operating at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution viewed the Earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2,852 {angstrom} is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2,972 {angstrom} line from O({sup 1}S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O({sup 1}S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5,577 {angstrom} emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  6. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-08-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized.

  7. Induced Emission of Cold Atoms Passing Through a Micromaser Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud; Obada, Abdel-Shafy F.

    The emission probability of a cold atom in a microcavity when its center-of-mass motion is described quantum mechanically is presented, but is distinguished from other treatments by the inclusion of the spatial variation along the cavity axis. In particular, the mesa mode cavity profile is considered. The quantum theory of the one-photon mazer is constructed in the framework of the dressed-state coordinate formalism. Simple expressions for the atomic populations, the cavity photon statistics, and the reflection and transmission probabilities are given for any initial state of the atom-field system. The general conclusions reached are illustrated by numerical results.

  8. High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy applied to problems in Nuclear Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; Winge, R.K.; Eckels, D.E. ); Douglas, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) is a variant of the more conventional ICP-AES that is widely used for environmental monitoring. The relevance of high-resolution capabilities of three such analytical problems are discussed herein. (1) Pu in very complex, radioactive matrices can be determined with good accuracy without the need for prior chemical separations. Isotopically resolved spectra from actinides in fuel dissolver solutions can be obtained after a simple ion-exchange step. (2) High-resolution methods permit the simultaneous determination of fission products and actinides in simulated high-level nuclear waste solutions. Such measurements can be useful for both safeguards and waste processing. (3) The ICP-AES technique, with a photodiode array detector, can be used to determine the composition of nuclear waste glasses. Such measurements can assist the glass producer as well as providing predictors of nuclear waste form performance in a repository. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Alcohol and metal determination in alcoholic beverages through high-temperature liquid-chromatography coupled to an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Terol, Amanda; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E; Prats, Soledad; Todolí, José L

    2011-06-01

    In the present work, an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system was used as a high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) detector for the determination of alcohols and metals in beverages. For the sake of comparison, a refractive index (RI) detector was also employed for the first time to detect alcohols with HTLC. The organic compounds studied were methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol (in the 10-125 mg/L concentration range) and the elements tested were magnesium, aluminum, copper, manganese and barium at concentrations included between roughly 0.01 and 80 mg/L. Column heating temperatures ranged from 80 to 175 °C and the optimum ones in terms of peak resolution, sensitivity and column lifetime were 125 and 100 °C for the HTLC-RI and HTLC-ICP-AES couplings, respectively. The HTLC-ICP-AES interface design (i.e., spray chamber design and nebulizer type used) was studied and it was found that a single pass spray chamber provided about 2 times higher sensitivities than a cyclonic conventional design. Comparatively speaking, limits of detection for alcohols were of the same order for the two evaluated detection systems (from 5 to 25 mg/L). In contrast, unlike RI, ICP-AES provided information about the content of both organic and inorganic species. Furthermore, temperature programming was applied to shorten the analysis time and it was verified that ICP-AES was less sensitive to temperature changes and modifications in the analyte chemical nature than the RI detector. Both detectors were successfully applied to the determination of short chain alcohols in several beverages such as muscatel, pacharan, punch, vermouth and two different brands of whiskeys (from 10 to 40 g of ethanol/100 g of sample). The results of the inorganic elements studied by HTLC-ICP-AES were compared with those obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) obtaining good agreement between them. Recoveries found for spiked samples

  10. EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, I. D.; Adams, S.; Clegg, R. E. S.; Ruffle, D. P.; Liu, X.-W.; Pritchet, C. J.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-03-01

    The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

  11. Electron-Impact-Induced Emission Cross Sections of Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    One cannot overstate the importance of ultraviolet (UV) lines of neutral atomic oxygen. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum of the Earth's aurora and dayglow as well as the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this poster, we present our measurements of the electron-impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 100 eV impact energy. A high-density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at a right angle by a magnetically focused electron beam. A 0.2m UV spectrometer system was used in the present measurements. It consists of an electron-impact collision chamber in tandem with an UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  12. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sidnei G; Donati, George L; Santos, Luana N; Jones, Bradley T; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2013-05-30

    Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L(-1) Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ=425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L(-1); a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr(+) by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr(+)/e(-) recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25-10 mg L(-1) and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n=10) for a 2.0 mg L(-1) Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and 112%. PMID:23680545

  13. Atomic Auger Doppler effects upon emission of fast photoelectrons.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc; Püttner, Ralph; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Journel, Loïc; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Ablett, James M; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Studies of photoemission processes induced by hard X-rays including production of energetic electrons have become feasible due to recent substantial improvement of instrumentation. Novel dynamical phenomena have become possible to investigate in this new regime. Here we show a significant change in Auger emission following 1s photoionization of neon, which we attribute to the recoil of the Ne ion induced by the emission of a fast photoelectron. Because of the preferential motion of the ionized Ne atoms along two opposite directions, an Auger Doppler shift is revealed, which manifests itself as a gradual broadening and doubling of the Auger spectral features. This Auger Doppler effect should be a general phenomenon in high-energy photoemission of both isolated atoms and molecules, which will have to be taken into account in studies of other recoil effects such as vibrational or rotational recoil in molecules, and may also have consequences in measurements in solids. PMID:24906107

  14. Atomic Number Dependence of Ion-Induced Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrale, Abdikarim Mohamed

    Knowledge of the atomic number (Z_1 ) dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields (gamma) can be the basis for a general understanding of ion-atom interaction phenomena and, in particular, for the design of Z_1 -sensitive detectors that could be useful, for example, in the separation of isobars in accelerator mass spectrometry. The Z_1 dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields has been investigated using heavy ions of identical velocity (v = 2 v_0, with v_0 as the Bohr velocity) incident in a normal direction on sputter-cleaned carbon foils. Yields measured in this work plotted as a function of the ion's atomic number reveal an oscillatory behavior with pronounced maxima and minima. This nonmonotonic dependence of the yield on Z_1 will be discussed in the light of existing theories. Ion-induced electron emission yields from contaminated surfaces are well known to be enhanced relative to the yields from atomically clean surfaces. Under the bombardment of energetic ions, the surfaces become sputter-cleaned with time, and the yields from the samples are reduced accordingly. The time dependent reduction of yields observed are shown to be due to various effects such as the desorption of contaminant atoms and molecules by incident ions and the adsorption of residual gas onto previously clean sites. Experimental results obtained in the present work show the lower, saturated yield (gamma_{rm s} ) to be a function of residual gas pressure (P) and the fluence (phi_{rm i}) of the ion. We present a dynamic equilibrium model which explains the increase in yields for surface gas contamination, the decrease in yields for contaminant desorption, and the pressure/fluence dependence of the time required to reach gamma_{ rm s}. The predictions of the model agree well with the observations of gamma _{rm s} as a function of the ratio of gas flux to ion flux, and the electron yields of clean and gas covered surfaces.

  15. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  16. Detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: an approach to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported for different equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This paper deals with the differences among detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) as reported for different experimental facilities. The factor by which such detection limits differ can be split into three factors to account separately for the differences between the sources, the resolving powers of the spectrometers and the noise characteristics of the systems. The approach uses earlier results about the behaviour of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the background signal and, as a new feature, an experimentally established linear relationship between the ratio of signal-to-background ratios, (SBR) HR/(SBR) MR, and the inverse ratio of the effective line widths, (Δλ eff) MR/(Δλ eff) HR, where "HR" and "MR" refer to high and medium spectral resolution as achieved by applying narrow (60μm) and wide (210μm) slits in a 1.5-m echelle monochromator. The approach is applied to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported by winge et al. ( Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)) for a 27-MHz ICP and those found in this work for a 50-MHz ICP. Data for some 100 prominent ICP lines in the wavelength region between about 280 and 325 nm were processed. It is shown that the approach leads to a rational comparison of detection limits.

  17. Spontaneous emission from an excited atom in the presence of N atoms and M modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited two-level atom into a system of N nonexcited atoms of the same type (with N much greater than 1) in the presence of M electromagnetic-field modes is investigated analytically, applying the Hamiltonian formulation of Dicke (1954) studied by Jaynes and Cummings (1963), Tavis and Cummings (1968), and Buley and Cummings (1964). It is shown that the trapping of radiation in the system seen when one EM mode is present does not persist as M approaches N. The feasibility of an experimental verification of these phenomena is discussed.

  18. Observation of superfluorescent emissions from laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, E.; Barrett, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Zhang, R.; Raithel, G.

    2008-04-01

    We study superfluorescence (SF) from spherical and cigar-shaped clouds of laser-cooled Rubidium atoms from the 5D5/2 level through the 6P3/2 level to the 5S1/2 ground level. The atomic system is initially excited to the 5D5/2 level from the ground state via two-photon excitation through the intermediate 5P3/2 level. The fluorescence on the 6P-5S transition at 420 nm is recorded using time-resolved measurements. The time delays of the observed SF emission peaks typically scale as ˜N-1 , where N is the atom number, and are much smaller than the time delay expected for uncorrelated cascade fluorescence. Since N is significantly smaller than the threshold number for SF on the 420 nm transition, and larger than the threshold number for the 5D-6P transition at 5.2μm , our observations suggest that the 420 nm SF emission is triggered by rapid deexcitation of the 5D to the 6P level via SF at 5.2μm . The observed SF time delays for 420 nm emission agree with SF time-delay estimates for the 5.2μm transition. For spherical clouds, the SF is isotropic. For cigar-shaped clouds, the SF is highly anisotropic. Along the long axis of cigar-shaped atom clouds, SF and incoherent cascade fluorescence produce temporally well-resolved peaks in the detected signal. In this case, the SF component of the signal is highly concentrated along a direction in between the directions of the two almost parallel excitation beams. The observed SF intensities scale as N , suggesting that the 5D level is regeneratively pumped during the SF decay.

  19. Factors influence accuracy and precision in the determination of the elemental composition of defense waste glass by ICP-emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    The influence of instrumental factors on the accuracy and precision of the determination of the composition of glass and glass feedstock is presented. In addition, the effects of different methods of sampling, dissolution methods, and standardization procedures and their effect on the quality of the chemical analysis will also be presented. The target glass simulates the material that will be prepared by the vitrification of highly radioactive liquid defense waste. The glass and feedstock streams must be well characterized to ensure a durable glass; current models estimate a 100,000 year lifetime. The elemental composition will be determined by ICP-emission spectrometry with radiation exposure issues requiring a multielement analysis for all constituents, on a single analytical sample, using compromise conditions.

  20. Determination of Minerals in Apples by ICP AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that involves the elemental analysis of apples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (IICP AES). The results of the experiment allow students to predict the cold-storage stability of apples. During the experiment the sample-preparation techniques and digestion procedures involved in elemental analysis of solid organic samples are introduced and the optimization of the ICP AES is explored. The method detailed can easily be adapted for the analysis of a wider range of elements. The laboratory experiment may also be undertaken using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with only minor modifications in the sample-preparation procedure.

  1. Spectral shaping of cascade emissions from multiplexed cold atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of the biphoton state from the cascade emissions of cold atomic ensembles, which are composed of a telecommunication photon (signal) followed by an infrared one (idler) via four-wave mixing. With adiabatic conditions for Gaussian driving pulses of width τ , the spectrum of the biphoton state has the form of a Gaussian that conserves signal and idler photon energies within ℏ /τ modulated by a Lorentzian with a superradiant linewidth. Multiplexing the atomic ensembles with frequency-shifted cascade emissions, we may manipulate and shape the spectrum of the biphoton state. The entropy of entanglement is derived from Schmidt decomposition, which can be larger if we multiplex the atomic ensembles in a way that conserves signal and idler photon central energies. The eigenvalues in Schmidt bases are degenerate in pairs for symmetric spectral shaping in which the mode probability densities show interference patterns. We also demonstrate the excess entropy of entanglement that comes from continuous frequency space, which scales up the total entropy. The scheme of the multiplexed cascade-emitted biphoton state provides multimode structures that are useful in long-distance quantum communication and multimode quantum information processing.

  2. Electron impact induced light emission from zinc atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejanovic, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Experimental studies of electron impact excitation of zinc atom are rare, primarily due to experimental difficulties. However, zinc is an interesting target because of possible applications in light sources. Also, due to its position in periodic table, zinc is an interesting case for the fundamental understanding of momentum couplings and the role of electron correlations in complex metal atoms. Recent experimental investigations have indicated the existence of highly correlated scattering mechanisms via formation of negative ion resonances and Post Collision Interaction (PCI) in the decay of autoionizing states. These can significantly modify energy dependence of the emission cross sections at low impact energies and the studies of photon emission offer a sensitive way to investigate electron correlations. Specifically, in the lowest autoionizing region of zinc, i.e. between 10 and 15 eV, both the cross sections and polarization of emitted light are affected by the formation of short lived negative ions and PCI effects. These are associated with excitation of one of the sub-valence 3d electrons and complex correlations between inner 3d and outer excited electrons in the target and also with the slow electron released into continuum, need to be included in modeling. Also the scattering of the spin polarized electrons has shown significant spin effects when excitation proceeds via negative ion resonances. Emission cross sections and comparison with theory would be discussed at the conference.

  3. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, O.; Motooka, J.M.; Church, S.E.; Bailey, E.A.; Arbogast, B.F.; Willson, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented detailing analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska.

  4. Modelling of the evaporation behaviour of particulate material for slurry nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, D.; Heitland, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for modelling the evaporation behaviour of particles in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Computer software has been developed in FORTRAN 77 language in order to simulate the evaporation behaviour of particles of refractory materials such as encountered in the analysis of advanced ceramic powders by slurry nebulization inductively coupled argon plasma atomic spectrometry. The program simulates the evaporation of single particles in the inductively coupled plasma and also enable it to calculate on the base of a given particle size distribution the evaporation behaviour of all the particles contained in a sample. In a so-called "intensity concept", the intensity is calculated as a function of the observation height in order to determine recovery rates for slurries compared with aqueous solutions. This yields a quick insight whether a calibration with aqueous solutions can be used for analysis of slurries of a given powder by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and also is a help in determining the optimal parameters for analyses of powders by means of slurry nebulization ICP-AES. Applications for the evaporation of Al 2O 3 and SiC powders document the usefulness of the model for the case of a 1.5 kW argon ICP of which the temperature at 8 mm above the load coil has been determined to be 6100 K. The model predicts the maximum particle size for SiC and Al 2O 3 that can be transported (10-15 μm) and evaporated for a given efficiency under given experimental conditions. For both Al 2O 3 and SiC, two ceramic powders of different grain size were investigated. The median particle sizes cover

  5. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  6. [Determination of SiO2 in Groundwater and Mineral Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-bing; Han, Mei; Jia, Na; Liu, Sheng-hua

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of silica in groundwater and mineral water was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). After a more sensitive analytical line of silicon was chosen, the effects of operating conditions of the ICP spectrometer on the analysis results were investigated, at the same time, the impact of coexisting ions on determination results of SiO2 was also considered and eliminated. The transmit power of 1 350 W, observation height of 12 mm, the nebulizer pressure of 0. 20 MPa and the pump speed of analysis of 75 r . min-1 were selected by experimental conditions. Under the optimum analytical conditions of spectrometer, the method was used for the determination of SiO2 in groundwater and mineral water with the detection limit of 0. 017. mg . L-1, recoveries between 94. 10% and 103. 8%, and relative standard deviation (RSD)s≤3. 06%. Compared with the results of silicon molybdenum yellow spectrophotometry, the results were basically consistent with the relative deviation ≤3. 00%. In conclusion, the method is simple and efficient with high precision and accuracy, and can be used for research and routine production. PMID:26415465

  7. Determination of metal concentrations in lichen samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique after applying different digestion procedures.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, S G; Yenisoy-Karakas, S; Dogangün, A

    2004-05-28

    Three digestion procedures have been tested on lichen samples for application in the determination of major, minor and trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in lichen samples collected in Aegean Region of Turkey by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The acid mixture of concentrated HNO(3), H(2)O(2) and HF were used. The instrument was optimized using lichen matrix considering RF power, nebulizer pressure, auxiliary flow rate and pump rate. The accuracy of the overall analyses was first estimated by analysis of two certified reference materials. Good agreement between measured and reference values were found for almost all elements. As the second way of determining the accuracy, results obtained from independent analytical techniques (ICP-AES and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)) were compared for all elements by analyzing real samples. Correlation coefficients of two techniques for the elements ranged between 0.70 (Mg) and 0.96 (Fe). Among the three digestion systems, namely microwave, open vessel and acid bomb, microwave digestion system gave the best recovery results. The method detection limit (MDL) was computed using reagent blanks of microwave digestion system since it provides cleaner sample preparation. Detection limit is adequate for all elements to determine the elements in lichen samples. The precision was assessed from the replicate analyses of reagent blanks of microwave digestion system and was found to be less than 1.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.). PMID:18969428

  8. Study of polymer ablation products obtained by ultraviolet laser ablation — inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todolí, J.-L.; Mermet, J.-M.

    1998-10-01

    A study of the nature of aerosols following polymer laser ablation was performed. A glass sample was used for comparison. Aerosol fractions were analyzed by using simple methods based on transport efficiency and filters. Three different tube lengths, i.e. 4, 29 and 54 m, were inserted between the ablation cell and the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) injector. For the glass sample, 10 elements were studied. Only Na and K exhibited different results as the particle size, i.e. tube length, was varied. The polymers used were poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(ethylene), PE. Three elements (Ca, Ti and Sn) under different chemical forms were measured. Unlike Ti and Sn the ablated aerosol particle size (mass) seemed to depend on the Ca chemical form. Another PVC sample containing 11 elements was also studied. Na, Al and C exhibited a different behavior with particle size with respect to the remaining elements. Then, the carbon signal was studied after a 0.3 μm pore size filter had been placed between the ablation cell and the ICP torch. The results indicated that carbon was mainly present under gaseous form and particles smaller than 0.3 μm size. The analysis of the aerosol gaseous phase by thermal desorption GC-MS confirmed the presence of polymer volatile thermal degradation products. These results explained why carbon could not be applied as an efficient internal standard.

  9. [Study on the simultaneous determintion of various components in cement samples by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue-Qin

    2013-07-01

    A simple and rapid method for determination of CaO, MgO, Fe2O3, Al2O3 and TiO2 in cement samples by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed. In order to carry out the analysis, the cement samples were dissolved with mixed aqua regia, hydrofluoric acid, perchloric acid, hydrochloric acid, and the standard solution was prepared by a series of standard cement samples. The matrix interference and the mutual interference of elements under test were studied by ICP-AES. The detection limits are in the range of 3.79 x 10(-4)-1.07 x 10(-2) microg x mL(-1). The recovery rates and relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method are in the range of 87.5%-105.6% and less than 1% respectively. Research results show that the method can meet the requirements of rapid chemical analysis for cement. PMID:24059210

  10. Enrichment with air-sandwiched method of on-line collection/concentration using chelating resin and simultaneous determination of trace elements by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Osamu; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-06-15

    The application of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) to the forensic sample was studied. On-line collection/concentration method of the sample with chelating resin column (TE-05) and air-sandwiched method to isolate the analyte zone at the highest concentration of an eluent was coupled with ICP-AES. The limits of detection (LODs) were much improved to 35 fold (Co): from Sc, 0.15 ng ml(-1) to Ni, 1.99 ng ml(-1), and the concentration efficiency was 7-14 times. This method was applied to the concrete with about 10mg of samples. Major elements (Al, Fe, Mg) measured by conventional/ICP-AES and trace elements measured by this method, such as Cd, Co, Ni, and Pb were determined without matrices interference. Four concrete samples can be discriminated by comparing the content profiles of the trace elements and the major elements. PMID:19362181

  11. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  12. Vibrational structure in atomic emission spectra: Hg atoms in molecular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, C.; Tramer, A.

    1997-08-01

    Mercury atoms excited to the 3P1 state in rare gas and molecular (CH4, CD4, CF4, and SF6) matrices relax by a direct 3P1→1S0 fluorescence with a ca. 60 ns lifetime or by the 3P1⇝3P0 radiationless transition followed by the 3P0→1S0 long-lived (τ in the 10 to 500 ms range) emission. The main difference between atomic and molecular hosts is the appearance, in the latter case, of a well resolved vibrational structure in the spectrum of the 3P0→1S0 transition involving the frequencies of nontotally symmetric modes of the host molecules. This structure, related to a shortening of the lifetime of the 3P0→1S0 emission is explained by the intensity borrowing from the allowed 3P1→1S0 transition, i.e., by the 3P1↔3P0 mixing induced by nontotally symmetric vibrations of neighbor molecules (analog of the Herzberg-Teller effect). Relative intensities of bands corresponding to different vibrational modes may be deduced from estimation of electric fields induced in the Hg atom by displacements of electric charges of the vibrating molecule

  13. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  14. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  15. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. In the HPLC mode, the LODDs were found to be comparable to those obtained by continuous-flow sample introduction into the ICP, or inferior by up to only a factor of four. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methyl-isobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organo-metallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered.

  16. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  17. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  18. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report: January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1993-12-31

    In this research, new high-temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. During the period January 1993--December 1993, emphasis was placed on (a) analytical investigations of atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasma (He ICP) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies; (b) simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources to predict their structure and fundamental and analytical properties without incurring the enormous cost of experimental studies; (c) spectrosopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas; (d) fundamental studies of He ICP discharges and argon-nitrogen plasma by high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometry; and (e) fundamental and analytical investigation of new, low-cost devices as sample introduction systems for atomic spectrometry and examination of new diagnostic techniques for probing aerosols. Only the most important achievements are included in this report to illustrate progress and obstacles. Detailed descriptions of the authors` investigations are outlined in the reprints and preprints that accompany this report. The technical progress expected next year is briefly described at the end of this report.

  19. Analysis of high-purity germanium dioxide by ETV-ICP-AES with preliminary concentration of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Nickolay S; Shaverina, Anastasiya V; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Saprykin, Anatoly I

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a combined technique of germanium dioxide analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with preconcentration of trace elements by distilling off matrix and electrothermal (ETV) introduction of the trace elements concentrate into the ICP. Evaluation of metrological characteristics of the developed technique of high-purity germanium dioxide analysis was performed. The limits of detection (LODs) for 25 trace elements ranged from 0.05 to 20ng/g. The accuracy of proposed technique is confirmed by "added-found" («or spiking») experiment and comparing the results of ETV-ICP-AES and ICP-AES analysis of high purity germanium dioxide samples. PMID:27216693

  20. Use of gradient dilution to flag and overcome matrix interferences in axial-viewing inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-10-01

    Despite the undisputed power of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), its users still face serious challenges in obtaining accurate analytical results. Matrix interference is perhaps the most important challenge. Dilution of a matrix-containing sample is a common practice to reduce matrix interference. However, determining the optimal dilution factor requires tedious and time-consuming offline sample preparation, since emission lines and the effect of matrix interferences are affected differently by the dilution. The current study exploits this difference by employing a high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump prior to the nebulizer to perform on-line mixing of a sample solution and diluent. Linear gradient dilution is performed on both the calibration standard and the matrix-containing sample. By ratioing the signals from two emission lines (from the same or different elements) as a function of dilution factor, the analyst can not only identify the presence of a matrix interference, but also determine the optimal dilution factor needed to overcome the interference. A ratio that does not change with dilution signals the absence of a matrix interference, whereas a changing ratio indicates the presence of an interference. The point on the dilution profile where the ratio stabilizes indicates the optimal dilution factor to correct the interference. The current study was performed on axial-viewing ICP-AES with o-xylene as the solvent.

  1. Simultaneous determination of trace heavy metals in ambient aerosols by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Talebi, S M; Malekiha, M

    2008-07-01

    The simultaneous determination of heavy metals associated with airborne particulate matter in the atmosphere of the city Isfahan (Iran) was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. The preconcentration procedure developed found instrumental to determine the trace heavy metals associated with ambient aerosols collected at a short sampling period or collected from rural areas where the concentrations of these metals are much less than those in urban areas. Several samples were analyzed by both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as a conventional method and the proposed method. The results obtained by the two methods were found in good agreement. The method was applied to the determination of atmospheric level of heavy metals in rural area and also for study of variation in levels of heavy metals in urban atmosphere during the days and nights. PMID:19552073

  2. Method development for the determination of manganese, cobalt and copper in green coffee comparing direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Nédio; Castro, Jacira T; da Silva, Márcia M; Korn, Maria das Graças A; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R

    2007-10-31

    A method has been developed for the determination of cobalt, copper and manganese in green coffee using direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ET AAS). The motivation for the study was that only a few elements might be suitable to determine the origin of green coffee so that the multi-element techniques usually applied for this purpose might not be necessary. The three elements have been chosen as test elements as they were found to be significant in previous investigations. A number of botanical certified reference materials (CRM) and pre-analyzed samples of green coffee have been used for method validation, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples as reference method. Calibration against aqueous standards could be used for the determination of Mn and Co by SS-ET AAS, but calibration against solid CRM was necessary for the determination of Cu. No significant difference was found between the results obtained with the proposed method and certified or independently determined values. The limits of detection for Mn, Cu and Co were 0.012, 0.006 and 0.004mugg(-1) using SS-ET AAS and 0.015, 0.13 and 0.10mugg(-1) using ICP OES. Seven samples of Brazilian green coffee have been analyzed, and there was no significant difference between the values obtained with SS-ET AAS and ICP OES for Mn and Cu. ICP OES could not be used as a reference method for Co, as essentially all values were below the limit of quantification of this technique. PMID:19073113

  3. Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing team: An examination of LA-ICP-AES in a mobile configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for field-deployable elemental analysis devices that are safer, faster, and less expensive than the fixed laboratory procedures now used to screen hazardous waste sites. As a response to this need, the Technology Integration Program (TIP) created a mobile, field-deployable laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) sampling and analysis prototype. Although the elemental. screening prototype has been successfully field-tested, continued marketing and technical development efforts are required to transfer LA-ICP-AES technology to the commercial sector. TIP established and supported a student research and design group called the Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing (IDMM) team to advance the technology transfer of mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES. The IDMM team developed a conceptual design (which is detailed in this report) for a mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES sampling and analysis system, and reports the following findings: Mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES is commercially viable. Eventual regulatory acceptance of field-deployable LA-ICP-AES, while not a simple process, is likely. Further refinement of certain processes and components of LA-ICP-AES will enhance the device`s sensitivity and accuracy.

  4. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effects induced by the vacuum radiation field and the two laser fields. More importantly, the almost 100% probability of finding an atom within a certain range can be reached when corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in a spatially selective single-qubit phase gate, entangling gates, and quantum error correction for quantum information processing.

  5. Exact solution for spontaneous emission in the presence of N atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-10-01

    N two-level "atoms" are considered in interaction with a single-mode resonant electromagnetic field. The exact solution is given nonrelativistically for all times for the case of spontaneous emission, when only one atom is initially excited. The solution is given for the general case of the N atoms in inequivalent mode positions.

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  7. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-07-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of {sup 139}La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, {sup 236}U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of {sup 235}U:{sup 238}U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES.

  8. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  9. Selective solid phase extraction of copper using a new Cu(II)-imprinted polymer and determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri; Hazer, Orhan; Yilmaz, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the preparation of a novel Cu(II)-ion imprinted polymer using 2-thiozylmethacrylamide (TMA) for on-line preconcentration of Cu(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Cu(II)-TMA monomer (complex) was synthesized and copolymerized via bulk polymerization method in the presence of ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate cross-linker. The resulting polymer was washed with 5% (v/v) HNO3 to remove Cu(II) ions and then with water until a neutral pH. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized by FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental conditions were optimized for on-line preconcentration of Cu(II) using a minicolumn of ion imprinted polymer (IIP). Quantitative retention was achieved between pH 5.0 and 6.0, whereas the recoveries for the non-imprinted polymer (NIP) were about 61%. The IIP showed about 30 times higher selectivity to Cu(II) in comparison to NIP. The IIP also exhibited excellent selectivity for Cu(II) against the competing transition and heavy metal ions, including Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Computational calculations revealed that the selectivity of IIP was mediated by the stability of Cu(II)-TMA complex which was far more stable than those of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) that have similar charge and ionic radii to Cu(II). A volume of 10 mL sample solution was loaded onto the column at 4.0 mL min−1 by using a sequential injection system (FIALab 3200) followed by elution with 1.0 mL of 2% (v/v) HNO3. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and limit of detection (LOD, 3s) of the method were 3.2% and 0.4 μg L−1, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cu(II) in fish otoliths (CRM 22), bone ash (SRM 1400) and coastal seawater and estuarine water samples. PMID:24511158

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, R.; Zoller, P.; Ritsch, H.

    1992-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission in terms of atomic wave functions is developed. Realizations of the time evolution of atomic wave functions are constructed that correspond to an ensemble of atoms driven by laser light undergoing a sequence of spontaneous emissions. The atomic decay times are drawn according to the photon count distribution of the driven atom. Each quantum jump of the atomic electron projects the atomic wave function to the ground state of the atom. Our theory is based on a stochastic interpretation and generalization of Mollow's pure-state analysis of resonant light scattering, and the Srinivas-Davies theory of continuous measurements in photodetection. An extension of the theory to include mechanical light effects and a generalization to atomic systems with Zeeman substructure are given. We illustrate the method by simulating the solutions of the optical Bloch equations for two-level systems, and laser cooling of a two-level atom in an ion trap where the center-of-mass motion of the atom is described quantum mechanically.

  11. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  12. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shuichi Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-15

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at S{sub B} steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  13. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  14. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  15. Effects of acid type and concentration on the determination of 34 elements by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hee, S.S.Q.; Macdonald, T.J.; Boyle, J.R.

    1985-06-01

    A mixed acid consisting of 11.6% HCl/2.8% HNO/sub 3/ proved superior to 2 to 10% HCl, HNO/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone in chemical compatibility and storage characteristics for simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of 33 elements admixed up to concentrations of 100 ..mu..g/mL each. A 2% aqua regia solution appeared to be adequate below 10..mu..g/mL of all these admixed elements plus silver. Use of the mixed acid generally also allowed for more reproducible interelemental k factors. Less sensitive elements and elements whose lines were in the vacuum ultraviolet were not as reproducible. A two-point standardization procedure was adequate, and k factor values agreed within 10% only over a specific concentration range. A practical procedure to define the range of determination was developed using the 11.6% HCl/2.8% HNO/sub 3/ acid solvent. 24 references, 11 tables.

  16. High-pressure combustor exhaust emissions with improved air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A high-pressure combustor segment 0.456 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was tested with specially designed air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles at inlet-air temperatures of 340 to 755 k (610 deg to 1360 R), reference velocities of 12.4 to 26.1 meters per second (41 to 86 ft/sec), and fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.020. Increasing inlet-air pressure from 4 to 20 atmospheres generally increased smoke number and nitric oxide, but decreased carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon concentrations with air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles. Emission indexes for carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were lower at 4, 10, and 20 atmospheres, and nitric oxide emission indexes were lower at 10 and 20 atmospheres with air-atomizing than with pressure-atomizing nozzles.

  17. Calibration graphs for Ti, Ta and Nb in sintered tungsten carbide by infrared laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanický, V; Otruba, V; Mermet, J M

    2001-12-01

    Infrared laser ablation (IR-LA) has been studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of sintered cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Fractionation of cobalt was observed. Linearity of calibration plots was verified at least up to 15% Ti, 8% Ta, and 3% Nb. Above 1% (m/m) Ti, Ta, and Nb, the repeatability of results was better than 3% R.S.D. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 3% to +/- 4% for Ti, Ta, and Nb with internal standardization by tungsten and up to +/- 5% without internal standardization. The limits of detection were 0.004% Ti, 0.001% Ta, and 0.004% Nb. Elimination of the cemented hardmetal dissolution procedure is the main advantage of this method. PMID:11769803

  18. Solvent extraction of cadmium as a previous step for its determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siles Cordero, M.T.; Garcia de Torres, A.; Cano Pavon, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A method is proposed for the solvent extraction of cadmium using 1,5-bis[1-(2-pyridyl)ethylidene] thiocarbonohydrazide (APTH) as extractant. The optimum extraction conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the effect of pH, concentration of extractant, shaking time and ionic strength. The maximum volume ratio of the aqueous to organic phase was 25:1 for a single-stage extraction of 99-100% of the metal ion. The detection limit is 0.15 ng/ml cadmium, and the calibration is linear from 0.2 to 500 ng/ml. The effect of interferences was studied and no interferences from the elements commonly found in biological materials were observed. The extraction method was applied to the determination of cadmium in some biological materials using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

  19. Spontaneous emission from a single two-level atom in the presence of N initially unexcited identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1986-03-01

    The quantum-electrodynamical problem of N identical two-level atoms interacting with M field modes is considered, and an exact solution for the case of spontaneous emission from a single atom is obtained. The behavior of this system is shown to be quite different from the exponential decay of a single excited atom radiating into free space. A 'ringing' behavior at the enigmatic frequency of approximately the square root of N, which occurs when only one mode is accessible to the field, persists when many modes are present. When a continuum of modes is accessible, the long-time limit shows that the energy of the originally excited atom is equally likely to be shared by the N-1 originally unexcited atoms and the electromagnetic field when M/N approaches 1. 'Radiation suppression' occurs whenever N is much greater than 1 and M is much less than N, when the originally excited atom does not emit its energy. When M = N much greater than 1, the single atom decays monotonically to zero (and approximately exponentially), but with a decay rate that is the square root of N times the Rabi frequency. Such unexpected affects are presently within experimental range.

  20. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  1. The metamorphosis in the emission angular profile from an inverted two-level atoms system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2009-08-01

    A rich variety of angular distributions in the cooperative emission from a sphere of inverted N two-level atoms are shown to result from the eigenstructure of the complex kernel of scalar photon theory exp( ik0R)/( ik0R). This angular distribution is sensitive both to the size of the sphere and to the instant of observation of the emission.

  2. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU[center dot]Spec[trademark] column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  3. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU{center_dot}Spec{trademark} column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  4. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, D. N.; Zachariadis, G. A.; Anthemidis, A. N.; Tsirliganis, N. C.; Stratis, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level).

  5. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-06-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed, and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methylisobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organometallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts, and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered. 227 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  7. Evaluation of sample preparation methods for the detection of total metal content using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in wastewater and sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimpe, K. M.; Ngila, J. C.; Mabuba, N.; Nomngongo, P. N.

    Heavy metal contamination exists in aqueous wastes and sludge of many industrial discharges and domestic wastewater, among other sources. Determination of metals in the wastewater and sludge requires sample pre-treatment prior to analysis because of certain challenges such as the complexity of the physical state of the sample, which may lead to wrong readings in the measurement. This is particularly the case with low analyte concentration to be detected by the instrument. The purpose of this work was to assess and validate the different sample preparation methods namely, hot plate and microwave-assisted digestion procedures for extraction of metal ions in wastewater and sludge samples prior to their inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric (ICP-OES) determination. For the extraction of As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, three acid mixtures, that is, HNO3/H2O2, HNO3/HClO4/H2O2 and aqua regia + H2O2, were evaluated. Influent wastewater spiked with the SRM (CWW-TM-B) was used for the optimization of acid mixtures affecting the extraction procedure. After sample digestion, the filtration capabilities of cellulose-acetate filter paper and the acrodisc syringe filter with the pore size of 0.45 μm were compared. In terms of performance, acrodisc syringe filter in terms of the improved recoveries obtained, was found to be the best filtration method compared to the filter paper. Based on the analytical results obtained, microwave-assisted digestion (MAD) using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was found to be the most suitable method for extraction of heavy metals and major elements in all the sample matrices. Therefore, MAD using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was used for further investigations. The precision of the developed MAD method expressed in terms of relative standard deviations (% RSD) for different metals was found to be <5%. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.12% to 2.18 μg L-1 and 0.61% to 3.43 μg L-1

  8. Auroral excitation of optical emissions of atomic and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    The O I 'green line' (1S-1D) at 5577 A and the O2 (0,0) atmosphere band at 7620 A were measured in a steady IBC II(plus) aurora simultaneously with N2 emissions and the auroral electron flux. An empirical model based on these rocket measurements shows that the principal excitation source of O2(b 1 Sigma g plus) is energy transfer from O(1D), with direct electron impact of O2 contributing less than 5 percent. While the altitude profile of the green line emission resembles that which would be produced by electron impact excitation of O2, a dissociative excitation cross section of 10 to the minus 16th power is required for this interpretation. None of the other known O(1S) excitation mechanisms are thought capable of producing the observed emission rate.

  9. The analysis of chlorine with other elements of interest in waste oil/fuels by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Tsourides, D.

    1998-12-31

    It has been said that there are more chemical analysis performed on oil/fuels than any other material. The sensitivity, linearity, multi-element capability, and relative freedom from matrix effects of ICP-AES makes it particularly suitable for elemental analysis of these samples. However, until recently the routine analysis of Chlorine had not been possible by ICP-AES. The addition of the Halogen elements, particularly Chlorine, to ICP-AES analysis is of importance to several industries that burn waste oil as fuel. The recycling and disposal of waste oil is closely regulated by metal and halogen content in all developed countries. In some countries, waste oil containing more than 1,000 ppm of Chlorine is considered hazardous waste. However, used oil may be burned as a fuel if it meets certain allowable limits. The paper describes the procedures for chlorine analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

  10. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  11. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-04-15

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-01

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures. PMID:24328147

  13. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  14. Effect of discharge parameters on emission yields in a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Mark; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    1997-05-01

    A study is performed on a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission (rf-GD-AES) source to determine the factors effecting the emission yields for both metallic and nonconductive sample types. Specifically, these studies focus on determining how the operating parameters (power and pressure) influence emission yields. The results follow predicted patterns as determined by Langmuir probe diagnostic studies of a similar source. In particular, discharge gas pressure is the key operating parameter as slight changes in pressure may significantly affect the emission yield of the analyte species. RF power is less important and is shown to produce only relatively small changes in the emission yield over the ranges typically used in rf-GD analyses. These studies indicate that the quantitative analysis of layered materials, depth-profiling, may be adversely affected if the data collection scheme, i.e. the quantitative algorithm, requires changing the pressure during an analysis to keep the operating current and voltage constant. A direct relationship is shown to exist between the Ar (discharge gas) emission intensity and that of sputtered species for nonconductors. This observance is used to compensate for differences in emission intensities observed in the analysis of various thickness nonconductive samples. The sputtered element emission signals are corrected based on the emission intensity of an Ar (1) transition, implying that quantitative analysis of nonconductive samples is not severely limited by the availability of matrix matched standards.

  15. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  16. Protecting remote atomic entanglement against spontaneous emission by separated photonic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Du, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2015-07-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics between two spatially separated atoms trapped in two separate optical cavities. Based on cavity-assisted interactions between the atoms and separated photonic pulses, we propose a scheme for the implemention of a controlled-phase-flip gate (CPF gate) between each of the atoms and the photonic pulse to protect the remote atomic quantum entanglement against the decaying caused by spontaneous emission. What we need to do is to shoot the horizontally polarized photons onto the cavity mirror successively, plus a train of Hadamard operations on the atoms, and no measurement is needed here. It is shown that the quantum entanglement of the two remote atoms can be protected effectively in this way. We also extend our scheme to the case of weak coupling and low Q cavity cases. The simplicity of the current scheme may warrant its experimental realization.

  17. Coherent x-ray emission from hollow Xe atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Kepple, P.; Dasgupta, A.; Clark, R.; Velikovich, A.; Borisov, A. B.; Rhodes, C. K.

    2004-11-01

    We investigated small Xe clusters subject to intense ultrashort laser radiation. The dynamics and evolution of the cluster plasma is described by a relativistic time-dependent 3-D molecular dynamics model and a detailed atomic physics model describing the formation of hollow Xe atoms. At a peak laser intensity of (1-5)x10^20 W/cm^2 the model predicts inversions in a number of states distributed in several ionization stages in agreement with experimental observations [1,2]. The particle simulation model suggests that at laser intensities below 10^20 W/cm^2 the outer electrons form a low-density uniform plasma, while at higher intensities the electrons may behave collectively in a manner similar to that described by the "collective oscillation model" [1,2]. [1] W. A. Schroeder, F. G. Omenetto, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, A. McPherson, C. Jordan, K. Boyer, K. Kondo, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 31, 5031 (1998) [2] W. A. Schroeder, T. R. Nelson, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, K. Boyer, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 34, 297 (2001)

  18. An analytical method for hydrogeochemical surveys: Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after using enrichment coprecipitation with cobalt and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Trace metals that are commonly associated with mineralization were concentrated and separated from natural water by coprecipitation with ammonium pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and cobalt and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The method is useful in hydrogeochemical surveys because it permits preconcentration near the sample sites, and selected metals are preserved shortly after the samples are collected. The procedure is relatively simple: (1) a liter of water is filtered; (2) the pH is adjusted; (3) Co chloride and APDC are added to coprecipitate the trace metals; and (4) later, the precipitate is filtered, dissolved, and diluted to 10 ml for a 100-fold concentration enrichment of the separated metals. Sb(III), As(III), Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Ag, V, and Zn can then be determined simultaneously by ICP-AES. In an experiment designed to measure the coprecipitation efficiency, Sb(III), Cd and Ag were recovered at 70 to 75% of their original concentration. The remaining metals were recovered at 85 to 100% of their original concentrations, however. The range for the lower limits of determination for the metals after preconcentration is 0.1 to 3.0 ??g/l. The precision of the method was evaluated by replicate analyses of a Colorado creek water and two simulated water samples. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a water reference standard (SRM 1643a) certified by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. In addition, the method was evaluated by analyzing groundwater samples collected near a porphyry copper deposit in Arizona and by analyzing meltwater from glacier-covered areas favorable for mineralization in south-central Alaska. The results for the ICP-AES analyses compared favorably with those obtained using the sequential technique of GFAAS on the acidified but unconcentrated water samples. ICP-AES analysis of trace-metal preconcentrates for hydrogeochemical surveys is more efficient than GFAAS because a

  19. Emission spectrum of holmium atoms excited during ionic sputtering of a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, S. S.; Braslavets, V. V.; Evdokimov, S. A.

    1988-08-01

    The article shows the fundamental possibility of using the bombardment of the surface of solids by kilo V ions for exciting the emission spectrum of particles of the target material and for obtaining spectroscopic data. The method is tested by studying the emission spectra of holmium as an example. It is shown that the sensitivity of the method can be substantially increased by using the so-called chemical effect, i.e., the effect of strengthening the spectral lines of sputtered excited metal atoms during bombardment of the target in the presence of oxygen. It is proposed that the chemical effect, which takes place only for atomic lines, in contrast to ionic ones, can also be used for simplifying the identification of atomic lines. It is noted that the proposed method is suitable for studying the atomic spectra of any solids, including refractory and chemically reactive substances.

  20. Directional spontaneous emission and lateral Casimir-Polder force on an atom close to a nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Clausen, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of an excited atom close to an optical nanofiber and the resulting scattering forces. For a suitably chosen orientation of the atomic dipole, the spontaneous emission pattern becomes asymmetric and a resonant Casimir-Polder force parallel to the fiber axis arises. For a simple model case, we show that such a lateral force is due to the interaction of the circularly oscillating atomic dipole moment with its image inside the material. With the Casimir-Polder energy being constant in the lateral direction, the predicted lateral force does not derive from a potential in the usual way. Our results have implications for optical force measurements on a substrate as well as for laser cooling of atoms in nanophotonic traps.

  1. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  2. Ability to Control a Titanium-Alloy Structure by Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchan, N. V.; Polkin, I. S.; Fertikov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of material structure on the analytical signal was studied using atomic emission spectroscopy with spark excitation of solids. A method for assessing the structure of the titanium alloy was proposed. It consisted of repeated analysis of a series of samples before and after heat treatment with excitation and recording of the spectrum under identical conditions followed by statistical processing of the results. The effects on the alloy structure of two heattreatment regimes, quenching and annealing, were studied. Atomic-emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma was used to control the homogeneity of the chemical composition in the test samples.

  3. Near-ionization-threshold emission in atomic gases driven by intense sub-cycle pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Chun; Travers, John C.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2016-02-01

    We study theoretically the dipole radiation of a hydrogen atom driven by an intense sub-cycle pulse. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the system is solved by ab initio calculation to obtain the dipole response. Remarkably, a narrowband emission lasting longer than the driving pulse appears at a frequency just above the ionization threshold. An additional calculation using the strong field approximation also recovers this emission, which suggests that it corresponds to the oscillation of nearly bound electrons that behave similarly to Rydberg electrons. The predicted phenomenon is unique to ultrashort driving pulses but not specific to any particular atomic structure.

  4. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters. PMID:18261510

  5. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP-AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP-AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP-AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP-AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP-AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data. PMID:27043594

  6. Method for reducing emissions utilizing pre-atomized fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

    1987-05-19

    A method is described for reducing particulate emissions during combustion of a hydrocarbon with API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 40,000 centipoise at 122/sup 0/F, paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less, aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and asphaltene content of about 50% by weight or greater. The method comprises: emulsifying such hydrocarbon to form a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume and in which emulsion the hydrocarbon has a particle size predominantly of about 50 microns in diameter or less; preheating such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion prior to combustion; and burning such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

  7. Comparison of ultrasonic and thermospray systems for high performance sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conver, Timothy S.; Koropchak, John A.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes detailed work done in our lab to compare analytical figures of merit for pneumatic, ultrasonic and thermospray sample introduction (SI) systems with three different inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instruments. One instrument from Leeman Labs, Inc. has an air path echelle spectrometer and a 27 MHz ICP. For low dissolved solid samples with this instrument, we observed that the ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and fused silica aperture thermospray (FSApT) both offered similar LOD improvements as compared to pneumatic nebulization (PN), 14 and 16 times, respectively. Average sensitivities compared to PN were better for the USN, by 58 times, compared to 39 times for the FSApT. For solutions containing high dissolved solids we observed that FSApT optimized at the same conditions as for low dissolved solids, whereas USN required changes in power and gas flows to maintain a stable discharge. These changes degraded the LODs for USN substantially as compared to those utilized for low dissolved solid solutions, limiting improvement compared to PN to an average factor of 4. In general, sensitivities for USN were degraded at these new conditions. When solutions with 3000 μg/g Ca were analyzed, LOD improvements were smaller for FSApT and USN, but FSApT showed an improvement over USN of 6.5 times. Sensitivities compared to solutions without high dissolved solids were degraded by 19% on average for FSApT, while those for USN were degraded by 26%. The SI systems were also tested with a Varian Instruments Liberty 220 having a vacuum path Czerny-Turner monochromator and a 40 MHz generator. The sensitivities with low dissolved solids solutions compared to PN were 20 times better for the USN and 39 times better for FSApT, and LODs for every element were better for FSApT. Better correlation between relative sensitivities and anticipated relative analyte mass fluxes for FSApT and USN was observed with the Varian instrument. LOD

  8. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  9. Determination of soluble toxic arsenic species in alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García Salgado, S; Quijano Nieto, M A; Bonilla Simón, M M

    2006-09-29

    A microwave-based procedure for arsenic species extraction in alga samples (Sargassum fulvellum, Chlorella vulgaris, Hizikia fusiformis and Laminaria digitata) is described. Extraction time and temperature were tested in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of the process. Arsenic compounds were extracted in 8 ml of deionised water at 90 degrees C for 5 min. The process was repeated three times. Soluble arsenic compounds extracted accounted for about 78-98% of total arsenic. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous work, where the extraction process was carried out by ultrasonic focussed probe for 30 s. Speciation studies were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-AES). The chromatographic method allowed us to separate As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in less than 13 min. The chromatographic analysis of the samples allowed us to identify and quantify As(V) in Hizikia sample and Sargasso material, while the four arsenic species studied were found in Chlorella sample. In the case of Laminaria sample, none of these species was identified by HPLC-HG-ICP-AES. However, in the chromatographic analysis of this alga by HPLC-ICP-AES, an unknown arsenic species was detected. PMID:16876177

  10. [Study of emission spectra of N atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yu, Ran; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-06-01

    The emission spectra of nitrogen (N) atom produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge in air were detected successfully at one atmosphere, and the excited transition spectral line at 674.5 nm with maximum value of relative intensity was selected to investigate the influences of air and electrical parameters on N atom relative density. The results indicate that N atom relative density in ionization region increases with the increase in power; decreases with increasing discharge gap and relative humidity; and with the increase in N2 content, the relative density of N active atom firstly increases and then decreases. Under present experimental conditions, the maximum value of N atom relative density appears at the axial distance from needle point r = 1 mm. PMID:22870624

  11. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  12. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  13. Atomic Data and Emission Line Intensities for CA VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work we calculate energy levels, transition probabilities and electron-ion collisional excitation rates for the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3) and 3s(sup 2)3p3d configurations of the silicon-like ion Ca VII. The total number of intermediate coupling levels considered is 27. Collision strengths are calculated at seven incident electron energies: 8, 10, 15, 20, 30,40 and 60 Ry, using the Distorted Wave approximation and a 5-configuration model. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities and are used to calculate level populations and line emissivities under the assumption of statistical equilibrium. Line intensity ratios are calculated and compared with observed values measured from SERTS and SOHO/CDS spectra. The diagnostic potential of Ca VII is demonstrated, with particular emphasis on the possibility to measure the Ne/Ca relative abundance through simultaneous observations of Ca VII and N VI lines. Ca VII proves to be an excellent tool for the study of the FIP effect in the solar transition region.

  14. Sampling and excitation of refractory solids with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Scheeline, A.

    1987-01-15

    Work with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source for solids analysis is reported. Argon at 3.5 torr provided the most intense analyte emission compared to several other gases. A study of the effects of sample positioning provides further understanding of the plasma motion and plasma/sample interactions. Application of the new sample positioning knowledge has resulted in significant increases in analyte emission, as is demonstrated by use of samples of tungsten powder, boron nitride, and aluminum oxide ceramics.

  15. Determination of microelements in uncontaminated natural water from the Baikal region by atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, A.I.; Chumakova, N.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, concentration by evaporation was used to determine 17 microelements (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ba, and Pb) in water from Lake Baikal and its tributaries by atomic-emission spectrometry with the arc excitation of spectra.

  16. INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY METHOD 6010 AND DIGESTION METHOD 3050

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design, execution, and results of an interlaboratory study of Method 6010, 'Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy,' are described. The study examined the application of the method to the analysis of solid-waste materials for 23 elements. Part of the interlab...

  17. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  18. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  19. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  20. Atomic emission line wavelength calculations below 2000 angstroms for Lithium II through Cobalt XXVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Atomic-emission-line wavelengths are presented which were calculated from wavelengths of previously identified transition sequences using second-degree polynomials fitted to known wave numbers by the least squares method. Wavelengths less than 2000 angstroms are included for ions from Li II to Co XXVI. The computer program written in FORTRAN 4 is also included.

  1. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Emission Cross Sections resulting from Electron Impact in the FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    The atomic oxygen emissions from astronomical sources provide valuable (perhaps unique) information on densities, gas dynamics, etc. of the atmospheres of the planets and their satellites. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum of the Earth's aurora and day glow as well as the atmospheres of Europa, Ganymede, Mars and Venus. In this poster we present our measurements of the electron impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 1000 eV impact energy. A high density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at right angles by a magnetically focused electron beam. The experimental apparatus consists of an electron impact collision chamber in tandem with a 0.2m UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  3. Emission of energetic neutral atoms from water ice under Ganymede surface-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wurz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The co-rotating plasma around Jupiter precipitates on the surfaces of the jovian moons, where it is not hindered by a local magnetic field. Precipitating ions lead to the emission of energetic neutral atoms, which are produced via backscattering and sputtering processes, from the surface. The European Space Agency's JUICE mission to Jupiter carries as part of the Particle Environment Package experiment an imaging energetic neutral atom spectrometer called the jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). When it is in orbit around Ganymede, JNA will measure the energetic neutral atom flux emitted from the surface of Ganymede in the energy range from 10 eV to 3300 eV. The surface of Ganymede consists of a large fraction of water ice. To characterize the expected energetic neutral atom fluxes from water ice due to precipitating jovian plasma, we impacted protons and singly charged oxygen ions with energies up to 33 keV on a salty water ice target kept at Ganymede surface conditions. Emitted energetic atoms were measured energy- and mass-resolved using the JNA prototype instrument. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms per incident ion in the JNA energy range. For incident protons, energetic neutral atom yields between 0.28 at 1 keV and ∼40 at 33 keV were observed. For incident singly charged oxygen ions, the observed energetic neutral atom yield ranged from 0.8 for at 3 keV to ∼170 at 23 keV.

  4. Analytical and quantitative concentration of gunshot residues (Pb, Sb, Ba) to estimate entrance hole and shooting-distance using confocal laser microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Di Peri, Giovanni Paolo; Nieddu, Antonio; Bello, Stefania; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rabozzi, Roberto; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-09-10

    The identification of gunshot residues (GSRs) on human body in firearm related fatalities may be essential for the evaluation of gunshot wounds and for the analysis of the shooting distance. The present study introduces the elemental analysis of the GSRs by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis (ICP-AES) performed on skin samples. ICP-AES was used to increase the accuracy of the analysis in gunshots fired from long and medium distance. In this experimental study, a series of 50 test shots have been performed in an open space with lateral wind protection. As target we used pig skin cut into 20 cm × 20 cm squares. The firing distances were 0.2, 5, 50, 100 and 150 cm. To exclude environmental contamination, each skin sample was carefully washed with deionized water and dried at room temperature in a closed box before the shooting test. We choose 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers handguns, loaded with different ammunitions. At ICP-AES analysis a clearly decreasing trend in the quantity and the concentration of the different elements of GSR by increasing the firing distance for both the guns used in the test was evident for every portion of skin samples analyzed. The analytical results obtained by ICP-AES confirmed very high concentrations of Pb, Sb, and Ba in the close-range shots and low concentrations of these particles in the intermediate and distant shots. In particular, the concentration of Sb, Ba, and Pb was significantly different from loose values when the firing distance was 100-150 cm for both the 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers. PMID:23890629

  5. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  6. [Artificial neural network applied for spectral overlap interference correction in ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liu, S; Zeng, X

    1997-10-01

    A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) has been applied to correcting spectral overlap interference in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Some network parameters including the range of input values and training sequence for training patterns presented to the network were discussed using simulated Ce 413.380nm and Pr 413.380nm line profiles. Results show that the noise in simulated mixture spectra will slow down the network convergence and has more influence on network prediction. PMID:15810366

  7. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  8. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, H.H.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  10. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  11. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  12. An Atomically Precise Au10 Ag2 Nanocluster with Red-Near-IR Dual Emission.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Guan, Zong-Jie; Pei, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Shang-Fu; Wan, Xian-Kai; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    A red-near-IR dual-emissive nanocluster with the composition [Au10 Ag2 (2-py-C≡C)3 (dppy)6 ](BF4 )5 (1; 2-py-C≡C is 2-pyridylethynyl, dppy=2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine) has been synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 has a trigonal bipyramidal Au10 Ag2 core that contains a planar Au4 (2-py-C≡C)3 unit sandwiched by two Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs. Cluster 1 shows intense red-NIR dual emission in solution. The visible emission originates from metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from silver atoms to phosphine ligands in the Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs, and the intense NIR emission is associated with the participation of 2-pyridylethynyl in the frontier orbitals of the cluster, which is confirmed by a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation. PMID:27305386

  13. Electron emission in H sup 0 --atom collisions: A coincidence study of the angular dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, O.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Groeneveld, K.O. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); DuBois, R.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Differential electron emission occurring as the result of fast hydrogen atom impact on helium and argon targets has been studied using standard non-coincidence and emitted electron-ionized projectile coincidence techniques. Impact energies were 0.5 and 1 MeV; electron emission was measured between approximately 20 and 2000 eV for selected laboratory emission angles ranging from 0{degree} to 180{degree}. These data demonstrate the importance of simultaneous target-projectile ionization as was previously observed for energetic He{sup +} impact. The experimental data for the helium target, when compared to PWBA calculations using hydrogenic wave functions, indicate good agreement with theory for projectile ionization and, indirectly, reasonably good agreement for target ionization. Simultaneous target-projectile ionization events were not included in the model. The argon data are compared with more sophisticated calculations for electron loss. These comparisons indicate the importance of second order effects at large emission angles.

  14. Characterization of binary silver based alloys by nanosecond-infrared-laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Ciro; Sobral, Hugo

    2013-11-01

    A nanosecond infrared laser ablation (LA) system was examined to determine the composition of several silver-copper alloys through an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Samples with different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by atomic absorption, and ICP-OES after sample digestion, and compared with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer-scanning electron microscopy (EDX-SEM). Elemental fractionation during the ablation process and within the ICP was investigated for different laser frequencies and fluences. Samples were used for optimizing and calibrating the coupling between LA to the ICP-OES system. Results obtained from the samples analysis were in agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX-SEM, showing that fractionation was not significant for laser fluences higher than 55 J cm-2.

  15. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  16. Enhanced emission from an ensemble of inverted atoms in the presence of another isotopic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-04-01

    The emission flux from a slab of two homogeneously-broadened isotope species ensembles is analyzed. Initially one of the species is coherently nearly all inverted, the atoms of the other species are in the ground state. The slab thickness is less than the wavelength of the resonant transition radiation. In particular, in a narrow band of the slab thickness centered at 237λ/500, the emission flux from the species mixture for different detunings between the two species resonance frequencies is shown to be greatly enhanced over its value where only a single species is present.

  17. Spontaneous emission of a photon: Wave-packet structures and atom-photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.V.; Efremov, M.A.; Kazakov, A.E.; Chan, K.W.; Eberly, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    2005-09-15

    Spontaneous emission of a photon by an atom is described theoretically in three dimensions with the initial wave function of a finite-mass atom taken in the form of a finite-size wave packet. Recoil and wave-packet spreading are taken into account. The total atom-photon wave function is found in the momentum and coordinate representations as the solution of an initial-value problem. The atom-photon entanglement arising in such a process is shown to be closely related to the structure of atom and photon wave packets which can be measured in the coincidence and single-particle schemes of measurements. Two predicted effects, arising under the conditions of high entanglement, are anomalous narrowing of the coincidence wave packets and, under different conditions, anomalous broadening of the single-particle wave packets. Fundamental symmetry relations between the photon and atom single-particle and coincidence wave-packet widths are established. The relationship with the famous scenario of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen is discussed.

  18. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  19. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  20. Instabilities in fluorocarbon ICP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Abada, Hana

    2000-10-01

    Several recent studies (Lieberman and al(M. A. Lieberman, A. J. Lichtenberg and A. M. Marakhtanov, App. Phys. Vol75,3617 (1999)), Tuszewski(M. Tuszewski, J. Appl. Phys. 79, 8967 (1996))) have shown the presence of instabilities in low pressure inductively coupled discharges with electronegative gases (O_2, Ar/SF_6). Lieberman and al^1 have proposed an explanation for this effect in terms of electon attachment processes causing an oscillation between capacitive and inductive coupling modes. We have observed similar instabilities in ICP fluorocarbon plasmas (CF_4, C_2F_6, CHF_3) by observing the optical emission from the plasma. In CF4 plasmas, the optical emission is modulated by up to 90% at frequencies 200-1 kHz at 1-20 mtorr with rf powers of 300 W and 500W. We have also observed an interesting phenomenon whereby inductive/capacitive oscillations occur during several hundreds of ms, in between periods of stable capactive operation lasting several hudreds of ms.

  1. Europa - Ultraviolet emissions and the possibility of atomic oxygen and hydrogen clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F.-M.; Judge, D. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Emission signals from Europa with wavelength below 800 A were detected by the Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer. In the present paper, improved procedures for data reduction are used to determine the spatial region as well as the intensity of the suggested emission sources. The observations indicate a cloud with a radius of about 1.5 Jupiter radii and an apparent brightness of approximately 10 rayleighs for a wavelength of 500 A. It is argued that neutral oxygen atoms, along with neutral hydrogen, are produced through dissociation of water ice on the surface of Europa by particle impact. Electron impact ionization excitation of oxygen atoms in the resulting cloud then gives rise to the observed emission. The present source brightness and cloud radius results are used to estimate an oxygen column density of the order of 10 trillion per sq cm, while the density of atomic hydrogen is at most 100 billion per sq cm and 1 trillion per sq cm for molecular hydrogen.

  2. Photon emission from translational energy in atomic collisions: A dynamic Casimir-Polder effect

    SciTech Connect

    Westlund, Per-Olof; Wennerstroem, H.

    2005-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using a Liouville formalism, that the relative motion of two atoms can result in the emission of photons and conversely that photons can be absorbed to excite the relative translational motion. The mechanism responsible for the energy transfer between the radiation field and the translational motion of the atoms is a dynamic version of the long-range Casimir-Polder interaction between two fixed atoms. The phenomenon is analogous to the dynamic Casimir effect discussed for moving macro- (or meso)scopic objects and we term it the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect. The absorption or emission is a two-photon process and we find that the transition probability is proportional to the spectral density of a correlation function involving the relative translational motion of two atoms. An energy transfer only occurs for photons with energies smaller than or of the same magnitude as the thermal energy. The effect provides a microscopic mechanism for establishing thermal equilibrium between the radiation field and a gas. A sufficiently large volume of gas would be perceived as a black-body radiator. Applications of the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect might be found in the microscopic description of the cosmic low-temperature black-body radiation.

  3. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  4. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  5. Two-photon-induced x-ray emission in neon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Carniato, Stephane; Simon, Marc; Taieeb, Richard

    2010-10-15

    We investigated the resonant x-ray emission from a neon atom induced by the two-photon population of a double-core-hole excited state. Two qualitatively different schemes of this process are studied: The first one involves an off-resonant intermediate single-core-hole state; the second scheme passes through a resonant core-ionized intermediate state. The numerical simulations of the resonant x-ray emission performed for different peak intensities and pulse durations show significant population of the double-core-hole final states. Therefore, rather strong two-photon absorption-induced x-ray emission is predicted for both studied schemes. Thus, high counting rates in experimental measurements are expected.

  6. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  7. Atom probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of semiconductor films on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1995-03-01

    The surface morphology and the electronic states of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir-and Mo-tips were investigated by a combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES). The overlayers were deposited on the tips while observing field emission microscope (FEM) images of the surfaces. The FEM images of thin Ge overlayers on the Ir-tips show layer-like structures. In field emission electron distribution (FEED) of a Ge overlayer on the Ir-tip, about 5 ML thick, an energy gap near the Fermi level was clearly widened by low temperature annealing. After the thickness was reduced to 3 ML by field evaporation, the energy gap still remained wide. The FEEDs of the Ge overlayers on the Mo-tips exhibit several peaks distinct from those on the Ir-tip. This may be attributed to the local strong electric field surrounding the Ge clusters formed on the Mo-tips.

  8. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  9. Evaluation of flow injection-solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of major elements in brines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Zheng, Hongtao; Belshaw, Nicholas Stanley; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the determination of major metal elements in high salinity brines was developed by solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) with flow injection analysis (FIA). The matrix interferences of major cations and anions in brines have been evaluated. It was found that high concentration of Na(+) and K(+) could interfere each other, K(+) at a concentration of 400mgL(-1) enhanced the signal intensity of Na(+) more than 20%. The effect of the anions was observed and it was noted that the signal intensity of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were suppressed significantly when the SO4(2-) reached 100mgL(-1). It was demonstrated that some low molecular weight organic substances such as formic acid, glycerol and ascorbic acid could eliminate interference of SO4(2-) even with volume percentages of 0.5%. Under the optimized condition, the proposed FIA-SCGD can determine K, Na, Ca and Mg with the limits of detection of 0.49 (K), 0.14 (Na), 11 (Ca) and 5.5 (Mg) ngmL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of 5 salt lake samples and compared with those obtained with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The advantages of small size, low energy consumption, good stability and repeatability indicated that the SCGD is promising for the determination of major ions in brine samples. PMID:27216688

  10. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-02-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g - 1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  11. Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran

    Hybrid quantum systems are promising candidates for opening new avenues for quantum technologies [G. Kurizki et. al, PNAS, 112 (13), 3866-3873 (2015)]. Hybrid atom-optomechanical (HAOM) systems set an intriguing example in this context. From the perspective of practical utilizations of these HAOM systems in future quantum devices, it is crucial to fully understand the excitation dynamics as well as the spectral features of these systems. In this poster, I'll present my calculations of single-photon time-dependent (TD) spectrum emitted by such a HAOM system in a strong atom-cavity as well as strong cavity-mechanics (strong-strong) coupling regime [``Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity'', Imran M. Mirza, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 32 (8), 1604-1614 (2015)]. In order to make the system more realistic the effects of dissipation through the mechanical oscillator, optical cavity and spontaneous emission from the two-level emitter are also incorporated. The TD spectrum reveals some novel features that are not possible to observe otherwise. For instance, time order in which different side bands appears which explains different photon-phonon interactions responsible for the production of distinct spectral resonances. .

  12. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  13. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  14. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.

    2012-01-10

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic database and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  15. A Complete Model Helium Atom: Theoretical Emissivities, the Case B Approximation, and the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. L.; Bauman, R. P.; MacAdam, K. B.; Ferland, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    We have completed the development of a new model helium atom for the spectra simulation code Cloudy. All relevant astrophysically significant processes are included, and the spectrum is solved self-consistently with the thermal and ionization structure of the simulated system. We present here an overview of the differences that distinguish our model from those by previous authors. We also compare predicted case B emissivities with those from previous works. The differences will have significant consequences for the interpretation of spectra of a wide variety of systems. We also explore deviations from the case B approximation and present an estimate of the primordial helium abundance.

  16. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-10-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  17. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  18. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  19. Determination of barium, strontium and nine minor and trace elements in impure barite and strontianite by inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry after dissolution in disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1991-10-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of barium, strontium, silicon and nine minor and trace elements of barite and strontianite associated with gangue materials. It involves dissolution of the sample by boiling under reflux with a concentrated solution of disodium ethylenedi-aminetetraacetate (EDTA-2Na) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide. Barite and strontianite dissolve quantitatively under this condition, and any associated silicate and sulphide mineral impurities, remaining insoluble, are filtered off and ignited to constant weight in a platinum crucible. Silica is determined gravimetrically by heating the residue with concentrated sulphuric and hydrofluoric acids, followed by ignition to oxides. The residue is fused with sodium bisulphate and dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid. After suitable dilution of the EDTA-2Na solution, Ba, Sr, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, La, Ni, V, Yb and Zn are determined by inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The bisulphate fusion product is separately analysed by ICP-AES, and the elements found are combined with those obtained from the EDTA-2Na solution. The replicate values of this work compare well with each other and with other values obtained by independent methods. PMID:18965264

  20. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  1. Determination of titanium atom and ion densities in sputter deposition plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, P.; Fekete, M.; Hnilica, J.; Klein, P.; Dosoudilová, L.; Dvořák, P.; Navrátil, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The thorough characterizations of deposition plasma lead to important achievements in the fundamental understanding of the deposition process, with a clear impact on the development of technology. Measurement of the spatial and, in the case of pulse excited plasma, also temporal evolution, of the concentrations of sputtered atoms and ions is a primary task in the diagnostics of any sputter deposition plasma. However, it is difficult to estimate absolute number densities of the sputtered species (atoms and ions) in ground states directly from optical emission spectroscopy, because the species in the ground levels do not produce any optical signal. A method using effective branching fractions enables us to determine the density of non-radiating species from the intensities of self-absorbed spectral lines. The branching fractions method described in the first part of this paper was applied to determine the ground state densities of the sputtered titanium atoms and ions. The method is based on fitting the theoretically calculated branching fractions to experimentally measured ratios of the relative intensities of carefully selected resonant titanium atomic and ionic lines. The sputtered species density is determined in our experimental setup with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% for the dc driven magnetron and typically 15% for time-resolved measurements of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge. In the second part of the paper, the method was applied to determine the evolution of titanium atom and ion densities in three typical cases ranging from the dc driven sputter process to HiPIMS.

  2. Measurement of Trace Metals in Tobacco and Cigarette Ash by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The ICP AES experiment reported here is suitable for use in a junior- or senior-level undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory. The objective of this experiment is to analyze trace metals present in cigarette tobacco, the cigarette filter, and the ash obtained when the cigarette is burned. Two different brands of cigarettes, one with and one without a filter, were used. The filter was analyzed before and after smoke was drawn through it. The trace metals were extracted using concentrated nitric acid at room temperature and at 100 °C respectively, to test the extraction efficiency. Some tobacco samples were spiked with ZnCl2 and FeCl3 to assess the efficiency of the recovery. Zinc and iron are shown to be present in tobacco, filter, and ash, while chromium was above the detection limit only in the ash. These metals are concentrated in the ash compared to the tobacco by factors of ˜4 (Zn), 12 17 (Fe), and ≥ 2 (Cr). If sufficient laboratory time is available, this experiment could be paired with one using atomic absorption (AA) to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of ICP when compared to AA.

  3. Carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; Mora, Juan; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the influence of carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions on the emission signal of 34 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, I, In, Ir, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pt, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Te, and Zn) in axially viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry has been investigated. To this end, atomic and ionic emission signals for diluted glycerol, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid solutions were registered and results were compared to those obtained for a 1% w w- 1 nitric acid solution. Experimental results show that the emission intensities of As, Se, and Te atomic lines are enhanced by charge transfer from carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ions. Iodine and P atomic emission is enhanced by carbon- and sulfur-based charge transfer whereas the Hg atomic emission signal is enhanced only by carbon. Though signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions is also expected for ionic emission lines of the above-mentioned elements, no experimental evidence has been found with the exception of Hg ionic lines operating carbon solutions. The effect of carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus charge transfer reactions on atomic emission depends on (i) wavelength characteristics. In general, signal enhancement is more pronounced for electronic transitions involving the highest upper energy levels; (ii) plasma experimental conditions. The use of robust conditions (i.e. high r.f. power and lower nebulizer gas flow rates) improves carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ionization in the plasma and, hence, signal enhancement; and (iii) the presence of other concomitants (e.g. K or Ca). Easily ionizable elements reduce ionization in the plasma and consequently reduce signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions.

  4. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  5. Plants as biomarkers for monitoring heavy metal contaminants on landfill sites using sequential extraction and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES).

    PubMed

    Murphy, A P; Coudert, M; Barker, J

    2000-12-01

    There have been a number of studies investigating metal uptake in plants on contaminated landfill sites, but little on their role as biomarkers to identify metal mobility for continuous monitoring purposes. Vegetation can be used as a biomonitor of site pollution, by identifying the mobilisation of heavy metals and by providing an understanding of their bioavailability. Plants selected were the common nettle (Uritica Dioica), bramble (Rubus Fruticosa) and sycamore (Acer Pseudoplatanus). A study of the soil fractionation was made to investigate the soil properties that are likely to influence metal mobility and a correlation exercise was undertaken to investigate if variations in concentration of metals in vegetation can reflect variations in concentration of the metals in soil. The soil was digested using aqua regia in a microwave closed vessel. The vegetation was digested using both microwave and a hydrogen peroxide-nitric acid mixture, refluxed on a heating block and a comparison made. The certified reference materials (CRMs) used were Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1547, peach leaves for vegetation (NIST) and for soil CRM 143R, sewage sludge-amended soil (BCR). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2-6% for the analyses. Our findings show evidence of phytoextraction by some plants, (especially bramble and nettle), with certain plants, (sycamore) exhibiting signs of phytostabilisation. The evidence suggests that there is a degree of selectivity in metal uptake and partitioning within the plant compartments. It was also possible to correlate mobility phases of certain metals (Pb, Cu and Zn) using the soil and plant record. Zn and Cu exhibited the greatest potential to migrate from the roots to the leaves, with Pb found principally in the roots of ground vegetation. Our results suggest that analysis of bramble leaves, nettle leaves and roots can be used to monitor the mobility of Pb in the soil with nettle, bramble and sycamore leaves to monitor Cu and Zn. PMID:11296751

  6. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  7. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  8. Determination of trace elements in uranium by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry using Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, E.H. van; de Loos-Vollebregt, T.C. de; Wassink, A.P.; Kalter, H.

    1992-08-01

    Trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride were analyzed by ICP-AES. The data were reduced using a Kalman filtering technique. Normally, multiple extraction steps are required for this analysis using conventional ICP-AES.

  9. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  10. Gross boron determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.F.; Johnson, D.A.; Steele, S.M.; Messick, K.; Miller, D.L.; Propp, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the analysis of boron in biological samples including urine, blood plasma, and tissues with subsequent boron determinations by ICP-AES. A comparison will be made between results obtained by this method and by the prompt-gamma technique on the same samples. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of fast noble gas atoms from an Al(1 1 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S.; Winter, H.; Winter, HP.

    2007-05-01

    Electron loss and electron emission for grazing impact of noble gas atoms with energies in the keV domain are investigated via time-of-flight spectra recorded in coincidence with the number of emitted electrons. The data is analyzed in terms of computer simulations concerning the interaction of the fast atoms with the electron gas in the selvedge of the Al(1 1 1) surface. The interaction is approximated by binary collisions of the fast atoms with Fermi electrons of the conduction band and differential cross sections obtained for electron scattering from free atoms. For an effective number of collisions of about 50 the energy loss spectra are fairly well reproduced by our calculations. We show that for our conditions the shift of the energy spectra for the emission of an additional electron from the surface is close to the work function of the target.

  12. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, A. A.; Qamar, Sajid; Atta, M. A.

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ( μg/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of ten of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) have been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD B) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision.

  13. Atom-probe and field emission electron spectroscope studies of Ge on Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1993-04-01

    The combination of an atom-probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES) was employed to investigate the electronic structure of Ge layers on an Ir substrate. Germanium forms a thin film with a fairly uniform thickness, possibly owing to a small activation energy for diffusion on Ir or the lattice matching between Ge and Ir. The FEES spectrum obtained from Ge layers thicker than 8-9 ML exhibits a semiconductive energy gap and a peak at 0.7 eV below the Fermi level as for Si on Mo. However, the minimum layer thickness to exhibit the semiconductive spectrum profile is significantly thicker than that for Si on Mo. The observed difference could be attributed to the layer structure of the deposited Ge and to the narrower energy gap of Ge than that of Si.

  14. Environmental Indicators of Metal Pollution and Emission: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, John A.; Nocito, Brian A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.; Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment enlightens students on the use of environmental indicators and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and demonstrates the ability of these monitoring tools to measure metal deposition in environmental samples (both as a result of lab-simulated and real events). In this two-part study, the initial…

  15. Transport of laser emission with broadband spectrum in optically dense atomic medium under the coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.; Popov, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents a theory describing the formation of the coherent population trapping resonance for the finite laser bandwidth in an optically-dense medium of atoms inside a buffer gas cell. The equations of the atomic density matrix are established, as well as the transfer equations of laser emission spectrum inside a cell with working and buffer gas at a determined temperature. The dependence of the quality of the coherent population trapping resonance on the laser bandwidth has been studied in the case of detecting the signal of the transmitted emission and the fluorescence signal.

  16. Separation and preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of beryllium in water samples using mixed micelle-mediated extraction and determination by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beiraghi, Assadollah; Babaee, Saeed

    2008-01-28

    In the present study a cloud point extraction process using mixed micelle of the cationic surfactant cetyl-pyridinium chloride (CPC) and non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 for extraction of beryllium from aqueous solutions is developed. The extraction of analyte from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 1,8-dihydroxyanthrone as chelating agent in buffer media of pH 9.5. After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 0.4mL of a 60:40 methanol-water mixture containing 0.03 mL HNO(3). Then, the enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The different variables affecting the complexation and extraction conditions were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. 1.6 x 10(-4) molL(-1) 1,8-dihydroxyanthrone, 1.2 x 10(-4) molL(-1) CPC, 0.15% (v/v) Triton X-114, 50 degrees C equilibrium temperature) the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.006-80 ngmL(-1) with detection limit of 0.001 ngmL(-1) and the precision (R.S.D.%) for five replicate determinations at 18 ngmL(-1) of Be(II) was better than 2.9%. In this manner the preconcentration and enrichment factors were 16.7 and 24.8, respectively. Under the presence of foreign ions no significant interference was observed. Finally, the proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of this cation in water samples. PMID:18190807

  17. Air pollution studies using PIXE and ICP methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stihi, Claudia; Bancuta, Anca; Popescu, I. V.; Virgolici, M.; Cimpoca, V.; Gugiu, M.; Vlaicu, Gh

    2006-05-01

    In the present work the moss biomonitoring technique and the combination of two analytical techniques - Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) [3] and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) [4] - were applied for assessing environmental situation from the point of view of air polluting along the transect from north to south of the Dambovita County. PIXE analysis at the Tandem Accelerator FN-8 of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics - Horia Hulubei of Magurele, Bucharest, allowed determination of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd and Pb in samples. ICP analyses were made using a Baird ICP2070 - Sequential Plasma Spectrometer in Targoviste and we determined in samples the concentration of Li, B, Na, and Mg together with Cd and Pb. The obtained results will permit to determine the regional extent of heavy metals and toxic elements atmospheric pollution and to identify specially affected areas and local sources of

  18. Application of ICP-SFMS, ICP-AES integrate method to the geochemical characterization of ANDRILL-MIS oceanic sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugi, F.; Castellano, E.; Marino, F.; Ghedini, C.; Severi, M.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2009-12-01

    An integrated system for the determination of 39 major and trace (including Rare Earths Elements -REE) metals in soils and marine sediments was set up by using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrophotometry (ICP - AES) devices, in order to achieve an extensive geochemical characterization. Major elements, in particular silicon, are also quantified with PIXE technique. Method selectivity, accuracy and reproducibility was evaluated analyzing six certified materials: Basalt, Hawaiian Volcanic Observatory (BHVO-1); Japanese Andesite (JA-2); Montana Soil (NIST 2711); Antarctic Sediment (CRM-MURST-ISS-A1); Antarctic Sediment (GBW 073113) e Antarctic Sediment (NIST 2702); after mineralization with fluoridric, nitric and perchloric acids on hot plate. The choice of the isotope (ICP-SFMS) or wavelength (ICP-AES) was addressed obtaining the best compromise between high sensitivity and suitable selectivity for the metal determination. Particular care was paid in optimizing analytical quantification of each species, because of the huge difference in concentration of major and trace elements in geological samples. For ICP-SFMS, high resolution (10,000 m/Δm) was selected for all metals to avoid isobaric interferences. An accurate blank evaluation was carried out, especially for metals present at sub-ppb levels in the extract solutions (REE and other trace elements). The obtained operative blank values included sample manipulation and digestion, reagent content and analytical procedures. ICP-SFMS and ICP-AES methods were applied to the characterization of the geochemical composition of sample from the first 90 m of Mc Murdo Ice Shelf (MIS) marine core, in the framework of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic DRILLing) Project. This international project aims to study the role of the Antarctic Continent within the global climatic system, by the recovery and analysis of two deep sediment cores (named MIS

  19. [A genetic algorithm approach to qualitative analysis in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Bin; Liu, Ke-ling; Li, Zhi-min; Wang, Yue-song; Huang, Tu-jiang

    2002-06-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) is used in automatic qualitative analysis by a sequential inductively coupled plasma spectrometer (ICP-AES) and a computer program is developed in this paper. No any standard samples are needed, and spectroscopic interferences can be eliminated. All elements and their concentration ranges of an unknown sample can be reported. The replication rate Pr, crossover rate Pc, and mutation rate of the genetic algorithm were adjusted to be 0.6, 0.4 and 0 respectively. The analytical results of GA are in good agreement with the reference values. It indicates that, combined with the intensity information, the GA can be applied to spectroscopic qualitative analysis and expected to become an effective method in qualitative analysis in ICP-AES after further work. PMID:12938334

  20. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN, ORGANOLEAD, AND ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a continuing evaluation of new analytical and sample preparation techniques conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the use of capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the simultaneous determination of organotin, organ...

  1. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  2. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  3. ICP OES and CV AAS in determination of mercury in an unusual fatal case of long-term exposure to elemental mercury in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa

    2014-04-01

    In this work, a case of deliberate self-poisoning is presented. A 14-year-old girl suddenly died during one of the several hospitalizations. Abdominal computer tomography showed a large number of metallic particles in the large intestine. Analysis of blood and internal organs for mercury and other toxic metals carried out by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) revealed high concentrations of mercury in kidneys and liver (64,200 and 2470ng/g, respectively), less in stomach (90ng/g), and none in blood. Using cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS), high levels of mercury were confirmed in all examined materials, including blood (87ng/g), and additionally in hair. The results of analysis obtained by two techniques revealed that the exposure to mercury was considerable (some time later, it was stated that the mercury originated from thermometers that had been broken over the course of about 1 year, because of Münchausen syndrome). CV AAS is a more sensitive technique, particularly for blood samples (negative results using ICP OES), and tissue samples - with LOQ: 0.63ng/g of Hg (CV AAS) vis-à-vis 70ng/g of Hg (ICP OES). However, ICP OES may be used as a screening technique for autopsy material in acute poisoning by a heavy metal, even one as volatile as mercury. PMID:24630410

  4. Infrared laser ablation study of pressed soil pellets with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mikolás, J; Musil, P; Stuchliková, V; Novotný, K; Otruba, V; Kanický, V

    2002-09-01

    Potential of infrared laser ablation (LA) coupled with ICP-AES as a technique suitable for the determination of trace elements (Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and V) in agricultural soils was studied. Operating parameters such as laser beam energy, laser beam focusing with respect to the sample surface, and velocity of the sample translation in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam were optimized. Soil samples were mixed with powdered Ag as a binder, and an internal standard (GeO(2)), and pressed into pellets. Calibration samples were prepared by adding known amounts of oxides of elements of interest into soils of known elemental composition and then processed in the same way as the analyzed samples. Calibration curves were found to be linear at least up to several hundreds of mg kg(-1) for the elements of interest. The elemental contents obtained by using LA-ICP-AES were compared with those obtained by analysis using wet chemistry followed by ICP-AES with pneumatic nebulization (PN). The results were in good agreement. Accuracy was also tested using certified reference soils with a bias not exceeding 10% relative. PMID:12324844

  5. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-coupled three-level{Lambda}-type atom in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X. Q.; Zhang, B.; Sun, X. D.; Lu, Z. W.

    2011-05-15

    The spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level {Lambda}-type atom driven by a microwave field was studied. For the two transitions coupled to the same modified reservoir, we discussed the influence of photonic band gap and Rabi frequency of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. The emission spectrum is given for different locations of the upper band-edge frequency. With the transition frequencies moving from outside the band gap to inside, the number of peaks decreases in the emission spectrum and the multipeak structure of spectral line is finally replaced by a strong non-Lorentzian shape. With increase of the Rabi frequency of the microwave field, we find the spectral line changes from a multipeak structure to a two-peak structure, originating from the inhibition of spontaneous emission for the corresponding decay channel.

  6. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  7. Practicality of Using Oxygen Atom Emissions to Evaluate the Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been proposed [Akasofu, 1999] that observation of the O(1S - 1D) green line from the atmospheres of extra-solar planets might be a marker for habitability. Guidance on this question is available within our own solar system. The green line is a dominant feature in the visible terrestrial nightglow, and the ultimate origin of its mesospheric emission is the three-body recombination of oxygen atoms. Until recently, it was believed that the green line was not a feature of the nightglows of the CO2 planets, Venus and Mars. It is now known that Venus at times shows green line emission with an intensity equal to terrestrial values [Slanger et al., 2001]. Furthermore, the intensity is quite variable, as is true for the much stronger O2( a-X) 1.27 μ emission. Recent observations of the Mars nightglow [Bertaux et al., 2005] give ambiguous results in the region of the O(1S-3P) line at 297.2 nm, but the same line in the dayglow is very strong, as evidenced in earlier Mariner results [Barth et al., 1971], and from the recent Mars Express data [F. Leblanc, private communication]. The O(1D-3P) 630 nm red line is a feature associated with Io, where dissociation of SO2 is a presumed source [Scherb et al., 1998]. Thus, observation of the oxygen green/red lines in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets provides insufficient information to reach conclusions about a habitable environment. Such detection would only indicate that there are oxygen-containing molecules present. Determination of an O2 column depth, by Fraunhofer A-band absorption, would be much more conclusive. Akasofu, S.-I., EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 80, 397, 1999. Barth, C.A., C.W. Hord, J.B. Pearce, K.K. Kelly, G.P. Anderson, and A.I. Stewart, Mariner 6 and 7 Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment: Upper Atmosphere Data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 2213-2227, 1971. Bertaux, J.-L., F. Leblanc, S. Perrier, E. Quemerais, O. Korablev, E. Dimarellis, A. Reberac, F. Forget, P

  8. Investigations of the use of inductively coupled plasma emissions for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, D. R.

    Investigations of applications of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) for analytical atomic emission spectroscopy are performed. Emissions below 185 nm, analysis of wear metals in lubricating oils, and use of the ICP as a selective detector for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are studied. A unique plasma coolant tube containing a side arm which allows direct observation of the discharge is used to investigate emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region between 120 and 185 nm. Emission from elements which do not emit radiation in the visible region are observed. A heated sample introduction system attached to a Babington nebulizer is investigated as a means to aerosolize lubricating oils for introduction into the ICP. This allows direct analysis of wear metals in oil samples without requiring the usual sample dilutions. The ICP is used as a selective detector for HPLC. Nucleotides separated by anion exchange chromatography are determined in the ICP by observing phosphorous emissions. Methanol and acetonitrile used for reverse phase HPLC are successfully run in the IPC.

  9. ICP-AES Determination of Mineral Content in Boletus tomentipes Collected from Different Sites of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-mei; Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Li, Jie-qing; Wang, Yuan-zhong; Liu, Hong-gao

    2015-05-01

    P, Na, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Zn, As, Cd, Co, Cr and Ni, contents have been examined in caps and stipes of Boletus tomentipes collected from different sites of Yunnan province, southwest China. The elements were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) with microwave digestion. P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Cu were the most abundant amongst elements determined in Boletus tomentipes. The caps were richer in P, Mg, Zn and Cd, and the stipes in Ca, Co and Ni. Cluster analysis showed a difference between Puer (BT7 and BT8) and other places. The PCA explained about 77% of the total variance, and the minerals differentiating these places were P (PC1) together with Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, As and Ni, Na (PC2) together with Cd, and Zn (PC3). The results of this study imply that element concentrations of a mushroom are mutative when collected from the different bedrock soil geochemistry. PMID:26415467

  10. Evaluation of inorganic elements in cat's claw teas using ICP OES and GF AAS.

    PubMed

    Pereira, João B; Dantas, Kelly G F

    2016-04-01

    The determination of Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, P, Pb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES), and Se by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS), has been carried out in dry matter and teas from 11 samples of the cat's claw plant. The accuracy and precision values were verified against GBW 07604 (Poplar leaves) certified reference material and by the recovery test. Results showed a high content of Ca in the medicinal plant studied, followed by Mg and P. The values obtained showed that the elements studied have different concentrations depending on the method of tea preparation. The highest levels were observed in Ca and Mg, and the lowest for Se and Pb, by both infusion and decoction. Teas prepared from this plant were found to be at safe levels for human consumption, and may be suitable as sources of these elements in the human diet. PMID:26593498

  11. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of uranium by ICP-AES technique

    SciTech Connect

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Nadraswala, K.H.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mallapurkar, V.S.; Joshi, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    An atomic emission spectrometric method based on the use of Inductively coupled argon plasma source has been developed for the determination of ultra trace concentrations of uranium in aqueous solutions. Using the optimized experimental conditions for the ICP source, uranium can be determined at 0.05 ..mu..g/ml concentration in 0.3M HNO/sub 3/ solutions with either of the two analytical lines viz. 3859.6 A/sup 0/ or 4090.1 A/sup 0/. The precision of determinations at the lowest detection limit is better than 2% R.S.D. The uranium estimation has been corrected for the interference due to the presence of eighteen metallic elements using an inter-element correction procedure. A number of spiked samples and NBL reference samples with concomitant impurities have been analysed using the standardised procedure and good agreement has been observed with their certified values.

  12. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  13. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26304350

  14. Revisiting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnesium with online inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shkirskiy, Viacheslav; King, Andrew D; Gharbi, Oumaïma; Volovitch, Polina; Scully, John R; Ogle, Kevin; Birbilis, Nick

    2015-02-23

    The electrochemical impedance of reactive metals such as magnesium is often complicated by an obvious inductive loop with decreasing frequency of the AC polarising signal. The characterisation and ensuing explanation of this phenomenon has been lacking in the literature to date, being either ignored or speculated. Herein, we couple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with online atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC) to simultaneously measure Mg-ion concentration and electrochemical impedance spectra during Mg corrosion, in real time. It is revealed that Mg dissolution occurs via Mg(2+) , and that corrosion is activated, as measured by AC frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz approaching DC conditions. The result of this is a higher rate of Mg(2+) dissolution, as the voltage excitation becomes slow enough to enable all Mg(2+) -enabling processes to adjust in real time. The manifestation of this in EIS data is an inductive loop. The rationalisation of such EIS behaviour, as it relates to Mg, is revealed for the first time by using concurrent AESEC. PMID:25425247

  15. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  16. The calibration of XRF polyethylene reference materials with k0-NAA and ICP-AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swagten, Josefien; Bossus, Daniël; Vanwersch, Hanny

    2006-08-01

    Due to the lack of commercially available polyethylene reference materials for the calibration of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (XRF), DSM Resolve, in cooperation with PANalytical, prepared and calibrated such a set of standards in 2005. The reference materials were prepared based on the addition of additives to virgin polyethylene. The mentioned additives are added to improve the performance of the polymers. The elements present in additives are tracers for the used additives. The reference materials contain the following elements: F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti and Zn in the concentration range of 5 mg/kg for Ti, up to 600 mg/kg for Mg. The calibration of the reference materials, including a blank, was performed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Neutron Activation Analysis ( k0-NAA). ICP-AES was used to determine the elements Na, Mg, Al, P, Ca, Ti and Zn whereas k0-NAA was used for F, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Ti and Zn. Over the complete concentration range, a good agreement of the results was found between the both techniques. This project has shown that within DSM Resolve, it is possible to develop and to calibrate homogenous reference materials for XRF.

  17. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: spatial distributions of emissions.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Z Lj; Phelps, A V

    2009-07-01

    Spatial distributions of H alpha , H beta , and the near-uv continuum emission from the H2 a ;{3}Sigma g;+ state are measured and compared with a model for low-current electrical discharges in H2 at high E/N and low Nd , where E is the spatially uniform electric field, N is the gas density, and d is the electrode separation. Data are analyzed for 300 Tdatoms and molecules with mean energies from 5 to 1500 eV. Electron-induced emission, dominant at low E/N and low pressures, is distinguished by its buildup toward the anode. Excitation of H alpha by fast H atoms dominates at high E/N and increases toward the cathode. The observed H alpha emission at low E/N is normalized to previous experiments to yield absolute experimental excitation coefficients for all E/N and Nd . Small adjustments of model parameters yield good agreement with H alpha data. Cross sections are derived for excitation of the H2 near-uv continuum by H atoms. Spatial and pressure dependencies of H alpha and H2 near-uv emissions agree well with a model in which reactions of H2+ , H3+ , and H+ ions with H2 lead to fast H atoms and H2 molecules, which then excite H atoms or H2 molecules. PMID:19658824

  18. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: Spatial distributions of emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj.; Phelps, A. V.

    2009-07-01

    Spatial distributions of Hα , Hβ , and the near-uv continuum emission from the H2 aΣ3g+ state are measured and compared with a model for low-current electrical discharges in H2 at high E/N and low Nd , where E is the spatially uniform electric field, N is the gas density, and d is the electrode separation. Data are analyzed for 300Tdatoms and molecules with mean energies from 5 to 1500 eV. Electron-induced emission, dominant at low E/N and low pressures, is distinguished by its buildup toward the anode. Excitation of Hα by fast H atoms dominates at high E/N and increases toward the cathode. The observed Hα emission at low E/N is normalized to previous experiments to yield absolute experimental excitation coefficients for all E/N and Nd . Small adjustments of model parameters yield good agreement with Hα data. Cross sections are derived for excitation of the H2 near-uv continuum by H atoms. Spatial and pressure dependencies of Hα and H2 near-uv emissions agree well with a model in which reactions of H2+ , H3+ , and H+ ions with H2 lead to fast H atoms and H2 molecules, which then excite H atoms or H2 molecules.

  19. Combustor exhaust emissions with air-atomizing splash-groove fuel injectors burning Jet A and Diesel number 2 fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Air-atomizing, splash-groove injectors were shown to improve primary-zone fuel spreading and reduce combustor exhaust emissions for Jet A and diesel number 2 fuels. With Jet A fuel large-orifice, splash-groove injectors the oxides-of-nitrogen emission index was reduced, but emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, or smoke were unaffected. Small-orifice, splash-groove injectors did not reduce oxides of nitrogen, but reduced the smoke number and carbon monoxide and unburned-hydrocarbon emission indices. With diesel number 2 fuel, the small-orifice, splash-groove injectors reduced oxides of nitrogen by 19 percent, smoke number by 28 percent, carbon monoxide by 75 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. Combustor blowout limits were similar for diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels.

  20. Excitation of O(1D) atoms in aurorae and emission of the forbidden OI 6300-A line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Roble, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The electron aurora leads to six processes capable of exciting the O(1D2) metastable state of the atomic-oxygen ground-state configuration, the parent state of the 6300-A red line. Altitude profiles of the volume emission rate resulting from each process are computed for Maxwellian electron spectra with characteristic energies between 0.1 and 2.0 keV. Since each process peaks at a different altitude, the sum or total volume emission rate extends over a wide altitude range. Measurements of 6300-A emission obtained by rocket and satellite-borne instruments are summarized, and it is shown that the chemical reaction of N(2D) with O2 is the major source of O(1D) atoms in the electron aurora. New calculations of the 6300-A:4728-A column emission-rate ratio are presented for a range of characteristic energies in an assumed Maxwellian electron spectrum. An approximate equation for the red-line emission per unit energy input is given as a function of electron-spectrum characteristic energy.

  1. Direct solid analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hardmetal precursors by laser-induced argon spark ablation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Kanický, Viktor; Mermet, Jean-Michel; Otruba, Vítezslav

    2003-12-01

    The potential of the laser-induced argon spark atomizer (LINA-Spark atomizer) coupled with ICP-AES as a convenient device for direct analysis of WC/Co powdered precursors of sintered hardmetals was studied. The samples were presented for the ablation as pressed pellets prepared by mixing with powdered silver binder containing GeO2 as internal standard. The pellets were ablated with the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) focused 16 mm behind the target surface with a resulting estimated power density of 5 GW cm(-2). Laser ablation ICP-AES signals were studied as a function of ablation time, and the duration of time prior to measurement (pre-ablation time) which was necessary to obtain reliable results was about 40 s. Linear calibration plots were obtained up to 10% (m/m) Ti, 9% Ta and 3.5% Nb both without internal standardization and by using germanium as an added internal standard or tungsten as a contained internal standard. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 6% to +/- 11% for Nb, Ta and Ti both with and without internal standardisation by Ge. A higher spread of points about the regression was observed for cobalt for which the relative uncertainty at the centroid was in the range from +/- 9% to +/- 14%. Repeatability of results was improved by the use of both Ge and W internal standards. The lowest determinable quantities calculated for calibration plots were 0.060% Co, 0.010% Nb, 0.16% Ta and 0.030% Ti with internal standardization by Ge. The LA-ICP-AES analyses of real samples led to good agreement with the results obtained by solution-based ICP determination with a relative bias not exceeding 10%. The elimination of the dissolution procedure of powdered tungsten (Nb, Ta, Ti) carbide is the principal advantage of the developed LA-ICP-AES method. PMID:14564441

  2. Identifying student and teacher difficulties in interpreting atomic spectra using a quantum model of emission and absorption of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two questionnaires, one for teachers and the other for students. By analyzing the responses, we conclude that (i) teachers lack a quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation capable of explaining the spectra, (ii) teachers and students share the same difficulties, and (iii) these difficulties concern the model of the atom, the model of radiation, and the model of the interaction between them.

  3. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  4. Atomizing characteristics of swirl can combustor modules with swirl blast fuel injectors. [in terms of NOX emission rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Cold flow atomization tests of several different designs of swirl can combustor modules were conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter duct at airflow rates (per unit area) of 7.3 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec and water flow rates of 6.3 to 18.9 g/sec. The effect of air and water flow rates on the mean drop size of water sprays produced with the swirl blast fuel injectors were determined. Also, from these data it was possible to determine the effect of design modifications on the atomizing performance of various fuel injector and air swirler configurations. The trend in atomizing performance, as based on the mean drop size, was then compared with the trends in the production of nitrogen oxides obtained in combustion studues with the same swirl can combustors. It was found that the fuel injector design that gave the best combustor performance in terms of a low NOx emission index also gave the best atomizing performance as characterized by a spray of relatively small mean drop diameter. It was also demonstrated that at constant inlet air stream momentum the nitrogen oxides emission index was found to vary inversely with the square of the mean drop diameter of the spray produced by the different swirl blast fuel injectors. Test conditions were inlet air static pressures of 100,000 to 200,000 N/sq m at an inlet air temperature of 293 K.

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  6. Zeeman effects in the hyperfine structure of atomic iodine photodissociation laser emission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of hyperfine structure in laser emission from CF3I and C2F5I photodissociation lasers. Constant magnetic fields affect the time behavior of the emission by changing the relative gains of the hyperfine transitions. Time-varying fields usually present in photodissociation lasers further complicate the emission.

  7. The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Ludmila; Leonovich, Vitaly; Tashchilin, Anatoly

    The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure was revealed at mid-latitudes. The paper presents the study results of the dependence of the observed emissions intensity from the sudden variations in the solar wind and the geomagnetic field. These results show a relationship of the emissions disturbance amplitude with the solar wind speed, as well as with the geomagnetic field variations. We used the zenith photometer optical data, the geomagnetic field and the total electron content variations obtained for the Eastern Siberia region (52(°) N, 103(°) E). The investigation was supported by the RFFI grants № 12-05-00024-а, № 13-05-00733.

  8. Determination of traces of As, B, Bi, Ga, Ge, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si and Te in high-purity nickel using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Thangavel, S; Dash, K; Dhavile, S M; Sahayam, A C

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of traces of arsenic, boron, bismuth, gallium, germanium, phosphorus, lead, antimony, selenium, silicon and tellurium in nickel matrix. The sample was dissolved in HClO4 (~ 150°C) and nickel was settled as crystalline nickelperchlorate [Ni(ClO4)2] on cooling. The mixture was ultrasonicated and after the separation of Ni(ClO4)2, analytes of interest were determined in the supernatant using ICP-OES. Similarly, it was also found that, after the dissolution of nickel in perchloric acid, when the solution temperature was maintained at ~ 100°C, long needle like crystals of nickel perchlorate were formed. The crystals were separated from the mixture and trace elements in the supernatant were determined using ICP-OES. In both methods the matrix removal was >99% and the recoveries of analytes were in the range 92-97%. The limits of detection for As, B, Bi, Ga, Ge, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si and Te were found to be 0.18, 0.21, 0.07, 0.06, 0.25, 0.11, 0.09, 0.10, 0.17, 0.20 and 0.07 μg g(-1) respectively. The procedure was applied for the analysis of a standard reference material nickel oxide (SRM 761, Nickel Oxide No.1, NBS, USA) and the values obtained are in close agreement with the certified values. PMID:25281133

  9. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis of monomethylmercury.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, René Bernard; Breidenbach, Rembert; Epema, Onno Jacob

    2007-12-01

    Optimum conditions for headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) in the analysis of monomethylmercury (MeHg) have been determined. Sodium tetra(n-)propylborate (NaBPr(4)) is used as derivatization reagent to promote volatility. A simple aluminium bar was used to cool the SPME fiber to about 2 degrees C during the equilibration phase just before extraction. HS-SPME was performed using different fibers. The 100 microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fibers showed the best results. Although the extraction efficiency for MeHg derivative of the polydimethylsiloxane-Carboxen (PDMS-CAR) fiber is similar to the other fibers, desorption of MeHg derivative from a PDMS-CAR fiber is poor. Factors affecting the HS-SPME process such as adsorption and desorption times, ionic strength (salting-out) and extraction temperature have been evaluated and optimized thoroughly. The highest extraction efficiency for the PDMS fiber was obtained by extraction at a low temperature (2 degrees C) immediately after equilibration at 30 degrees C. With the PDMS-DVB and PDMS-CAR fiber improvement of extraction efficiency at lower temperatures is negligible. Repeated extraction out of the same vial revealed that about 30% of MeHg derivative is extracted from the headspace with a PDMS fiber at 2 degrees C and about 70% with a PDMS-DVB fiber. Repeated extraction with two different fiber coatings showed that the PDMS-CAR fiber also extracts about 70% but that the desorption is incomplete. Attempts to improve the desorption failed due to degradation of the MeHg derivate at high injection temperatures. The limit of detection (3sigma) was 16 pg/L MeHg. The relative standard deviation (n = 8) for 100 pg/L of MeHg was found to be 5%. Linearity of the HS-SPME-GC-atomic emission detection method was established over at least two orders of magnitude in the range 0-2000 pg/L. Recovery of a surface water sample spiked at 2 ng/L was 85%. The

  10. Physical interaction between the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early regulatory proteins ICP0 and ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, F; Schaffer, P A

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein ICP0 enhances expression of a spectrum of viral genes alone and synergistically with ICP4. To test whether ICP0 and ICP4 interact physically, we performed far-Western blotting analysis of proteins from mock-, wild-type-, and ICP4 mutant virus-infected cells with in vitro-synthesized [35S]Met-labeled ICP0 and ICP4 as probes. The ICP4 and ICP0 polypeptides synthesized in vitro exhibited molecular weights similar to those of their counterparts in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells, and the in vitro-synthesized ICP4 was able to bind to a probe containing the ICP4 consensus binding site. Far-Western blotting experiments demonstrated that ICP0 interacts directly and specifically with ICP4 and with itself. To further define the interaction between ICP0 and ICP4, we generated a set of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-ICP0 fusion proteins that contain GST and either ICP0 N-terminal amino acids 1 to 244 or 1 to 394 or C-terminal amino acids 395 to 616 or 395 to 775. Using GST-ICP0 fusion protein affinity chromatography and in vitro-synthesized [35S]Met-labeled ICP0 and ICP4, ICP4 was shown to interact preferentially with the fusion protein containing ICP0 C-terminal amino acids 395 to 775, whereas ICP0 interacted efficiently with both the N-terminal GST-ICP0 fusion proteins and the C-terminal GST-ICP0 fusion proteins containing amino acids 395 to 775. Fusion protein affinity chromatography also demonstrated that the C-terminal 235 amino acid residues of ICP4 are important for efficient interaction with ICP0. Collectively, these results reveal a direct and specific physical interaction between ICP0 and ICP4. Images PMID:7966607

  11. Automated detection and interpretation of spectral information using cross-correlation, millilitre volumes, pneumatic nebulization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry with photodiode array detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanassios, V.; Drouin, P. J.; Spiers, G. A.

    1998-08-01

    A method for automated detection and interpretation of spectral information from ˜230 nm spectral windows, millilitre volume samples for 15 elements is presented. The basic approach involves cross-correlation of a spectral pattern obtained by running laboratory prepared multi-element `unknowns' with a reference spectral pattern obtained by running a single element standard. From the resultant cross-correlogram, it can be decided whether or not the sought-for reference spectral pattern (and the corresponding element) are present in the unknown. Spectral patterns were acquired using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system equipped with a linear, 1024-element, photo-diode array (Leco, Plasmarray). Reference spectral patterns for Al, Au, Be, Cd, Cu, Ga, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pd, Si, Sc, Y, Sr and Zn were converted to noise-free and interference-free binary software masks and, subsequently, to analogue software masks. Cross-correlation of the analogue masks with spectral patterns acquired by running multi-element unknowns is discussed, an algorithm that does not rely on fast Fourier transforms (FFT) to calculate cross-correlations is presented and a context-sensitive, colour-coded and interrogatable periodic table graphical user-interface that presents the likely composition of an unknown on the computer screen is described in detail.

  12. A novel methodology for rapid digestion of rare earth element ores and determination by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and dynamic reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helmeczi, Erick; Wang, Yong; Brindle, Ian D

    2016-11-01

    Short-wavelength infrared radiation has been successfully applied to accelerate the acid digestion of refractory rare-earth ore samples. Determinations were achieved with microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) and dynamic reaction cell - inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS). The digestion method developed was able to tackle high iron-oxide and silicate matrices using only phosphoric acid in a time frame of only 8min, and did not require perchloric or hydrofluoric acid. Additionally, excellent recoveries and reproducibilities of the rare earth elements, as well as uranium and thorium, were achieved. Digestions of the certified reference materials OREAS-465 and REE-1, with radically different mineralogies, delivered results that mirror those obtained by fusion processes. For the rare-earth CRM OKA-2, whose REE data are provisional, experimental data for the rare-earth elements were generally higher than the provisional values, often exceeding z-values of +2. Determined values for Th and U in this reference material, for which certified values are available, were in excellent agreement. PMID:27591646

  13. Collection of trace evidence of explosive residues from the skin in a death due to a disguised letter bomb. The synergy between confocal laser scanning microscope and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analyses.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Baroni, Davide; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2010-04-15

    In most deaths caused by explosive, the victim's body becomes a depot for fragments of explosive materials, so contributing to the collection of trace evidence which may provide clues about the specific type of device used with explosion. Improvised explosive devices are used which contain "homemade" explosives rather than high explosives because of the relative ease with which such components can be procured. Many methods such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, stereomicroscopy, capillary electrophoresis are available for use in the identification of explosive residues on objects and bomb fragments. Identification and reconstruction of the distribution of explosive residues on the decedent's body may give additional hints in assessing the position of the victim in relation to the device. Traditionally these residues are retrieved by swabbing the body and clothing during the early phase, at autopsy. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and other analytical methods may be used to analyze the material swabbed from the victim body. The histological examination of explosive residues on skin samples collected during the autopsy may reveal significant details. The information about type, quantity and particularly about anatomical distribution of explosive residues obtained utilizing confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) together with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), may provide very significant evidence in the clarification and reconstruction of the explosive-related events. PMID:20047806

  14. Characterization of helium/argon working gas systems in a radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission source. Part I: Optical emission, sputtering and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Steven J.; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Belkin, Mikhail; Caruso, Joseph A.

    1998-08-01

    Studies are performed to determine the influence of discharge gas composition (helium/argon working gas mixtures) on the analyte emission signal intensities, sputtering rates, and DC-bias characteristics of an analytical radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission spectroscopy (RF-GD-AES) source. As the partial pressure of He is increased from 0 to 15 torr, increased emission intensity is observed for a range of bulk and trace elements in NIST 1250 SRM (low alloy steel), regardless of the base pressure of Ar in the source (5 and 9 torr). In contrast to increases in analyte emission intensity of up to 300%, counterindicative decreases in the sputtering rates on the order of about 30-50% are observed. The magnitude of these effects depends on both the partial pressure of helium introduced to the source and the total pressure of the He and Ar gases. Use of relative emission yield (REY) to normalize changes in emission intensity to sputtering rates indicates that excitation efficiencies increase under these conditions. Increases in average electron energy and temperature appear to control this response. Decreases in both analyte emission intensities and sputter rates occur with increasing He partial pressure when the total pressure in the cell remains fixed (11 torr in these studies). Emission yields for the fixed pressure, mixed gas plasmas decrease as the partial pressure of He (He/Ar ratio) in the RF-GD source increases. In this case, decreases in electron number densities appear to dictate the lower REYs. Measurement of DC-bias values at the sample surface provide understanding with respect to the observed changes in sputtering rates as well as suggest the origins of changes in plasma electron energetics. Use of a diamond stylus profilometer provides both the quantitative sputter rate information as well as qualitative insights into the use of mixed gas plasmas for enhanced depth profiling capabilities. The analyte emission characteristics of these mixed gas

  15. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  16. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  17. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Dikshit, B; Bhatia, M S; Mago, V K

    2008-09-01

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data. PMID:19044405

  18. Fast Excitation and Photon Emission of a Single-Atom-Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Bochmann, J.; Muecke, M.; Langfahl-Klabes, G.; Erbel, C.; Weber, B.; Specht, H. P.; Moehring, D. L.; Rempe, G.

    2008-11-28

    We report on the fast excitation of a single atom coupled to an optical cavity using laser pulses that are much shorter than all other relevant processes. The cavity frequency constitutes a control parameter that allows the creation of single photons in a superposition of two tunable frequencies. Each photon emitted from the cavity thus exhibits a pronounced amplitude modulation determined by the oscillatory energy exchange between the atom and the cavity. Our technique constitutes a versatile tool for future quantum networking experiments.

  19. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  20. Conditions for statistical determination of the neutrino mass spectrum in radiative emission of neutrino pairs in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningqiang; Boyero Garcia, R.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Peralta Conde, A.; Taron, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The photon spectrum in macrocoherent atomic deexcitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper we revisit this interesting proposal in order to quantify the requirements for statistical determination of some of the properties of the neutrino spectrum, in particular, the neutrino mass scale and the mass ordering. Our results are shown as the product of the experimental lifetime, the target volume, and the number density of atoms which have to be set in a coherence state with a given electric field in the target, needed for determination of these properties with a given confidence level.

  1. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  2. Focused microwave-induced combustion for digestion of botanical samples and metals determination by ICP OES and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Barin, J S; Pereira, J S F; Mello, P A; Knorr, C L; Moraes, D P; Mesko, M F; Nóbrega, J A; Korn, M G A; Flores, E M M

    2012-05-30

    The advantages and shortcomings of focused microwave-induced combustion (FMIC) for digestion of plant samples were studied. The effects of sample mass, absorbing solution, oxygen gas flow-rate, and time of reflux step on recoveries of major, minor and trace metals were systematically evaluated. Afterwards, Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr, V, and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The main advantages of FMIC when compared to microwave-assisted wet digestion (MAWD) and focused-microwave-assisted wet digestion (FMAWD) are the possibility to digest larger masses of samples (up to 3g) using shorter heating times and diluted nitric acid solution for absorbing all analytes. Using the selected experimental conditions for FMIC, residual carbon content was lower than 0.7% for all samples and relative standard deviation (RSD) varied from 1.5 to 14.1%. Certified reference materials (NIST 1515 apple leaves and NIST 1547 peach leaves) were used for checking accuracy and determined values for all metals were in agreement with certified values at a 95% confidence level. No statistical difference (ANOVA, 95% of confidence level) was observed for results obtained by FMIC, FMAWD, and MAWD. Limits of detection were lower when using FMIC in the range of 0.02-0.15 μg g(-1) for ICP OES and 0.001-0.01 μg g(-1) for ICP-MS, which were about 3 and 6 times lower than the values obtained by FMAWD and MAWD, respectively. It is important to point out that FMIC was a suitable sample preparation method for major, minor and trace metals by both determination techniques (ICP OES and ICP-MS). Additionally, since it allows lower LODs (because up to 3g of sample can be digested) and diluted acid solutions are used (without any further dilution), the use of ICP-MS is not mandatory. PMID:22608453

  3. ICP27-dependent resistance of herpes simplex virus type 1 to leptomycin B is associated with enhanced nuclear localization of ICP4 and ICP0

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, Joy; Strain, Anna K.; Perkins, Keith D.; Rice, Stephen A. . E-mail: ricex019@umn.edu

    2006-09-01

    It was previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is sensitive to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of nuclear export factor CRM1, and that a single methionine to threonine change at residue 50 (M50T) of viral immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 can confer LMB resistance. In this work, we show that deletion of residues 21-63 from ICP27 can also confer LMB resistance. We further show that neither the M50T mutation nor the presence of LMB affects the nuclear shuttling activity of ICP27, suggesting that another function of ICP27 determines LMB resistance. A possible clue to this function emerged when it was discovered that LMB treatment of HSV-1-infected cells dramatically enhances the cytoplasmic accumulation of two other IE proteins, ICP0 and ICP4. This effect is completely dependent on ICP27 and is reversed in cells infected with LMB-resistant mutants. Moreover, LMB-resistant mutations in ICP27 enhance the nuclear localization of ICP0 and ICP4 even in the absence of LMB, and this effect can be discerned in transfected cells. Thus, the same amino (N)-terminal region of ICP27 that determines sensitivity to LMB also enhances ICP27's previously documented ability to promote the cytoplasmic accumulation of ICP4 and ICP0. We speculate that ICP27's effects on ICP4 and ICP0 may contribute to HSV-1 LMB sensitivity.

  4. Differentiation of colloidal and dissolved silica: Analytical separation using spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Ranville, J.; Kashuba, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described that differentiates between solutions containing silica-dominated colloids and solutions that are essentially free of colloids. Suspensions of tuff particles were treated to remove colloids by centrifugation, filtration or both. Agreement of silica concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and by a spectrophotometric method was taken as an indication of colloid-free solutions. For two tuffs, centrifugation was effective for removing colloids. For the third, highly altered tuff, filtration was more effective for removing colloids.

  5. Dislocation emission at the Silicon/Silicon nitride interface: A million atom molecular dynamics simulation on parallel computers

    PubMed

    Bachlechner; Omeltchenko; Nakano; Kalia; Vashishta; Ebbsjo; Madhukar

    2000-01-10

    Mechanical behavior of the Si(111)/Si(3)N4(0001) interface is studied using million atom molecular dynamics simulations. At a critical value of applied strain parallel to the interface, a crack forms on the silicon nitride surface and moves toward the interface. The crack does not propagate into the silicon substrate; instead, dislocations are emitted when the crack reaches the interface. The dislocation loop propagates in the (1; 1;1) plane of the silicon substrate with a speed of 500 (+/-100) m/s. Time evolution of the dislocation emission and nature of defects is studied. PMID:11015901

  6. Retrieval of thermospheric atomic oxygen, nitrogen and temperature from the 732 NM emission measured by the ISO on ATLAS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, Judy A.; Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, Phillip G.; Yung, Sopo

    1993-01-01

    The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) was a part of the ATLAS 1 Mission flown on the shuttle Atlantis from March 24 to April 2, 1992. During limb scanning operations, the ISO measured the O+(2P) ion emission at 732 nm. We have used a numerical inversion technique to retrieve thermospheric atomic oxygen, molecular nitrogen and temperature profiles. These preliminary results indicate a lower thermospheric temperature cooler than that predicted by MSIS for the solar conditions during the mission. Although the densities agree at low altitudes, the reduced scale height produces O and N2 densities 25 percent lower than the MSIS at 300 km.

  7. New method for determining relative oscillator strengths of atoms through combined absorption and emission measurements - Application to titanium /Ti I/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Whaling, W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces a procedure that combines measurements of absorption and emission by atoms to obtain relative oscillator strengths that are independent of temperature determination in the sources and of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium. The experimental observations are formed into sets of transitions and required to satisfy defined ratios. The procedure is illustrated with the published data of Whaling et al. and Smith and Kuehne for 16 transitions in Ti I. It is shown that the relative oscillator strengths resulting from this procedure have calculated uncertainties between 5 and 17% (about 95% confidence level). Evidence is presented to suggest that these uncertainties have been overestimated.

  8. Optical emission generated by collisions of 5 eV O(3P) atoms with surface-absorbed hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Martus, K. E.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optical emission has been observed corresponding to vibrational bands in the NH (A 3Pi - X 3Sigma(-)) electronic transition during collisions of 5 eV, ground-state oxygen O(3P) atoms with MgF2 and Ni surfaces continuously exposed to a beam of hydrazine (N2H4). The NH emission intensity is observed to be about five times greater for MgF2 than for Ni. No dependence on temperature was observed for either surface in the range 240 - 340 K, implying that the NH-producing intermediate species is tightly bound. The half-lifetime for desorption of hydrazine from each surface was measured. This was found to be 120 min for the MgF2 surface at 240 K, and less than 20 min for Ni. After exposure, the surface composition was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the exposed and unexposed areas of both targets.

  9. Shape-dependent localized surface plasmon enhanced UV-emission from ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Liu, Xing Qiang; Wang, Ti; Chen, Chao; Wu, Hao; Liao, Lei; Liu, Chang

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of Al nanoparticles (NPs) were used to demonstrate the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced UV light emission from ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition. Well defined NP arrays with different shapes were fabricated on the surface of ZnO by electron-beam lithography. A theoretical analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain method was carried out to show the shape dependence of the LSPR wavelength. Time resolved photoluminescence and temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements suggested that the Al NPs arrays increase the radiative recombination rate by the resonance coupling between the localized surface plasmons and the excitons of the ZnO. By top excitation of the Al NP arrays coupled with ZnO, a 2.6-fold enhancement in peak photoluminescence intensity was measured. The enhancement strongly depended on the NP’s shape, revealing an important way of geometrical tuning the UV-emission.

  10. Shape-dependent localized surface plasmon enhanced UV-emission from ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Liu, Xing Qiang; Wang, Ti; Chen, Chao; Wu, Hao; Liao, Lei; Liu, Chang

    2013-03-29

    Two-dimensional arrays of Al nanoparticles (NPs) were used to demonstrate the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced UV light emission from ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition. Well defined NP arrays with different shapes were fabricated on the surface of ZnO by electron-beam lithography. A theoretical analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain method was carried out to show the shape dependence of the LSPR wavelength. Time resolved photoluminescence and temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements suggested that the Al NPs arrays increase the radiative recombination rate by the resonance coupling between the localized surface plasmons and the excitons of the ZnO. By top excitation of the Al NP arrays coupled with ZnO, a 2.6-fold enhancement in peak photoluminescence intensity was measured. The enhancement strongly depended on the NP's shape, revealing an important way of geometrical tuning the UV-emission. PMID:23466715

  11. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-07-15

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  12. The Role of Plasma Sheet Conditions in Ring Current Formation and Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions: TWINS Results and CRCM Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, M.; Buzulukova, N.; McComas, D.; Brandt, P.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; Alquiza, J.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamics of the ring current is sensitive to plasma sheet density and temperature. The situation is further complicated by ionospheric feedback and the existence of electric shielding at low latitudes. Most of the ring current pressure is carried by ions with energies of ~5-50 keV. In this energy range, H-H+ charge exchange cross section falls sharply with increasing energy. As a result, the intensity of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) emitted from the ring current is very sensitive to the ion energy distribution, which, in turn, is controlled by the plasma sheet temperature. Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with different plasma sheet models, we calculate ENA emissions during several moderate storms in years 2008 and 2009. We compare the simulated images with those from the TWINS imagers and study the effects of plasma sheet conditions on the ring current and the associated ENA emissions.

  13. Methyl oleate as matrix simulacrum for the simultaneous determination of metals in biodiesel samples by flame atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Conny Cerai; Costa, Letícia Malta; Barbeira, Paulo Jorge Sanches

    2015-06-01

    A measurement procedure for direct and simultaneous quantification of Na, K and Ca in biodiesel by flame atomic emission spectroscopy (FAES) was developed. A lab-made device was constructed by coupling a nebulizer/combustion system from a commercial photometer to a continuous emission detector in a spectral range of 255 to 862 nm. Instrumental optimizations were carried out evaluating the most important variables, such as gas flow rates and sample introduction temperature, indicating that a temperature of 50°C enhances the analytical signals and assures good precision. The direct analysis method was properly validated and presented limits of quantification of 0.09, 0.07 and 0.43 μg kg(-1) for Na, K and Ca, respectively. Accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked by comparing the results with those obtained by the standard procedure described in ABNT NBR 15556 and the standard addition method. PMID:25863364

  14. Teacher Reaction to ICP Quality Assurance Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Ann

    An integral part of the Quality Assurance Manual developed by Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) to accompany the Kindergarten Program is the end-of-program assessment of the Instructional Concepts Program (ICP). Following completion of ICP Quality Assurance assessment, four teachers were interviewed in order to gather information pertinent to…

  15. A Coupled Chemistry-emission Model for Atomic Oxygen Green and Red-doublet Emissions in the Comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-03-01

    The green (5577 Å) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the 1 S and 1 D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H2O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1 S) and O(1 D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H2O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO2 and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O(1 S) to O(1 D) would be around 0.03 (±0.01) if H2O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is ~0.6 if the parent is CO2. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O(1 S) production in the photodissociation of H2O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  16. A COUPLED CHEMISTRY-EMISSION MODEL FOR ATOMIC OXYGEN GREEN AND RED-DOUBLET EMISSIONS IN THE COMET C/1996 B2 HYAKUTAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla E-mail: anil_bhardwaj@vssc.gov.in

    2012-03-20

    The green (5577 Angstrom-Sign ) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Angstrom-Sign ) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the {sup 1}S and {sup 1}D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H{sub 2}O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O({sup 1}S) and O({sup 1}D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H{sub 2}O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO{sub 2} and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O({sup 1} S) to O({sup 1} D) would be around 0.03 ({+-}0.01) if H{sub 2}O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is {approx}0.6 if the parent is CO{sub 2}. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O({sup 1} S) production in the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  17. Comment on ''Effect of entanglement on the decay dynamics of a pair of H(2p) atoms due to spontaneous emission''

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro; Plaja, Luis

    2011-06-15

    T. Tanabe et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 040101(R) (2010)] have experimentally demonstrated that the emission properties of unstable atoms in entangled and product states are different. The authors define an apparent decay time as a fitting parameter which falls below the lifetime of the single atom for entangled pairs. We argue that their results about coincidence time spectra are correct, but those concerning lifetimes cannot be considered conclusive because they assume the emission of photons by the two atoms to be independent processes, a doubtful hypothesis for entangled states. We suggest an improved evaluation of the lifetimes based on a rigorous approach, which demands some modifications of the experimental procedure.

  18. Light emission induced by an XUV laser pulse interacting resonantly with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Suyu; Guo, Fuming; Yang, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    The resonant interaction between XUV ultra-short laser pulses and atomic hydrogen is systematically studied by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in this paper. Triple-peak structures are found to appear in the harmonics emitted provided that the incident laser is resonant with the 1 s-2p transition of the hydrogen atom. Moreover, the energy difference between neighboring peaks is the same and turns out to be proportional to the peak field strength E 0. Based on the theory of strong field approximation, and taking the interactions of the 1 s-2p bound energy levels into consideration, theoretical interpretations of the phenomena mentioned are successfully presented. This work provides a possible approach for generating XUV radiation with a tunable frequency via the interaction between atoms and XUV laser pulses.

  19. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  20. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  1. Anisotropic emission of neutral atoms: evidence of an anisotropic Rydberg sheath in nanoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-02-01

    Intense laser-produced plasma is a complex amalgam of ions, electrons and atoms both in ground and excited states. Little is known about the spatial composition of the excited states that are an integral part of most gaseous or cluster plasma. In cluster-plasma, Rydberg excitations change the charge composition of the ions through charge transfer reactions and shape the angular distributions. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive technique that reveals the anisotropic Rydberg excited cluster sheath by measuring anisotropy in fast neutral atoms. The sheath is stronger in the direction of light polarization and the enhanced charge transfer by the excited clusters results in larger neutralization.

  2. Distribution profiles of sulphur in caramel colours on a gel-filtration column studied by HPLC/ICP.

    PubMed

    Maitani, T; Kubota, H; Yamada, T

    1996-01-01

    The distribution profiles of sulphur in commercial caramel colours I, III and IV on a gel-filtration column were studied with a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) connected directly to a vacuum-ultraviolet inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). A small sulphur peak of sulphate was detected in most products of caramel III, whereas caramel I products did not exhibit a sulphur peak, as predicted from the total sulphur concentration. In caramel IV products, sulphur was detected continuously in the fractions of the colouring ingredients with high molecular weights. The molar ratio of sulphur was bound to every 2-4 molecules of original hexose. However, sulphur was also contained in lower molecular weight fractions which were not the colouring constituents, the content being over twice that of the colouring ingredients. PMID:8950119

  3. Pump laser wavelength-dependent control of the efficiency of kilovolt x-ray emission from atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W. Andreas; Omenetto, F. G.; Borisov, A. B.; Longworth, J. W.; McPherson, A.; Jordan, C.; Boyer, K.; Kondo, K.; Rhodes, C. K.

    1998-11-01

    An explanation is presented for the recently reported striking differences in the kilovolt Xe L-shell 0953-4075/31/22/014/img15 x-ray emission from Xe cluster targets excited by comparable terawatt ultraviolet (248 nm) and infrared (800 nm) femtosecond laser pulses under nearly identical experimental conditions (Kondo K et al 1997 J. Phys. B.: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 2707-16). A classical analysis of these results, within the framework of the first Born approximation for electron-atom collisions producing inner-shell ionization, strongly suggests that both the 0953-4075/31/22/014/img16 times stronger Xe(L) emission under ultraviolet laser excitation and the observed differences in the x-ray spectra are caused primarily by the different ultraviolet and infrared pump laser wavelengths. The kinematics of photoionized electrons in the intense laser fields (0953-4075/31/22/014/img17-0953-4075/31/22/014/img18) and the Coulomb-driven expansion of the electron distribution photoionized from the atomic cluster both indicate that the strong pump-laser wavelength scaling in the production of kilovolt x-rays from Xe clusters results from the more localized and controlled electron-cluster interactions afforded by a shorter optical period.

  4. CHIANTI—An Atomic Database for Emission Lines. XIII. Soft X-Ray Improvements and Other Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  5. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-15

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 A wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  6. Post sunset behavior of the 6300 A atomic oxygen airglow emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical model of the 6300 A OI airglow emission was developed based on the assumptions that both the charged and neutral portions of the Earth's upper atmosphere are in steady state conditions of diffusive equilibrium. Intensities of 6300 A OI emission line were calculated using electron density true height profiles from a standard C-4 ionosonde and exospheric temperatures derived from Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of the Doppler broadened 6300 A emission line shape as inputs to the model. Reaction rate coefficient values, production mechanism efficiencies, solar radiation fluxes, absorption cross sections, and models of the neutral atmosphere were varied parametrically to establish a set of acceptable inputs which will consistently predict 6300 A emission intensities that closely agree with intensities observed during the post-sunset twilight period by an airglow observatory consisting of a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a turret photometer. Emission intensities that can only result from the dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions were observed during the latter portion of the observational period. Theoretical calculations indicate that contamination of the 6300 A OI emission should be on the order of or less than 3 percent; however, these results are very sensitive to the wavelengths of the individual lines and their intensities relative to the 6300 A OI intensity. This combination of a model atmosphere, production mechanism efficiencies, and quenching coefficient values was used when the dissociative photoexcitation and direct impact excitation processes were contributing to the intensity to establish best estimates of solar radiation fluxes in the Schumann--Runge continuum and associated absorption cross sections. Results show that the Jacchia 1971 model of the upper atmosphere combined with the Ackerman recommended solar radiation fluxes and associated absorption cross sections produces theoretically calculated intensities that more

  7. Effects of nozzle lip geometry on spray atomization and emissions advanced gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, Gerald J.; Roychoudhury, Subir; Nguyen, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of nozzle lip geometry on nozzle fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution for a rich burn section of a rich burn/quick quench/lean burn combustor. It is seen that the nozzle lip geometry greatly affects the fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution. It is determined that at an equivalence ratio of 1.6 the NO concentration could be lowered by a factor greater than three by changing the nozzle lip geometry.

  8. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  9. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  10. COMPARISON OF AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM VAPORIZING AND AIR ATOMIZING WASTE OIL HEATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions and vaporizing pot solid residues resulting from the combustion of waste crankcase oil in space heaters. Two types of waste oil burners were tested: a vaporizing oil burner rated at 35.2 kW, and an...

  11. Spontaneous light emission by atomic hydrogen: Fermi's golden rule without cheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, V.; Durt, T.; Nicolet, A.; Zolla, F.

    2015-10-01

    Focusing on the 2 p- 1 s transition in atomic hydrogen, we investigate through first order perturbation theory the time evolution of the survival probability of an electron initially taken to be in the excited (2 p) state. We examine both the results yielded by the standard dipole approximation for the coupling between the atom and the electromagnetic field - for which we propose a cutoff-independent regularisation - and those yielded by the exact coupling function. In both cases, Fermi's golden rule is shown to be an excellent approximation for the system at hand: we found its maximal deviation from the exact behaviour of the system to be of order 10-8 /10-7. Our treatment also yields a rigorous prescription for the choice of the optimal cutoff frequency in the dipole approximation. With our cutoff, the predictions of the dipole approximation are almost indistinguishable at all times from the exact dynamics of the system.

  12. Distinguishing Astragalus mongholicus and Its Planting Soil Samples from Different Regions by ICP-AES.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zheng, Sihao; Yang, Qingzhen; Chen, Shilin; Huang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    "Daodi herb" enjoys a good reputation for its quality and clinical effects. As one of the most popular daodi herbs, Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge var. mongholicus (Bge.) Hsiao (A. membranaceus) is popularly used for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immune-enhancing properties. In this study, we used inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) technique to investigate the inorganic elements contents in A. mongholicu and its soil samples from daodi area (Shanxi) and non-daodi areas (Inner Mongolia and Gansu). A total of 21 inorganic elements (Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cu, P, K, Zn, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe, Se, B, Al, Na, Cr, Ni, Ba, Ti and Sr) were simultaneously determined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to differentiate A. mongholicu and soil samples from the three main producing areas. It was found that the inorganic element characteristics as well as the uptake and accumulation behavior of the three kinds of samples were significantly different. The high contents of Fe, B, Al, Na, Cr and Ni could be used as a standard in the elements fingerprint to identify daodi and non-daodi A. Mongholicus. As the main effective compounds were closely related to the pharmacodynamics activities, the inter-relationships between selected elements and components could reflect that the quality of A. Mongholicus from Shanxi were superior to others to a certain degree. This finding highlighted the usefulness of ICP-AES elemental analysis and evidenced that the inorganic element profile can be employed to evaluate the genuineness of A. mongholicus. PMID:27077837

  13. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices-rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ∼ 0.5% and ∼ 0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies. PMID:24608229

  14. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M.; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices--rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ~0.5% and ~0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  15. Improved statistical determination of absolute neutrino masses via radiative emission of neutrino pairs from atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The atomic transition from an excited state |e ⟩ to the ground state |g ⟩ by emitting a neutrino pair and a photon, i.e., |e ⟩→|g ⟩+|γ ⟩+|νi⟩+|ν¯j⟩ with i , j =1 , 2, 3, has been proposed by Yoshimura and his collaborators as an alternative way to determine the absolute scale m0 of neutrino masses. More recently, a statistical analysis of the fine structure of the photon spectrum from this atomic process has been performed [N. Song et al. Phys. Rev. D 93, 013020 (2016)] to quantitatively examine the experimental requirements for a realistic determination of absolute neutrino masses. In this paper, we show how to improve the statistical analysis and demonstrate that the previously required detection time can be reduced by one order of magnitude for the case of a 3 σ determination of m0˜0.01 eV with an accuracy better than 10%. Such an improvement is very encouraging for further investigations on measuring absolute neutrino masses through atomic processes.

  16. Efficient field emission from α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes on an atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. W.; Yu, T.; Sow, C. H.; Liu, Y. J.; Wee, A. T. S.; Xu, X. J.; Lim, C. T.; Thong, J. T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Aligned arrays of flake-shaped hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanostructure have been fabricated on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. They are created by simply heating an iron-coated AFM tip in ambience on a hot plate. These nanoflakes are characterized as α-Fe2O3 single crystalline structures with tip radii as small as several nanometers and are highly effective as electron field emitters. With a vacuum gap of about 150μm, field emission measurements of α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes on AFM tips show a low turn-on voltage of about 400-600V and a high current density of 1.6Acm-2 under 900V. Such high emission current density is attributed to the nanoscale sharp tips of the as-grown nanoflakes. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, it is demonstrated the enhancement factor of α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes on AFM tips is comparable to that of carbon nanotubes. Our findings suggest that α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes are potentially useful as candidates for future electron field emission devices.

  17. Time-delayed intensity-interferometry of the emission from ultracold atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Shafi, K.; Pandey, Deepak; Suryabrahmam, Buti; Girish, B. S.; Ramachandran, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Time-delayed intensity-interferometry (TDII) measurements of the fluorescent emission from an ultracold ensemble of thermal 87Rb atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap are presented, which reveal the underlying coherent and incoherent dynamics of the atoms. Measurements carried out with a 5 ns time resolution yielded a second-order intensity correlation function with the theoretically predicted value of 2 at zero delay. In addition coherent Rabi oscillations were seen for up to five full periods—much longer than the spontaneous emission lifetime of the excited state of Rb. The oscillations were damped out by ˜150 ns, and thereafter an exponential decay observed, from which the mean velocity of atoms and thus, the temperature of the ensemble was estimated. The values so obtained compare well with those determined by standard techniques. It is seen that TDII permits a quantitative study of the coherent and incoherent processes, even in a large ensemble of independent atomic emitters in random thermal motion. This measurement of second-order correlation powerful technique can reveal hidden periodicities such as coherent Rabi oscillations that are not directly seen in the emission from a large collection of atoms. In addition it can also reveal information about the mean velocity of the thermal ensemble of emitters, even though the Doppler broadening of emission due to the motion of atoms is smaller than the natural linewidth and is not directly measureable.

  18. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1994-09-01

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  19. Solid state effects in electron emission from atomic collisions near surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Minniti, R.; Elston, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present a brief progress report of recent studies of the ejected electron spectra arising from glancing-angle ion-surface scattering involving collision energies of hundreds of keV/u. A broad range of electron energies and emission angles is analyzed containing prominent structures such as the convoy electron peak and the binary ridge. Particular emphasis is placed on the search for signatures of dynamic image interactions and multiple scattering near surfaces. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Tracing the Milky Way Nuclear Wind with 21cm Atomic Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence in 21 cm H i emission for voids several kiloparsecs in size centered approximately on the Galactic center, both above and below the Galactic plane. These appear to map the boundaries of the Galactic nuclear wind. An analysis of H i at the tangent points, where the distance to the gas can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, shows a sharp transition at Galactic radii R ≲ 2.4 kpc from the extended neutral gas layer characteristic of much of the Galactic disk, to a thin Gaussian layer with FWHM ∼ 125 pc. An anti-correlation between H i and γ-ray emission at latitudes 10^\\circ ≤slant | b| ≤slant 20^\\circ suggests that the boundary of the extended H i layer marks the walls of the Fermi Bubbles. With H i, we are able to trace the edges of the voids from | z| \\gt 2 {{kpc}} down to z ≈ 0, where they have a radius ∼2 kpc. The extended Hi layer likely results from star formation in the disk, which is limited largely to R ≳ 3 kpc, so the wind may be expanding into an area of relatively little H i. Because the H i kinematics can discriminate between gas in the Galactic center and foreground material, 21 cm H i emission may be the best probe of the extent of the nuclear wind near the Galactic plane.

  1. Tracing the Milky Way Nuclear Wind with 21cm Atomic Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence in 21 cm H i emission for voids several kiloparsecs in size centered approximately on the Galactic center, both above and below the Galactic plane. These appear to map the boundaries of the Galactic nuclear wind. An analysis of H i at the tangent points, where the distance to the gas can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, shows a sharp transition at Galactic radii R ≲ 2.4 kpc from the extended neutral gas layer characteristic of much of the Galactic disk, to a thin Gaussian layer with FWHM ˜ 125 pc. An anti-correlation between H i and γ-ray emission at latitudes 10^\\circ ≤slant | b| ≤slant 20^\\circ suggests that the boundary of the extended H i layer marks the walls of the Fermi Bubbles. With H i, we are able to trace the edges of the voids from | z| \\gt 2 {{kpc}} down to z ≈ 0, where they have a radius ˜2 kpc. The extended Hi layer likely results from star formation in the disk, which is limited largely to R ≳ 3 kpc, so the wind may be expanding into an area of relatively little H i. Because the H i kinematics can discriminate between gas in the Galactic center and foreground material, 21 cm H i emission may be the best probe of the extent of the nuclear wind near the Galactic plane.

  2. X-Ray Emission from a Merger Remnant, NGC 7252 (the ``Atoms-for-Peace'' Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tomida, Hiroshi

    2002-03-01

    We observed a nearby merger remnant NGC 7252 with the X-ray satellite ASCA and detected X-ray emission with the X-ray flux of (1.8+/-0.3)×10-13 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10 keV band. This corresponds to the X-ray luminosity of 8.1×1040 ergs s-1. The X-ray emission is well described with a two-component model: a soft component with kT=0.72+/-0.13 keV and a hard component with kT>5.1 keV. Although NGC 7252 is referred to as a dynamically young protoelliptical, the 0.5-4 keV luminosity of the soft component is about 2×1040 ergs s-1, which is low for an early-type galaxy. The ratio of LX/LFIR suggests that the soft component originated from the hot gas due to star formation. Its low luminosity can be explained by the gas ejection from the galaxy as galaxy winds. Our observation reveals the existence of hard X-ray emission with the 2-10 keV luminosity of 5.6×1040 ergs s-1. This may indicate the existence of nuclear activity or an intermediate-mass black hole in NGC 7252.

  3. The Determination of Metals in Sediment Pore Waters and in 1N HCl-Extracted Sediments by ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, R.H.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Schmitt, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of metals in sediment interstitial water (pore water) and those extractable from sediment with weak acids can provide important information about the bioavailability and toxicological effects of such contaminants. The highly variable nature of metal concentrations in these matrices requires instrumentation with the detection limit capability of graphite furnace atomic absorption and the wide dynamic linear range capability of ICP-OES. These criteria are satisfied with ICP-MS instrumentation. We investigated the performance of ICP-MS in the determination of certain metals from these matrices. The results for three metals were compared to those determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was concluded that ICP-MS was an excellent instrumental approach for the determination of metals in these matrices.

  4. Continuous emission monitoring of metal aerosol concentrations in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Anne-Marie; Sarrette, Jean-Philippe; Madon, Lydie; Almi, Abdenbi

    1996-11-01

    Improvements of an apparatus for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) of metal aerosols in air are described. The method simultaneously offers low operating costs, large volume of tested air for valuable sampling and avoids supplementary contamination or keeping of the air pollutant concentrations. Questions related to detection and calibration are discussed. The detection limits (DL) obtained for the eight pollutants studied are lower than the recommended threshold limit values (TLV) and as satisfactory as the results obtained with other CEM methods involving air-argon plasmas.

  5. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  6. ICP Reactor Modeling: CF4 Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    1999-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors are widely used now for etching and deposition applications due to their simpler design compared to other high density sources. Plasma reactor modeling has been playing an important role since it can, in principle, reduce the number of trial and error iterations in the design process and provide valuable understanding of mechanisms. Fluorocarbon precursors have been the choice for oxide etching. We have data available on CF4 from our laboratory. These are current voltage characteristics, La.ngmuir probe data, UV-absorption, and mass spectrometry measurements in a GEC-ICP reactor. We have developed a comprehensive model for ICP reactors which couples plasma generation and transport and neutral species dynamics with the gas flow equations. The model has been verified by comparison with experimental results for a nitrogen discharge in an ICP reactor. In the present work, the model has been applied to CF4 discharge and compared to available experimental data.

  7. Atom-probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of ordered structures and electronic properties of Ge overlayers on Ir-tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1994-03-01

    The combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES) was employed to investigate the crystallinity and the surface electronic state of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir tips. The crystallinity of Ge overlayers deposited at 300 and 420 K, and those annealed after the deposition, is better than that of the overlayers deposited at 50 K. The surface electronic state of the well-crystallized Ge overlayer is semiconductive at the thickness of ≈4 ML. When the degree of crystallinity is rather low or Ir atoms exist in the Ge overlayer, even a thick overlayer exhibits metallic surface electronic states. When an Ir atom exists on the overlayer surface, a small peak appears at ≈ 0.3 eV below the Fermi level in the field emission electron distribution (FEED), indicating a local state of the Ir atom.

  8. Study of soft X-ray emission from Z-pinches with a complex atomic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, G. S.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Grabovski, E. V.; Fedulov, M. V.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Lakhtyushko, N. I.

    2010-03-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of Z-pinches produced by implosion of aluminum and tungsten cylindrical wire arrays in the Angara-5-1 facility. The electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} of the high-temperature pinch plasma have been determined by analyzing line emission from multicharged ions. For the same mass and radius of the array and the same number of wires in it, the intensity of line emission of H- and He-like Al ions from an imploded Al + W wire array containing even a small amount of tungsten (7 wt %) is one order of magnitude lower than that from an Al array. As the W content increases, the total soft X-ray (SXR) yield increases, while the duration of the SXR pulse decreases. For the 30% W content in the array, the power and duration of the SXR pulse are nearly the same as those recorded during the implosion of a W array with the same linear mass and radius and the same number of wires. Results are also presented from experiments with nested wire arrays in which the outer and inner shells were made of Al and W wires, respectively. It is found that, in this case, the effect of tungsten on the line emission of aluminum is much weaker than that in experiments with arrays in which tungsten and aluminum wires were placed in the same shell, even if the mass of the inner (tungsten) shell was larger than that of the outer (aluminum) one. At the same time, the inner W shell plays a significant role in the implosion dynamics of a nested wire array, reducing the duration of the SXR pulse and increasing the SXR power.

  9. Study of soft X-ray emission from Z-pinches with a complex atomic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, G. S.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Grabovski, E. V.; Fedulov, M. V.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Lakhtyushko, N. I.

    2010-03-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of Z-pinches produced by implosion of aluminum and tungsten cylindrical wire arrays in the Angara-5-1 facility. The electron temperature T e and density n e of the high-temperature pinch plasma have been determined by analyzing line emission from multicharged ions. For the same mass and radius of the array and the same number of wires in it, the intensity of line emission of H- and He-like Al ions from an imploded Al + W wire array containing even a small amount of tungsten (7 wt %) is one order of magnitude lower than that from an Al array. As the W content increases, the total soft X-ray (SXR) yield increases, while the duration of the SXR pulse decreases. For the 30% W content in the array, the power and duration of the SXR pulse are nearly the same as those recorded during the implosion of a W array with the same linear mass and radius and the same number of wires. Results are also presented from experiments with nested wire arrays in which the outer and inner shells were made of Al and W wires, respectively. It is found that, in this case, the effect of tungsten on the line emission of aluminum is much weaker than that in experiments with arrays in which tungsten and aluminum wires were placed in the same shell, even if the mass of the inner (tungsten) shell was larger than that of the outer (aluminum) one. At the same time, the inner W shell plays a significant role in the implosion dynamics of a nested wire array, reducing the duration of the SXR pulse and increasing the SXR power.

  10. Subnanogram determination of inorganic and organic mercury by helium-microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushi, K. ); Willie, S.N.; Sturgeon, R.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Inorganic and organic mercury were determined by helium-microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following cold vapor generation. Whereas only inorganic mercury was reduced by stannous ion in an acidic medium, both inorganic and organic mercury (total mercury) were reduced by stannous ion in the presence of cupric ion in a basic medium. Organic mercury was determined as the difference between total and inorganic mercury. Detection limits for inorganic and organic mercury were 11 and 10 pg, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was verified through the determination of inorganic, total and organic mercury in two marine biological standard reference materials, DORM-1 and TORT-1. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Selected problems with boron determination in water treatment processes. Part I: comparison of the reference methods for ICP-MS and ICP-OES determinations.

    PubMed

    Kmiecik, Ewa; Tomaszewska, Barbara; Wątor, Katarzyna; Bodzek, Michał

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the two reference methods for the determination of boron in water samples and further assess the impact of the method of preparation of samples for analysis on the results obtained. Samples were collected during different desalination processes, ultrafiltration and the double reverse osmosis system, connected in series. From each point, samples were prepared in four different ways: the first was filtered (through a membrane filter of 0.45 μm) and acidified (using 1 mL ultrapure nitric acid for each 100 mL of samples) (FA), the second was unfiltered and not acidified (UFNA), the third was filtered but not acidified (FNA), and finally, the fourth was unfiltered but acidified (UFA). All samples were analysed using two analytical methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results obtained were compared and correlated, and the differences between them were studied. The results show that there are statistically significant differences between the concentrations obtained using the ICP-MS and ICP-OES techniques regardless of the methods of sampling preparation (sample filtration and preservation). Finally, both the ICP-MS and ICP-OES methods can be used for determination of the boron concentration in water. The differences in the boron concentrations obtained using these two methods can be caused by several high-level concentrations in selected whole-water digestates and some matrix effects. Higher concentrations of iron (from 1 to 20 mg/L) than chromium (0.02-1 mg/L) in the samples analysed can influence boron determination. When iron concentrations are high, we can observe the emission spectrum as a double joined and overlapping peak. PMID:26939686

  12. Development of a coincidence system for the measurement of X-ray emission atomic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Filiberto; Miranda, Javier

    2013-07-03

    Preliminary results obtained in experiments carried out with an x-ray spectrometer built at the Instituto de Fisica for Atomic Physics and environmental sciences studies are presented. The experiments are based on a coincidence method for signals produced by LEGe and Si(Li) detectors. The x-ray fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub Li}) and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (f{sub ij}) for elements with 55 {<=} Z {<=} 60 are among the quantities of interest. The method is based on the simultaneous detection of K x-rays with the LEGe detector and the L x-rays with the Si(Li) detector. The primary radiation source is an x-ray tube with Rh anode. The system was tested with the coincidence of the L x-rays from Ce with its K line, demonstrating the feasibility of the experiments.

  13. Development of a coincidence system for the measurement of X-ray emission atomic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Filiberto; Miranda, Javier

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary results obtained in experiments carried out with an x-ray spectrometer built at the Instituto de Física for Atomic Physics and environmental sciences studies are presented. The experiments are based on a coincidence method for signals produced by LEGe and Si(Li) detectors. The x-ray fluorescence yields (ωLi) and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (fij) for elements with 55 ≤ Z ≤ 60 are among the quantities of interest. The method is based on the simultaneous detection of K x-rays with the LEGe detector and the L x-rays with the Si(Li) detector. The primary radiation source is an x-ray tube with Rh anode. The system was tested with the coincidence of the L x-rays from Ce with its K line, demonstrating the feasibility of the experiments.

  14. Infrared light emission from nano hot electron gas created in atomic point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, T.; Klein, H. R.; Iazykov, M.; Dumas, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Gold atomic point contacts are prototype systems to evidence ballistic electron transport. The typical dimension of the nanojunction being smaller than the electron-phonon interaction length, even at room temperature, electrons transfer their excess energy to the lattice only far from the contact. At the contact however, favored by huge current densities, electron-electron interactions result in a nano hot electron gas acting as a source of photons. Using a home built Mechanically Controlled Break Junction, it is reported here, for the first time, that this nano hot electron gas also radiates in the infrared range (0.2 eV to 1.2 eV). Moreover, following the description introduced by Tomchuk et al. (Sov. Phys.-Solid State, 8 (1966) 2510), we show that this radiation is compatible with a black-body–like spectrum emitted from an electron gas at temperatures of several thousands of kelvins.

  15. Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Stefan; Sjöberg, Viktor; Ogar, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as plasma gas for microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (MP AES) is an interesting development in analytical science since the running cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to the inductively coupled argon plasma. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument for the analysis of principal metals (Ca, K, Mg, and Na), lithogenic metals (Al, Fe, and Mn) and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in nitric acid plant digests. The digests were prepared by microwave-assisted dissolution of dry plant material from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in concentrated nitric acid. Comparisons are made with analysis of the same solutions with ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cx) using the octopole reaction system (ORS) in the collision mode for As, Fe, and V. The limits of detection were usually in the low µg L(-1) range and all principal and lithogenic metals were successfully determined with the MP AES and provided almost identical results with the ICP-MS. The same applies for the selected trace metals except for As, Co and Mo where the concentrations were below the detection limit with the MP AES. For successful analysis we recommend that (i) only atom lines are used, (ii) ionization is minimized (e.g. addition of CsNO3) and (iii) the use of internal standards should be considered to resolve spectral interferences. PMID:25640135

  16. ION TEMPERATURE AND NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION: USING EMISSION LINES OF DIFFERENT ATOMIC SPECIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.

    2009-11-10

    We have studied the characteristics of the ion thermal temperature and non-thermal velocity in an active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer onboard Hinode. We used two emission lines of different atomic species (Fe XVI 262.98 A and S XIII 256.69 A) to distinguish the ion thermal velocity from the observed full width at half-maximum. We assumed that the sources of the two emission lines are the same thermal temperature. We also assumed that they have the same non-thermal velocity. With these assumptions, we could obtain the ion thermal temperature, after noting that M{sub sulfur} approx 0.6M{sub iron}. We have carried out the ion thermal temperature analysis in the active region where the photon counts are sufficient (>4500). What we found is as follows: (1) the common ion thermal temperatures obtained by Fe XVI and S XIII are approx2.5 MK, (2) the typical non-thermal velocities are approx13 km s{sup -1}, (3) the highest non-thermal velocities (>20 km s{sup -1}) are preferentially observed between the bright points in Fe XVI, while (4) the hottest material (>3 MK) is observed relatively inside the bright points compared with the highest non-thermal velocity region.

  17. Pesticide analysis in herbal infusions by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with atomic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Peñalver, Rosa; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2007-02-28

    A direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) procedure was used in combination with capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the determination of 10 pesticides (organochlorines, organophosphorus compounds and pyrethrins) in herbal and tea infusions. Ionic strength, sample dilution and time and temperature of the absorption and desorption stages were some of the parameters investigated in order to select the optimum conditions for SPME with a 100mum PDMS fiber-coating. Element-specific detection and quantification was carried out by monitoring the chlorine (479nm) and bromine (478nm) emission lines, which provided nearly specific chromatograms. Calibration was carried out by using a spiked sample infusion. The detection limits varied between 11.9ngml(-1) for deltamethrin and 0.03ngml(-1) for p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD. The recoveries ranged from 73.5% for deltamethrin to 108.3% for p,p'-DDT in a spiked white tea infusion. Two of the eight samples analyzed contained low levels of some the pesticides considered. PMID:19071467

  18. Transition rates and transition rate diagrams in atomic emission spectroscopy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B. M.; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2015-08-01

    In low pressure plasmas with low electron densities, such as glow discharges, radiative de-excitation is a major de-excitation process of most excited states. Their relative de-excitation rates can be determined by emission spectroscopy, making it possible to study excitation processes in these discharges. This is in contrast to denser plasmas, in which such considerations are usually based on relative populations of excited states and concepts related to thermodynamic equilibrium. In the approach using reaction rates rather than populations, a convenient tool is the recently introduced formalism of transition rate diagrams. This formalism is reviewed, its relevance to different plasmas is discussed and some recent results on glow discharge excitation of manganese, copper and iron ions are presented. The prospects for the use of this formalism for the comparison of rate constants and cross sections for charge transfer reactions with argon ions of elements of interest in analytical glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed.

  19. Wafer-Size and Single-Crystal MoSe2 Atomically Thin Films Grown on GaN Substrate for Light Emission and Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuxin; Liu, Huiqiang; Chen, Xuechen; Chu, Guang; Chu, Sheng; Zhang, Hang

    2016-08-10

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layered semiconductors are important for next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. Here, we designed the growth of an MoSe2 atomic layer on a lattice-matched GaN semiconductor substrate. The results demonstrated that the MoSe2 films were less than three atomic layers thick and were single crystalline of MoSe2 over the entire GaN substrate. The ultrathin MoSe2/GaN heterojunction diode demonstrated ∼850 nm light emission and could also be used in photovoltaic applications. PMID:27409977

  20. Development of an international standard for the determination of metals and metalloids in workplace air using ICP-AES: evaluation of sample dissolution procedures through an interlaboratory trial.

    PubMed

    Butler, O T; Howe, A M

    1999-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is rapidly overtaking atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) as the method of choice for the determination of toxic metals in workplace air. However, the few ICP-AES methods that have been published are not well characterised in terms of the effectiveness of the sample dissolution procedures described and their validation status. The International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently engaged in developing ISO 15202, which will describe a generic method for the determination of metals and metalloids in airborne particulate matter by ICP-AES. One part of the proposed standard deals with dissolution procedures. The ISO work has been supported by a project carried out in the authors' laboratory to identify, develop and validate sample dissolution procedures for inclusion in the proposed standard. This paper describes an interlaboratory comparison carried out to assess the performance of selected procedures using samples of airborne particulate matter collected on filters with a multiport sampler. Five dissolution procedures were tested. These included an ultrasonic agitation procedure, two hot-plate procedures (based upon NIOSH 7300 and OSHA ID 125G) and two microwave-assisted procedures (based upon EPA 3052). It was shown that the dissolution procedures selected for use in the trial and used internally at HSL generally gave equivalent performance. As expected, a wider spread of results was obtained by participants in the trial. More specifically, there exists some reservation regarding the ability of the ultrasonic and hot-plate procedures to attack fully on a consistent basis some resistant materials, e.g., chromium containing particulate matter. Above all, the trial demonstrated the usefulness of microwave-assisted dissolution procedures in a modern laboratory. PMID:11529075

  1. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  2. Effect of different glycation agents on Cu(II) binding to human serum albumin, studied by liquid chromatography, nitrogen microwave-plasma atomic-emission spectrometry, inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry, and high-resolution molecular-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Jaramillo Ortiz, Sarahi; Ramirez Segovia, Alejandra Sarahi; Wrobel, Kazimierz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of human serum albumin to capture unbound copper under different clinical conditions is an important variable potentially affecting homeostasis of this element. Here, we propose a simple procedure based on size-exclusion chromatography with on-line UV and nitrogen microwave-plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for quantitative evaluation of Cu(II) binding to HSA upon its glycation in vitro. The Cu-to-protein molar ratio for non-glycated albumin was 0.98 ± 0.09; for HSA modified with glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO), oxoacetic acid (GA), and glucose (Glc), the ratios were 1.30 ± 0.22, 0.72 ± 0.14, 0.50 ± 0.06, and 0.95 ± 0.12, respectively. The results were confirmed by using ICP-MS as an alternative detection system. A reduced ability of glycated protein to coordinate Cu(II) was associated with alteration of the N-terminal metal-binding site during incubation with MGO and GA. In contrast, glycation with GO seemed to generate new binding sites as a result of tertiary structural changes in HSA. Capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray-ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry enabled detection and identification of Cu(II) coordinated to the N-terminal metal-binding site (Cu(II)-DAHK) in all tryptic digests analyzed. This is the first report confirming Cu(II)-DAHK species in HSA by means of high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, and the first report on the use of MP-AES in combination with chromatographic separation. PMID:25428457

  3. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  4. Physical and functional interactions between herpes simplex virus immediate-early proteins ICP4 and ICP27.

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotidis, C A; Lium, E K; Silverstein, S J

    1997-01-01

    The ordered expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes, during the course of a productive infection, requires the action of the virus immediate-early regulatory proteins. Using a protein interaction assay, we demonstrate specific in vitro protein-protein interactions between ICP4 and ICP27, two immediate-early proteins of HSV-1 that are essential for virus replication. We map multiple points of contact between these proteins. Furthermore, by coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrate the following. (i) ICP4-ICP27 complexes are present in extracts from HSV-1 infected cells. (ii) ICP27 binds preferentially to less modified forms of ICP4, a protein that is extensively modified posttranslationally. We also demonstrate, by performing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershifts with monoclonal antibodies to ICP4 or ICP27, that both proteins are present in a DNA-protein complex with a noncanonical ICP4 binding site present in the HSV thymidine kinase (TK) gene. ICP4, in extracts from cells infected with ICP27-deficient viruses, is impaired in its ability to form complexes with the TK site but not with the canonical site from the alpha4 gene. However, ICP4 is able to form complexes with the TK probe, in the absence of ICP27, when overproduced in mammalian cells or expressed in bacteria. These data suggest that the inability of ICP4 from infected cell extracts to bind the TK probe in the absence of ICP27 does not reflect a requirement for the physical presence of ICP27 in the complex. Rather, they imply that ICP27 is likely to modulate the DNA binding activity of ICP4 by affecting its posttranslational modification status. Therefore, we propose that ICP27, in addition to its established role as a posttranscriptional regulator of virus gene expression, may also modulate transcription either through direct or indirect interactions with HSV regulatory regions, or through its ability to modulate the DNA binding activity of ICP4. PMID:8995681

  5. Ignition delay of a pulsed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in tandem with an auxiliary ICP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma ignition delays were observed in a ‘main’ inductively coupled plasma (ICP), in tandem with an ‘auxiliary’ ICP. The Faraday-shielded ICPs were separated by a grounded metal grid. Power (13.56 MHz) to the main ICP was pulsed with a frequency of 1 kHz, while the auxiliary ICP was operated in continuous wave (cw) mode. In chlorine plasmas, ignition delay was observed for duty cycles greater than 60% and, in contrast to expectation, the delay was longer with increasing duty cycle up to ~99.5%. The ignition delay could be varied by changing the auxiliary and/or main ICP power. Langmuir probe measurements provided the temporal evolution of electron temperature, and electron and positive ion densities. These measurements revealed that the plasma was ignited shortly after the decaying positive ion density (n +), in the afterglow of the main ICP, reached the density ({{n}+},\\text{aux} ) prevailing when only the auxiliary ICP was powered. At that time, production of electrons began to dominate their loss in the main ICP, due to hot electron injection from the auxiliary ICP. As a result, {{n}\\text{e}} increased from a value below {{n}\\text{e,\\text{aux}}} , improving inductive power coupling efficiency, further increasing plasma density leading to plasma ignition. Plasma ignition delay occurred when the afterglow of the pulsed plasma was not long enough for the ion density to reach {{n}+},\\text{aux} during the afterglow. Besides Cl2, plasma ignition delays were also observed in other electronegative gases (SF6, CF4/O2 and O2) but not in an electropositive gas (Ar).

  6. Element-tagged immunoassay with ICP-MS detection: evaluation and comparison to conventional immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Razumienko, Eva; Ornatsky, Olga; Kinach, Robert; Milyavsky, Michael; Lechman, Eric; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using element-tagged antibodies for protein detection and quantification in microplate format using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and compared the results to conventional immunoassays, such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The technique was further employed to detect low levels and measure DNA-binding activity of transcription factor p53 in leukemia cell lysates through its interaction with immobilized oligonucleotides and recognition by element-tagged antibodies. The advantages of ICP-MS detection for routine performance of immunoassays include increased sensitivity, wide dynamic range, minimal interference from complex matrices, and high throughput. Our approach advances the ICP-MS technology and demonstrates its applicability to proteomic studies through the use of antibodies directly labeled with polymer tags bearing multiple atoms of lanthanides. Development of this novel methodology will enable fast and quantitative identification of multiple analytes in a single well. PMID:18456275

  7. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  8. Simplified multi-element analysis of ground and instant coffees by ICP-OES and FAAS.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna; Welna, Maja; Pohl, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    A simplified alternative to the wet digestion sample preparation procedure for roasted ground and instant coffees has been developed and validated for the determination of different elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) (Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) (Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na). The proposed procedure, i.e. the ultrasound-assisted solubilisation in aqua regia, is quite fast and simple, requires minimal use of reagents, and demonstrated good analytical performance, i.e. accuracy from -4.7% to 1.9%, precision within 0.5-8.6% and recovery in the range 93.5-103%. Detection limits of elements were from 0.086 ng ml(-1) (Sr) to 40 ng ml(-1) (Fe). A preliminary classification of 18 samples of ground and instant coffees was successfully made based on concentrations of selected elements and using principal component analysis and hierarchic cluster analysis. PMID:26140574

  9. Comment on ``Effect of entanglement on the decay dynamics of a pair of H(2p) atoms due to spontaneous emission''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro; Plaja, Luis

    2011-06-01

    T. Tanabe [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.040101 82, 040101(R) (2010)] have experimentally demonstrated that the emission properties of unstable atoms in entangled and product states are different. The authors define an apparent decay time as a fitting parameter which falls below the lifetime of the single atom for entangled pairs. We argue that their results about coincidence time spectra are correct, but those concerning lifetimes cannot be considered conclusive because they assume the emission of photons by the two atoms to be independent processes, a doubtful hypothesis for entangled states. We suggest an improved evaluation of the lifetimes based on a rigorous approach, which demands some modifications of the experimental procedure.

  10. Determination of boron isotope ratios and rare earth elements by ETC-ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Richner, P.; Wanner, B.

    1994-12-31

    Matrix modifiers play an important role in ETV-ICP-MS as they do in GF-AAS. In ETV-ICP-MS matrix modifiers, which are used as carriers for the analyte from the furnace to the ICP, enhance both sensitivity and reproducibility. Furthermore, matrix modifiers can be used to bring the element investigated into a specific compound with certain properties. The graphite furnace plays the role of a chemical reactor. In GF-AAS volatile elements are transformed into refractory compounds in order to prevent loss during the ashing stage of the temperature program. In ETV-ICP-MS, refractory elements can be transformed into volatile compounds with the help of matrix modifiers. Both B and the REE`s are known to form refractory compounds such as carbides and oxides which make them difficult to analyze by GF-AAS. However, halides of both B and the REE`s have boiling points below 2000{degrees}C. If these compounds are formed within the furnace the analyte elements can then be effectively transported into the ICP where they will be consequentially atomized and ionized. The technique will be applied to the determination of boron isotope ratios in a tracer study of the boron metabolism in vegetables, using NH4F as a matrix modifier, and the determination of REE`s in geological samples, with CHF{sub 3} as matrix modifier.

  11. Emission Characteristics of Ca and Mg Atoms in Gas Plasma Induced by the Bombardment of Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser at 1 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Sukra Lie, Zener; Inn Lee, Yong; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    To study the mechanism of atomic excitation in gas plasma, a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on a metal subtarget through a hole (2 mm in diameter) produced in a glass slide sample (1.5 mm in thickness); the glass slide sample was placed in close contact with a nickel metal plate, which functions as the metal subtarget. It was demonstrated that a strong gas plasma can be induced in various gases including He, N2, and CO2 and that plasma can be employed as the excitation source for spectrochemical analysis. It has been proved that, in He gas plasma, strong Ca ionic emissions (Ca II 393.3 nm and Ca II 373.7 nm) with a long lifetime can be observed regardless of excitation energy. On the other hand, in N2 and CO2 gases, the emissions are very weak and have a short lifetime. We assumed that, in He gas plasma, He metastable atoms play significant role in excitation. In the case of the Ca atom, the double ionization of Ca (Ca2+) is directly induced when a Ca atom collides with He metastable atoms through the Penning effect. The ion produced then recombines with an electron to produce an ionic excitation state, from which ionic emission is induced. In neutral Ca and Mg emissions, unique emission characteristics were observed in the He gas plasma case, namely, the triplet state is the main product and the singlet state is a minor product. This result can be explained by our proposed model.

  12. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  13. Straightforward way to enhance robustness in ultrasonic nebulization-axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry via an additional N2 gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Guilherme Luiz; Pozebon, Dirce

    2015-11-01

    In the present study a low flow of N2 is mixed with the aerosol produced by ultrasonic nebulization (USN) prior analysis using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The foreign gas is added for improving plasma characteristics in axially-viewed ICP. By computing the Mg ionic to atomic ratio (plasma robustness) it was concluded that N2 dissociates closer to the load coil when USN is used as sample introduction system. The maximum emission intensity of Mg(II) for pneumatic nebulization (PN) was observed at 11 mm from the load coil while it was 8 mm for USN, indicating earlier aerosol desolvation, atomization and excitation processes in the ICP. Emission profiles of Ar(I) 415.861 nm, Ba(II) 486.601 nm and Ba(II) 233.527 nm indicated that metastable Ar species are overpopulated in the ICP under the N2 flow. Copper and manganese ionic lines with energy close to 16 eV (Ar ionization) were monitored to evaluate spatially dependent charge-transfer reaction along the ICP axis in the presence and absence of the N2 flow. The Cu(II) signal profiles indicated abundance of Ar+ species at low distances from the load coil when N2 was added. On the other hand, differences were not observed at longer distances from the load coil for both plasmas (mixed-gas and pure Ar-ICP). The calculated limits of detection (LODs) for both plasmas had the same order of magnitude. Analysis of certified reference samples demonstrated that the accuracy was preserved by adding the low flow of N2. It was concluded that adding a low flow of N2 to the aerosol produced by USN is a simple way to increase plasma robustness, which is usually lower than that achieved using conventional PN.

  14. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  15. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  16. [Study on distribution of nitrogen compounds in catalytic diesel oil by gas chromatography-atomic emission detector].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongtan; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Haiying; Lu, Wanzhen

    2004-09-01

    The method for the separation and determination of nitrogen compounds in a typical catalytic diesel oil by gas chromatography-atomic emission detector (GC-AED) was established. Seventy-three nitrogen compounds (including aniline, alkyl anilines, quinoline, indole, alkyl indole, carbazole, alkyl carbazole) in the catalytic diesel oil were qualified based on the retention times of some pure nitrogen compounds and the retention indices of nitrogen compounds. Effects of pressures of various reagent gases on peak area of main nitrogen compounds in diesel oil were examined as well. The pressures of reagent gases were optimized. Retention indices of different nitrogen compounds under temperature programmed condition were calculated. Reproducibilities of peak areas of main nitrogen compounds in the catalytic diesel oil were no more than 8.0%. The detection limit for nitrogen was 1.0 mg/L under specific conditions. The linear range was 2.0 - 600 mg/L for each nitrogen compound and correlation coefficient was greater than 0.998. The method can be successfully applied in the determination of nitrogen compounds in different catalytic diesel oils. PMID:15706939

  17. Spectroscopic detection and analysis of atomic emissions during industrial pulsed laser-drilling of structural aerospace alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Robin Michael

    The ability to adequately cool internal gas-turbine engine components in next-generation commercial and military aircraft is of extreme importance to the aerospace industry as the demand for high-efficiency engines continues to push operating temperatures higher. Pulsed laser-drilling is rapidly becoming the preferred method of creating cooling holes in high temperature components due a variety of manufacturing advantages of laser-drilling over conventional hole-drilling techniques. As cooling requirements become more demanding, the impact of drilling conditions on material removal behavior and subsequent effects on hole quality becomes critical. In this work, the development of emission spectroscopy as a method to probe the laser-drilling process is presented and subsequently applied to the study of material behavior of various structural aerospace materials during drilling. Specifically, emitted photons associated with energy level transitions within excited neutral atoms in material ejected during drilling were detected and analyzed. Systematic spectroscopic studies indicated that electron energy level populations and calculated electron temperatures within ejected material are dependent on both laser pulse energy and duration. Local thermal conditions detected by the developed method were related to the characteristics of ejected material during drilling and to final hole quality. Finally, methods of utilizing the observed relationships for spectroscopic process monitoring and control were demonstrated.

  18. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard. PMID:18937424

  19. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels. PMID:22483872

  20. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg{sup +}/Dy{sup +}, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  3. X-RAY NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROCESSES IN ATOMS USING A SELF-AMPLIFIED SPONTANEOUS EMISSION FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N

    2008-08-08

    X-ray free electron lasers (xFEL) will open new avenues to the virtually unexplored territory of non-linear interactions of x rays with matter. Initially xFELs will be based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Each SASE pulse consists of a number of coherent intensity spikes of random amplitude, i.e. the process is chaotic and pulses are irreproducible. The coherence time of SASE xFELs will be a few femtoseconds for a photon energy near 1 keV. The importance of coherence properties of light in non-linear optical processes was theoretically discovered in the early 1960s. In this contribution we will illustrate the impact of field chaoticity on x-ray non-linear optical processes on neon for photon energies around 1 keV and intensities up to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Resonant and non-resonant processes are discussed. The first process to be addressed is the formation of a double-core hole in neon by photoionization with x rays above 1.25 keV energy. In contrast to the long-wavelength regime, non-linear optical processes in the x-ray regime are characterized in general by sequential single-photon single-electron interactions. Despite this fact, the sequential absorption of multiple x-ray photons depends on the statistical properties of the radiation field. Treating the x rays generated by a SASE FEL as fully chaotic, a quantum-mechanical analysis of inner-shell two-photon absorption is performed. By solving a system of time-dependent rate equations, we demonstrate that double-core hole formation in neon via x-ray two-photon absorption is enhanced by chaotic photon statistics. At an intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the statistical enhancement is about 30%, much smaller than typical values in the optical regime. The second part of this presentation discusses the resonant Auger effect of atomic neon at the 1s-3p transition (at 867.1 eV). For low X-ray intensity, the excitation process 1s {yields} 3p in Neon can be treated perturbatively. The

  4. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  5. Prediction of CO Cameron band and atomic oxygen visible emissions in comets C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, S.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2014-04-01

    The forbidden emissions of cometary species have special importance in the cometary spectra. The excited species which produce these forbidden emissions can not be populated by direct solar radiation excitation. These metastable species are produced mainly from dissociative excitation and ion-electron recombination reactions. Thus the observed emissions have been used as tracers of parent cometary species. The CO (a3 -X1) is a forbidden transition which produces Cameron band emission in the ultraviolet region during dissociative excitation of CObearing neutrals and the dissociative recombination of CO-ionic species in the cometary coma. Similarly, the forbidden transitions of metastable atomic oxygen 1S-3P (green, 5577 Å), and 1D-3P (red-doublet, 6300 and 6364 Å) produce line emissions in the visible region. These emissions have been used to probe H2O and CO2 abundances in the comets. We have developed a coupled chemistry-emission model to study various production and loss mechanisms of these excited metastable states. The model is applied to comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) which will have a close fly-by of Mars during mid October, 2014, when Indian Mars orbiter Mission and NASA's Maven, would be orbiting the planet. The model is also applied on ESA's Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko which will be useful for different observations over various heliocentric distances. The predicted intensities and quantitative analysis of these emissions can be a theoretical support for various space and ground-based observations.

  6. Two-center effect on low-energy electron emission in collisions of 1-MeV/u bare ions with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and helium. I. Atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Richard, P.; Gulyás, L.; Rudd, M. E.; Moshammer, R.

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated ionization mechanisms in fast ion-atom collisions by measuring the low-energy electron emission cross sections in a pure three-body collision involving bare carbon ions (v=6.35 a.u.) colliding with atomic hydrogen targets. The measurements have also been extended to molecular hydrogen and helium targets. In this paper we provide the energy and angular distributions of double differential cross sections of low-energy electron emission for atomic hydrogen targets. The Slevin rf source with a high degree of dissociation was used to produce the atomic H target. It is found that the two-center effect has a major influence on the observed large forward-backward angular asymmetry. A detailed comparison is presented with calculations based on the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) and CDW-EIS (eikonal initial-state) approximations. Both the continuum distorted-wave calculations provide a very good understanding of the data, whereas the first Born calculation predicts almost symmetric forward-backward distributions that do not agree with the data. The two-center effect is slightly better represented by the CDW calculations compared to the CDW-EIS calculation. The total cross sections are, however, in good agreement with the theories used. The results for molecular hydrogen and helium will be discussed in the following paper.

  7. COST EFFECTIVE SEAWATER DESALINATION WITH ICP ELEMENT ARRAYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Okeanos Technologies is developing a desalination system that uses Ion Concentration Polarization (ICP) elements and modular arrays. ICP can separate water from solutes and contaminants far more efficiently than reverse osmosis (RO) or electrodialysis (ED) because no extrem...

  8. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  9. An helium microwave-induced plasma Fourier transform atomic emission spectrometer as a novel two-dimensional detector for gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The helium microwave-induced plasma (MIP) emission excitation source is a sensitive, element selective detector for gas chromatography. Fourier transform (FT) spectrometry is a technique that allows rapid simultaneous monitoring of the full spectrum of a light source. The combination of the MIP excitation course with an FT spectrometer provides a versatile simultaneous multielement gas chromatography detector. The design and construction of a helium microwave-induced plasma/Fourier transform atomic emission detector for gas chromatography is described. Examples of the operation of this instrument are given.

  10. Low-Altitude Emission of Energetic Neutral Atoms from Precipitating Magnetospheric Ions: IMAGE/HENA Mission-Long Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, J. T.; Roelof, E. C.; Nair, H.; Sotirelis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of ring current losses should be of considerable utility to the RBSP mission. Low-altitude emission (LAE) of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) yields a sensitive measurement of the precipitation of magnetospheric energetic ions into the dense monatomic oxygen (O) exosphere at altitudes ˜350 km. LAE is the brightest source of ENAs with energies 1emission (RCE) of ENAs produced by the same energetic ion population directly by charge exchange with the neutral hydrogen atom (H) geocorona. LAE has been detected by many spacecraft (including the NASA TWINS spacecraft now in orbit), but the HENA imager on the IMAGE spacecraft (operating during 2000-2005) had the highest angular resolution (6o×6opixels) and sensitivity (G=1.6 cm2 sr) over the energy range of the bulk of the ring current (20

  11. Application of microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for environmental monitoring of industrially contaminated sites in Hyderabad city.

    PubMed

    Kamala C T; Balaram V; Dharmendra V; Satyanarayanan M; Subramanyam K S V; Krishnaiah A

    2014-11-01

    Recently introduced microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES) represents yet another and very important addition to the existing array of modern instrumental analytical techniques. In this study, an attempt is made to summarize the performance characteristics of MP-AES and its potential as an analytical tool for environmental studies with some practical examples from Patancheru and Uppal industrial sectors of Hyderabad city. A range of soil, sediment, water reference materials, particulate matter, and real-life samples were chosen to evaluate the performance of this new analytical technique. Analytical wavelengths were selected considering the interference effects of other concomitant elements present in different sample solutions. The detection limits for several elements were found to be in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng/g. The trace metals analyzed in both the sectors followed the topography with more pollution in the low-lying sites. The metal contents were found to be more in ground waters than surface waters. Since a decade, the pollutants are transfered from Patancheru industrial area to Musi River. After polluting Nakkavagu and turning huge tracts of agricultural lands barren besides making people residing along the rivulet impotent and sick, industrialists of Patancheru are shifting the effluents to downstream of Musi River through an 18-km pipeline from Patancheru. Since the effluent undergoes primary treatment at Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) at Patanchru and travels through pipeline and mixes with sewage, the organic effluents will be diluted. But the inorganic pollutants such as heavy and toxic metals tend to accumulate in the environmental segments near and downstreams of Musi River. The data generated by MP-AES of toxic metals like Zn, Cu, and Cr in the ground and surface waters can only be attributed to pollution from Patancheru since no other sources are available to Musi River. PMID:25086712

  12. Spectral Evolution of Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions at the Heliospheric Poles as Measured by IBEX during its First Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Allegrini, F.; DeMajistre, R.; Desai, M. I.; Ebert, R. W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Janzen, P.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Siewert, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to measure energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions produced by charge exchange between solar wind (SW) protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first 3 yr of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (2009-2011), we examined the spectral evolution of ~0.5-6 keV ENAs at the polar regions (above 60°). We found the following: (1) pixels with a characteristic "ankle" spectra (lower spectral index at higher energies) increase by ~5% in 2010 and ~10% in 2011 compared to 2009. (2) The averaged spectral index in 2011 is smaller than that of 2009. (3) The slope of the ENA spectrum above ~1.7 keV is more variable than the slope below ~1.7 keV. The lower spectral index at higher energies of the spectrum does not appear to be caused by an increase of the ENA production at these energies, but rather from a consistent decrease at lower energies. (4) The decrease in polar ENA fluxes does not correlate significantly with the averaged SW dynamic pressure, back-traced in time to 1 AU along the flow streamlines (originating between 10° and 30° for slow SW, and 60° and 80° for fast SW), assuming these are the respective conditions of ENA progenitors back in time. These results provide insights into the complexity of relating the slow and fast SW contributions to polar ENAs and shed light on how the solar output and the resulting change in the global heliospheric structure possibly affect the heliosheath (HS) populations.

  13. Spectral evolution of energetic neutral atom emissions at the heliospheric poles as measured by IBEX during its first three years

    SciTech Connect

    Dayeh, M. A.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M. I.; Ebert, R. W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; DeMajistre, R.; Janzen, P.; Reisenfeld, D.; Siewert, M.

    2014-12-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to measure energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions produced by charge exchange between solar wind (SW) protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first 3 yr of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (2009-2011), we examined the spectral evolution of ∼0.5-6 keV ENAs at the polar regions (above 60°). We found the following: (1) pixels with a characteristic 'ankle' spectra (lower spectral index at higher energies) increase by ∼5% in 2010 and ∼10% in 2011 compared to 2009. (2) The averaged spectral index in 2011 is smaller than that of 2009. (3) The slope of the ENA spectrum above ∼1.7 keV is more variable than the slope below ∼1.7 keV. The lower spectral index at higher energies of the spectrum does not appear to be caused by an increase of the ENA production at these energies, but rather from a consistent decrease at lower energies. (4) The decrease in polar ENA fluxes does not correlate significantly with the averaged SW dynamic pressure, back-traced in time to 1 AU along the flow streamlines (originating between 10° and 30° for slow SW, and 60° and 80° for fast SW), assuming these are the respective conditions of ENA progenitors back in time. These results provide insights into the complexity of relating the slow and fast SW contributions to polar ENAs and shed light on how the solar output and the resulting change in the global heliospheric structure possibly affect the heliosheath (HS) populations.

  14. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  15. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  16. Modification and control of coherence effects in the spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level atom at weak field regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that coherence effects have a marked influence in the spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level Λ -type atom driven by weak coherent and incoherent fields. Phase dependent evolution of interference effects leading to spectral narrowing, generation of spectral hole and dark line are exhibited in the present scheme when the atom does not interact with the incoherent fields. The basic mechanism underlying this scheme seems to be appropriate for a phaseonium. Apart from phase-coherence introduced in the system the phenomenon of line narrowing, in the presence of weak incoherent pumping, can be achieved in a different way as a consequence of two competitive resonant effects: sharp non-Lorentzian and symmetric Fano-like-resonance contributions to the line shape. In both the situations, the evolution of narrow structures in the line shape can be achieved even when the emission is influenced by the dephasing of Raman coherence.

  17. Determination of trace elements of Egyptian cane sugar (Naga Hammady factories) by neutron activation, atomic absorption spectrophotometric and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Awadallah, R M; Sherif, M K; Mohamed, A E; Grass, F

    1984-01-01

    INAA, AAS and ICP-AES techniques are applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Eu, Fe, Ga, Hf, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, W and Zn in the stalks of sugar cane plant after extracting juice, raw juice principal (mixed) juice, juice withdrawn from the successive stages of sugar industry, sirup, deposits from evaporators, molasse, A-? and B-sugar and in the soil samples (collected from the field supplying the factories by cane plants) taken from the immediate vicinity of the plant roots at surface, 30 and 60 cm depth. The results obtained are in a good agreement of the safety baselines of using juice as beverage, molasse derivatives (honey, sweets, ...) as diet for common people in the developed countries and in industry (methanol, ethanol, acetone & acetic acid, ...) and sugar sweeting for many purposes (in beverages, desserts, ...). Differences of trace elements concentrations in soil samples may be reasoned to geochemical and biogeochemical fractionation while those in juice may be due to the changes in the environmental conditions, chemical composition and botanic structures. Variations in trace element contents in the products formed during the successive stages of sugar industry may be a result of evaporation, filtration processes, chemical treatments or corrosion of vessels, containers or engines. Trace elements are very important where they are responsible for enzymatic and biochemical reactions, matabolism, health and diseases. PMID:6526566

  18. Multi-Window Classical Least Squares Multivariate Calibration Methods for Quantitative ICP-AES Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    CHAMBERS,WILLIAM B.; HAALAND,DAVID M.; KEENAN,MICHAEL R.; MELGAARD,DAVID K.

    1999-10-01

    The advent of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometers (ICP-AES) equipped with charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector arrays allows the application of multivariate calibration methods to the quantitative analysis of spectral data. We have applied classical least squares (CLS) methods to the analysis of a variety of samples containing up to 12 elements plus an internal standard. The elements included in the calibration models were Ag, Al, As, Au, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Pd, and Se. By performing the CLS analysis separately in each of 46 spectral windows and by pooling the CLS concentration results for each element in all windows in a statistically efficient manner, we have been able to significantly improve the accuracy and precision of the ICP-AES analyses relative to the univariate and single-window multivariate methods supplied with the spectrometer. This new multi-window CLS (MWCLS) approach simplifies the analyses by providing a single concentration determination for each element from all spectral windows. Thus, the analyst does not have to perform the tedious task of reviewing the results from each window in an attempt to decide the correct value among discrepant analyses in one or more windows for each element. Furthermore, it is not necessary to construct a spectral correction model for each window prior to calibration and analysis: When one or more interfering elements was present, the new MWCLS method was able to reduce prediction errors for a selected analyte by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared to the worst case single-window multivariate and univariate predictions. The MWCLS detection limits in the presence of multiple interferences are 15 rig/g (i.e., 15 ppb) or better for each element. In addition, errors with the new method are only slightly inflated when only a single target element is included in the calibration (i.e., knowledge of all other elements is excluded during calibration). The MWCLS method is found to be vastly

  19. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He∗(2S1 and 2S3 ) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He∗-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN .

  20. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-15

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He*(2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He*-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN.

  1. Identification of a Single Light Atom within a Multinuclear Metal Cluster using Valence-to-Core X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Dible, Benjamin R.; Chiang, Karen P.; Brennessel, William W.; Bergmann, Uwe; Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Iron valence-to-core Fe Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C XES) is established as a means to identify light atoms (C. N, O) within complex multimetallic frameworks. The ability to distinguish light atoms, particularly in the presence of heavier atoms, is a well-known limitation of both crystallography and EXAFS. Using the sensitivity of V2C XES to the ionization potential of the bound ligand energetic shifts of ~10 eV in the ligand 2s ionization energies of bound C, N and O may be observed. As V2C XES is a high-energy X-ray method, it is readily applicable to samples in any physical form. This method thus has great potential for application to multimetallic inorganic frameworks involved in both small molecule storage and activation. PMID:21954894

  2. Optoelectronic properties of Black-Silicon generated through inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing for crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Jens; Gaudig, Maria; Bernhard, Norbert; Lausch, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    The optoelectronic properties of maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated black silicon through SF6 and O2 are analyzed by using reflection measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quasi steady state photoconductivity (QSSPC). The results are discussed and compared to capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and industrial standard wet chemical textures. The ICP process forms parabolic like surface structures in a scale of 500 nm. This surface structure reduces the average hemispherical reflection between 300 and 1120 nm up to 8%. Additionally, the ICP texture shows a weak increase of the hemispherical reflection under tilted angles of incidence up to 60°. Furthermore, we report that the ICP process is independent of the crystal orientation and the surface roughness. This allows the texturing of monocrystalline, multicrystalline and kerf-less wafers using the same parameter set. The ICP generation of black silicon does not apply a self-bias on the silicon sample. Therefore, the silicon sample is exposed to a reduced ion bombardment, which reduces the plasma induced surface damage. This leads to an enhancement of the effective charge carrier lifetime up to 2.5 ms at 1015 cm-3 minority carrier density (MCD) after an atomic layer deposition (ALD) with Al2O3. Since excellent etch results were obtained already after 4 min process time, we conclude that the ICP generation of black silicon is a promising technique to substitute the industrial state of the art wet chemical textures in the solar cell mass production.

  3. Isotopic ratio measurements with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1986-06-03

    An inductively-coupled-plasma source mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Pb, Os, and B standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on uranium because of its nuclear and environmental interest and because of the availability of a well-characterized set of standards with a wide range of isotopic compositions. The precision and accuracy obtainable in isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS depend on many factors including background, interferences, dead time, mass fractionation (bias), abundance sensitivity, and counting statistics. Which, if any, of these factors controls accuracy and precision depends on the type of sample being analyzed and the characteristics of the mass spectrometer. These issues are discussed in detail.

  4. Newton's Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Andrea; Espinosa, James; Espinosa, James

    2006-10-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, physicists and chemists were developing atomic models. Some of the phenomena that they had to explain were the periodic table, the stability of the atom, and the emission spectra. Niels Bohr is known as making the first modern picture that accounted for these. Unknown to much of the physics community is the work of Walter Ritz. His model explained more emission spectra and predates Bohr's work. We will fit several spectra using Ritz's magnetic model for the atom. The problems of stability and chemical periodicity will be shown to be challenges that this model has difficulty solving, but we will present some potentially useful adaptations to the Ritzian atom that can account for them.

  5. Fundamental properties of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, P.S.; Houk, R.S.; Praphairakisit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector can be used to constrict the analyte zone in an ICP. From a practical standpoint, oxide levels can be reduced to 0.01% for the signal ratio LaO{sup +}/La{sup +} and analyte signals increased by factors of three to fifteen, depending on the element. This paper reports recent measurements of background mass spectra, temperature and electron density in the plasma flowing into the sampler using a graphite torch injector. The graphite injector improves BEC values for most analytes that suffer interference from prominent polyatomic ions like ArO{sup +}, ClO{sup +}, and ArCl{sup +}. One notable exception is ArC{sup +}, which is substantially worse because of the high level of carbon injected into the plasma. Carbon evaporation rates of 1x10{sup 17} to 5x10{sup 17} atoms/s have been measured, the actual values depending on the grade of graphite used. This is sufficient carbon for C{sup +} to become a major background ion and for formation of CO to help reduce the level of O atoms in the plasma. Charge transfer reactions from C{sup +} to neutral As and Se help enhance the sensitivity for these important elements. Doubly charged ions are somewhat more abundant with the graphite injector than with a conventional torch, because a hotter region of the plasma is sampled with the graphite injector.

  6. Title: The validation of Cryogenic Laser Ablation ICP-MS (CLA-ICP-MS) methods by comparison to laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS methods, for the analysis of metals in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannigan, R.; Darrah, T. H.; Horton, M.

    2009-12-01

    ICP-MS and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) are well established techniques for the analysis of metals in geological and environmental samples. LA-ICP-MS is commonly used in geological applications to determine the spatial distribution of metal concentrations at small sampling intervals (as low as 10 microns). However, measurement of metals in water-rich, soft biological tissues typically requires samples to be digested into solutions, obfuscating spatial variations in metal concentrations. The cryogenic cell solidifies (by freezing) soft tissue, allowing these tissues to be analyzed by laser ablation for spatial variations in metal concentration. The cell is temperature programmable and capable of maintaining a sample at any temperature between -35C and 25C throughout prolonged analysis. We validate the cryogenic laser ablation ICP-MS (CLA-ICP-MS) method using NIST Glass SRM 612. We also compare metal concentration data analyzed by cryogenic laser ablation ICP-MS (CLA-ICP-MS), LA-ICP-MS, and solution based ICP-MS, for human and rodent brain samples. The cryogenic laser ablation cell will expand analytical capabilities for measuring spatial distribution and concentration of metals incorporated into biological tissues.

  7. Method of low tantalum amounts determination in niobium and its compounds by ICP-OES technique.

    PubMed

    Smolik, Marek; Turkowska, Magdalena

    2013-10-15

    A method of determination of low amounts of tantalum in niobium and niobium compounds without its prior separation by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) has been worked out. The method involves dissolution of the analyzed samples of niobium as well as its various compounds (oxides, fluorides, chlorides, niobates(V)) in fluoride environments, precipitation of sparingly soluble niobic(tantalic) acid (Nb2O5(Ta2O5) · xH2O), converting them into soluble complex compounds by means of oxalic acid with addition of hydrogen peroxide and finally analyzing directly obtained solutions by ICP-OES. This method permits determination of Ta in niobium at the level of 10(-3)% with relatively good precision (≤ 8% RSD) and accuracy (recovery factor: 0.9-1.1). Relative differences in the results obtained by two independent methods (ICP-OES and ICP-MS) do not exceed 14%, and other elements present in niobium compounds (Ti, W, Zr, Hf, V, Mo, Fe, Cr) at the level of 10(-2)% do not affect determination. PMID:24054577

  8. Spectra, Emission Yields, Cross Sections, and Kinetic Energy Distributions of Hydrogen Atoms from H2 X 1Eg+-d 3IIu Excitation by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianming; Shemansky, Donald E.; Yoshii, Jean; Johnson, Paul V.; Malone, Charles P.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    2016-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation of H2 triplet states plays an important role in the heating of outer planet upper thermospheres. The {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state is the third ungerade triplet state, and the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ emission is the largest cascade channel for the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ state. Accurate energies of the d{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-(v, J) levels are calculated from an ab initio potential energy curve. Radiative lifetimes of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u(v, J) levels are obtained by an accurate evaluation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ transition probabilities. The emission yields are determined from experimental lifetimes and calculated radiative lifetimes and are further verified by comparing experimental and synthetic {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ spectra at 20 eV impact energy. Spectral analysis revealed that multipolar components beyond the dipolar term are required to model the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-{d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitation, and significant cascade excitation occurs at the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u(v = 0,1) levels. Kinetic energy (Ek) distributions of H atoms produced via predissociation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state and the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade dissociative emission are obtained. Predissociation of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state produces H atoms with an average Ek of 2.3 ± 0.4 eV/atom, while the Ek distribution of the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ channel is similar to that of the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+-b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ channel and produces H(1s) atoms with an average Ek of 1.15 ± 0.05 eV/atom. On average, each H2 excited to the {d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state in an H2-dominated atmosphere deposits 3.3 ± 0.4 eV into the atmosphere, while each H2 directly excited to the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ state gives 2.2-2.3 eV to the atmosphere. The spectral distribution of the calculated a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ -b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ continuum emission due to the {X}1{{{Σ }}}g+-{d}3{{{\\Pi }}}u excitation is significantly different from

  9. [Determination of Mineral Elements in Choerospondias Axillaris and Its Extractives by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yu-xin; Chen, Jun; Li, Ti; Liu, Ji-yan; Wang, Xie-yi; Cheng, Chao; Liu, Cheng-mei

    2015-04-01

    Nine elements in Choerospondias axillaris flesh, peels, aqueous extractives and gastric digesta were determined by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in the present study. The results showed that the contents of Fe, Ca, Zn, Mn, Al, Mg, Cu, K and P in the flesh were 27.37, 269.88, 1.51, 2.45, 1.95, 195.30, 2.45, 2,970.11, and 133.94 µg · g(-1), respectively. They are lower than that in the peels, about 40.31%, 11.70%, 21.68%, 4.27%, 10.58%, 15.76%, 68.72%, 42.04%, and 22.59%, respectively. For microwave assistant extraction, the release rate of Mn was highest (81.68%), while Fe was lowest (4.42%) in the flesh. The release rate of Zn was the highest (79.00%), while that of A1 was the lowest (4.94%) in the peels. Except Fe, Cu and Zn, the release rates of the other elements in flesh were higher than those in the peels. After gastric digestion, the release rates of nine elements were 3.25%-87.51% in the flesh and 7.11%-50.69% in the peels. The release rates of minerals in the flesh were found to be higher than those in the peels except Fe and Cu. Microwave assistant extraction can more efficiently release Fe, Ca, Mn, Mg and K from the flesh than the gastric digestion do. While gastric digestion had a significant effect on the peels, the release rates of elements, except Zn, were higher than those in microwave assistant extraction. Therefore, the difference of distribution and release of mineral elements between peels and flesh of Choerospondias axillaris was understood, which will provide a positive guide for further study of bioavailability of minerals for human body. PMID:26197601

  10. Herschel Key Program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT): The Origin of Molecular and Atomic Emission in Low-mass Protostars in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Seokho; Evans, Neal J., II; Green, Joel D.

    2014-10-01

    Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 μm as part of the Herschel key program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time." The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at ~30%, while the cooling fraction by H2O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H2O. The gas with a power-law temperature distribution with a moderately high density can reproduce the observed CO fluxes, indicative of CO close to LTE. However, H2O is mostly subthermally excited. L1551-IRS5 is the most luminous source (Łbol = 24.5 L ⊙) and the [O I] 63.1 μm line accounts for more than 70% of its FIR line luminosity, suggesting complete photodissociation of H2O by a J shock. In L1551-IRS5, the central velocity shifts of the [O I] line, which exceed the wavelength calibration uncertainty (~70 km s-1) of PACS, are consistent with the known redshifted and blueshifted outflow direction.

  11. Application of ICP-OES for Evaluating Energy Extraction and Production Wastewater Discharge Impacts on Surface Waters in Western Pennsylvania

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oil and gas extraction and coal-fired electrical power generating stations produce wastewaters that are treated and discharged to rivers in Western Pennsylvania with public drinking water system (PDWS) intakes. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) w...

  12. Low Altitude Emission (LAE) of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) Observed by TWINS and its Relation to the CINEMA CubeSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazell, D.; Sotirelis, T.; Nair, H.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    The brightest source of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) at energies >1keV is low altitude emission (LAE) from ~200-400km near auroral latitudes where precipitating energetic ions undergo multiple atomic collisions with the monatomic (O) exosphere. This emission is many times brighter than that from the high-altitude ring current region where the energetic ions interact only weakly with the much less dense monatomic (H) hydrogen geocorona. The recently selected NSF CubeSat mission CINEMA [Lin et al., this special session] has, as part of its science payload (STEIN), an ENA imager covering energies 4-100keV. From a high-inclination ~800km orbit, STEIN will view the LAE four times during every 90 minutes. The NASA TWINS stereo ENA imagers (2-40keV) will also view the LAE from their Molniya orbits (apogee radius~7Re). We have been analyzing the TWINS ENA images of LAE and comparing them with in situ ion measurements (1-40keV) from DMSP spacecraft when their tracks take them under the ion precipitation regions imaged by TWINS. We have developed an ENA emissivity function that relates the directionally-dependent emergent ENA spectrum to that of the precipitating ions. The TWINS/DMSP direct comparisons show good agreement. We offer suggestions on joint observing strategies for CINEMA, TWINS and DMSP after the CINEMA launch in the second half of 2011.

  13. Native defects affecting the Li atom distribution tune the optical emission of ZnO:Li epitaxial thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, R.; Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.

    2014-02-01

    It is found that the oxygen vacancy (VO) defect concentration affecting the separation between individual species in LiZn-Lii complex influences the optical emission property of Li0.06Zn0.94O epitaxial thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition. The film grown under low oxygen partial pressure (n-type conductivity)/higher partial pressure (resistive-type) has broad emission at ˜2.99 eV/˜2.1 eV and a narrower emission at 3.63 eV/3.56 eV, respectively. First principle based mBJLDA electronic structure calculation suggests that the emission at 2.99 eV is due to the LiZn-Lii pair complex and the emission at 2.1 eV is when the component species are away from each other.

  14. Electron-impact studies of atomic oxygen: II. Emission cross section measurements of the O I 3So→ 3P transition (130.4 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; Johnson, P. V.; McCartney, P.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The optical excitation function of the O I 3So→ 3P transition (130.4 nm), produced by electron-impact excitation of atomic oxygen, has been measured over an extended energy range from threshold to 1.0 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beam experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic oxygen produced by a microwave discharge source. A 0.2 m vacuum ultraviolet monochromator system was used to measure the emitted O I radiation at 130.4 nm. The relative O I (130.4 nm) emission intensity corresponding to the 3So→ 3P transition was then put on the absolute scale by normalization to the O I (130.4 nm) cross section produced by dissociative excitation of O2 at 30 eV (Kanik et al 2000).

  15. Determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A M Y; Mehanna, N A; Sultan, S M

    2009-06-15

    The continuous flow sample introduction technique with a hydride generator system in conjunction with an inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP-AES-HG), is used in this study for quantitative determination of ammonium and organic bound nitrogen in aqueous and solid samples. Ammonia vapor released from ammonium salt after treatment with concentrated NaOH is transferred by argon to plasma for detection at 174.273 nm using axial argon plasma mode. The calibration curves were linear within a range of 25-1000 mg L(-1)N as ammonium molybdate with correlation coefficients of better than 0.99 and limits of detection of about 10-25mg L(-1)N. The percent recovery of N (25-500 mg L(-1)N) in soft (distilled) water and high salt content (1.7 mol L(-1) NaCl) matrices was found to be in the range of about 97-102% with %RSD in the range of 4.6-0.62. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and blank contribution from the atmospheric nitrogen, were tremendously improved in this method compared with the available ICP-AES spray chamber counterpart. Furthermore, the ICP-AES-HG method gave results for real samples (soil, fertilizer, waste water) containing about 50-1800 mg L(-1)N in good agreement with those obtained by the standard Kjeldahl method. No statistical differences at the 95% confidence level on applying the t-test were observed between the values obtained by the two methods. Thus, the ICP-AES-HG method is reliable and faster than the conventional tedious Kjeldahl method, superior to the ICP-AES spray chamber method, and almost free from matrix interference which is usually a critical factor in atomic emission spectroscopic techniques. PMID:19362191

  16. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  17. Chemical analysis of metal impurity distribution of zone-refined mercuric iodide by ICP-AES and DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.-T.; Salary, L.; Burger, A.; Soria, E.; Antolak, A.; James, R. B.

    A mercuric iodide single crystal is being developed for X-ray and gamma-ray detector applications where high-purity starting material is required. Zone-refining processing has been proven to be an effective step in the purification of large amounts of mercuric iodide for crystal growth. In this study we used the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to identify and determine the distribution of impurity concentrations along the ampoule after zone-refining mercuric iodide. The results show that for Ag, Cu, Fe, Mg, Ca, Zn, Cr and Al, the zone-refining process does sweep the impurities to the last-to-freeze zone, due to an effective distribution coefficient, keff < 1. For Na, Ni, Cd, Mn and Pb the concentration gradient seems to be fairly independent of the position along the ingot. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was also employed to investigate the deviation from stoichiometry caused by the zone-refining process, and the results indicated that the first-to-freeze section is Hg-rich, and the middle section tends to become slightly Hg-rich, while the last-to-freeze section becomes I-rich.

  18. ICP-Enhanced Sputter Deposition for Reactivity Control and Low-Temperature Formation of a-IGZO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Nakata, Keitaro; Satake, Yoshikatsu; Takenaka, Kosuke; Uchida, Giichiro; Ebe, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) - enhanced sputter deposition for a-IGZO channel TFTs fabrication have been performed. This advantage of fine control of reactivity during the deposition process is of great significance for film deposition of the transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-InGaZnOx (a-IGZO), whose electrical properties are significantly sensitive to the reactivity during the film deposition. The a-IGZO film deposition with addition of H2 gas were performed in order to control oxidation process during a-IGZO film formation via balance between oxidation-reduction. The results of optical emission spectrum indicate the possibility for the suppression of oxidation by oxygen atoms of a-IGZO films during deposition due to addition of H2 gas. The characteristics of TFT fabricated with IGZO film via plasma-enhanced magnetron sputter deposition system have been investigated. The result exhibits that the possibility of expanding process window for control of balance between oxidization and reduction by addition of H2 gas. The a-IGZO channel TFTs fabricated plasma-enhanced reactive sputtering system with addition of H2 gas exhibited good performance of field-effect mobility 15.3 cm2(Vs)-1 and subthreshold gate voltage swing (S) of 0.48 V decade-1. This work was partly supported by ASTEP (JST) and Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Exploratory Research (JSPS).

  19. [Determination of Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, P, Si, Mo and Ti in high chromium cast iron by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Guo-Xin; Xu, Yu-Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Peng-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The high-chromium cast iron sample was microwave-assisted digested with aqueous regia in a closed vessel. Series standards were prepared with matching Fe matrix and adding Y as internal standard. Line intensities of the prepared standards and the digested sample solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified by the analysis of three national standard Materials GSBH 41018, GBW 01120 and GBW 01121, and the results were well agreed with the certification data. PMID:22097871

  20. Determination of trace amounts of molybdenum in plant tissue by solvent extraction-atomic-absorption and direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, L H; Kubin, A

    1986-03-01

    Methods are presented for determination of molybdenum in plant tissue by flame and graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry and direct-current argon-plasma emission spectrometry. The samples are digested in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4)-HC1O(4) mixture, and Mo is separated and concentrated by chelation and extraction. Three organic solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone, di-isobutyl ketone and isoamyl alcohol) and two ligands (8-hydroxyquinoline and toluene-3,4-dithiol) were studied. The procedure were tested on pine needle and birch leaf samples. PMID:18964076

  1. Atomic line emission and high-order harmonic generation in argon driven by 4-MHz sub-μJ laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättermann, Alexander; Chiang, Cheng-Tien; Widdra, Wolf

    2014-04-01

    We report on the coexistence of atomic line emission (ALE) and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from argon with experimental conditions bridging the multiphoton and tunnel ionization regimes. Driven by sub-μJ femtosecond laser pulses in tight-focusing geometry, characteristic spectra of ALE from highly excited neutral argon as well as from singly ionized argon are detected in the presence of the harmonics. The results are discussed with respect to the electronic structure of argon and the phase-matching condition of the HHG process.

  2. Differentiation of Corynebacterium amycolatum, C. minutissimum, C. striatum and related species by pyrolysis-gas-liquid chromatography with atomic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Sébastien; Deruaz, Daniel; Freney, Jean; Renaud, François N R

    2002-06-01

    We report here the application of pyrolysis-gas chromatography followed by atomic emission detection (AED) for the characterisation of Corynebacterium amycolatum and related species (i.e., C. striatum, C. minutissimum, C. xerosis and the recently described C. freneyi). This phenotypic method, which analyses the whole chemical composition of bacteria, clearly separates C. amycolatum from other species. Moreover, this C. amycolatum group is subdivided into two distinct subgroups. We cannot differentiate the C. minutissimum strains from those of C. striatum. On the other hand, C. freneyi and C. xerosis are clearly distinct from the other species. PMID:12160322

  3. [Intracranial volume reserve assessment based on ICP pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Berdyga, J; Czernicki, Z; Jurkiewicz, J

    1994-01-01

    ICP waves were analysed in the situation of expanding intracranial mass. The aim of the study was to determine how big the intracranial added volume has to be in order to produce significant changes of harmonic disturbances index (HFC) of ICP pulse waves. The diagnostic value of HFC and other parameters was compared. The following other parameters were studied: intracranial pressure (ICP), CSF outflow resistance (R), volume pressure response (VPR) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). It was found that ICP wave analysis very clearly reflects the intracranial volume-pressure relation changes. PMID:8028705

  4. Emissive properties of xenon ions from a laser-produced plasma in the 100-140 Å spectral range: Atomic-physics analysis of the experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilleron, F.; Poirier, M.; Blenski, T.; Schmidt, M.; Ceccotti, T.

    2003-08-01

    In order to design extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources for nanolithography, xenon EUV emission has been experimentally studied in a plasma generated by the interaction of a high-power laser with a droplet jet. A theoretical model assuming that the resulting plasma is optically thick allows one to find the distribution of the relevant ions and transitions involved in the emission process. Atomic physics computations are performed using the HULLAC code to give a detailed account of the transitions involved. The importance of 4p-4d, 4d-4f, and 4d-5p transitions is stressed, as well as the need for configuration-interaction treatment of the Δn=0 transitions. Comparisons of a modeled local thermodynamical equilibrium spectrum with experiment provides qualitative agreement and permits an estimate of the plasma temperature, density, and dimensions.

  5. Measurement of the helium 23S metastable atom density by observation of the change in the 23S-23P emission line shape due to radiation reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, T.; Ogane, S.; Iida, Y.; Hasuo, M.

    2016-01-01

    In helium discharge plasmas, the relative emission intensities of the fine-structure transitions belonging to the HeI 23S-23P transition can be affected by radiation reabsorption. Since the magnitude of the reabsorption depends on the density and temperature of the 23S metastable atoms, their density can be determined by measuring the 23S-23P emission line shape using a high wavelength-resolution spectrometer. In this study, the applicable conditions of the method in terms of the opacity and line broadening are revealed, and possible causes of errors in the measurement, i.e. spatial distributions of the density and temperature and the effects of external magnetic and electric fields, are investigated. The effect of reabsorption under an external magnetic field is experimentally confirmed using a glow discharge plasma installed in a superconducting magnet.

  6. The New Netherland/New York ceramic chemistry archive: Compositional analysis of bricks by ICP

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, A.S. ); Harbottle, G. )

    1990-01-01

    The need to track down the origins of ceramics recovered in historical excavations within the region of New York led to the establishment of a similar collection of ceramic analytical data. This initiative, called the New Netherland/New York ceramic chemistry archive (or NNNY), resides at Fordham University. The brick component of the archive is especially important. Whereas bricks or fragments of them are common in historic sites, their relatively narrow range of morphological variability makes it difficult to erect detailed classifications or link the different types with discrete sources. The present paper will explore the use of a cheap, recently developed multielement analytical technique, inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (or ICP), that has been the basis for all NNNY determinations. A demonstration of how ICP characterization works in the discrimination of brickmaking establishments along the Hudson River in the late 19th century follows in Section 5. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry observations of daytime mesospheric O2(1Δ) 1.27 μm emission and derivation of ozone, atomic oxygen, and solar and chemical energy deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Russell, James M.; Thompson, R. Earl; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-08-01

    We report observations of the daytime O2(1Δ) airglow emission at 1.27 μm recorded by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. The measured limb radiances are inverted to yield vertical profiles of the volume emission rate of energy from the O2 molecule. From these emission rates we subsequently derive the mesospheric ozone concentrations using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative and kinetic model. Rates of energy deposition due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone are also derived, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance and solar irradiances. Atomic oxygen concentrations are obtained from the ozone abundance using photochemical steady state assumptions. Rates of energy deposition due to exothermic chemical reactions are also derived. The data products illustrated here are from a test day (4 July 2002) of SABER Version 1.07 data which are now becoming publicly available. This test day illustrates the high quality of the SABER O2(1Δ) airglow and ozone data and the variety of fundamental science questions to which they can be applied.

  8. Coherently controlled emissions |4P3/2,1/2> ↔ |4S1/2> from a femtosecond Λ-type excitation scheme in potassium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentaris, D.; Damianos, D.; Papademetriou, G.; Lyras, A.; Steponkevičius, K.; Vaičaitis, V.; Efthimiopoulos, T.

    2016-07-01

    The combined excitation of high density potassium (K) vapour by 100 fs pump-coupling pulses is experimentally studied. The intense pump pulse excites the two-photon ? transition and internally generated emissions are initiated along the atomic paths: ? (path-1) and, ? (path-2). The temporally delayed coupling pulse coherently drives the ? transitions, in a Λ-type excitation scheme. The competing axial and conical emission components of the well-resolved ? transitions (D2 and D1 lines of K) are substantially enhanced and controlled, for appropriate detunings and pump-coupling temporal delays. The coherence relaxation time (CRT) of the two-photon excited ? state is determined by exploiting the temporal delay in the pulse sequence. The effect of the pulse delay and the fs pulse bandwidth on the system dynamics is discussed as well as the role of dephasing collisions between K and buffer gas atoms. The proposed scheme can be employed in radiative multi-level systems, for the direct estimation of coherence relaxation rates of various states.

  9. The concentration and distribution of essential elements in brown rice associated with the polishing rate: Use of ICP-AES and Micro-PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiyama, Shinichi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2008-08-01

    The concentration and distribution of essential elements in brown rice grains ( Oryza sativa L. var. japonica) associated with the polishing rate was determined. Rice samples were collected in Japan and polished to 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% loss of the total weight of brown rice. Concentrations of eight essential elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and distributions of the elements in a single grain were visualized as elemental distribution maps of a cross section by micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis. Results of ICP-AES analysis indicated that in rice which polished from 0% to 10% loss of weight, there were three patterns in the P/ B ratio, which is the mean concentration of an element in polished rice divided by that of the element in the brown rice: no change (Cu and Zn), a gradual decrease (P, Mg, Mn and Fe), and a decrease after a constant phase (Ca and K). There was no remarkable change of the P/ B ratio in rice grains which polished from 10% to 20% loss of weight. Micro-PIXE analysis images showed that P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn were present in large amounts in the surface layer (approx. <200 μm thickness) of brown rice. Two sub-layers were mainly recognized in the grain surface layer in the elemental distribution maps of a cross section. The first sub-layer was approximately 130-170 μm thick. The second sub-layer was approximately 20-50 μm thick, and the primary part of the grain (endosperm cells and starch granules) was under it. The images showed Cu and Zn were uniformity distributed in brown rice, and their concentrations of polished rice were not affected by the polishing rate. Although ICP-AES measurements could not provide the detail structure of the surface layer of the rice grains, the trend of concentration of the elements generally agreed with the elemental distribution maps obtained Micro-PIXE analysis.

  10. Determination of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical products and related matrices by ICP-based methods: a review.

    PubMed

    Barin, Juliano S; Mello, Paola A; Mesko, Marcia F; Duarte, Fabio A; Flores, Erico M M

    2016-07-01

    Interest in the determination of elemental impurities in pharmaceuticals has increased in recent years because of changes in regulatory requirements and the need for changing or updating the current limit tests recommended in pharmacopeias. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) optical emission spectrometry and ICP mass spectrometry are suitable alternatives to perform multielemental analysis for this purpose. The main advantages and limitations of these techniques are described, covering the applications reported in the literature in the last 10 years mainly for active pharmaceutical ingredients, raw materials, and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Strategies used for sample preparation, including dissolution in aqueous or organic solvents, extraction, wet digestion and combustion methods are described, as well as direct solid analysis and ICP-based systems applied for speciation analysis. Interferences observed during the analysis of pharmaceutical products using ICP-based methods are discussed. Methods currently recommended by pharmacopeias for elemental impurities are also covered, showing that the use of ICP-based methods could be considered as a trend in the determination of these impurities in pharmaceuticals. However, the development of a general method that is accurate for all elemental impurities and the establishment of an official method are still challenges. In this regard, the main drawbacks and suitable alternatives are discussed. PMID:27020927

  11. ICP-MS Data Analysis Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-01-14

    VG2Xl - this program reads binary data files generated by VG instrumentals inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometers using PlasmaQuad Software Version 4.2.1 and 4.2.2 running under IBM OS/2. ICPCalc - this module is a macro for Microsoft Excel written in VBA (Virtual Basic for Applications) that performs data analysis for ICP-MS data required for nuclear materials that cannot readily be done with the vendor''s software. VG2GRAMS - This program reads binary data files generated by VGmore » instruments inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers using PlasmaQuad software versions 4.2.1 and 4.2.2 running under IBM OS/2.« less

  12. BROMIDE INTERFERENCE ON ARSENIC AND SELENIUM IN ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a complex analytical technology with multielement capabilities, wide linear range, and low detection limits. Though the ICP-MS offers many positive advantages, it is necessary that analysts, whether performing drinking wat...

  13. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  14. HSV-1 ICP0: paving the way for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miles C; Boutell, Chris; Davido, David J

    2011-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has two distinct phases of its viral life cycle: lytic and latent. One viral immediate-early protein that is responsible for determining the balance between productive lytic replication and reactivation from latency is infected cell protein 0 (ICP0). ICP0 is a 775-amino acid really interesting new gene (RING)-finger-containing protein that possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which is required for ICP0 to activate HSV-1 gene expression, disrupt nuclear domain (ND) 10 structures, mediate the degradation of cellular proteins, and evade the host cell's intrinsic and innate antiviral defenses. This article examines our current understanding of ICP0's transactivating, E3 ubiquitin ligase, and antihost defense activities and their inter-relationships to one another. Lastly, we will discuss how these properties of ICP0 may be utilized as possible targets for HSV-1 antiviral therapies. PMID:21765858

  15. Ophthalmodynamometry for ICP prediction and pilot test on Mt. Everest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent development in non-invasive techniques to predict intracranial pressure (ICP) termed venous ophthalmodynamometry (vODM) has made measurements in absolute units possible. However, there has been little progress to show utility in the clinic or field. One important application would be to predict changes in actual ICP during adaptive responses to physiologic stress such as hypoxia. A causal relationship between raised intracranial pressure and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is suspected. Several MRI studies report that modest physiologic increases in cerebral volume, from swelling, normally accompany subacute ascent to simulated high altitudes. Objectives 1) Validate and calibrate an advanced, portable vODM instrument on intensive patients with raised intracranial pressure and 2) make pilot, non-invasive ICP estimations of normal subjects at increasing altitudes. Methods The vODM was calibrated against actual ICP in 12 neurosurgical patients, most affected with acute hydrocephalus and monitored using ventriculostomy/pressure transducers. The operator was blinded to the transducer read-out. A clinical field test was then conducted on a variable data set of 42 volunteer trekkers and climbers scaling Mt. Everest, Nepal. Mean ICPs were estimated at several altitudes on the ascent both across and within subjects. Results Portable vODM measurements increased directly and linearly with ICP resulting in good predictability (r = 0.85). We also found that estimated ICP increases normally with altitude (10 ± 3 mm Hg; sea level to 20 ± 2 mm Hg; 6553 m) and that AMS symptoms did not correlate with raised ICP. Conclusion vODM technology has potential to reliably estimate absolute ICP and is portable. Physiologic increases in ICP and mild-mod AMS are separate responses to high altitude, possibly reflecting swelling and vasoactive instability, respectively. PMID:21040572

  16. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on nanographite films: structure and field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Smolnikova, Elena A.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Tuyakova, Feruza; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides (MO) was used to modify the properties of nanographite (NG) films produced by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. NG films consist of a few layers of graphene flakes (nanowalls) and nanoscrolls homogeneously distributed over a silicon substrate with a predominantly vertical orientation of graphene sheets to the substrate surface. TiO2 and Al2O3 layers, with thicknesses in the range of 50 to 250 nm, were deposited on NG films by ALD. The obtained NG-MO composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that ALD forms a uniform coating on graphene flakes, while on the surface of needle-like nanoscrolls it forms spherical nanoparticles. Field emission properties of the films were measured in a flat vacuum diode configuration. Analysis based on obtained current-voltage characteristics and electrostatic calculations show that emission from NG-TiO2 films is determined by the nanoscrolls protruding from the TiO2 coverage. The TiO2 layers with thicknesses of <200 nm almost do not affect the overall field emission characteristics of the films. At the same time, these layers are able to stabilize the NG films' surface and can lead to an improvement of the NG cold cathode performance in vacuum electronics.

  17. Determination of rare earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled argon plasma/atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Inductively coupled argon plasma/optical emission spectrometery (ICAP/OES) is useful as a simultaneous, multielement analytical technique for the determination of trace elements in geological materials. A method for the determination of trace-level rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials using an ICAP 63-channel emission spectrometer is described. Separation and preconcentration of the REE and yttrium from a sample digest are achieved by a nitric acid gradient cation exchange and hydrochloric acid anion exchange. Precision of 1-4% relative standard deviation and comparable accuracy are demonstrated by the triplicate analysis of three splits of BCR-1 and BHVO-1. Analyses of other geological materials including coals, soils, and rocks show comparable precision and accuracy.

  18. Electron emission in He sup + -atom and He sup + -molecule collisions: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D. ); Manson, S.T. )

    1990-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the electron emission, differential in emission angle and energy, is presented for He{sup +} impact on several gaseous targets. Experimentally, data at 400-, 500-, and 750-keV/amu impact on He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and H{sub 2}O are presented; theoretically, cross sections for He and Ar are calculated using the first-order Born approximation. By measuring the total electron emission, as well as electron-scattered projectile coincidences, contributions to the differential cross sections resulting from projectile ionization, from target ionization, and from simultaneous projectile-target ionization events are identified. Theoretical cross sections for each of these processes, as well as their total sum, are compared with the experimental data. From these comparisons, it is found that the present theoretical treatment does a reasonable job of describing the total projectile and target ionization cross sections, but is poor for the double-differential cross section. It also severely underestimates the simultaneous projectile-target ionization cross section.

  19. The herpes simplex virus immediate-early protein ICP0 affects transcription from the viral genome and infected-cell survival in the absence of ICP4 and ICP27.

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, L A; Wu, N; DeLuca, N A

    1997-01-01

    ICP4, ICP0, and ICP27 are the immediate-early (IE) regulatory proteins of herpes simplex virus that have the greatest effect on viral gene expression and growth. Comparative analysis of viral mutants defective in various subsets of these IE genes should help elucidate how these proteins affect cellular and viral processes. This study focuses on the mutant d97, which is defective for the genes encoding ICP4, ICP0, and ICP27 and expresses the bacterial beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene from the ICP0 promoter. Together with the d92 virus (ICP4- ICP27-) and the ICP0-complementing cell line L7, d97 provided a unique opportunity to evaluate ICP0 function in the absence of the regulatory activities specified by ICP4 and ICP27. The pattern of protein synthesis in d97-infected cells was unique relative to other IE gene mutants in that it was similar to that seen in the absence of prior viral protein synthesis, possibly approximating the effect of cellular factors and virion components alone. Inactivation of ICP0 in the absence of ICP4 produced a significant decrease in the levels of the early mRNAs ICP6 and thymidine kinase (tk). There was also a marginal reduction in the levels of the IE ICP22 mRNA, and this was most notable at low multiplicity of infection (MOI). In d97-infected L7 cells, the levels of the viral mRNAs were mostly restored to those observed in infections with d92. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that the presence of ICP0 resulted in an increase in the transcription rates of the analyzed genes. The transcription rates of the early genes were dramatically reduced in the absence of ICP0. At low MOI, the transcription rates of ICP6 and tk were comparable to the rate of transcription of a cellular gene. Relevant to the potential use of d97 as a transfer vector, it was also determined that the absence of ICP0 reduced the cellular toxicity of the virus compared to that of d92. The beta-gal transgene expressed from an IE promoter was detected

  20. Modes competition in superradiant emission from an inverted sub-wavelength thick slab of two-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-08-01

    Using the expansion in the eigenmodes of 1-D Lienard-Wiechert kernel, the temporal and spectral profiles of the radiation emitted by a fully inverted collection of two-level atoms in a sub-wavelength slab geometry are computed. The initial number of amplifying modes determine the specific regime of radiation. In particular, the temporal profile of the field intensity is oscillatory and the spectral profile is non-Lorentzian with two unequal height peaks in a narrow band centered at the slab thickness value at which the real parts of the lowest order odd and even eigenvalues are equal.

  1. Determination of stable and long-lived radioactive halides using high resolution ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kerl, W.; Hoppstock, K.; Becker, J.S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1996-09-01

    Routine control of radioactive waste demands efficient techniques which allow many samples to be analyzed per day with high precision and accuracy. ICP-MS is well established as a trace analytical method and permits the extremely sensitive and fast detection of stable and long-lived radioactive nuclides. Though ICP-MS is rarely used for the determination of halides, the author`s investigation shows that a sufficient low detection limit can be achieved (e.g., for the declaration of {sup 129}I in radioactive waste samples.). In this work, a double focusing mass spectrometer with an ICP ion source ({open_quotes}ELEMENT{close_quotes}, Finnigan MAT) is used for the determination of halides (Cl, Br and I) in biological standard reference materials as well as {sup 129}I in low-activity radioactive waste samples. A method was developed for the determination of halides in the {mu}g/mL-range for bromine and chlorine and the ng/mL-range for iodine including isotopic analysis of stable and radioactive halides. Possible interferences of atomic ions with other ions (e.g., {sup 129}I{sup +} with {sup 129}Xe{sup +}) were investigated and possibilities for correction of these interferences will be discussed. To achieve a lower detection limit a new method for iodine sample introduction was developed. The iodide ion in an aqueous sample is oxidized to elemental iodine and introduced directly into the ICP by a special introduction system. Iodine ({sup 127}I or {sup 129}I) can be measured by this new method even in the lower ng/mL-range. The studies were extended to include the determination of bromine and chlorine.

  2. Study on the low leakage current of an MIS structure fabricated by ICP-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S.-Y.; Lu, Y.-M.; Hon, M.-H.

    2008-03-01

    As the dimensions of electric devices continue to shrink, it is becoming increasingly important to understand how to obtain good quality gate oxide film materials wilth higher carrier mobility, lower leakage current and greater reliability. All of them have become major concerns in the fabrication of thin film oxide transistors. A novel film deposition method called Inductively Coupled Plasma-Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICP-CVD) has received attraction in the semiconductor industry, because it can be capable of generating high density plasmas at extremely low temperature, resulting in less ion bombardment of the material surface. In this work, we present the results of crystallized silicon dioxide films deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition technique at an extremely low temperature of 90°C. The value of the refractive index of the crystallized ICP-CVD SiO2 film depends on the r.f. power of the ICP system, and approximates to be 1.46. This value is comparable to that of SiO2 films prepared by thermal oxidation. As the r.f. power of ICP applied more than 1250 Watts, still only the (111) diffraction peak is observed by XRD, which implies a very strong preferred orientation or single crystal structure. Too low or too high r.f. power both produces amorphous SiO2 films. From the I-V curve, the MIS device with a SiO2 dielectric film has a lower leakage current density of 6.8×10-8A/cm2 at 1V as the film prepared at 1750 watts. The highest breakdown field in this study is 15.8 MV/cm. From the FTIR analysis, it was found that more hydrogen atoms incorporate into films and form Si-OH bonds as the r.f. power increases. The existence of Si-OH bonds leads to a poor reliability of the MIS device.

  3. LA-ICP-MS of magnetite: Methods and reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in magnetite. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of magnetite but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of magnetite. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized magnetite samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for magnetite minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line. PMID:19277614

  5. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  6. Continuous-flow determination of aqueous sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry with gas-phase sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Taketoshi; Mori, Toshio; Morimoto, Satoru; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    1995-06-01

    A simple continuous-flow generation of volatile hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide by acidification of aqueous sulfide and sulfite ions, respectively, is described for the determination of low concentrations of sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in the normal ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions of the spectrum. For measuring spectral lines in the VUV region, the monochromator and the enclosed external optical path between the MIP source and the entrance slit of the monochromator have both been purged with nitrogen to minimize oxygen absorption below 190 nm. Sulfur atomic emission lines at 180.73, 182.04 and 217.05 nm have been selected as the analytical lines. Of the various acids examined, 1.0 M hydrochloric acid is the most favorable for both the generation of hydrogen sulfide from sulfide ions and sulfur dioxide from sulfite ions. Either generated hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide is separated from the solution in a simple gas-liquid separator and swept into the helium stream of a microwave-induced plasma for analysis. The best attainable detection limits (3 σ criterion) for sulfur at 180.73 nm were 0.13 and 1.28 ng ml -1 for the generation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, respectively, with the corresponding background equivalent concentrations of 20.9 and 62.2 ng ml -1 in sulfur concentration. The typical analytical working graphs obtained under the optimized experimental conditions were rectilinear over approximately four orders of magnitude in sulfur concentration. The present method has been successfully applied to the recovery test of the sulfide spiked to waste water samples and to the determination of sulfite in some samples of commercially available wine.

  7. Pressure dissolution and real sample matrix calibration for multielement analysis of raw agricultural crops by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuennen, R.W.; Woinik, K.A.; Fricke, F.L.; Caruso, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A method utilizing a pressure dissolution technique to minimize sample pretreatment is described for multielement analysis of raw agricultural crops by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The procedure employs a 30-min pressure dissolution of sample composite with 6 M HCI at 80/sup 8/C in 60-mL linear polyethylene bottles. A sample introduction system is also described which permits direct atomization of complex organic matrices. Combined with a real sample matrix callbration technique, this introduction system allows rapid and accurate multielement analysis of complex HCl sample matrix solutions. The procedure compares favorably to more time-consuming conventional wet ashing methods for the determination of major, minor, and trace elements occurring in lettuce, potatoes, peanuts, soybeans, spinach, sweet corn, and wheat. Recoveries for spiked samples, precision studies, and analyses of NBS reference materials demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the procedure. Advantages and limitations of this technique relative to conventional wet ashing methods are discussed. 2 figures, 7 tables.

  8. Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

  9. Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations from WINDII O+(2P→2D) 732 nm emission: Comparisons with the NRLMSISE-00 and C-IAM models and with GUVI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations have been retrieved from observations by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) O+(2P→2D) 732 and 733 nm emissions and are compared with results obtained by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Although the observations compared were taken ten years apart, the periods were selected on the basis of solar activity, using the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) to bridge the time gap. Results from all of these were compared with those from the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (NRLMSISE-00) model. Comparisons were made on the basis of F10.7 solar flux, day of year, local time, season, latitude and longitude. The WINDII local time variations showed enhanced values for the Northern spring season. Latitude and longitude plots showed smooth variations for NRLMSISE-00 and large variations for both WINDII and GUVI observations; in particular a depression in atomic oxygen concentration around 40 °S latitude and 100 °E longitude that is tentatively identified with a longitudinal wave 1 that does not propagate in local time but has an annual variation. The averaged values showed the WINDII values to be 0.75 that of NRLMSISE-00 compared with 0.80 for GUVI. Thus the WINDII values agreed with those of GUVI to within 6%, although taken 10 years apart.

  10. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical "matrix removal" approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the plasma with respect to analytes repartition; (iii) the subsequent modifications of plasma fundamental properties; and (iv) the resulting spectroscopic and non spectroscopic interferences. This first part of this tutorial review is addressed either to beginners or to more experienced scientists who are interested in the

  11. Uncertainty estimation in the determination of metals in superficial water by ICP-OES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustino, Mainara G.; Marques, Joyce R.; Monteiro, Lucilena R.; Stellato, Thamiris B.; Soares, Sabrina M. V.; Silva, Tatiane B. S. C.; da Silva, Douglas B.; Pires, Maria Aparecida F.; Cotrim, Marycel E. B.

    2016-07-01

    From validation studies, it was possible to estimate a measurement uncertainty of several elements such as Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Cr, Cd, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and K in water samples from Guarapiranga Dam. These elements were analyzed by optical emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). The value of relative estimated uncertainties were between 3% and 15%. The greatest uncertainty contributions were analytical curve, and the recovery method, which were related with elements concentrations and the equipment response. Water samples analyzed were compared with CONAMA Resolution #357/2005.

  12. LA-ICP-MS of rare earth elements concentrated in cation-exchange resin particles for origin attribution of uranium ore concentrate.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shiho; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) concentrated on cation-exchange resin particles were measured with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to obtain chondrite-normalized REE plots. The sensitivity of REE increased in ascending order of the atomic number, according to the sensitivity trend in pneumatic nebulization ICP-MS (PN-ICP-MS). The signal intensities of REE were nearly proportional to the concentrations of REE in the immersion solution used for particle-preparation. Minimum measurable concentration calculated from the net signals of REE was approximately 1 ng/g corresponding to 0.1 ng in the particle-preparation solution. In LA analysis, formation of oxide and hydroxide of the light REE and Ba which causes spectral interferences in the heavy REE measurement was effectively attenuated due to the solvent-free measurement capability, compared to conventional PN-ICP-MS. To evaluate the applicability of the proposed method, the REE-adsorbed particles prepared by immersing them in a U-bearing solution (commercially available U standard solution) were measured with LA-ICP-MS. Aside from the LA analysis, each concentration of REE in the same U standard solution was determined with conventional PN-ICP-MS after separating REE by cation-exchange chromatography. The concentrations of REE were ranging from 0.04 (Pr) to 1.08 (Dy) μg/g-U. The chondrite-normalized plot obtained through LA-ICP-MS analysis of the U standard sample exhibited close agreement with that obtained through the PN-ICP-MS of the REE-separated solution within the uncertainties. PMID:25640124

  13. [Determination of aqueous potassium and sodium ions with liquid-phase diaphragm glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-jun; Wang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The present paper described the determination of potassium and sodium ions with a liquid-phase diaphragm glow discharge emission spectroscopy (LDGD-AES) in aqueous solution. The discharge was formed in a pin hole on a dielectric diaphragm interposed between two submerged graphite electrodes. Effects of applied voltage and the addition of organic additive methanol on the determination were examined. It was found that increasing the applied voltage and adding of methanol can increase the detection sensitivity and decrease the detection limit. Limits of detection for K and Na were 0. 007 and 0. 001 mg x L(-1) under the applied voltage of 850 V and addition of 0.6%-0.8% methanol, respectively. It was demonstrated that the LDGD-AES is a promising technique in measurements of metal ions in aqueous solution, because no optical interferences from the electrodes and the background molecular bands from air were found. PMID:24369674

  14. Online Standard Additions Technique for La-ICP-MS Using a Desolvating Nebulizer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, J.; Asogan, D.; Moody, S.; Clarke, D.

    2014-12-01

    Historically, quantification with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been limited to the ability to matrix match both standards and samples. This can prove problematic when a particular matrix matched standard is not readily available. Liquid standard addition has been shown1-4 as an alternative technique for quantification that does not require matrix matching; however, further fundamental study is needed especially considering the different mass flow rates delivered to the plasma from traditional pneumatic nebulizers and laser ablation itself. In this work, the authors combine a specialized low-flow desolvating nebulizer system with LA-ICP-MS. This nebulizer system efficiently removes water vapour, thereby significantly reducing oxide based mass spectral interferences. For the instrument setup, the output from the laser is combined with the dried aerosol from the nebulizer system prior to entering the ICP-MS source. By using two sources of dry aerosol, mixing efficiency is improved whilst minimising plasma power lost to solvent (water vapour) processing. The method was applied to both USGS Green River Shale and an Arkansas Womble Shale. The results showed a number of elements that were correctly quantified using the technique as compared to reference values. References Gunther, D., Cousin, H., Magyar, B., Leopold, I., J. Anal. Atom. Spectrom., 1997, 12, 165 - 170. Leach, J.J., Allen, L. A., Aeschliman, D.B., Houk, R.S., Anal. Chem., 1999, 71, 440 - 445. O'Conner, C.J.P., Sharp, B.L, Evans, P.J., Anal. Atom. Spectrom., 2006, 21, 556. Yang, C.K., Chi, P.H., Lin, Y.C., Sun, Y.C., Yang, M.H., Talanta, 2010, 80, 1222 - 1227.

  15. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geochemical samples by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Typically, quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is used to determine as many as 57 major, minor, and trace elements in aqueous geochemical samples, including natural surface water and groundwater, acid mine drainage water, and extracts or leachates from geological samples. The sample solution is aspirated into the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) which is an electrodeless discharge of ionized argon gas at a temperature of approximately 6,000 degrees Celsius. The elements in the sample solution are subsequently volatilized, atomized, and ionized by the ICP. The ions generated are then focused and introduced into a quadrupole mass filter which only allows one mass to reach the detector at a given moment in time. As the settings of the mass analyzer change, subsequent masses are allowed to impact the detector. Although the typical quadrupole ICP-MS system is a sequential scanning instrument (determining each mass separately), the scan speed of modern instruments is on the order of several thousand masses per second. Consequently, typical total sample analysis times of 2–3 minutes are readily achievable for up to 57 elements.

  16. Performance testing of multi-metal continuous emissions monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, W.J.; French, N.B.; Brown, C.H.; Burns, D.B.; Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; Priebe, S.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-11-17

    Three prototype multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in April 1996 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The CEM instruments were: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES); Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometry-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (LIBS); and Laser Spark Spectrometry, another LIBS instrument. The three CEMs were tested simultaneously during test periods in which low, medium, and high concentration levels of seven toxic metals -- antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury -- were maintained under carefully controlled conditions. Two methods were used to introduce the test metals into the flue gas: (1) solution atomization, introducing metal-containing aerosol directly into the secondary combustion burner, and (2) injection of fly ash particulates. The testing addressed four measures of CEM performance: relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift, zero drift, and response time. These were accomplished by comparing the toxic metal analyte concentrations reported by the CEMs to the concentrations measured using the EPA reference method (RM) for the same analytes. Overall, the test results showed the prototype nature of the test CEMs and the clear need for further development. None of the CEMs tested consistently achieved RA values of 20% or less as required by the EPA draft performance specification. Instrument size reduction and automation will also likely need additional attention before multi-metal CEMs systems become commercially available for service as envisioned by regulators and citizens.

  17. Glow discharge optical emission of plutonium and plutonium waste

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, R.K.; Spencer, W.A.

    1995-11-09

    The application of glow discharges to the analysis of nonconducting materials such as glasses and ceramics is of great interest due to the number of advantages afforded by their direct solids capabilities. These types of samples, by their chemical nature, pose difficulties in dissolution for their subsequent analysis by common spectroscopic instrumental methods such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission (ICP-AES). The ability of the glow discharge to sputter-atomize and excite solid nonconducting materials greatly reduces sample preparation time, cost, and complexity of an analysis. In comparison with x-ray spectroscopies, GD also provides the advantage of a relatively uniform sample atomization rate, resulting in a lowering of matrix effects. In a traditional direct current glow discharge (dc-GD), the material to be analyzed must first be ground and thoroughly mixed with a conductive host matrix and pressed into a solid pellet. Additionally, atmospheric gases which are often trapped in the sample upon pressing can degrade the quality of the plasma and obscure analytical results by reducing sputtering rates and affecting excitation conditions. Internal standardization has been carried out in both atomic absorption and emission dc-GD analyses in order to improve precision and accuracy which are affected by these problems.

  18. Resonant nonstationary amplification of polychromatic laser pulses and conical emission in an optically dense ensemble of neon metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Egorov, V. S.; Mekhov, I. B.; Moroshkin, P. V.; Chekhonin, I. A.; Davliatchine, E. M.; Kindel, E.

    2003-10-01

    Experimental and numerical investigation of single-beam and pump-probe interaction with a resonantly absorbing dense extended medium under strong and weak field-matter coupling is presented. Significant probe beam amplification and conical emission were observed. Under relatively weak pumping and high medium density, when the condition of strong coupling between field and resonant matter is fulfilled, the probe amplification spectrum has a form of spectral doublet. Stronger pumping leads to the appearance of a single peak of the probe beam amplification at the transition frequency. The greater probe intensity results in an asymmetrical transmission spectrum with amplification at the blue wing of the absorption line and attenuation at the red one. Under high medium density, a broadband of amplification appears. The theoretical model is based on the solution of the Maxwell-Bloch equations for a two-level system. Different types of probe transmission spectra obtained are attributed to complex dynamics of a coherent medium response to broadband polychromatic radiation of a multimode dye laser.

  19. On the dependence of solar flare X-ray spectral line intensity ratios of highly ionized sulfur, calcium, and iron on electron temperature, differential emission measure, and atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lang, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on what can be learned about the emission measure distribution and certain atomic physics parameters from spectral lines of highly ionized ions of sulfur, calcium, and iron that appear in solar flare spectra. The particular lines chosen for analysis allow the electron temperature to be determined independently of the assumption of ionization equilibrium. An attempt is made to find emission measure models based on selected functional dependences of emission measure on temperature that reproduce the observed temperatures deduced from spectral line ratios as well as the relative intensities of resonance lines of different elements.

  20. A novel method for simultaneous determination of selected elements in dolomite and magnesia by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy with slurry sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok-Badura, Joanna; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Turek, Marian; Szczerba, Jacek; Lemanowicz, Marcin; Karoń, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    The slurry nebulization ICP-AES method for simultaneous determination of selected elements in dolomite and magnesia was proposed. Based on the investigation results the optimal conditions for this analysis were as follows: particle size < 40 μm, the nitric acid concentration 10%, the RF power 1.0 kW, aqueous solutions (no dispersing agents) and mixing on magnetic stirrer, during the sample introduction into plasma, as homogenization method. The certified reference materials Dolomite CRM 782-1 and High Purity Magnesia BCS-CRM 389/1 were analyzed. Student's t-test proved that there were no statistically significant differences between determined values and the certified ones. This proves that the slurry sample introduction into plasma in ICP-AES technique can be applied for simultaneous determination of elements in dolomite and magnesia.

  1. [Study on microwave digestion of coal for the determination of multi-element by ICP-OES and ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Song, Qiang; Yao, Qiang; Chen, Chang-He; Yu, Fei-Lu

    2012-06-01

    Effects of temperature and four acids (HNO3, HNO3/H2O2, HNO3/HF and HNO3/HF+H3BO3) on the coal decomposition by microwave digestion and the multi-element analysis were studied. SARM20 was used as a coal standard reference material. The contents of 10 mineral elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Si, Sr and Ti) in the coal SARM20 were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). And the contents of 20 heavy metals (Li, Be, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Zr, Sn, Cs, Ba, Ce, Eu and Pb) were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results showed that the coal was completely decomposed by microwave digestion with HNO3/HF+ H3BO3 at 210 degrees C. Good recoveries for all elements in the coal SARM20 were obtained by this two-step microwave digestion method. The recoveries of the 10 mineral elements were from 87.5% to 98.8%, and the recoveries of the 20 heavy metals were from 85% to 112.5%. All RSDs of tests were below 3%. PMID:22870661

  2. ICP measurement accuracy: the effect of temperature drift. Design of a laboratory test for assessment of ICP transducers.

    PubMed

    Morgalla, M H; Mettenleiter, H; Katzenberger, T

    1999-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has become the mainstay of multimodal neuromonitoring of comatous patients after head injury. In the presence of rising ICP and faced with pressures, difficult to control, aggressive measures, such as hypothermia may be used. The ICP readings should not be influenced by temperature changes. A laboratory test was designed to simulate temperature variations between 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C at different pressure levels under physiological conditions. Five types of transducers were examined: Epidyn Braun Melsungen, ICT/B-Titan Gaeltec, Camino-OLM-110-4B, Codman MicroSensor ICP-Transducer, Neurovent ICP transducer Rehau Ag+Co. Tests were performed at 6 different pressure levels between 0 mmHg and 50 mmHg. The results show very low drifts of less than 0.15 mmHg degree C-1 for Codman, Epidyn and Neurovent. Gaeltec and Camino exhibited higher drifts of 0.18 mmHg and 0.2 mmHg degree C-1 respectively. Within the temperature range from 35 degrees C to 42 degrees C all probes tested show insignificant temperature drift. Whether these results also apply to other types of transducers needs further evaluation. Problems and requirements related to the design of a laboratory test for the in vitro assessment of ICP transducers are discussed in detail. PMID:10202697

  3. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (<100W), the helium microwave plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as

  4. Atlas of atomic spectral lines of plutonium emitted by an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; DeKalb, E.L.; Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.

    1986-09-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Pu-242 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 2280 to 7008 Angstrom wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on ICP-Pu spectroscopy.

  5. Investigating Pu and U isotopic compositions in sediments: a case study in Lake Obuchi, Rokkasho Village, Japan using sector-field ICP-MS and ICP-QMS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2005-08-01

    The objectives of the present work were to study isotope ratios and the inventory of plutonium and uranium isotope compositions in sediments from Lake Obuchi, which is in the vicinity of several nuclear fuel facilities in Rokkasho, Japan. Pu and its isotopes were determined using sector-field ICP-MS and U and its isotopes were determined with ICP-QMS after separation and purification with a combination of ion-exchange and extraction chromatography. The observed (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio (0.186 +/- 0.016) was similar to that of global fallout, indicating that the possible early tropospheric fallout Pu did not deliver Pu from the Pacific Proving Ground to areas above 40 degrees N. The previously reported higher Pu inventory in the deep water area of Lake Obuchi could be attributed to the lateral transportation of Pu deposited in the shallow area which resulted from the migration of deposited global fallout Pu from the land into the lake by river runoff and from the Pacific Ocean by tide movement and sea water scavenging, as well as from direct soil input by winds. The (235)U/(238)U atom ratios ranged from 0.00723 to 0.00732, indicating the natural origin of U in the sediments. The average (234)U/(238)U activity ratio of 1.11 in a sediment core indicated a significant sea water U contribution. No evidence was found for the release of U containing wastes from the nearby nuclear facilities. These results will serve as a reference baseline on the levels of Pu and U in the studied site so that any further contamination from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, the radioactive waste disposal and storage facilities, and the uranium enrichment plant can be identified, and the impact of future release can be rapidly assessed. PMID:16049580

  6. Application of ICP-OES to the determination of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin films used as absorber materials in solar cell devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Caballero, Raquel; Guillén, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, María Teresa; Rucandio, María Isabel

    2005-05-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 [CIGS; x=Ga/(In+Ga)] thin films are among of the best candidates as absorber materials for solar cell applications. The material quality and main properties of the polycrystalline absorber layer are critically influenced by deviations in the stoichiometry, particularly in the Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratio. In this work a simple, sensitive and accurate method has been developed for the quantitative determination of these thin films by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The proposed method involves an acid digestion of the samples to achieve the complete solubilization of CIGS, followed by the analytical determination by ICP-OES. A digestion procedure with 50% HNO3 alone or in the presence of 10% HCl was performed to dissolve those thin films deposited on glass or Mo-coated glass substrates, respectively. Two analytical lines were selected for each element (Cu 324.754 and 327.396 nm, Ga 294.364 and 417.206 nm, In 303.936 and 325.609 nm, Se 196.090 and 203.985 nm, and Mo 202.030 and 379.825 nm) and a study of spectral interferences was performed which showed them to be suitable, since they offered a high sensitivity and no significant inter-element interferences were detected. Detection limits for all elements at the selected lines were found to be appropriate for this kind of application, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 1.5% for all elements with the exception of Se (about 5%). The Cu/(In+Ga) atomic ratios obtained from the application of this method to CIGS thin films were consistent with the study of the structural and morphological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:15702309

  7. Microwave-assisted wet digestion with H2O2 at high temperature and pressure using single reaction chamber for elemental determination in milk powder by ICP-OES and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Muller, Edson I; Souza, Juliana P; Muller, Cristiano C; Muller, Aline L H; Mello, Paola A; Bizzi, Cezar A

    2016-08-15

    In this work a green digestion method which only used H2O2 as an oxidant and high temperature and pressure in the single reaction chamber system (SRC-UltraWave™) was applied for subsequent elemental determination by inductively coupled plasma-based techniques. Milk powder was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed method. Samples masses up to 500mg were efficiently digested, and the determination of Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), while trace elements (B, Ba, Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sr and Zn) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Residual carbon (RC) lower than 918mgL(-1) of C was obtained for digests which contributed to minimizing interferences in determination by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder certified reference material) and NIST 8435 (whole milk powder reference material). The results obtained by the proposed method were in agreement with the certified reference values (t-test, 95% confidence level). In addition, no significant difference was observed between results obtained by the proposed method and conventional wet digestion using concentrated HNO3. As digestion was performed without using any kind of acid, the characteristics of final digests were in agreement with green chemistry principles when compared to digests obtained using conventional wet digestion method with concentrated HNO3. Additionally, H2O2 digests were more suitable for subsequent analysis by ICP-based techniques due to of water being the main product of organic matrix oxidation. The proposed method was suitable for quality control of major components and trace elements present in milk powder in consonance with green sample preparation. PMID:27260458

  8. [Stoichiometry of multi-elements in the zinc-cadmium hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens grown hydroponically under different zinc concentrations determined by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-xuan; Xu, Yi-ming; Du, Wei; Tang, Ao-han; Jiang, Rong-feng

    2009-09-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens is commonly known as a zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, which can be used to clean up the Zn- and/or Cd-contaminated soil. However, it is unclear whether high soil Zn concentrations will stimulate undue accumulations of other elements to such an extent as to cause the nutrient unbalance in the soil. To address this question, the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was employed to investigate the effect of Zn on the stoichiometry of Zn, Cd, K, P, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn and Cu in T. caerulescens (Ganges ecotype) exposed to low, middle and high Zn concentrations (5, 50 and 500 micromol x L(-1), respectively) in a hydroponic experiment. The results showed that there were no significant variations in contents of Cd, K, P, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn and Cu in the shoot of T. caerulescens, however, the Zn content in the shoot and root with 500 mciromol x L(-1) Zn treatment increased as much as 13 times higher than that with low Zn exposure, indicating that the plant is capable of Zn hyperaccumulating. The authors' study suggests that it is improbable to induce soil nutrient unbalance when T. caerulescensis (Ganges) is used for phytoremediation of Zn-contaminated soil, in that over-uptake of nutrient elements from the soil other than Zn was not observed, at least for the elements K, P, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn and Cu. PMID:19950676

  9. Mineralogical basis for the interpretation of multi-element (ICP-AES), oxalic acid, and aqua regia partial digestions of stream sediments for reconnaissance exploration geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Mosier, E.L.; Motooka, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have applied partial digestion procedures, primarily oxalic acid and aqua regia leaches, to several regional geochemical reconnaissance studies carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analytical methods. We have chosen to use these two acids because the oxalic acid primarily attacks those compounds formed during secondary geochemical processes, whereas aqua regia will digest the primary sulfide phases as well as secondary phases. Application of the partial digestion technique has proven superior to total digestion because the concentration of metals in hydromorphic compounds and the sulfides is enhanced relative to the metals bound in the unattacked silicate phases. The aqua regia digestion attacks and leaches metals from the mafic chain silicates and the phyllosilicates (coordination number of VI or more), yielding a characteristic geochemical signature, but does not leach appreciable metal from many other silicates. In order to interpret the results from these leach studies, we have initiated an investigation of a large suite of hand-picked mineral separates. The study includes analyses of about two hundred minerals representing the common rock-forming minerals as well as end-member compositions of various silicates, oxides, sulfides, carbonates, sulfates, and some vanadates, molybdates, tungstates, and phosphates. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of leaching by acids of particular lattice sites in specific mineral structures. ?? 1987.

  10. Multielement determination of heavy metals in water samples by continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after preconcentration on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Krzysztof; Yao, Jun; Kasiura, Krzysztof; Jackowska, Adrianna; Sieradzka, Anna

    2005-03-01

    A novel continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry method (CPI-MIP-AES) has been developed for trace determination of metals in ground and tap water samples after preconcentration on activated carbon. The experimental setup consisted of integrated rectangular cavity TE 101 and vertically positioned plasma torch. The technical arrangement of the sample introduction system has been designed based on the fluidized bed concept. The satisfactory signal stability required for sequential analysis was attained owing to the vertical plasma configuration, as well as the plasma gas flow rate compatibility with sample introduction flow rate. The elements of interest (Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were preconcentrated in a batch procedure at pH 8-8.5 after addition of activated carbon and then, after filtering and drying of the activated carbon suspension, introduced to the MIP by the CPI system. An enrichment factor of about 1000-fold for a sample volume of 1 l was obtained. The detection limit values for the proposed method were 17-250 ng l -1. The proposed method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials: SRW "Warta" Synthetic River Water and BCR CRM 399 major elements in freshwater. The method was successfully applied to the determination of the heavy metals in tap water samples.

  11. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. PMID:26830585

  12. Determination of white phosphorus residues in ducks: An atomic emission detection/compound-independent calibration-based method of generating residue data for risk assessment and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.J.; Goldade, D.A.; Kohler, D.J.; Cummings, J.L.

    2000-05-01

    Analysis of phosphorus concentrations in the gizzards of ducks harvested from munitions sites is necessary to ascertain if acute phosphorus toxicity was the cause of death and to estimate potential secondary hazards to predators and scavengers, such as eagles that readily consume the dead ducks. Gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis permitted compound-independent quantification of white phosphorus standards following analysis of the stable phosphorus-containing compound triethyl phosphate. The white phosphorus standards were then used to quantify white phosphorus residues in duck gizzard extracts by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection analysis. For gizzards containing less than 0.01 {micro}g of phosphorus, quantification was based on a three-point calibration curve. For gizzards containing 0.01 {micro}g or more of white phosphorus, single-point calibration was used. Mean recoveries for phosphorus-fortified gizzards ranged from 73 to 91%. The method limit of detection was 0.013 {micro}g of phosphorus. This method was successfully applied to the quantification of white phosphorus in ducks collected from Eagle River Flats, AK. Potential applications to risk assessment and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

  13. Prolonged gene expression and cell survival after infection by a herpes simplex virus mutant defective in the immediate-early genes encoding ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N; Watkins, S C; Schaffer, P A; DeLuca, N A

    1996-01-01

    Very early in infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) expresses four immediate-early (IE) regulatory proteins, ICP4, ICP0, ICP22, and ICP27. The systematic inactivation of sets of the IE proteins in cis, and the subsequent phenotypic analysis of the resulting mutants, should provide insights into how these proteins function in the HSV life cycle and also into the specific macromolecular events that are altered or perturbed in cells infected with virus strains blocked very early in infection. This approach may also provide a rational basis to assess the efficacy and safety of HSV mutants for use in gene transfer experiments. In this study, we generated and examined the phenotype of an HSV mutant simultaneously mutated in the ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22 genes of HSV. Unlike mutants deficient in ICP4 (d120), ICP4 and ICP27 (d92), and ICP4 and ICP22 (d96), mutants defective in ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22 (d95) were visually much less toxic to Vero and human embryonic lung cells. Cells infected with d95 at a multiplicity of infection of 10 PFU per cell retained a relatively normal morphology and expressed genes from the viral and cellular genomes for at least 3 days postinfection. The other mutant backgrounds were too toxic to allow examination of gene expression past 1 day postinfection. However, when cell survival was measured by the capacity of the infected cells to form colonies, d95 inhibited colony formation similarly to d92. This apparent paradox was reconciled by the observation that host cell DNA synthesis was inhibited in cells infected with d120, d92, d96, and d95. In addition, all of the mutants exhibited pronounced and distinctive alterations in nuclear morphology, as determined by electron microscopy. The appearance of d95-infected cells deviated from that of uninfected cells in that large circular structures formed in the nucleus. d95-infected cells abundantly expressed ICP0, which accumulated in fine punctate structures in the nucleus at early times postinfection

  14. On coherence in spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-05-01

    The case of a single excited two-level atom emitting spontaneously in the presence of N unexcited atoms is solved exactly for emission into a single electromagnetic mode. The two-level atoms are in inequivalent mode positions.

  15. Volatile organic silicon compounds in biogases: development of sampling and analytical methods for total silicon quantification by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Chottier, Claire; Chatain, Vincent; Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES. PMID:25379538

  16. A rapid ICP-OES strategy for determination of gold and silver in blister copper by nitric acid digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gai; Tian, Min

    2014-03-01

    A rapid strategy for the analysis of gold and silver in blister copper by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was firstly proposed. Nitric acid was used to digest blister copper instead of commonly used sulfuric acid. This prevented forming the salt of copper sulfate in the filtration process when the volume of the mixture is very small. Thus, the time of filtration was saved. After filtrating, aqua regia was used to digest the residue and acidize the filter liquor. Two parts of gotten solution were directly determined by ICP-OES. The cycle of analysis was shortened compared with sulfuric acid-fire assay. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine gold and silver in blister copper, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by lead fire assay.

  17. Volatile Organic Silicon Compounds in Biogases: Development of Sampling and Analytical Methods for Total Silicon Quantification by ICP-OES

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jennifer; Dumont, Nathalie; Lebouil, David; Germain, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Current waste management policies favor biogases (digester gases (DGs) and landfill gases (LFGs)) valorization as it becomes a way for energy politics. However, volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs) contained into DGs/LFGs severely damage combustion engines and endanger the conversion into electricity by power plants, resulting in a high purification level requirement. Assessing treatment efficiency is still difficult. No consensus has been reached to provide a standardized sampling and quantification of VOSiCs into gases because of their diversity, their physicochemical properties, and the omnipresence of silicon in analytical chains. Usually, samplings are done by adsorption or absorption and quantification made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this objective, this paper presents and discusses the optimization of a patented method consisting in VOSiCs sampling by absorption of 100% ethanol and quantification of total Si by ICP-OES. PMID:25379538

  18. Producing ion waves from acoustic pressure waves in pulsed ICP: Modeling vs. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    Neutral depletion is an important phenomenon in CW high-density plasmas, mostly caused by gas heating - with a small contribution due to electron pressure Pe - under typical material processing conditions. In pulsed ICP, neutral depletion plays an important role on radical transport in the afterglow. At the beginning of the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly (10 μs) by electron cooling and the gas cools down as well. It generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls, which in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Fast gas displacement is evidenced by measuring Al atoms drift velocity in the early afterglow of a Cl2/Ar discharge by time-resolved LIF, the acoustic wave in the chamber being observed by mass spectrometry. 2D fluid simulations of Cl2 pulsed ICP predict similar results. These phenomena are further studied during both the plasma ignition and afterglow using modeling and experiments. Strong oscillations are observed both on the Cl2 neutral densities and on the ion flux. As neutrals are pushed towards (or outwards) the chamber walls by the pressure gradient, ions are also pushed in that direction through collisions, as well captured by our ion flux probe.

  19. Direct solid sampling system for electrothermal vaporization and its application to the determination of chlorine in nanopowder samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Bunji; Uchihara, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Ishizaka, Syoji; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2015-06-01

    An electrothermal vaporization (ETV) system using a tungsten boat furnace (TBF) sample cuvette was designed for the direct determination of chlorine in metallic nanopowders and fine powder samples with detection by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). A portion of a powder or particle sample was placed into a small tungsten sample cuvette and weighed accurately. A modifier solution of aqueous or alcoholic potassium hydroxide was added to it. Then, the cuvette was positioned on the TBF incorporated into the ETV apparatus. The analyte was vaporized and introduced into the ICP optical emission spectrometer with a carrier gas stream of argon and hydrogen. The metal samples were analyzed by using an external calibration curve prepared from aqueous standard solutions. Few chemical species including analyte and some chlorine-free species were introduced into the ICP, because the analyte has been separated from the matrix before introduction. Under such dry plasma conditions, the energy of plasma discharge was focused on the excitation of chlorine atoms, and as a result, lower detection limits were achieved. A detection limit of 170 ng g(-1) of chlorine in solid metal samples was established when 60 mg sample was used. The relative standard deviation for 16 replicate measurements obtained with 100 ng chlorine was 8.7%. Approximately 30 batches could be vaporized per hour. The analytical results for various nanopowders (iron (III) oxide, copper, silver, and gold) and metallic fine powder samples (silver and gold) are described. PMID:25863402

  20. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals. Annual performance report, February 1, 1989--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  1. The CHIANTI atomic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    The freely available CHIANTI atomic database was first released in 1996 and has had a huge impact on the analysis and modeling of emissions from astrophysical plasmas. It contains data and software for modeling optically thin atom and positive ion emission from low density (≲1013 cm-3) plasmas from x-ray to infrared wavelengths. A key feature is that the data are assessed and regularly updated, with version 8 released in 2015. Atomic data for modeling the emissivities of 246 ions and neutrals are contained in CHIANTI, together with data for deriving the ionization fractions of all elements up to zinc. The different types of atomic data are summarized here and their formats discussed. Statistics on the impact of CHIANTI to the astrophysical community are given and examples of the diverse range of applications are presented.

  2. Atomic spectrometry update - atomic mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, J.; Crain, J. S.; McMahon, A. W.; Williams, J. G.; Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; The Macaulay Land Use Research Inst.; Manchester Metropolitan Univ.; Imperial Coll.

    1996-10-01

    The MS and XRF updates have been published together since their introduction in 1988. In the last few years, however, the two sections have been prepared independently of each other and it therefore seemed appropriate to publish the two sections separately. With effect from this issue, the MS Update will appear in the October issue of JAAS and the XRF Update in the November issue. The format used for the MS section is broadly similar to that used last year, with some additional sub-headings. This Update is intended to cover all atomic and stable isotopic MS techniques, but not those used in studies of fundamental nuclear physics and exotic nuclei far from stability. Also excluded are those reports in which MS is used as a tool in the study of molecular processes and of gaseous components. the review is based on critical selection of developments in instrumentation and methodology, notable for their innovation, originality or achievement of significant advances, and is not intended to be comprehensive in its coverage. Conference papers are only included if they contain enough information to show they meet these criteria, and our policy in general remains one of waiting for a development to appear in a full paper before inclusion in the review. a similar policy applies to foreign language papers unlikely to reach a wide audience. Routine applications of atomic MS are not included in this Update and the reader is referred to the Updates on Industrial Analysis: Metals, Chemicals and Advanced Materials (96/416), Environmental Analysis (96/1444) and Clinical and Biological Materials, Food and Beverages (96/2479). Also excluded are those applications, even if not routine, which use atomic spectroscopy as a tool for the study of a non-atomic property, for example, the use of stable isotope labeling of carbon or nitrogen in biomolecules in metabolic studies. There have been few general reviews on atomic MS of note in the period covered by this update. That of Colodner et al

  3. Determination of silicon in petroleum products by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, S.G.; Williams, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The determination of silicon in petroleum and related products is an important issue due to the effects it has in its various compound forms. Silicone fluids are used in many lubricants as foam inhibitors and serve a vital function as performance additives. Likewise, silicates are used in coolant formulations. The beneficial effects of these additives can be seen at very low treatment levels. Silicon can also occur as an unwanted contaminant in refined products as carryover of foam inhibitor used in refinery units or as silica deposited as fines from catalyst supports. Silicon compounds can poison refinery catalysts and their presence in certain products can ruin machinery. Traditionally, the presence of foam inhibitor in lubricants has been indicated by a foam test (ASTMD 8924P 146) rather than by spectroscopic determination of silicon. Aspects of determining silicon by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy in petroleum and related products will be presented.

  4. The Approach to Reducing the Detection Limit for LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteshin, S. S.; Sysoev, Alexey A.; Torbotryas, R.

    This work is a part of the RED-100 big project. The aim of the RED-100 experiment is to detect the presently undiscovered coherent neutrino scattering off xenon atomic nuclei. The manufacture of such detectors requires ultrapure materials with very low content of natural radioactive elements. So the pure titanium was selected to assay the uranium and thorium contaminations on 1 ng/g level. In this paper we investigate the possibility of reducing the LOD for LA-ICP-MS analysis by increasing the pulse repetition rate of solid-state laser irradiation up to 4,000 Hz and appropriate adjusting the irradiation power. LODs for U and Th in titanium matrix estimation fell in the sub 10-10 g g- 1 level.

  5. [Determination of trace elements in radix ophiopogonis by HG-ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Lou, Qi-Zheng; Xu, Run-Sheng

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, a method of microwave digestion technique for the contents determination of trace elements Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca and Pb in radix ophiopogonis by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emition spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES) was reported. Its recovery ratio obtained by standard addition method ranged between 97.8% and 102.5%, and its RSD was lower than 4.0%. The results of the determination show that radix ophiopogonis is rich in the inorganic elements such as Fe, and the content of Zn in radix ophiopogonis of Zhejiang is much higher in radix ophiopogonis of Sichun. The result will provide scientific data for the study on the elements in radix ophiopogonis and on their relativity of medicine efficacy. PMID:17763797

  6. Reduction of Solvent Effect in Reverse Phase Gradient Elution LC-ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Allen Sullivan

    2005-12-17

    %-35% (simulated) and 8%-32% (actual). Quadrupole (low resolution) and sector field (high resolution) ICP-MS instrumentation were utilized in these studies. Once an AIS pair is determined, quantification studies can be performed. First, an analysis is performed by adding both elements of the AIS pair post-column while performing the gradient elution without sample injection. A comparison of the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the two standards is used to determine a correction factor that can be used to account for the matrix effects caused by the mobile phase. Then, organic and/or biological molecules containing one of the two elements in the AIS pair are injected into the LC column. A gradient method is used to vary the methanol-water mixture in the mobile phase and to separate out the compounds in a given sample. A standard solution of the second ion in the AIS pair is added continuously post-column. By comparing the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the eluting compound and internal standard, the concentration of the injected compound can be determined.

  7. ICP35 Is a TREX-Like Protein Identified in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Phairoh, Panapat; Suthibatpong, Thana; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Jongruja, Nujarin; Senapin, Saengchan; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    ICP35 is a non-structural protein from White spot syndrome virus believed to be important in viral replication. Since ICP35 was found to localize in the host nucleus, it has been speculated that the function of ICP35 might be involved in the interaction of DNA. In this study, we overexpressed, purified and characterized ICP35. The thioredoxin-fused ICP35 (thio-ICP35) was strongly expressed in E. coli and be able to form itself into dimers. Investigation of the interaction between ICP35 and DNA revealed that ICP35 can perform DNase activity. Structural model of ICP35 was successfully built on TREX1, suggesting that ICP35 might adopt the folding similar to that of TREX1 protein. Several residues important for dimerization in TREX1 are also conserved in ICP35. Residue Asn126 and Asp132, which are seen to be in close proximity to metal ions in the ICP35 model, were shown through site-directed mutagenesis to be critical for DNase activity. PMID:27348862

  8. Multianalytical determination of trace elements in atmospheric biomonitors by k0-INAA, ICP-MS and AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, M. C.; Pacheco, A. M. G.; Dionísio, I.; Sarmento, S.; Baptista, M. S.; Vasconcelos, M. T. S. D.; Cabral, J. P.

    2006-08-01

    Elemental contents of atmospheric biomonitors—epiphytic lichens and tree bark, exposed in continuous and discontinuous modes—have been assessed through k0-standardised instrumental neutron activation analysis ( k0-INAA) (two different institutions), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Certified reference materials—ISE-921 (river clay), NIST-1547 (peach leaves), ICHTJ-INCT-TL-1 (tea leaves; TL-1 hereinafter) and IAEA-336 (lichen material), and nonparametric statistics—rank-order correlations (Spearman RS) and enhanced-sign tests (Wilcoxon T)—were used for analytical control and data comparison, respectively. In general, quality of procedures was deemed good, except for k0-INAA in determining Br, Cu and Na, all likely affected by high counting statistics, and/or contamination issues (the latter). Results for Cu, Ni, Pb and Sr (by both ICP-MS and AAS) revealed that, despite an outstanding correlation (asymptotic p=0.000), they could be viewed as statistically equal for Cu only: AAS tended to yield higher values for Pb and Ni, and lower ones for Sr. The comparison between ICP-MS and k0-INAA data from TUDelft, for Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Ti and V, showed an excellent correlation (as above) and random (relative) magnitude for Cu, Mg, Mn and Ti only: ICP-MS tended to yield higher values for Al, Na and V, and lower ones for Ca, whereas between k0-INAA data from TUDelft and ITN, for Br, Ca and Na, resulted in systematically higher [Br] and [Ca] variates from TUDelft, even if all corresponding data sets were found to correlate at stringent significance levels. In a few cases, though—Ca, Sr in lichens; Pb in bark—matrix effects did appear to interfere in the outcome of matched-pairs, signed-rank tests, since random hierarchy of variates could be asserted just when lichen and bark data sets were processed separately.

  9. Comparison of modelled and monitored deposition fluxes of sulphur and nitrogen to ICP-forest sites in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westling, O.; Fagerli, H.; Hellsten, S.; Knulst, J. C.; Simpson, D.

    2005-08-01

    The EMEP MSC-W Eulerian chemical transport model, and its predictions of deposition of acidifying and eutrophying pollutants over Europe, play a key role in the development of emission control strategies for the UNECE and EU. It is important that this model is tested against observational data. Such model evaluation is usually conducted using observations from the EMEP monitoring network, which includes around 70 sites with wet deposition measurements in a variety of landscapes. Here we compare the results of the EMEP model with a completely independent data-set, that of the EU/ICP Forest (Level II) monitoring network. Modelled data from 1997 and 2000 were compared with observed deposition data from 160 ICP-Forest plots.

    In general, similarities between modelled and observed deposition in this study were reasonably good (r2 values between 0.5-0.8 for most components and years, with mean values across all sites being within 30%), despite the uncertainty in comparing measured plot data with modelled grid data. EMEP tends to give somewhat lower values for the average, median and percentile SO2-4, NO-3 and NH+4, wet deposition in the whole deposition gradient compared to ICP, but differences in mean values were within 20% in 1997 and 30% in 2000. Modelled and observed concentrations of SO2-4, NO -3 and NH4+ in precipitation are very similar as average (differences of 0-14%), median and percentiles, and the correlation between modelled and observed data is rather high r2=0.50-0.78). Many of the sites showing large discrepancies between EMEP and ICP data were found to have unusually high inter-annual variability in the precipitation amounts registered by ICP, suggesting that some differences may be due to sampling procedures or complex topographic effects. A simple precipitation variability index (PVI) was devised to flag sites with large variability, and many outliers in the chemical comparison were shown to be such sites. The largest

  10. LIBS and LA-ICP-MS; Old techniques, new approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, P. A.; Foster, D. A.; Gonzalez, J.; Colucci, M.; Russo, R.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade laser ablation in-situ solid sampling for chemical analysis with an ICP-MS analyzer (LA-ICP-MS, single and multi-collector) has become a generally accepted technique across a wide range of disciplines (geochemistry, forensic science, life sciences, etc). More recently, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometry (LIBS) has developed into a complementary technique that offers full spectral analysis of the laser plasma without the need for a mass spectrometer. Both techniques provide in-situ solid sample elemental and isotopic analysis at high spatial resolution (<5 microns) with minimal sample preparation. LA-ICP-MS affords the analyst low detection limits (ppb) and the ability to optimize across a specific mass range for high precision element or isotope ratios. LIBS, while providing slightly higher detection limits (ppm), allows for simultaneous and near complete spectral coverage of the laser plasma. Both techniques are capable of producing semi-quantitative and quantitative data. Integration of a LA and LIBS system could be a powerful tool to allow full spectral element and isotope/element ratio data on the same laser plume (plasma and particulates). Although LIBS and LA typically operate under different conditions of pulse length, spot size, and energy, the ability to capture elemental abundance information from the light that is otherwise wasted during LA makes an important complement to the limited number of ions measured in multi-collector ICP-MS analyses. Such an approach would not require the compromises in sampled volume associated with either split-streams (two ICP-MS systems required; diluted aerosol streams) or with peak switching in the MS (magnetic or electrostatic) because extraction of light-based information does not impact the number of ions measured for isotope ratios. We present LIBS experiments with UV-nanosecond lasers at 17mJ energies delivered to spot sizes of <100 μm and light directed to an ICCD detection system on NIST

  11. The composition of hypersaline, iron-rich granitic fluids based on laser-ICP and Synchrotron-XRF microprobe analysis of individual fluid inclusions in topaz, Mole granite, eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, A. H.; Ramsey, M. H.; Coles, B.; Van Langevelde, F.; Thomas, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    High-temperature (>550°C) hypersaline (>50 wt% salts) fluid inclusions, representative of the earliest hydrothermal fluids associated with the Sn-W-Cu-Pb-Zn-mineralised Mole granite of eastern Australia, are well developed in topaz from the Fielders Hill locality. Methods based on Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy following laser ablation and on Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence microanalysis are described and applied to the semiquantitative point analysis of these inclusions. Crushleach analysis provides further information as well as highlighting the importance of point methods when several generations of inclusions are present. The laser-ICP results confirm the dominance of Fe, K, and Na in these early high-temperature fluids. The mean Fe:K:Na atomic ratios (0.95:0.79:1.00) are entirely in agreement with published experimental data on the composition of chloride brines in equilibrium with synthetic granite at magmatic temperatures and support the view that these fluids are direct products from a cooling granite magma. A number of trace and minor elements have also been detected in the inclusions. These include Ca, Mg, Li, B, Be, Ba, Sr, and several of the ore metals. Order of magnitude estimates of the ore metal contents of these fluids, based on combined XRF-microprobe and laser-ICP analysis, are in the percent range for Fe, Mn, and Zn, in the range from several hundred to several thousand ppm in the case of Sn, Cu, and Pb, and less than 600 ppm for Mo and W. These results have important implications for ore genesis in granitic environments and point to the very high ore-carrying potential of high-temperature, hypersaline, chloride-rich brines exsolved from cooling granite magmas.

  12. LA-ICP-MS-derived U-concentrations and microstructural domains within biogenic aragonite of Arctica islandica shell.

    PubMed

    Helama, Samuli; Heikkilä, Pasi; Rinne, Katja; Nielsen, Jan Kresten; Nielsen, Jesper Kresten

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of the uranium uptake processes (both in vivo and post-mortem) into the skeletal structures of marine calcifiers is a subject of multi-disciplinary interest. U-concentration changes within the molluscan shell may serve as a paleoceanographic proxy of the pH history. A proxy of this type is needed to track the effects of fossil fuel emissions to ocean acidification. Moreover, attaining reliable U-series dates using shell materials would be a geochronological breakthrough. Picturing the high-resolution changes of U-concentrations in shell profiles is now possible by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Here, we analyzed in situ U-concentration variations in sub-fossilized shells of ocean quahog (Arctica islandica), a commonly studied bivalve species in Quaternary geoscience, using LA-ICP-MS. Microstructural details of the shell profiles were achieved by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Comparison of the shell aragonite microstructure with the changes in U-concentration revealed that uranium of possibly secondary origin is concentrated into the porous granular layers of the shell. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that U-concentration variations can be linked with microstructural differences within the shell. A combination of LA-ICP-MS and SEM analyses is recommended as an interesting approach for understanding the U-concentration variations in similar materials. PMID:25877646

  13. Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: A synergistic association for chromium determination in water samples.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Lorena; Silva, Sidnei G; Canals, Antonio; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2016-02-01

    A novel and environment friendly analytical method is reported for total chromium determination and chromium speciation in water samples, whereby tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) is combined with in situ ionic liquid formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL-DLLME). A two stage multivariate optimization approach has been developed employing a Plackett-Burman design for screening and selection of the significant factor involved in the in situ IL-DLLME procedure, which was later optimized by means of a circumscribed central composite design. The optimum conditions were complexant concentration: 0.5% (or 0.1%); complexant type: DDTC; IL anion: PF6(-); [Hmim][Cl] IL amount: 60 mg; ionic strength: 0% NaCl; pH: 5 (or 2); centrifugation time: 10 min; and centrifugation speed: 1000 rpm. Under the optimized experimental conditions the method was evaluated and proper linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.991 (5 calibration standards). Limits of detection and quantification for both chromium species were 3 and 10 µg L(-1), respectively. This is a 233-fold improvement when compared with chromium determination by WCAES without using preconcentration. The repeatability of the proposed method was evaluated at two different spiking levels (10 and 50 µg L(-1)) obtaining coefficients of variation of 11.4% and 3.6% (n=3), respectively. A certified reference material (SRM-1643e NIST) was analyzed in order to determine the accuracy of the method for total chromium determination and 112.3% and 2.5 µg L(-1) were the recovery (trueness) and standard deviation values, respectively. Tap, bottled mineral and natural mineral water samples were analyzed at 60 µg L(-1) spiking level of total Cr content at two Cr(VI)/Cr(III) ratios, and relative recovery values ranged between 88% and 112% showing that the matrix has a negligible effect. To our knowledge, this is the first time that combines in situ IL-DLLME and WCAES. PMID:26653490

  14. Online elemental analysis of process gases with ICP-OES: A case study on waste wood combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, Marco; Wochele, Joerg; Biollaz, Serge M.A.; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous measurements of 23 elements in process gases of a waste wood combustor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobile ICP spectrometer allows measurements of high quality at industrial plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous online measurements with high temporal resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear correlations among element concentrations in the raw flue gas were detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel sampling and calibration methods for ICP-OES analysis of process gases. - Abstract: A mobile sampling and measurement system for the analysis of gaseous and liquid samples in the field was developed. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), which is built into a van, was used as detector. The analytical system was calibrated with liquid and/or gaseous standards. It was shown that identical mass flows of either gaseous or liquid standards resulted in identical ICP-OES signal intensities. In a field measurement campaign trace and minor elements in the raw flue gas of a waste wood combustor were monitored. Sampling was performed with a highly transport efficient liquid quench system, which allowed to observe temporal variations in the elemental process gas composition. After a change in feedstock an immediate change of the element concentrations in the flue gas was detected. A comparison of the average element concentrations during the combustion of the two feedstocks showed a high reproducibility for matrix elements that are expected to be present in similar concentrations. On the other hand elements that showed strong differences in their concentration in the feedstock were also represented by a higher concentration in the flue gas. Following the temporal variations of different elements revealed strong correlations between a number of elements, such as chlorine with sodium, potassium and zinc, as well as arsenic with lead, and calcium with strontium.

  15. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper discusses the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels. The purified HgI{sub 2} is grown into a single crystal by physical vapor transport. The crystal are cut into slices and they are fabricated into room temperature radiation detectors and photocells. Crystals that produce good resolution gamma detector do not necessarily make good resolution photocells or x-ray detectors. Many factors other than elemental impurities may contribute to these differences in performance.

  16. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionization of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  17. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionisation of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high-alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary, both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  18. 3D face recognition based on a modified ICP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kankan; Xi, Jiangtao; Yu, Yanguang; Chicharo, Joe F.

    2011-11-01

    3D face recognition technique has gained much more attention recently, and it is widely used in security system, identification system, and access control system, etc. The core technique in 3D face recognition is to find out the corresponding points in different 3D face images. The classic partial Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method is iteratively align the two point sets based on repetitively calculate the closest points as the corresponding points in each iteration. After several iterations, the corresponding points can be obtained accurately. However, if two 3D face images with different scale are from the same person, the classic partial ICP does not work. In this paper we propose a modified partial Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method in which the scaling effect is considered to achieve 3D face recognition. We design a 3x3 diagonal matrix as the scale matrix in each iteration of the classic partial ICP. The probing face image which is multiplied by the scale matrix will keep the similar scale with the reference face image. Therefore, we can accurately determine the corresponding points even the scales of probing image and reference image are different. 3D face images in our experiments are acquired by a 3D data acquisition system based on Digital Fringe Projection Profilometry (DFPP). A 3D database consists of 30 group images, three images with the same scale, which are from the same person with different views, are included in each group. And in different groups, the scale of the 3 images may be different from other groups. The experiment results show that our proposed method can achieve 3D face recognition, especially in the case that the scales of probing image and referent image are different.

  19. Atomic scale investigations on Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots: Correlation between the composition and emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Benallali, H. Hoummada, K.; Mangelinck, D.; Cremel, T.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Kheng, K.

    2014-08-04

    Atom probe tomography and photoluminescence spectroscopy have been used to study Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots embedded in a ZnSe layer grown on a (001) GaAs substrate. Atom probe tomography analyses show significant cadmium incorporation in the center of the dots surrounded by poor cadmium region. These measurements illustrate that the maximum cadmium concentration in the quantum dots is significantly higher than the concentration estimated by transmission electron microscopy. The composition and size of quantum dots obtained by atom probe tomography have been used to calculate the transition energies including excitonic and strain effects.

  20. High-resolution spectroscopy using an echelle spectrometer with predisperser-II. Analytical optimization for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This work is primarily concerned with the optimization of the slit width (and thus the practical resolving power) of a new type of echelle spectrometer coupled to a 50-MHz ICP operated with a pneumatic nebulizer, as described in Part I of this article series (Spectrochim. Acta39B, this issue (1984)). The optimization is carried out under "ICP compromise conditions" and uses detection power as criterion. With a "pure water" matrix, the effects of slit width on net line and background signals, signal-to-background ratio (SBR), relative standard deviation (RSD) of background signal and detection limit were evaluated for a set of prominent ICP lines spread over wavelengths between 190 and 500 nm. The detection limits eventually attained under optimum conditions were an order of magnitude better than "standard" values reported in the literature (winge et al., Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)). The optimization was extended to a Ni-Co matrix, the latter serving as an example of samples that emit line-rich spectra. In this context, a detailed analysis was made of the background enhancements associated with the presence of major elements that emit line-rich spectra. Accordingly the effects of slit width on SBR, background RSD and detection limit were differentiated in dependence on whether the background enhancement was due to quasicontinuous background, due to complete coincidence of the analysis line with a line of the matrix, or due to partial line overlap. The quasi-continuous background was attributed to the wings of strong lines of the matrix, as described in Part III ( Spectrochim. Acta39B, this issue (1984)). It was established that with pure line wing interference the gain in detection power achieved by improving the practical spectral bandwidth from, say, 0.015-0.005 nm is approximately similar to that found for pure water, that is, a factor of 2-3. In the case of partial line overlap, larger improvements can be achieved depending on the physical widths of the

  1. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotti, Marco; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todolí, José Luis

    2008-05-01

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the "stirred tank method". The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as "signatures" of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  2. Measuring sulfur isotopes by multicollector ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.; Adkins, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfur have traditionally been measured by converting analytes to SO2, which is then introduced to a gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Recently, we and several other groups have begun measuring S isotopes using a multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). The approach offers several advantages, including decreased reliance on preparatory chemical conversion (including combustion) of analytes, greater flexibility of sample introduction, and increased sensitivity. Sulfur is measured as monoatomic S+ ions produced in the plasma source, and can be introduced in a variety of forms including dissolved sulfate or sulfide, or as organosulfur compounds either in solution or in the gas phase. A primary requirement for accurate measurements is resolving isobaric interferences from O2+, which requires a mass analyzer with resolution > 4000. Using a Thermo Neptune system, we document accuracy and precision for δ34S near the shot-noise limit (ie, counting statistics) for both aqueous solutions and gas streams. For samples containing 50 pmol S (as gaseous SF6), this corresponds to ~0.3%; for 50 nmol S (as aqueous SO4) this is ~0.02%. One important application of this new analytical approach is the measurement of S isotopes in volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. No IRMS-based methods for measuring compound-specific S isotopes currently exist. We have demonstrated this capability by coupling a capillary gas chromatograph (GC) directly to the ICP-MS via a heated transfer line. Isotope ratios (δ34S values) are calculated relative to co-injected peaks of SF6 reference gas, in the same manner as is used by GC-combustion-IRMS approaches. As a demonstration of this capability, we measured the δ34S values of individual thiophene isomers separated by GC from a crude oil, which range over 20% for compounds from the same oil. A second application of ICP-MS to sulfur isotopes is the measurement of dissolved

  3. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1994-02-25

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state.

  4. Fingerprinting of ground water by ICP-MS. Progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains the results of the chemical analysis of water from springs in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada. Each spring was sampled two to five times between July, 1992 and March, 1994. Samples were collected and analyzed by the Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies (HRC) Environmental/Analytical Laboratory, at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Chemical analyses included major cations and anions and trace elements. The analyses for the major anions were performed by atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometry, the anions by ion chromatography (IC) and the trace elements by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The standard operating procedures (SOP) used for each method are included. The concentrations of the analytes range from the part per million (ppm) levels for the major cations and anions to the sub part per trillion (ppt) levels for a number of the trace elements. Approximately nine orders of magnitude are covered from the highest to the lowest concentrations. The formation of molecular species in the ICP-MS, plasma produces false positives for a number of elements. None of the elements reported here, that the HRC is aware of, are subject to these isobaric interferences, with the exception of europium (Eu). Europium values are reported for samplings four and five where the HRC used an extraction procedure that extracted Eu but not barium (Ba), whose oxides cause the interference. In order to overcome matrix effects in the samples from high concentrations of cations and other elements, the method of standard additions was instituted for the analysis of samplings four and five as an alternative to external standardization. It is believed that these data, and those for the Death Valley Spring reported in January, 1995 are the first efforts at such a comprehensive trace element analysis of ground waters. HRC has had to develop, test, and refine sampling and analysis procedures throughout the course of this study.

  5. Simultaneous preconcentration of copper and mercury in water samples by cloud point extraction and their determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoaee, Hamta; Roshdi, Mina; Khanlarzadeh, Nasibeh; Beiraghi, Asadollah

    2012-12-01

    A cloud-point extraction process coupled to ICP-OES by using 3-nitro benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-NBT) as complexing agent was developed for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of copper and mercury in water samples. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. 1.5 × 10-5 mol L-1 ligand, 0.3% (v/v) Triton X-114, 55 °C equilibrium temperature, incubation time of 30 min) the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 5-120 and 10-100 ng mL-1 with enhancement factor of 82.7 and 51.3 for Cu2+ and Hg2+, respectively. The preconcentration factors were 28.6 in both cases and detection limits were obtained 0.48 for Cu and 1.1 ng mL-1 for Hg. The precisions (R.S.D.%) for five replicate determinations at 50 ng mL-1 of copper and mercury were better than 1.8% and 3.2%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method is validated by analyzing a certified reference material of water (RTC-QCI-049) with satisfactory results. Finally, the proposed method was utilized successfully for the determination of copper and mercury in surface water (river), tap water and bottled mineral water samples.

  6. [Determination of trace nickel in bi-based superconductor powder by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy after separation with anion exchange resin and extraction with methylbenzene].

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-xin; Li, Jian-qiang; Fan, Hui-li; Sun, Jian-ling; Zhang, Xia; Bao, Rui; Lu, Qing; Wang, Jie

    2011-12-01

    A new method for the determination of trace nickel in superconductor powder by ICP-AES was proposed. The instrument parameters were optimized, and the matrix effects as well as the method of eliminating interferences were also studied systemically. The results showed that matrix interference in the superconductor powder was serious when the amount of matrix increased, and the repeatability as well as the accuracy was poor, so it was necessary to used separation and preconcentration to improve the accuracy and precision. In this experiment, Ni-diacetyl dioxime complexes were enriched by toluene extraction in alkaline condition after eliminating the interference of major element Bi and partial Pb, Sr, Ca and Cu by eluting with anion exchange resin, then the Ni-complexes were back extracted by diluted hydrochloric acid. The enrichment conditions were investigated in detail and the recovery rate of Ni was higher than 95%. Under the optimal condition, an artificial sample was analysed, the result showed that the found values were identical with reference values, and the RSD and detection limit were 1.9% and 0.19 microg x g(-1), respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of trace nickel in Bi-based superconductor powder samples with satisfactory results. PMID:22295798

  7. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-07-27

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process.

  8. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Chan, C. S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum ( 10-4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al2O3) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al2O3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films.

  9. Observation of CH A->X, Cn B->X, and NH A->X Emissions in Gas-phase Collisions of Fast O ((sup 3)P) Atoms with Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical emissions in single-collision reactions of fast (20 eV laboratory translational energy) O((sup 3)P) atoms with hydrazine, methylhydrazine, and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine have been measured in a crossed-beams geometry. The emissions were observed in the wavelength range 325-440 nm, and were identified as the CH (A 2(sub A))-->X(sup 2)pi(sub r), (for methylhydrazine), CN (B sup 2) Sigma(sup +) --> X(sup 2) Sigma(sup +) (for methylhydrazine)and NH(A(sup 3)pi --> X(sup3 Sigma) transitions (for all three hydraz vibration-rotation bands were fit to a synthetic spectrum of CH, CN and NH with given vibrational and rotational temperatures.

  10. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  11. Retrieval of atomic oxygen and temperature in the thermosphere. Part 1: Feasibility of an experiment based on the spectrally resolved 147 micrometer limb emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachor, A. S.; Sharma, R. D.; Yap, B. K.; Riehl, J. P.

    1989-04-01

    The importance of atomic oxygen and translational temperature in mesospheric/thermospheric processes is the motivation to study the feasibility of recovering vertical profiles of the temperature and O-atom density from limb scan data obtained near 147 micrometer and/or 63 micrometer wavelength, corresponding to the oxygen atom ground electronic state (OI) transitions. The limb radiance data must be spectrally resolved to recover both temperature and atomic oxygen density if only one of the OI lines is used, which is the approach investigated in this report. We show how the two vertical profiles can be recovered by applying an onion-peeling method to synthetic data. The temperature and O-atom density in each peeled layer are obtained simultaneously by nonlinear least-squares spectrum fitting. Spectral data in the 147 micrometer line was found to yield reasonably accurate and stable profiles from 300 km down to an altitude between 130 and 90 km, depending on the noise level and spectral resolution, and gave better results than the stronger 63 micrometer data below 140 km. We estimate that the S/N and spectral resolution required for successful retrievals could be provided by a confocal Fabry-Perot system operating near 147 micrometer although retrievals down to 90 km from data obtained at orbital altitude would require cooled foreoptics roughly a meter in diameter.

  12. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions. PMID:24749452

  13. Uranium in soils integrated demonstration site characterization at Fernald, Ohio. Report of uranium concentrations in soil determined by in situ LA-ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.; Zamzow, D.; Bajic, S.J.

    1993-02-02

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry was used for in situ determination of uranium and thorium concentrations in soil at 80 sampling sites in the Sewage Treatment Plant area. This work was performed by the Environmental Technology Development Program of the Ames Laboratory using a completely self-contained mobile laboratory. This laboratory, the mobile demonstration laboratory for environmental screening technologies and the robotic sampling accessory, were designed and constructed by the Ames Laboratory during FY 1992. The instrumentation is capable of analyzing each sample for twenty operator-defined elements simultaneously. Using the MDLEST/RSA, the uranium concentrations in the soil at the 80 sampling sites were found to range from <20 parts-per-million (ppM)(<13.5 pCi/g) to 303 ppM (205 pCi/g). The 95% confidence interval for these field determined values range from 80 to 110 ppM. Bore hole samples from two sites were analyzed. No measurable uranium concentration was detected below the one foot depth. Seven samples taken from sites within an area currently under remediation were analyzed and found to contain uranium concentrations ranging from 101 ppM (68.3 pCi/g) to 788 ppM (532 pCi/g). Soil samples were taken from twelve of the 80 sampling sites in the field, using conventional sampling techniques. These samples were prepared by microwave digestion, using the wet chemistry capability in the MDLEST, and field analyzed using solution nebulization ICP-AES. The laboratory procedure followed for microwave digestion required the samples to be diluted by a factor of 100. This dilution resulted in uranium intensities too low to be accurately quantitated in the field. Optimization of the instrumentation and sample preparation will make this field capability useful in determining near real-time the soil matrix, and enable the performance of this quality assurance process in the field with greater sensitivity and accuracy.

  14. RELIABLE ANALYSES OF WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY BRANCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reduction of stray light in the inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICPES) has greatly increased its reliability as a technique for the multielemental analysis of water. Because of interferences introduced by matrix elements, reliable analysis of some less-sensitive...

  15. Spontaneous Emission of a Two-Level Static Atom Coupling with Electromagnetic Vacuum Fluctuations Outside a High-Dimensional Einstein Gauss-Bonnet Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Yue, Rui-Hong

    2014-10-01

    Using the generalized formalism of Dalibard, Dupont-Roc and Cohen-Tannoudji we investigate the spontaneous excitation of a static atom interacting with electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations outside an Einstein Gauss-Bonnet black hole in d-dimensions. It shows that spontaneous excitation does not occur in a Boulware vacuum, while exists in an Unruh vacuum and Hartle-Hawking vacuum. As to the total rate of change of the atomic energy, it does not receive the contribution from the coupling constant of the Gauss-Bonnet term at spatial infinity only the dimensional parameter has the contribution to it. Near the event horizon, both the coupling constant and the dimension p contribute to the total rate of change of the atomic energy in all three kinds of vacuum. We discuss the contribution of the coupling constant and dimensional factor to the results in three different kinds of spacetime lastly.

  16. Application of ICP-OES for evaluating energy extraction and production wastewater discharge impacts on surface waters in Western Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Norris, Gary A; Landis, Matthew S; Kovalcik, Kasey D; McGee, John K; Kamal, Ali S

    2015-10-01

    Oil and gas extraction and coal-fired electrical power generating stations produce wastewaters that are treated and discharged to rivers in Western Pennsylvania with public drinking water system (PDWS) intakes. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to quantify inorganic species in wastewater and river samples using a method based on EPA Method 200.7 rev4.4. A total of 53 emission lines from 30 elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Ti, Tl, V, and Zn) were investigated. Samples were prepared by microwave-assisted acid digestion using a mixture of 2% HNO3 and 0.5% HCl. Lower interferences and better detection characteristics resulted in selection of alternative wavelengths for Al, As, Sb, Mg, Mo, and Na. Radial view measurements offered accurate determinations of Al, Ba, K, Li, Na, and Sr in high-brine samples. Spike recovery studies and analyses of reference materials showed 80-105% recoveries for most analytes. This method was used to quantify species in samples with high to low brine concentrations with method detection limits a factor of 2 below the maximum contaminant limit concentrations of national drinking water standards. Elements B, Ca, K, Li, Mg, Na, and Sr were identified as potential tracers for the sources impacting PDWS intakes. Usability of the ICP-OES derived data for factor analytic model applications was also demonstrated. PMID:26005746

  17. Analysis of some Romanian fruit juices by ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.

    2013-11-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the heavy metal content of 21 Romanian single strength fruit (plum, apple, sour cherry) juices. The samples were collected from five Romanian areas namely: Alba, Maramures, Cluj, Salaj and Moldova. The results indicated macro (Na, Mg, Ca, P) and micro (Fe, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, etc) elements in the selected samples. The determination was performed by ICP-MS. Our results for fruit juice were compared with allowable limits for drinking water in the United Kingdom (NS30).

  18. Particle analysis of car exhaust by ETV-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Lüdke, C; Hoffmann, E; Skole, J; Artelt, S

    1996-06-01

    Particulates of platinum group elements (Pt, Rh, Pd, Ir) emitted in automotive catalyst exhaust were measured down to the pg/m(3) level. Samples were taken from a standard type three-way catalyst equipped gasoline engine, running on a computer controlled dynamometer. Particulates in catalyzed car exhaust were sampled fractionated according to size by using the cascade impactor with separate targets mounted underneath each nozzle. The targets, small flat discs made of pure graphite, were subsequently analyzed by ETV-ICP-MS without any preparatory steps. PMID:15045379

  19. Liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayvel, L.; Orzechowski, Z.

    The present text defines the physical processes of liquid atomization, the primary types of atomizers and their design, and ways of measuring spray characteristics; it also presents experimental investigation results on atomizers and illustrative applications for them. Attention is given to the macrostructural and microstructural parameters of atomized liquids; swirl, pneumatic, and rotary atomizers; and optical drop sizing methods, with emphasis on nonintrusive optical methods.

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF ATOMIC SPECTROSCOPY IN MEASURING TOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three decades of study of environmental conditions necessary for the protection of freshwater
    aquatic life have been limited by the development and application of analytical methodology utilizing atomic adsorption, atomic fluorescence, and atomic emission spectroscopy.
    The...

  1. The influence of laser pulse duration and energy on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental fractionation, and particle size distribution in NIR fs-LA-ICP-MS

    PubMed Central

    Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Laser parameters, typically wavelength, pulse width, irradiance, repetition rate, and pulse energy, are critical parameters which influence the laser ablation process and thereby influence the LA-ICP-MS signal. In recent times, femtosecond laser ablation has gained popularity owing to the reduction in fractionation related issues and improved analytical performance which can provide matrix-independent sampling. The advantage offered by fs-LA is due to shorter pulse duration of the laser as compared to the phonon relaxation time and heat diffusion time. Hence the thermal effects are minimized in fs-LA. Recently, fs-LA-ICP-MS demonstrated improved analytical performance as compared to ns-LA-ICP-MS, but detailed mechanisms and processes are still not clearly understood. Improvement of fs-LA-ICP-MS over ns-LA-ICP-MS elucidates the importance of laser pulse duration and related effects on the ablation process. In this study, we have investigated the influence of laser pulse width (40 fs to 0.3 ns) and energy on LA-ICP-MS signal intensity and repeatability using a brass sample. Experiments were performed in single spot ablation mode as well as rastering ablation mode to monitor the Cu/Zn ratio. The recorded ICP-MS signal was correlated with total particle counts generated during laser ablation as well as particle size distribution. Our results show the importance of pulse width effects in the fs regime that becomes more pronounced when moving from femtosecond to picosecond and nanosecond regimes. PMID:26664120

  2. Recent applications on isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Sabine; Sela, Hagit; Dobrowolska, Justina; Zoriy, Miroslav; Becker, J. Susanne

    2008-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) have proved themselves to be powerful and sensitive inorganic mass spectrometric techniques for analysing stable and radioactive isotopes in different application fields because of their high sensitivity, low detection limits, good accuracy and precision. New applications of ICP-MS focus on tracer experiments and the development of isotope dilution techniques together with nanoflow injections for the analysis of small volumes of biological samples. Today, LA-ICP-MS is the method of choice for direct determination of metals, e.g., on protein bands in gels after the gel electrophoresis of protein mixtures. Tracer experiments using highly enriched 65Cu were utilized in order to study the formation of metal-binding bovine serum proteins. A challenging task for LA-ICP-MS is its application as an imaging mass spectrometric technique for the production of isotope images (e.gE, from thin sections of brain tissues stained with neodymium). In this paper, we demonstrate the application of imaging mass spectrometry on single particles (zircon and uranium oxide). Single Precambrian zircon crystals from the Baltic Shield were investigated with respect to isotope ratios using LA-ICP-MS for age dating. The U-Pb age was determined from the isochrone with (1.48 ± 0.14) × 109 a. Using isotope ratio measurements on 10 nuclear uranium oxide single particles the 235U/238U isotope ratio was determined to be 0.032 ± 0.004. This paper describes recent developments and applications of isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles.

  3. Speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation, preconcentration, transport and ICP-AES determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI) with calix-crown hydroxamic acid in high purity grade materials and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y K; Sharma, K R

    2005-07-15

    A new functionalized calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid is reported for the speciation, liquid-liquid extraction, sequential separation and trace determination of Cr(III), Mo(VI) and W(VI). Chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) are extracted at pH 4.5, 1.5M HCl and 6.0M HCl, respectively with calixcrown hydroxamic acid (37,38,39,40,41,42-hexahydroxy7,25,31-calix[6]crown hydroxamic acid) in chloroform in presence of large number of cations and anions. The extraction mechanism is investigated. The various extraction parameters, appropriate pH/M HCl, choice of solvent, effect of the reagent concentration, temperature and distribution constant have been studied. The speciation, preconcentration and kinetic of transport has been investigated. The maximum transport is observed 35, 45 and 30min for chromium(III), molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(IV), respectively. For trace determination the extracts were directly inserted into the plasma for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, ICP-AES, measurements of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten which increase the sensitivity by 30-fold, with detection limits of 3ngml(-1). The method is applied for the determination of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten in high purity grade ores, biological and environmental samples. The chromium was recovered from the effluent of electroplating industries. PMID:18970144

  4. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  5. The Stair-Step Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a model of a generic atom that is used to represent the movement of electrons from lower to higher levels and vice-versa due to excitation and de-excitation of the atom. As the process of de-excitation takes place, photons represented by colored ping-pong balls are emitted, indicating the emission of light. (MDH)

  6. Identification of TRIM27 as a Novel Degradation Target of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0

    PubMed Central

    Conwell, Sara E.; White, Anne E.; Harper, J. Wade

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early protein ICP0 performs many functions during infection, including transactivation of viral gene expression, suppression of innate immune responses, and modification and eviction of histones from viral chromatin. Although these functions of ICP0 have been characterized, the detailed mechanisms underlying ICP0's complex role during infection warrant further investigation. We thus undertook an unbiased proteomic approach to identifying viral and cellular proteins that interact with ICP0 in the infected cell. Cellular candidates resulting from our analysis included the ubiquitin-specific protease USP7, the transcriptional repressor TRIM27, DNA repair proteins NBN and MRE11A, regulators of apoptosis, including BIRC6, and the proteasome. We also identified two HSV-1 early proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism, UL39 and UL50, as novel candidate interactors of ICP0. Because TRIM27 was the most statistically significant cellular candidate, we investigated the relationship between TRIM27 and ICP0. We observed rapid, ICP0-dependent loss of TRIM27 during HSV-1 infection. TRIM27 protein levels were restored by disrupting the RING domain of ICP0 or by inhibiting the proteasome, arguing that TRIM27 is a novel degradation target of ICP0. A mutant ICP0 lacking E3 ligase activity interacted with endogenous TRIM27 during infection as demonstrated by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and supported by immunofluorescence data. Surprisingly, ICP0-null mutant virus yields decreased upon TRIM27 depletion, arguing that TRIM27 has a positive effect on infection despite being targeted for degradation. These results illustrate a complex interaction between TRIM27 and viral infection with potential positive or negative effects of TRIM27 on HSV under different infection conditions. IMPORTANCE During productive infection, a virus must simultaneously redirect multiple cellular pathways to replicate itself while evading detection by the

  7. ICP0 Dismantles Microtubule Networks in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyu; Schmidt, Edward E.; Halford, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Infected-cell protein 0 (ICP0) is a RING finger E3 ligase that regulates herpes simplex virus (HSV) mRNA synthesis, and strongly influences the balance between latency and replication of HSV. For 25 years, the nuclear functions of ICP0 have been the subject of intense scrutiny. To obtain new clues about ICP0's mechanism of action, we constructed HSV-1 viruses that expressed GFP-tagged ICP0. To our surprise, both GFP-tagged and wild-type ICP0 were predominantly observed in the cytoplasm of HSV-infected cells. Although ICP0 is exclusively nuclear during the immediate-early phase of HSV infection, further analysis revealed that ICP0 translocated to the cytoplasm during the early phase where it triggered a previously unrecognized process; ICP0 dismantled the microtubule network of the host cell. A RING finger mutant of ICP0 efficiently bundled microtubules, but failed to disperse microtubule bundles. Synthesis of ICP0 proved to be necessary and sufficient to disrupt microtubule networks in HSV-infected and transfected cells. Plant and animal viruses encode many proteins that reorganize microtubules. However, this is the first report of a viral E3 ligase that regulates microtubule stability. Intriguingly, several cellular E3 ligases orchestrate microtubule disassembly and reassembly during mitosis. Our results suggest that ICP0 serves a dual role in the HSV life cycle, acting first as a nuclear regulator of viral mRNA synthesis and acting later, in the cytoplasm, to dismantle the host cell's microtubule network in preparation for virion synthesis and/or egress. PMID:20544015

  8. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  9. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  10. Effects of fast atoms and energy-dependent secondary electron emission yields in PIC/MCC simulations of capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzsi, A.; Korolov, I.; Schüngel, E.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2015-05-01

    In most PIC/MCC simulations of radio frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) several simplifications are commonly made: (i) fast neutrals are not traced, (ii) heavy particle induced excitation and ionization are neglected, (iii) secondary electron emission from boundary surfaces due to neutral particle impact is not taken into account, and (iv) the secondary electron emission coefficient is assumed to be constant, i.e. independent of the incident particle energy and the surface conditions. Here, we examine the validity of these simplifications under conditions typical for plasma processing applications. We study the effects of including fast neutrals and using realistic energy-dependent secondary electron emission coefficients for ions and fast neutrals in simulations of CCPs operated in argon at 13.56 MHz and at neutral gas pressures between 5 Pa and 100 Pa. We find an increase of the plasma density and the ion flux to the electrodes under most conditions when heavy particles are included realistically in the simulation. The sheath widths are found to be smaller and the simulations are found to diverge at high pressures for high voltage amplitudes in qualitative agreement with experimental findings. By switching individual processes on and off in the simulations we identify their individual effects on the ionization dynamics and plasma parameters. While the gas-phase effects of heavy particle processes are found to be moderate at most conditions, the self-consistent calculation of the effective secondary electron yield proves to be important in simulations of CCPs in order to yield realistic results.

  11. Application of ICP-QMS for the determination of plutonium in environmental samples for safeguards purposes.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Maria Luiza D P; Godoy, José Marcus; Roldão, Luiz Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    Aiming to determine the plutonium amount as well as its isotopic composition, in particular, in swipe samples for safeguards purposes, an analytical method was developed with a plutonium separation step based on extraction chromatography using 2 cm TEVA columns and detection with quadrupole ICP-MS applying an ultra-sonic nebulizer coupled with membrane desolvation system. The method was successfully applied to New Brunswick plutonium certified reference materials as well as to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory round robin samples, based on the round robin samples provided by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium), as part of the Regular European Interlaboratory Measurement Evaluation Programme (REIMEP), campaign 16 (isotopic abundances of plutonium in plutonium nitrate samples), with a total plutonium amount between 1 and 0.25 ng per sample. After the introduction of an additional separation step, it was also possible to carry out precise and accurate total plutonium, (240)Pu/(239)Pu, (241)Pu/(239)Pu and (242)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios determination in sediment sample showing its applicability to environmental samples in general, reaching a detection limit equivalent to 5 mBq(239)Pu kg(-1). PMID:17543430

  12. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  13. High-Precision Measurement of Eu/Eu* in Geological Glasses via LA-ICP-MS Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Ming; McDonough, William F.; Arevalo, Ricardo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Elemental fractionation during laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis has been historically documented between refractory and volatile elements. In this work, however, we observed fractionation between light rare earth elements (LREEs) and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) when using ablation strategies involving large spot sizes (greater than 100 millimeters) and line scanning mode. In addition: (1) ion yields decrease when using spot sizes above 100 millimeters; (2) (Eu/Eu*)(sub raw) (i.e. Europium anomaly) positively correlates with carrier gas (He) flow rate, which provides control over the particle size distribution of the aerosol reaching the ICP; (3) (Eu/Eu*)(sub raw) shows a positive correlation with spot size, and (4) the changes in REE signal intensity, induced by the He flow rate change, roughly correlate with REE condensation temperatures. The REE fractionation is likely driven by the slight but significant difference in their condensation temperatures. Large particles may not be completely dissociated in the ICP and result in preferential evaporation of the less refractory LREEs and thus non-stoichiometric particle-ion conversion. This mechanism may also be responsible for Sm-Eu-Gd fractionation as Eu is less refractory than Sm and Gd. The extent of fractionation depends upon the particle size distribution of the aerosol, which in turn is influenced by the laser parameters and matrix. Ablation pits and lines defined by low aspect ratios produce a higher proportion of large particles than high aspect ratio ablation, as confirmed by measurements of particle size distribution in the laser induced aerosol. Therefore, low aspect ratio ablation introduces particles that cannot be decomposed and/or atomized by the ICP and thus results in exacerbated elemental fractionation. Accurate quantification of REE concentrations and Eu/Eu* requires reduction of large particle production during laser ablation. For the reference

  14. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS for isotope analysis of long-lived radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Sabine

    2005-04-01

    For a few years now inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been increasingly used for precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived radionuclides at the trace and ultratrace level due to its excellent sensitivity, good precision and accuracy. At present, ICP-MS and also laser ablation ICP-MS are applied as powerful analytical techniques in different fields such as the characterization of nuclear materials, recycled and by-products (e.g., spent nuclear fuel or depleted uranium ammunitions), radioactive waste control, in environmental monitoring and in bioassay measurements, in health control, in geochemistry and geochronology. Especially double-focusing sector field ICP mass spectrometers with single ion detector or with multiple ion collector device have been used for the precise determination of long-lived radionuclides isotope ratios at very low concentration levels. Progress has been achieved by the combination of ultrasensitive mass spectrometric techniques with effective separation and enrichment procedures in order to improve detection limits or by the introduction of the collision cell in ICP-MS for reducing disturbing interfering ions (e.g., of 129Xe+ for the determination of 129I). This review describes the state of the art and the progress of ICP-MS and laser ablation ICP-MS for isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides in different sample types, especially in the main application fields of characterization of nuclear and radioactive waste material, environmental research and health controls.

  15. Herpes simplex ICP27 mutant viruses exhibit reduced expression of specific DNA replication genes.

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, S L; Knipe, D M

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants with certain lesions in the ICP27 gene show a 5- to 10-fold reduction in viral DNA synthesis. To determine how ICP27 promotes amplification of viral DNA, we examined the synthesis, accumulation, and stability of the essential viral replication proteins and steady-state levels of the replication gene transcripts throughout the course of ICP27 mutant virus infections. These studies reveal that in the absence of ICP27, expression of the UL5, UL8, UL52, UL9, UL42, and UL30 genes is significantly reduced at the level of mRNA accumulation. In contrast to that of these beta genes, ICP8 expression is unaltered in mutant virus-infected cells, indicating that ICP27 selectively stimulates only a subset of herpes simplex virus beta genes. Analysis of multiple ICP27 mutant viruses indicates a quantitative correlation between the ability of these mutants to replicate viral DNA and the level of replication proteins produced by each mutant. Therefore, we conclude that the primary defect responsible for restricted viral DNA synthesis in cells infected with ICP27 mutants is insufficient expression of most of the essential replication genes. Of further interest, this analysis also provides new information about the structure of the UL52 gene transcripts. PMID:8627723

  16. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 Micrometer PAH Emission Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    A population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related materials are thought to be responsible for the family of infrared emission features that are seen towards a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose edges contain excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs). While it has been suggested that this type of compound may be present in the interstellar population, it has been difficult to properly assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable infrared laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of the astronomical data. We present the 4000-500 cm(exp -1) (2.5-20 micrometers) infrared spectra of 23 H(sub n)-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices, under conditions suitable for use in the interpretation of astronomical data. The spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show unique characteristics that distinguish them from their fully aromatic PAH equivalents. We discuss the changes to the spectra of these types of molecules as they transition from fully aromatic to fully aliphatic forms. The implications for the interpretation of astronomical spectra are discussed with specific emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 micrometer features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, in addition to IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 micrometer features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H(sub n)-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  17. THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH EXCESS PERIPHERAL H ATOMS (H {sub n} -PAHs) AND THEIR RELATION TO THE 3.4 AND 6.9 {mu}m PAH EMISSION FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H {sub n} -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm{sup -1} (2.5-20 {mu}m) infrared spectra of 23 H {sub n} -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 {mu}m weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 {mu}m, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 {mu}m region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH{sub 2}- deformation mode near 6.9 {mu}m. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 {mu}m features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 {mu}m features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H {sub n} -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  18. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 µm PAH Emission Features

    PubMed Central

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (Hn-PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm−1 (2.5–20 µm) infrared spectra of 23 Hn-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 µm weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 µm, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11–15 µm region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH2-deformation mode near 6.9 µm. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 µm features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 µm features. We show that ‘normal’ PAH emission objects contain relatively few Hn-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules. PMID:26435553

  19. Sensitive redox speciation of neptunium by CE-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Stöbener, Nils; Amayri, Samer; Gehl, Aaron; Kaplan, Ugras; Malecha, Kurtis; Reich, Tobias

    2012-11-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to separate the neptunium oxidation states Np(IV) and Np(V), which are the only oxidation states of Np that are stable under environmental conditions. The CE setup was coupled to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Agilent 7500ce) using a Mira Mist CE nebulizer and a Scott-type spray chamber. The combination of the separation capacity of CE with the detection sensitivity of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows identification and quantification of Np(IV) and Np(V) at the trace levels expected in the far field of a nuclear waste repository. Limits of detection of 1 × 10(-9) and 5 × 10(-10) mol L(-1) for Np(IV) and Np(V), respectively, were achieved, with a linear range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) mol L(-1). The method was applied to study the redox speciation of the Np remaining in solution after interaction of 5 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) Np(V) with Opalinus Clay. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, a Np sorption of 31% was found, with all the Np remaining in solution being Np(V). A second sorption experiment performed in the presence of Fe(2+) led to complete sorption of the Np onto the clay. After desorption with HClO(4), a mixture of Np(IV) and Np(V) was found in solution by CE-ICP-MS, indicating that some of the sorbed Np had been reduced to Np(IV) by Fe(2+). PMID:23052867

  20. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.