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Sample records for icp atomic emission

  1. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in support of nuclear waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Edmund A.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    Simulated complex nuclear waste solutions are characterized by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Simultaneous and sequential measurements are made of liquid extraction distribution coefficients needed in the development of process flow sheets for component separations. This paper describes the determination of 19 elements, comprised of process contaminants (Al, Cr, Fe, Ni) and nuclear fission products (Ba, Cd, Ce, Eu, La, Mo, Nd, Pd, Pr, Rh, Ru, Sm, Sr, Y, Zr), in diverse aqueous streams. The concentrations determined vary from 0.04 to 4000μg ml -1 with dilutions being used to bring analytical measurements into the range of calibration standards. The estimated precision and accuracy of the method are 1-5 %. Data are presented on recoveries and material balances for extraction systems that can be used for the implementation of actinide (III)-fission product separation schemes.

  2. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Determination of barium, chromium, cadmium, manganese, lead and zinc in atmospheric particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boevski, I. V.; Daskalova, N.; Havezov, I.

    2000-11-01

    The present paper has shown that the Q concept, as proposed by P.W.J.M. Boumans, J.J.A.M. Vrakking, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 43 (1988) 69, can be used as a basic methodology in the determination of Ba, Cr, Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in pairs of atmospheric particles by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The data base of Q values for line interference [ QIj(λ a)] and Q values for wing background interference [ QWJ(Δλ a)] were obtained in our former work [N. Daskalova, Iv. Boevski, Spectral interferences in the determination of trace elements in environmental materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 54 (1999) 1099-1122]. The samples of atmospheric particles were collected by the Bergerhoff method. The ICP-AES determination was performed after sample digestion with aqua regia. Q values were used for the calculation of both the total interfering signal under the analysis lines and the true detection limits, depending on the matrix constituents in the different samples. Comparative data for the concentration of analytes were obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and direct current arc atomic emission spectrographic method (dc arc-AES).

  4. Simultaneous determination of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) by flow injection-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with ultrasonic nebulization.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Sathrugnan; Hirata, Shizuko

    2003-01-01

    A dual-column protocol for the sequential determination of As(III) and As(V) is described using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with ultrasonic nebulization (USN). This procedure employed a 16-way valve containing two different homemade mini columns for selective preconcentration of As(III) and As(V). One column was filled with Muromac A-1, which selectively preconcentrated As(III) at pH 3 after complexation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC, 0.05%). The effluent of the first column was then passed through the second column, which was filled with an anion-exchange resin to collect As(V). By using 0.6 M sodium hydroxide, both species were eluted sequentially and measured by ICP-AES. Enrichment factors of 136 (17 for micro column x8 for USN) for As(V) and 160 (20 for micro column x8 for USN) for As(III) were achieved with 4 min preconcentration. With the proposed procedure, the detection limits were calculated to be 0.7 micro g L(-1) for As(V) and 0.8 micro g L(-1) for As(III) based on (3 sigma) blank determination ( N=10). The relative standard deviations for 20 micro g L(-1) of As(V) and As(III) were 5.8% and 6.5%, respectively. The recovery for spiked water samples was in the range of 85-112%. PMID:12520450

  5. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in support of nuclear waste management. [HHDECMP (hexyl hexyl-N,N diethylcarbamolymethylphosphonate) and n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, E.A.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Simulated complex nuclear waste solutions are characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AEC). The system uses and ICP source focused on both a polychromator and a computer-controlled scanning monochromator for intensity measurements. This instrumentation allows for simultaneous and sequential measurements of liquid extraction distribution coefficients needed in the development of process flow sheets for component separations. A large number of elements are determined rapidly with adequate sensitivity and accuracy. The focus of this investigation centers on the analysis of nuclear fission products. 13 references, 13 tables.

  6. Determination of heavy metals in bee honey with connected and not connected metal wires using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Al Juhaimi, Fahad Y

    2012-04-01

    Two honey samples are taken from two parts of the same honeycomb: one that contacts to the surface of the wire and the other taken from the surface that does not contact the wires. Heavy metal contents of these two samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The Mo, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn contents of the honey in contact with wire is higher when compared to the other. Especially, Fe and Zn contents of honey in contact with wire is much higher than the non-contact one. These values are, respectively, 190.21 and 112.76 ppm. Besides, Ni content of honey in contact with wire is approximately 50% higher. PMID:21573852

  7. Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, David L.

    2012-06-13

    The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

  8. Use of a solution cathode glow discharge for cold vapor generation of mercury with determination by ICP-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-09-15

    A novel vapor-generation technique is described for mercury determination in aqueous solutions. Without need for a chemical reducing agent, dissolved mercury species are converted to volatile Hg vapor in a solution cathode glow discharge. The generated Hg vapor is then transported to an inductively coupled plasma for determination by atomic emission spectrometry. Mercury vapor is readily generated from a background electrolyte containing 0.1 M HNO 3. Vapor generation efficiency was found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (formic or acetic acids) or alcohols (ethanol). Optimal conditions for discharge-induced vapor generation and reduced interference from concomitant inorganic ions were also identified. However, the presence of chloride ion reduces the efficiency of Hg-vapor generation. In the continuous sample introduction mode, the detection limit was found to be 0.7 microg L (-1), and repeatability was 1.2% RSD ( n = 11) for a 20 microg L (-1) standard. In comparison with other vapor generation methods, it offers several advantages: First, it is applicable to both inorganic and organic Hg determination; organic mercury (thiomersal) can be directly transformed into volatile Hg species without the need for prior oxidation. Second, the vapor-generation efficiency is high; the efficiency (with formic acid as a promoter) is superior to that of conventional SnCl 2-HCl reduction. Third, the vapor generation is extremely rapid and therefore is easy to couple with flow injection. The method is sensitive and simple in operation, requires no auxiliary reagents, and serves as a useful alternative to conventional vapor generation for ultratrace Hg determination. PMID:18710258

  9. Study on the determination of major, minor, and trace constituents in meteorites by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Bear, B.R.; Fassel, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study on the ICP-AES determination of 42 major and trace elements in meteorites was described. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of aqua regia and HF in a sealed Teflon bomb and boric acid is added after dissolution to complex the excess HF. The final solution is transformed into an aerosol via ultrasonic nebulization. The reference solutions employed for calibrating the spectrometers contained only the HF-aqua regia-HS/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ matrix. A polychromator and a programmable scanning monochromator interfaced to the same plasma excitation source provided the spectroscopic data. The accuracy of the determination was assessed by: (a) comparing our results with those obtained by neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence; and (b) by analyzing several geological reference samples (US Geological Survey and Canadian Certified Reference Materials). The analytical results showed good agreement. The relative standard deviation of the determination of the major elements ranged from 0.5 to 2%, and of the minor and trace elements from 0.5 to 8%.

  10. A study on the determination of major, minor and trace constituents in meteorites by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Bear, B. R.; Fassel, V. A.

    A study on the ICP-AES determination of 42 major and trace elements in meteorites was described. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of aqua regia and HF in a sealed Teflon bomb and boric acid is added after dissolution to complex the excess HF. The final solution is transformed into an aerosol via ultrasonic nebulization. The reference solutions employed for calibrating the spectrometers contained only the HF-aqua regia-HS3BO3 matrix. A polychromator and a programmable scanning monochromator interfaced to the same plasma excitation source provided the spectroscopic data. The accuracy of the determination was assessed by: (1) comparing our results with those obtained by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence; and (2) by analyzing several geological references samples (US Geological Survey and Canadian Certified Reference Materials). The analytical results showed good agreement. The relative standard deviation of the determination of the major elements ranged from 0.5 to 2%, and of the minor and trace elements from 0.5 to 8%.

  11. A continuous sampling air-ICP for metals emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.; Eckels, D.E.; Miller, G.P.

    1999-09-19

    An air-inductively coupled plasma (air-ICP) system has been developed for continuous sampling and monitoring of metals as a continuous emission monitor (CEM). The plasma is contained in a metal enclosure to allow reduced-pressure operation. The enclosure and plasma are operated at a pressure slightly less than atmospheric using a Roots blower, so that sample gas is continuously drawn into the plasma. A Teflon sampling chamber, equipped with a sampling pump, is connected to the stack that is to be monitored to isokinetically sample gas from the exhaust line and introduce the sample into the air-ICP. Optical emission from metals in the sampled gas stream is detected and monitored using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)--echelle spectrometer system. A description of the continuous sampling air-ICP system is given, along with some preliminary laboratory data for continuous monitoring of metals.

  12. Continuous sampling air-ICP for metals emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, David P.; Zamzow, Daniel S.; Eckels, David E.; Miller, George P.

    1999-12-01

    An air-inductively coupled plasma (air-ICP) system has been developed for continuous sampling and monitoring of metals as a continuous emission monitor (CEM). The plasma is contained in a metal enclosure to allow reduced-pressure operation. The enclosure and plasma are operated at a pressure slightly less than atmospheric using a Roots blower, so that sample gas is continuously drawn into the plasma. A Teflon sampling chamber, equipped with a sampling pump, is connected to the stack that is to be monitored to isokinetically sample gas from the exhaust line and introduce the sample into the air-ICP. Optical emission from metals in the sampled gas stream is detected and monitored using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-echelle spectrometer system. A description of the continuous sampling air-ICP system is given, along with some preliminary laboratory data for continuous monitoring of metals.

  13. Quality assurance in operating a multielement ICP emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botto, Robert I.

    In the industrial laboratory environment, quality assurance in the operation of a multielement inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICPES) must often be entrusted to laboratory technicians with little or no technical background in spectrochemical analysis. Therefore, to be successful, a quality assurance program must be reduced to a simple, routine practice. Essential components of the quality assurance program described in this paper are (1) An atom-to-ion emission intensity ratio for multielement optimization and for reproducing optimum analysis conditions. (2) A concise, easily applied specification for sensitivity and for precision. (3) A regimen for monitoring of, and correcting for, calibration and background drift. (4) A set of comprehensive spectral interference calibrations maintained using the emission intensity ratio. (5) A high resolution spectrometer for minimizing spectral interferences. (6) A program of long term performance monitoring and maintenance/record keeping. Each of these components is described in detail. Adherence to this program enhances analytical reliability by helping to ensure that raw concentrations are generated consistently under optimum instrumental conditions, and that corrections for spectral interferences are applied accurately even though interference calibrations may be several months old. The importance of adequate resolution and the proper choice of positions for off-line background measurements is borne out by a detailed study of the determination of toxic trace elements in National Bureau of Standards fly ash samples. As, Be, Cd, Pb, Sb, and Se were determined accurately without isolation/preconcentration from the aluminosilicate matrix. Several determinations required corrections for residual spectral interferences amounting to 100-500% of the resultant concentration, underscoring the accuracy of the interference correction procedures.

  14. Correlation of laser ablation plasma emission with ICP-AES signal intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.J.; Mao, X.L.; Shannon, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Laser ablation offers many favorable characteristics for direct solid sample chemical analysis. However, the technique usually provides poor precision in comparison to solution nebulization. The primary contributor to this imprecision is the irreproducibility of the laser material interaction. This paper describes a technique for monitoring changes in the laser material interaction directly, and using these data to improve inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Simultaneous measurements of the spectral emission intensity in the laser-induced plasma (LIP) and the ICP-AES were made under different power density conditions. The LIP spatial profile and excitation temperature was measured. The data from the LIP show a strong correlation with ICP-AES signal intensity. Both emission signals increase linearly with the laser power density (log-log) and show a change in the slope for different spot sizes and laser powers. These results support the occurrence of two different ablation mechanisms, a less efficient interaction dominating at the higher power densities (> 1 GW/cm2) and a more efficient interaction in the lower power density regimes. The benefits of using simultaneous monitoring of the laser induced plasma for chemical analysis by ICP-AES will be discussed.

  15. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  16. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonic and pneumatic nebulizers used in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) are compared in the analysis of standard materials and environmental samples. Results verify that ICP-AES with ultrasonic nebulization is capable of lower detection limit...

  17. Atomic squeezing under collective emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yukalov, V.I.; Yukalova, E.P.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic squeezing is studied for the case of large systems of radiating atoms, when collective effects are well developed. All temporal stages are analyzed, starting with the quantum stage of spontaneous emission, passing through the coherent stage of superradiant emission, and going to the relaxation stage ending with stationary solutions. A method of governing the temporal behavior of the squeezing factor is suggested. The influence of a squeezed effective vacuum on the characteristics of collective emission is also investigated.

  18. Preconcentration of trace multi-elements in water samples using Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomngongo, Philiswa N.; Catherine Ngila, J.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Moodley, Brenda

    This work presents a solid phase extraction (SPE) method for simultaneous preconcentration of trace elements in water samples prior to their ICP-OES determination. Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins were used as SPE sorbent materials for preconcentration of trace Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn. The optimum sample pH, eluent concentration and sample flow rates were found to 6, 3.0 mol L-1 and 3.0 mL min-1, respectively. In terms of multi-element preconcentration capabilities, Dowex 50W-x8 appeared to be a better sorbent. The recoveries for all the tested analytes were >95%. However, Chelex-100 showed a better performance in terms of recovery (>95%) towards Cu, Fe and Zn. Under optimized conditions using Dowex 50W-x8, the relative standard deviations for different metals were <3%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification ranged from 0.01-0.39 μg L-1 and 0.05-0.1.3 μg L-1, respectively. The accuracy of the preconcentration method was confirmed by spike recovery test and the analysis of certified reference materials. The SPE method was applied for preconcentration of the analyte ions in tap water, bottled water and wastewater samples.

  19. Statistical evaluation of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric method for routine water quality testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Jones, B.E.; Stein, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    In an interlaboratory test, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was compared with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of 17 major and trace elements in 100 filtered natural water samples. No unacceptable biases were detected. The analysis precision of ICP-AES was found to be equal to or better than alternative methods. Known-addition recovery experiments demonstrated that the ICP-AES determinations are accurate to between plus or minus 2 and plus or minus 10 percent; four-fifths of the tests yielded average recoveries of 95-105 percent, with an average relative standard deviation of about 5 percent.

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  2. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  3. Testing of Continuous Sampling Air-ICP and Mercury Systems as Continuous Emission Monitors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Baldwin; S.J. Bajic; D.E. Eckels; D.S. Zamzow; G.P. Miller; S. Tao; C.A. Waggoner

    2001-03-15

    This report has been prepared to document the performance of the continuous sampling reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy) and mercury-monitor systems developed by Ames Laboratory for use as continuous emission monitors (CEM). This work was funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology, through the Mixed Waste Focus Area. The purpose of the project is to develop instrumentation and methods for spectroscopic field monitoring applications. During FY00 this included continued work on the development of the continuous sample introduction system and the multi-frequency AOTF-echelle spectrometer, used in conjunction with the reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES system as a multi-metal CEM. The assembly, development, and testing of an echelle spectrometer system for the detection of mercury (Hg) by atomic absorption was also completed during FY00. The continuous sampling system and the multi-metal air-ICP and mercury-monitor CEM systems were tested at Mississippi State University at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at the end of FY00. This report describes the characteristics and performance of these systems, and the results of the field tests performed at DIAL.

  4. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motooka, J.M.; Adrian, B.M.; Church, S.E.; McDougal, C.M.; Fife, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic and ICP results for many NURE stream sediments from the Killik River Quadrangle, Alaska.

  5. Elemental profiling and geographical differentiation of Ethiopian coffee samples through inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and direct mercury analyzer (DMA).

    PubMed

    Habte, Girum; Hwang, In Min; Kim, Jae Sung; Hong, Joon Ho; Hong, Young Sin; Choi, Ji Yeon; Nho, Eun Yeong; Jamila, Nargis; Khan, Naeem; Kim, Kyong Su

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed to establish the elemental profiling and provenance of coffee samples collected from eleven major coffee producing regions of Ethiopia. A total of 129 samples were analyzed for forty-five elements using inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-optical emission spectroscopy (OES), ICP-mass spectrometry (MS) and direct mercury analyzer (DMA). Among the macro elements, K showed the highest levels whereas Fe was found to have the lowest concentration values. In all the samples, Ca, K, Mg, P and S contents were statistically significant (p<0.05). Micro elements showed the concentrations order of: Mn>Cu>Sr>Zn>Rb>Ni>B. Contents of the trace elements were lower than the permissible standard values. Inter-regions differentiation by cluster analysis (CA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that micro and trace elements are the best chemical descriptors of the analyzed coffee samples. PMID:27374562

  6. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Trace elemental composition of curry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez, A; Armenta, S; De La Guardia, M

    2008-01-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion was developed to determine the content of traces elements in curry samples from the Spanish market. The methodology was validated in terms of accuracy by the analysis of citrus and tomato leaf reference materials achieving comparable results with the certified values. The trace metal content of curry samples was compared with data available from previously published reports concerning Indian samples, especially in terms of heavy metal composition, in order to guarantee the quality of the commercially available spices in the European countries. Values found for the analysis of arsenic, lead and cadmium were significantly lower than the maximum limit allowed by European Union statutory limits for heavy metals and lower than those obtained for Indian curry leaves reported by Indian research teams by using neutron activation and γ-ray analysis. PMID:24784807

  8. Comparative complexity of emission spectra from ICP, dc, Arc, and spark excitation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; DeKalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-07-01

    A comparison of atomic emission spectra excited in high voltage spark and dc are discharges and in an inductively coupled plasma revealed that the most complex spectra were emitted by the high voltage spark. The dc arc and the inductively coupled plasma yielded spectra of approximately equivalent complexity. These observations are not in accord with the impressions conveyed in the literature.

  9. Elemental analysis of glass by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Emily R; Almirall, José R

    2012-04-10

    The elemental analysis of glass evidence has been established as a powerful discrimination tool for forensic analysts. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) has been compared to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and energy dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF/EDS) as competing instrumentation for the elemental analysis of glass. The development of a method for the forensic analysis of glass coupling laser ablation to ICP-OES is presented for the first time. LA-ICP-OES has demonstrated comparable analytical performance to LA-ICP-MS based on the use of the element menu, Al (Al I 396.15 nm), Ba (Ba II 455.40 nm), Ca (Ca II 315.88 nm), Fe (Fe II 238.20 nm), Li (Li I 670.78 nm), Mg (Mg I 285.21 nm), Sr (Sr II 407.77 nm), Ti (Ti II 368.51 nm), and Zr (Zr II 343.82 nm). The relevant figures of merit, such as precision, accuracy and sensitivity, are presented and compared to LA-ICP-MS. A set of 41 glass samples was used to assess the discrimination power of the LA-ICP-OES method in comparison to other elemental analysis techniques. This sample set consisted of several vehicle glass samples that originated from the same source (inside and outside windshield panes) and several glass samples that originated from different vehicles. Different match criteria were used and compared to determine the potential for Type I and Type II errors. It was determined that broader match criteria is more applicable to the forensic comparison of glass analysis because it can reduce the affect that micro-heterogeneity inherent in the glass fragments and a less than ideal sampling strategy can have on the interpretation of the results. Based on the test set reported here, a plus or minus four standard deviation (± 4s) match criterion yielded the lowest possibility of Type I and Type II errors. The developed LA-ICP-OES method has been shown to perform similarly to LA-ICP-MS in the

  10. An argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor for hazardous air pollutant metals: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, M.D.; Mayer, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    A fully-operational, argon ICP-based continuous emissions monitor (CEM) for hazardous air pollutant (HAP) metals has recently been demonstrated. The CEM has undergone extensive field evaluation in conjunction with a variety of combustor configurations including coal-fired power plants, waste incinerators, and ordnance deactivation furnaces. The CEM has been successfully demonstrated to provide both speed and sensitivity for simultaneous, multielement detection of HAP metals while exhibiting considerable tolerance for both particulate and moisture loading in sample air streams. The CEM employs a state-of-the-art argon inductively coupled plasma spectrometer as an elemental analyzer. Stack air, continuously extracted under strictly isokinetic conditions, is transported to the CEM through heated sample lines. A sampling interface of novel design permits extraction of air at the high, often variable flow rates required for isokinetic sampling while at the same time, provides aliquots of sample air to the plasma spectrometer at the relatively low but constant analytical flow rates that are appropriate for plasma injection. The CEM is automated to high degree and can operate unattended for several hours at a time. CEM calibration is accomplished using precision-generated metal aerosols. Provision is made for correction of spectral interferences from concomitant metals and molecular species in stack gases. The prototype instrumentation described here is presently considered to be the leading candidate for multimetals CEM application. While specifically designed and implemented to monitor metal emissions from military furnaces used for ordnance deactivation, the CEM has exhibited versatility that makes it well-suited for numerous compliance and process control applications. Results of field testing under various conditions and relative accuracy assessments will be presented.

  11. Determination of argon resonance line emission in an ICP hitting a biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, P.; Bibinov, N.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo model for the calculation of argon resonance line photon trapping in a double inductively coupled plasma is presented. Different probabilities of photon behaviour are calculated and the flux of photons hitting a target placed in the middle of the chamber is determined by simulation. Different gas admixtures or gas impurities can absorb photons or quench excited argon atoms, which is considered in the simulation. Electron energy distribution function and electron density are measured with a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Nitrogen impurities, due to opening of the chamber, are measured using OES. These measured values and other additional input values such as gas temperature are used for simulation.

  12. AOTF-echelle spectrometer for air-ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals and actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, David P.; Zamzow, Daniel S.; Eckels, David E.; Miller, George P.

    1999-02-01

    A spectrometer system consisting of a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and an echelle grating has been assembled and tested for ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metal and actinide elements in stack exhaust offgases introduced into an air plasma. The AOTF is a rapidly tunable bandpass filter that is used to select a small wavelength range (0.1 to 0.6 nm) of optical emission from the air plasma; the echelle grating provides high dispersion, yielding a spectral resolution of approximately 0.004 to 0.008 nm from 200 to 425 nm. The AOTF-echelle spectrometer, equipped with a photodiode array or CCD, provides rapid sequential multielement analysis capabilities. It is much more compact and portable than commercial ICP-AES echelle spectrometers, allowing use of the system in field and on-line process monitoring applications. Data will be presented that detail the resolution, detection limits, capabilities, and performance of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer for continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals (As, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) and actinides (including U isotopes). The potential use of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer with other emission sources and for other monitoring applications will be discussed.

  13. Determination of Sulfur in High-Level Waste Sludge by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    COLEMAN, CJ

    2004-04-22

    Significant differences (approximately 30 percent) have been observed in the sulfur measurements in high-level waste sludge by the Analytical Development Section (ADS) using the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) method compared with the ADS ion chromatography (IC) method. Since the measured concentrations of sulfur in the sludge approached the maximum concentration that can be processed in the DWPF, experiments were performed to determine the source of the differences and assess the true accuracy of sulfur measurements.

  14. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  15. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  16. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  17. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  18. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  19. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  20. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions for resolution of atomic isobars: AMS and ICP-MS perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Dmitry R.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Litherland, A. E.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2006-09-01

    Ion-molecule reactions that can be used for resolution of spectral overlaps of long-lived or stable (T1/2 > 100 years) atomic isobars on the long-lived radio-isotopes (100 < T1/2 < 1012 years) in mass spectrometry are considered. Results for the separations of isobaric overlaps via cation reactions with NO, N2O, O2, CO2, C2H2, CH3F studied with the Inductively Coupled Plasma Dynamic Reaction Cell(TM) Mass Spectrometer (ICP-DRC(TM)-MS) with use of stable isotopes are presented. Overview of potential and reported reactions for separation of 35 isobars is given. Potential for the following isobaric pairs separation is shown (reaction gas and the extent of separation achieved to date in parenthesis): 32Si+/32S+(NO, 5 x 104), 40K+/40Ar+(N2O, 1.9 x 103), 40K+/40Ca+(N2O, 50), 59Ni+/59Co+(N2O, 6), 79Se+/79Br+(O2, 7.2 x 103), 81Kr+/81Br+(C2H2, 1.5 x 104), 93Mo+/93Nb+(N2O, 100), 93Mo+/93Zr+(N2O, 150), 135Cs+/135Ba+(N2O, 8 x 104), 137,138La+/137,138Ba+(O2, 40), 146Sm+/146Nd+(CO2, 1.5 x 105), 176Lu+/176Hf+(NO, 2.8 x 103), 187Re+/187Os+(N2O, 2.8 x 104). Effect of instrumental parameters on reactivity is discussed. The relevance of this work to accelerator mass spectrometry is discussed briefly.

  1. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  2. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  3. Spectral interferences in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjov, Metody; Velitchkova, Nikolaya; Veleva, Olga; Velichkov, Serafim; Markov, Pavel; Daskalova, Nonka

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with spectral interferences of complex matrix containing Mo, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca and Cu in the determination of rhenium in molybdenum and copper concentrates by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). By radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP equipped with a high resolution spectrometer (spectral bandwidth = 5 pm) the hyperfine structure (HFS) of the most prominent lines of rhenium (Re II 197.248 nm, Re II 221.426 nm and Re II 227.525 nm) was registered. The HFS components under high resolution conditions were used as separate prominent line in order to circumvent spectral interferences. The Q-concept was applied for quantification of spectral interferences. The quantitative databases for the type and the magnitude of the spectral interferences in the presence of above mentioned matrix constituents were obtained by using a radial viewing 40.68 MHz ICP with high resolution and an axial viewing 27.12 MHz ICP with middle resolution. The data for the both ICP-OES systems were collected chiefly with a view to spectrochemical analysis for comparing the magnitude of line and wing (background) spectral interference and the true detection limits with spectroscopic apparatus with different spectral resolution.

  4. Direct detection of vacuum ultraviolet radiation through an optical sampling orifice: determination of nonmetals in gaseous samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, B.R.; Houk, R.S.; Wiederin, D.R.; Fassel, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A copper cone with a sampling orifice is attached to the entrance slit chamber or a monochromator and inserted directly into an inductively couples plasma (ICP) to sample vacuum ultraviolet (vacuum UV) radiation emitted by the plasma. A unique interface with low dead volume (<40 ..mu..L) is used for introduction of gaseous samples directly into the axial channel of the ICP. Injection of a gaseous mixture of compounds containing the elements Br, C, Cl, and S results in detection limits of 50, 30, 80 and 20 pg, respectively. These detection limits are by far the best obtained for these elements by ICP atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) and are comparable to those obtained by AES with He plasmas. Precision of the analyte emission intensities is 2% relative standard deviation or better.

  5. Emission Characteristics of High Color Rendering Index Low-Pressure Xe and CO ICP's Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Ahmad; Kondo, Akira; Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    High color rendering index (CRI) has been obtained from mercury-free ICP’s lamp. Due to the strong demand on the development of mercury-free light sources, the authors investigated xenon and CO as an alternative element. These rare (Xe) and molecule (CO) gases have been used as a substitute for mercury as the environmental problems related necessitate the development of new type of light sources. The target of this study is to develop a new type of mercury-free lamp without using a phosphor where the authors concentrate on how to obtain a strong visible light instead of UV. In this paper, the colors, luminance and emission characteristics of these types of mercury-free ICP’s lamp is discussed. Without the use of phosphor, the authors obtained a good color rendering from xenon and CO ICP’s lamp where their CRI’s above 90. A strong continuum emission in visible region is obtained where luminance are ranged from 2000 to 25000 cd/m2 at 100 W of input power. Spectral distribution shows the continuum emissions are similar to the daylight distribution and chromaticity diagrams shows they are close to white region in color coordinates and color temperatures bringing a high index of the lamp’s color rendering.

  6. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  7. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  8. In situ digestion for the determination of Ca in beverages by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luana N; Gonzalez, Mário H; Moura, Monise F; Donati, George L; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2012-08-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) is employed for the determination of calcium in juice, mineral and coconut water samples. A sample aliquot of 20 μL is placed directly on the coil and a constant-voltage power source is used to dry and atomize the sample, as well as to promote Ca atomic emission. Analytical signals are resolved and detected using a Czerny-Turner spectrometer and a charge coupled device detector. Some experimental parameters such as coil position related to the spectrometer entrance slit and integration time are critically evaluated. A heating program with relatively constant drying temperatures is used in all measurements. An in situ digestion procedure is used to partially decompose organic matrices and improve WCAES precision and accuracy. By adding an oxidizing mixture to the sample and including a digestion step in the heating cycle, no statistical difference was observed between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in juice and coconut water samples. Mineral water samples were simply diluted with 1% vv(-1) HNO(3) before analysis and no significant interference was observed for concomitants such as Na and K. Despite severe positive interference caused by Mg, good agreement was obtained between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in several mineral water samples. Limits of detection and quantification obtained were 0.02 and 0.07 mg L(-1), respectively. The method precision, calculated as the relative standard deviation for 10 consecutive measurements of a 2.5 mg L(-1) Ca solution, is 3.8%. PMID:22841081

  9. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  10. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Hopper, Dale E.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-12-03

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C{sub 60}.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  12. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  13. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  14. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  15. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations. PMID:27030025

  16. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  17. Direct determination of metals in organics by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiebang; Jia, Xiujuan; Wu, Jane

    2003-11-24

    A simple method for the simultaneous determination of up to 21 elements in organic matrices is proposed. Organic samples are simply dispersed in concentrated nitric acid by sonication, and the resulting emulsions/suspensions are directly aspirated into an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) calibrated with aqueous standards for analysis. Proof of concept was provided by the excellent recoveries for the analysis of a 21-element metallo-organic standard. In addition, the results obtained using this method for a waste oil sample compared favorably with those from a method that utilized microwave digestion for sample preparation. Comparable results were also obtained by dilution in an organic solvent followed by ICP-AES analysis with an ultrasonic nebulizer equipped with a membrane desolvator. Furthermore, the viability and validity of this method were confirmed by the analysis of the National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material 1084a Wear-Metals in Lubricating Oil. Spike recoveries ranged from 83 to 105% and the limits of quantitation were 6 microg g(-1) or less for all the elements analyzed. PMID:14623589

  18. Development of Desolvation System for Single-cell Analysis Using Droplet Injection Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yukiko; Aida, Mari; Nomura, Akito; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Hokura, Akiko; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    With a view to enhance the sensitivity of analytical instruments used in the measurement of trace elements contained in a single cell, we have now equipped the previously reported micro-droplet injection system (M-DIS) with a desolvation system. This modified M-DIS was coupled to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and evaluated for its ability to measure trace elements. A flow rate of 100 mL/min for the additional gas and a measurement point -7.5 mm above the load coil (ALC) have been determined to be the optimal parameters for recording the emission intensity of the Ca(II) spectral lines. To evaluate the influence of the desolvation system, we recorded the emission intensities of the Ca(I), Ca(II), and H-β spectral lines with and without inclusion of the desolvation system. The emission intensity of the H-β spectral line reduces and the magnitude of the Ca(II)/Ca(I) emission intensity ratio increases four-fold with inclusion of the desolvation system. Finally, the elements Ca, Mg, and Fe present in a single cell of Pseudococcomyxa simplex are simultaneously determined by coupling the M-DIS equipped with the desolvation system to ICP-AES. PMID:26256601

  19. Development of a partial least-squares calibration model for simultaneous determination of elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chaloosi, Marzieh; Asadollahi, Seyed Azadeh; Khanchi, Ali Reza; FirozZare, Mahmoud; Mahani, Mohamad Khayatzadeh

    2009-01-01

    A partial least-squares (PLS) calibration model was developed for simultaneous multicomponent elemental analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in the presence of spectral interference. The best calibration model was obtained using a PLS2 algorithm. Validation was performed with an artificial test set. Multivariate calibration models were constructed using 2 series of synthetic mixtures (Zn, Cu, Fe, and U, V). Accuracy of the method was evaluated with unknown synthetic and real samples. PMID:19382589

  20. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  1. Two-atom spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ujihara, Kikuo; Dung, Ho Trung

    2002-11-01

    Spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity by two identical and spatially separated two-level atoms, both of them initially excited, is considered under fourth-order perturbation approximation in atom-field coupling constants. A delay-differential equation with proper retardation times for the probability of both atoms in the upper state is derived and expressions for the emitted-light intensity and spectrum are given. It is numerically shown that, while two-atom cooperation is enhanced for small interatomic distances, the two-atom vacuum Rabi oscillation is somewhat suppressed compared to the single-atom oscillation level when the interatomic separation is close to the cavity transverse coherence length.

  2. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2670 A and 3040 A was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter UV spectrometer operating at 3.5 A resolution viewed the earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2852 A is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2972 A line from O(1S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O(1S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5577 A emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  3. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this project, new high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are developed for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). These devices offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, biomedicine and nutrition. Emphasis is being placed on: generation of annular, helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies, with the intent of enhancing the detecting powers of a number of elements; diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas to quantify their fundamental properties, with the ultimate aim to improve analytical performance of atomic spectrometry; development and characterization of new sample introduction systems that consume microliter or microgram quantities of samples, and investigation of new membrane separators for striping solvent from sample aerosol to reduce various interferences and to enhance sensitivity in plasma spectrometry.

  4. Exploration geochemical technique for the determination of preconcentrated organometallic halides by ICP-AES

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Motooka, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    An atomic absorption extraction technique which is widely used in geochemical exploration for the determination of Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn has been modified and adapted to a simultaneous inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission instrument. the experimental and operating parameters are described for the preconcentration of the metals into their organometallic halides and for the determination of the metals. Lower limits of determination are equal to or improved over those for flame atomic absorption (except Au) and ICP results are very similar to the accepted AA values, with precision for the ICP data in excess of that necessary for exploration purposes.

  5. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.E.; Siskind, D.E. )

    1989-12-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2,670 {angstrom} and 3,040 {angstrom} was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter uv spectrometer operating at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution viewed the Earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2,852 {angstrom} is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2,972 {angstrom} line from O({sup 1}S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O({sup 1}S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5,577 {angstrom} emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  6. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-08-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized.

  7. Induced Emission of Cold Atoms Passing Through a Micromaser Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud; Obada, Abdel-Shafy F.

    The emission probability of a cold atom in a microcavity when its center-of-mass motion is described quantum mechanically is presented, but is distinguished from other treatments by the inclusion of the spatial variation along the cavity axis. In particular, the mesa mode cavity profile is considered. The quantum theory of the one-photon mazer is constructed in the framework of the dressed-state coordinate formalism. Simple expressions for the atomic populations, the cavity photon statistics, and the reflection and transmission probabilities are given for any initial state of the atom-field system. The general conclusions reached are illustrated by numerical results.

  8. High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy applied to problems in Nuclear Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; Winge, R.K.; Eckels, D.E. ); Douglas, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) is a variant of the more conventional ICP-AES that is widely used for environmental monitoring. The relevance of high-resolution capabilities of three such analytical problems are discussed herein. (1) Pu in very complex, radioactive matrices can be determined with good accuracy without the need for prior chemical separations. Isotopically resolved spectra from actinides in fuel dissolver solutions can be obtained after a simple ion-exchange step. (2) High-resolution methods permit the simultaneous determination of fission products and actinides in simulated high-level nuclear waste solutions. Such measurements can be useful for both safeguards and waste processing. (3) The ICP-AES technique, with a photodiode array detector, can be used to determine the composition of nuclear waste glasses. Such measurements can assist the glass producer as well as providing predictors of nuclear waste form performance in a repository. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Alcohol and metal determination in alcoholic beverages through high-temperature liquid-chromatography coupled to an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Terol, Amanda; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E; Prats, Soledad; Todolí, José L

    2011-06-01

    In the present work, an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system was used as a high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) detector for the determination of alcohols and metals in beverages. For the sake of comparison, a refractive index (RI) detector was also employed for the first time to detect alcohols with HTLC. The organic compounds studied were methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol (in the 10-125 mg/L concentration range) and the elements tested were magnesium, aluminum, copper, manganese and barium at concentrations included between roughly 0.01 and 80 mg/L. Column heating temperatures ranged from 80 to 175 °C and the optimum ones in terms of peak resolution, sensitivity and column lifetime were 125 and 100 °C for the HTLC-RI and HTLC-ICP-AES couplings, respectively. The HTLC-ICP-AES interface design (i.e., spray chamber design and nebulizer type used) was studied and it was found that a single pass spray chamber provided about 2 times higher sensitivities than a cyclonic conventional design. Comparatively speaking, limits of detection for alcohols were of the same order for the two evaluated detection systems (from 5 to 25 mg/L). In contrast, unlike RI, ICP-AES provided information about the content of both organic and inorganic species. Furthermore, temperature programming was applied to shorten the analysis time and it was verified that ICP-AES was less sensitive to temperature changes and modifications in the analyte chemical nature than the RI detector. Both detectors were successfully applied to the determination of short chain alcohols in several beverages such as muscatel, pacharan, punch, vermouth and two different brands of whiskeys (from 10 to 40 g of ethanol/100 g of sample). The results of the inorganic elements studied by HTLC-ICP-AES were compared with those obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) obtaining good agreement between them. Recoveries found for spiked samples

  10. EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, I. D.; Adams, S.; Clegg, R. E. S.; Ruffle, D. P.; Liu, X.-W.; Pritchet, C. J.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-03-01

    The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

  11. Electron-Impact-Induced Emission Cross Sections of Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    One cannot overstate the importance of ultraviolet (UV) lines of neutral atomic oxygen. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum of the Earth's aurora and dayglow as well as the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this poster, we present our measurements of the electron-impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 100 eV impact energy. A high-density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at a right angle by a magnetically focused electron beam. A 0.2m UV spectrometer system was used in the present measurements. It consists of an electron-impact collision chamber in tandem with an UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  12. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sidnei G; Donati, George L; Santos, Luana N; Jones, Bradley T; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2013-05-30

    Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L(-1) Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ=425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L(-1); a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr(+) by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr(+)/e(-) recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25-10 mg L(-1) and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n=10) for a 2.0 mg L(-1) Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and 112%. PMID:23680545

  13. Atomic Auger Doppler effects upon emission of fast photoelectrons.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc; Püttner, Ralph; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Journel, Loïc; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Ablett, James M; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Studies of photoemission processes induced by hard X-rays including production of energetic electrons have become feasible due to recent substantial improvement of instrumentation. Novel dynamical phenomena have become possible to investigate in this new regime. Here we show a significant change in Auger emission following 1s photoionization of neon, which we attribute to the recoil of the Ne ion induced by the emission of a fast photoelectron. Because of the preferential motion of the ionized Ne atoms along two opposite directions, an Auger Doppler shift is revealed, which manifests itself as a gradual broadening and doubling of the Auger spectral features. This Auger Doppler effect should be a general phenomenon in high-energy photoemission of both isolated atoms and molecules, which will have to be taken into account in studies of other recoil effects such as vibrational or rotational recoil in molecules, and may also have consequences in measurements in solids. PMID:24906107

  14. Atomic Number Dependence of Ion-Induced Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrale, Abdikarim Mohamed

    Knowledge of the atomic number (Z_1 ) dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields (gamma) can be the basis for a general understanding of ion-atom interaction phenomena and, in particular, for the design of Z_1 -sensitive detectors that could be useful, for example, in the separation of isobars in accelerator mass spectrometry. The Z_1 dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields has been investigated using heavy ions of identical velocity (v = 2 v_0, with v_0 as the Bohr velocity) incident in a normal direction on sputter-cleaned carbon foils. Yields measured in this work plotted as a function of the ion's atomic number reveal an oscillatory behavior with pronounced maxima and minima. This nonmonotonic dependence of the yield on Z_1 will be discussed in the light of existing theories. Ion-induced electron emission yields from contaminated surfaces are well known to be enhanced relative to the yields from atomically clean surfaces. Under the bombardment of energetic ions, the surfaces become sputter-cleaned with time, and the yields from the samples are reduced accordingly. The time dependent reduction of yields observed are shown to be due to various effects such as the desorption of contaminant atoms and molecules by incident ions and the adsorption of residual gas onto previously clean sites. Experimental results obtained in the present work show the lower, saturated yield (gamma_{rm s} ) to be a function of residual gas pressure (P) and the fluence (phi_{rm i}) of the ion. We present a dynamic equilibrium model which explains the increase in yields for surface gas contamination, the decrease in yields for contaminant desorption, and the pressure/fluence dependence of the time required to reach gamma_{ rm s}. The predictions of the model agree well with the observations of gamma _{rm s} as a function of the ratio of gas flux to ion flux, and the electron yields of clean and gas covered surfaces.

  15. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  16. Detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: an approach to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported for different equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This paper deals with the differences among detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) as reported for different experimental facilities. The factor by which such detection limits differ can be split into three factors to account separately for the differences between the sources, the resolving powers of the spectrometers and the noise characteristics of the systems. The approach uses earlier results about the behaviour of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the background signal and, as a new feature, an experimentally established linear relationship between the ratio of signal-to-background ratios, (SBR) HR/(SBR) MR, and the inverse ratio of the effective line widths, (Δλ eff) MR/(Δλ eff) HR, where "HR" and "MR" refer to high and medium spectral resolution as achieved by applying narrow (60μm) and wide (210μm) slits in a 1.5-m echelle monochromator. The approach is applied to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported by winge et al. ( Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)) for a 27-MHz ICP and those found in this work for a 50-MHz ICP. Data for some 100 prominent ICP lines in the wavelength region between about 280 and 325 nm were processed. It is shown that the approach leads to a rational comparison of detection limits.

  17. Spontaneous emission from an excited atom in the presence of N atoms and M modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited two-level atom into a system of N nonexcited atoms of the same type (with N much greater than 1) in the presence of M electromagnetic-field modes is investigated analytically, applying the Hamiltonian formulation of Dicke (1954) studied by Jaynes and Cummings (1963), Tavis and Cummings (1968), and Buley and Cummings (1964). It is shown that the trapping of radiation in the system seen when one EM mode is present does not persist as M approaches N. The feasibility of an experimental verification of these phenomena is discussed.

  18. Observation of superfluorescent emissions from laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, E.; Barrett, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Zhang, R.; Raithel, G.

    2008-04-01

    We study superfluorescence (SF) from spherical and cigar-shaped clouds of laser-cooled Rubidium atoms from the 5D5/2 level through the 6P3/2 level to the 5S1/2 ground level. The atomic system is initially excited to the 5D5/2 level from the ground state via two-photon excitation through the intermediate 5P3/2 level. The fluorescence on the 6P-5S transition at 420 nm is recorded using time-resolved measurements. The time delays of the observed SF emission peaks typically scale as ˜N-1 , where N is the atom number, and are much smaller than the time delay expected for uncorrelated cascade fluorescence. Since N is significantly smaller than the threshold number for SF on the 420 nm transition, and larger than the threshold number for the 5D-6P transition at 5.2μm , our observations suggest that the 420 nm SF emission is triggered by rapid deexcitation of the 5D to the 6P level via SF at 5.2μm . The observed SF time delays for 420 nm emission agree with SF time-delay estimates for the 5.2μm transition. For spherical clouds, the SF is isotropic. For cigar-shaped clouds, the SF is highly anisotropic. Along the long axis of cigar-shaped atom clouds, SF and incoherent cascade fluorescence produce temporally well-resolved peaks in the detected signal. In this case, the SF component of the signal is highly concentrated along a direction in between the directions of the two almost parallel excitation beams. The observed SF intensities scale as N , suggesting that the 5D level is regeneratively pumped during the SF decay.

  19. Factors influence accuracy and precision in the determination of the elemental composition of defense waste glass by ICP-emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    The influence of instrumental factors on the accuracy and precision of the determination of the composition of glass and glass feedstock is presented. In addition, the effects of different methods of sampling, dissolution methods, and standardization procedures and their effect on the quality of the chemical analysis will also be presented. The target glass simulates the material that will be prepared by the vitrification of highly radioactive liquid defense waste. The glass and feedstock streams must be well characterized to ensure a durable glass; current models estimate a 100,000 year lifetime. The elemental composition will be determined by ICP-emission spectrometry with radiation exposure issues requiring a multielement analysis for all constituents, on a single analytical sample, using compromise conditions.

  20. Determination of Minerals in Apples by ICP AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that involves the elemental analysis of apples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (IICP AES). The results of the experiment allow students to predict the cold-storage stability of apples. During the experiment the sample-preparation techniques and digestion procedures involved in elemental analysis of solid organic samples are introduced and the optimization of the ICP AES is explored. The method detailed can easily be adapted for the analysis of a wider range of elements. The laboratory experiment may also be undertaken using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with only minor modifications in the sample-preparation procedure.

  1. Spectral shaping of cascade emissions from multiplexed cold atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of the biphoton state from the cascade emissions of cold atomic ensembles, which are composed of a telecommunication photon (signal) followed by an infrared one (idler) via four-wave mixing. With adiabatic conditions for Gaussian driving pulses of width τ , the spectrum of the biphoton state has the form of a Gaussian that conserves signal and idler photon energies within ℏ /τ modulated by a Lorentzian with a superradiant linewidth. Multiplexing the atomic ensembles with frequency-shifted cascade emissions, we may manipulate and shape the spectrum of the biphoton state. The entropy of entanglement is derived from Schmidt decomposition, which can be larger if we multiplex the atomic ensembles in a way that conserves signal and idler photon central energies. The eigenvalues in Schmidt bases are degenerate in pairs for symmetric spectral shaping in which the mode probability densities show interference patterns. We also demonstrate the excess entropy of entanglement that comes from continuous frequency space, which scales up the total entropy. The scheme of the multiplexed cascade-emitted biphoton state provides multimode structures that are useful in long-distance quantum communication and multimode quantum information processing.

  2. Electron impact induced light emission from zinc atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejanovic, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Experimental studies of electron impact excitation of zinc atom are rare, primarily due to experimental difficulties. However, zinc is an interesting target because of possible applications in light sources. Also, due to its position in periodic table, zinc is an interesting case for the fundamental understanding of momentum couplings and the role of electron correlations in complex metal atoms. Recent experimental investigations have indicated the existence of highly correlated scattering mechanisms via formation of negative ion resonances and Post Collision Interaction (PCI) in the decay of autoionizing states. These can significantly modify energy dependence of the emission cross sections at low impact energies and the studies of photon emission offer a sensitive way to investigate electron correlations. Specifically, in the lowest autoionizing region of zinc, i.e. between 10 and 15 eV, both the cross sections and polarization of emitted light are affected by the formation of short lived negative ions and PCI effects. These are associated with excitation of one of the sub-valence 3d electrons and complex correlations between inner 3d and outer excited electrons in the target and also with the slow electron released into continuum, need to be included in modeling. Also the scattering of the spin polarized electrons has shown significant spin effects when excitation proceeds via negative ion resonances. Emission cross sections and comparison with theory would be discussed at the conference.

  3. Analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, O.; Motooka, J.M.; Church, S.E.; Bailey, E.A.; Arbogast, B.F.; Willson, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented detailing analytical data and sample locality map for aqua-regia leachates of stream sediments analyzed by ICP, and emission spectrographic results for both stream sediments and panned concentrates collected in 1985 from the Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Alaska.

  4. Modelling of the evaporation behaviour of particulate material for slurry nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, D.; Heitland, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for modelling the evaporation behaviour of particles in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Computer software has been developed in FORTRAN 77 language in order to simulate the evaporation behaviour of particles of refractory materials such as encountered in the analysis of advanced ceramic powders by slurry nebulization inductively coupled argon plasma atomic spectrometry. The program simulates the evaporation of single particles in the inductively coupled plasma and also enable it to calculate on the base of a given particle size distribution the evaporation behaviour of all the particles contained in a sample. In a so-called "intensity concept", the intensity is calculated as a function of the observation height in order to determine recovery rates for slurries compared with aqueous solutions. This yields a quick insight whether a calibration with aqueous solutions can be used for analysis of slurries of a given powder by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and also is a help in determining the optimal parameters for analyses of powders by means of slurry nebulization ICP-AES. Applications for the evaporation of Al 2O 3 and SiC powders document the usefulness of the model for the case of a 1.5 kW argon ICP of which the temperature at 8 mm above the load coil has been determined to be 6100 K. The model predicts the maximum particle size for SiC and Al 2O 3 that can be transported (10-15 μm) and evaporated for a given efficiency under given experimental conditions. For both Al 2O 3 and SiC, two ceramic powders of different grain size were investigated. The median particle sizes cover

  5. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  6. [Study on the simultaneous determintion of various components in cement samples by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue-Qin

    2013-07-01

    A simple and rapid method for determination of CaO, MgO, Fe2O3, Al2O3 and TiO2 in cement samples by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed. In order to carry out the analysis, the cement samples were dissolved with mixed aqua regia, hydrofluoric acid, perchloric acid, hydrochloric acid, and the standard solution was prepared by a series of standard cement samples. The matrix interference and the mutual interference of elements under test were studied by ICP-AES. The detection limits are in the range of 3.79 x 10(-4)-1.07 x 10(-2) microg x mL(-1). The recovery rates and relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method are in the range of 87.5%-105.6% and less than 1% respectively. Research results show that the method can meet the requirements of rapid chemical analysis for cement. PMID:24059210

  7. [Determination of SiO2 in Groundwater and Mineral Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-bing; Han, Mei; Jia, Na; Liu, Sheng-hua

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of silica in groundwater and mineral water was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). After a more sensitive analytical line of silicon was chosen, the effects of operating conditions of the ICP spectrometer on the analysis results were investigated, at the same time, the impact of coexisting ions on determination results of SiO2 was also considered and eliminated. The transmit power of 1 350 W, observation height of 12 mm, the nebulizer pressure of 0. 20 MPa and the pump speed of analysis of 75 r . min-1 were selected by experimental conditions. Under the optimum analytical conditions of spectrometer, the method was used for the determination of SiO2 in groundwater and mineral water with the detection limit of 0. 017. mg . L-1, recoveries between 94. 10% and 103. 8%, and relative standard deviation (RSD)s≤3. 06%. Compared with the results of silicon molybdenum yellow spectrophotometry, the results were basically consistent with the relative deviation ≤3. 00%. In conclusion, the method is simple and efficient with high precision and accuracy, and can be used for research and routine production. PMID:26415465

  8. Determination of metal concentrations in lichen samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique after applying different digestion procedures.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, S G; Yenisoy-Karakas, S; Dogangün, A

    2004-05-28

    Three digestion procedures have been tested on lichen samples for application in the determination of major, minor and trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in lichen samples collected in Aegean Region of Turkey by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The acid mixture of concentrated HNO(3), H(2)O(2) and HF were used. The instrument was optimized using lichen matrix considering RF power, nebulizer pressure, auxiliary flow rate and pump rate. The accuracy of the overall analyses was first estimated by analysis of two certified reference materials. Good agreement between measured and reference values were found for almost all elements. As the second way of determining the accuracy, results obtained from independent analytical techniques (ICP-AES and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)) were compared for all elements by analyzing real samples. Correlation coefficients of two techniques for the elements ranged between 0.70 (Mg) and 0.96 (Fe). Among the three digestion systems, namely microwave, open vessel and acid bomb, microwave digestion system gave the best recovery results. The method detection limit (MDL) was computed using reagent blanks of microwave digestion system since it provides cleaner sample preparation. Detection limit is adequate for all elements to determine the elements in lichen samples. The precision was assessed from the replicate analyses of reagent blanks of microwave digestion system and was found to be less than 1.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.). PMID:18969428

  9. Study of polymer ablation products obtained by ultraviolet laser ablation — inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todolí, J.-L.; Mermet, J.-M.

    1998-10-01

    A study of the nature of aerosols following polymer laser ablation was performed. A glass sample was used for comparison. Aerosol fractions were analyzed by using simple methods based on transport efficiency and filters. Three different tube lengths, i.e. 4, 29 and 54 m, were inserted between the ablation cell and the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) injector. For the glass sample, 10 elements were studied. Only Na and K exhibited different results as the particle size, i.e. tube length, was varied. The polymers used were poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(ethylene), PE. Three elements (Ca, Ti and Sn) under different chemical forms were measured. Unlike Ti and Sn the ablated aerosol particle size (mass) seemed to depend on the Ca chemical form. Another PVC sample containing 11 elements was also studied. Na, Al and C exhibited a different behavior with particle size with respect to the remaining elements. Then, the carbon signal was studied after a 0.3 μm pore size filter had been placed between the ablation cell and the ICP torch. The results indicated that carbon was mainly present under gaseous form and particles smaller than 0.3 μm size. The analysis of the aerosol gaseous phase by thermal desorption GC-MS confirmed the presence of polymer volatile thermal degradation products. These results explained why carbon could not be applied as an efficient internal standard.

  10. Enrichment with air-sandwiched method of on-line collection/concentration using chelating resin and simultaneous determination of trace elements by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Osamu; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-06-15

    The application of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) to the forensic sample was studied. On-line collection/concentration method of the sample with chelating resin column (TE-05) and air-sandwiched method to isolate the analyte zone at the highest concentration of an eluent was coupled with ICP-AES. The limits of detection (LODs) were much improved to 35 fold (Co): from Sc, 0.15 ng ml(-1) to Ni, 1.99 ng ml(-1), and the concentration efficiency was 7-14 times. This method was applied to the concrete with about 10mg of samples. Major elements (Al, Fe, Mg) measured by conventional/ICP-AES and trace elements measured by this method, such as Cd, Co, Ni, and Pb were determined without matrices interference. Four concrete samples can be discriminated by comparing the content profiles of the trace elements and the major elements. PMID:19362181

  11. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  12. Vibrational structure in atomic emission spectra: Hg atoms in molecular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, C.; Tramer, A.

    1997-08-01

    Mercury atoms excited to the 3P1 state in rare gas and molecular (CH4, CD4, CF4, and SF6) matrices relax by a direct 3P1→1S0 fluorescence with a ca. 60 ns lifetime or by the 3P1⇝3P0 radiationless transition followed by the 3P0→1S0 long-lived (τ in the 10 to 500 ms range) emission. The main difference between atomic and molecular hosts is the appearance, in the latter case, of a well resolved vibrational structure in the spectrum of the 3P0→1S0 transition involving the frequencies of nontotally symmetric modes of the host molecules. This structure, related to a shortening of the lifetime of the 3P0→1S0 emission is explained by the intensity borrowing from the allowed 3P1→1S0 transition, i.e., by the 3P1↔3P0 mixing induced by nontotally symmetric vibrations of neighbor molecules (analog of the Herzberg-Teller effect). Relative intensities of bands corresponding to different vibrational modes may be deduced from estimation of electric fields induced in the Hg atom by displacements of electric charges of the vibrating molecule

  13. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  14. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  15. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. In the HPLC mode, the LODDs were found to be comparable to those obtained by continuous-flow sample introduction into the ICP, or inferior by up to only a factor of four. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methyl-isobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organo-metallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered.

  16. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  17. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  18. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report: January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1993-12-31

    In this research, new high-temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. During the period January 1993--December 1993, emphasis was placed on (a) analytical investigations of atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasma (He ICP) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies; (b) simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources to predict their structure and fundamental and analytical properties without incurring the enormous cost of experimental studies; (c) spectrosopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas; (d) fundamental studies of He ICP discharges and argon-nitrogen plasma by high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometry; and (e) fundamental and analytical investigation of new, low-cost devices as sample introduction systems for atomic spectrometry and examination of new diagnostic techniques for probing aerosols. Only the most important achievements are included in this report to illustrate progress and obstacles. Detailed descriptions of the authors` investigations are outlined in the reprints and preprints that accompany this report. The technical progress expected next year is briefly described at the end of this report.

  19. Analysis of high-purity germanium dioxide by ETV-ICP-AES with preliminary concentration of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Nickolay S; Shaverina, Anastasiya V; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Saprykin, Anatoly I

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a combined technique of germanium dioxide analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with preconcentration of trace elements by distilling off matrix and electrothermal (ETV) introduction of the trace elements concentrate into the ICP. Evaluation of metrological characteristics of the developed technique of high-purity germanium dioxide analysis was performed. The limits of detection (LODs) for 25 trace elements ranged from 0.05 to 20ng/g. The accuracy of proposed technique is confirmed by "added-found" («or spiking») experiment and comparing the results of ETV-ICP-AES and ICP-AES analysis of high purity germanium dioxide samples. PMID:27216693

  20. Use of gradient dilution to flag and overcome matrix interferences in axial-viewing inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-10-01

    Despite the undisputed power of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), its users still face serious challenges in obtaining accurate analytical results. Matrix interference is perhaps the most important challenge. Dilution of a matrix-containing sample is a common practice to reduce matrix interference. However, determining the optimal dilution factor requires tedious and time-consuming offline sample preparation, since emission lines and the effect of matrix interferences are affected differently by the dilution. The current study exploits this difference by employing a high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump prior to the nebulizer to perform on-line mixing of a sample solution and diluent. Linear gradient dilution is performed on both the calibration standard and the matrix-containing sample. By ratioing the signals from two emission lines (from the same or different elements) as a function of dilution factor, the analyst can not only identify the presence of a matrix interference, but also determine the optimal dilution factor needed to overcome the interference. A ratio that does not change with dilution signals the absence of a matrix interference, whereas a changing ratio indicates the presence of an interference. The point on the dilution profile where the ratio stabilizes indicates the optimal dilution factor to correct the interference. The current study was performed on axial-viewing ICP-AES with o-xylene as the solvent.

  1. Simultaneous determination of trace heavy metals in ambient aerosols by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Talebi, S M; Malekiha, M

    2008-07-01

    The simultaneous determination of heavy metals associated with airborne particulate matter in the atmosphere of the city Isfahan (Iran) was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. The preconcentration procedure developed found instrumental to determine the trace heavy metals associated with ambient aerosols collected at a short sampling period or collected from rural areas where the concentrations of these metals are much less than those in urban areas. Several samples were analyzed by both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as a conventional method and the proposed method. The results obtained by the two methods were found in good agreement. The method was applied to the determination of atmospheric level of heavy metals in rural area and also for study of variation in levels of heavy metals in urban atmosphere during the days and nights. PMID:19552073

  2. Method development for the determination of manganese, cobalt and copper in green coffee comparing direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Nédio; Castro, Jacira T; da Silva, Márcia M; Korn, Maria das Graças A; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R

    2007-10-31

    A method has been developed for the determination of cobalt, copper and manganese in green coffee using direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ET AAS). The motivation for the study was that only a few elements might be suitable to determine the origin of green coffee so that the multi-element techniques usually applied for this purpose might not be necessary. The three elements have been chosen as test elements as they were found to be significant in previous investigations. A number of botanical certified reference materials (CRM) and pre-analyzed samples of green coffee have been used for method validation, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples as reference method. Calibration against aqueous standards could be used for the determination of Mn and Co by SS-ET AAS, but calibration against solid CRM was necessary for the determination of Cu. No significant difference was found between the results obtained with the proposed method and certified or independently determined values. The limits of detection for Mn, Cu and Co were 0.012, 0.006 and 0.004mugg(-1) using SS-ET AAS and 0.015, 0.13 and 0.10mugg(-1) using ICP OES. Seven samples of Brazilian green coffee have been analyzed, and there was no significant difference between the values obtained with SS-ET AAS and ICP OES for Mn and Cu. ICP OES could not be used as a reference method for Co, as essentially all values were below the limit of quantification of this technique. PMID:19073113

  3. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effects induced by the vacuum radiation field and the two laser fields. More importantly, the almost 100% probability of finding an atom within a certain range can be reached when corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in a spatially selective single-qubit phase gate, entangling gates, and quantum error correction for quantum information processing.

  4. Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing team: An examination of LA-ICP-AES in a mobile configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for field-deployable elemental analysis devices that are safer, faster, and less expensive than the fixed laboratory procedures now used to screen hazardous waste sites. As a response to this need, the Technology Integration Program (TIP) created a mobile, field-deployable laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) sampling and analysis prototype. Although the elemental. screening prototype has been successfully field-tested, continued marketing and technical development efforts are required to transfer LA-ICP-AES technology to the commercial sector. TIP established and supported a student research and design group called the Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing (IDMM) team to advance the technology transfer of mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES. The IDMM team developed a conceptual design (which is detailed in this report) for a mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES sampling and analysis system, and reports the following findings: Mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES is commercially viable. Eventual regulatory acceptance of field-deployable LA-ICP-AES, while not a simple process, is likely. Further refinement of certain processes and components of LA-ICP-AES will enhance the device`s sensitivity and accuracy.

  5. Exact solution for spontaneous emission in the presence of N atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-10-01

    N two-level "atoms" are considered in interaction with a single-mode resonant electromagnetic field. The exact solution is given nonrelativistically for all times for the case of spontaneous emission, when only one atom is initially excited. The solution is given for the general case of the N atoms in inequivalent mode positions.

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  7. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-07-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of {sup 139}La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, {sup 236}U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of {sup 235}U:{sup 238}U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES.

  8. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  9. Selective solid phase extraction of copper using a new Cu(II)-imprinted polymer and determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri; Hazer, Orhan; Yilmaz, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the preparation of a novel Cu(II)-ion imprinted polymer using 2-thiozylmethacrylamide (TMA) for on-line preconcentration of Cu(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Cu(II)-TMA monomer (complex) was synthesized and copolymerized via bulk polymerization method in the presence of ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate cross-linker. The resulting polymer was washed with 5% (v/v) HNO3 to remove Cu(II) ions and then with water until a neutral pH. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized by FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental conditions were optimized for on-line preconcentration of Cu(II) using a minicolumn of ion imprinted polymer (IIP). Quantitative retention was achieved between pH 5.0 and 6.0, whereas the recoveries for the non-imprinted polymer (NIP) were about 61%. The IIP showed about 30 times higher selectivity to Cu(II) in comparison to NIP. The IIP also exhibited excellent selectivity for Cu(II) against the competing transition and heavy metal ions, including Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Computational calculations revealed that the selectivity of IIP was mediated by the stability of Cu(II)-TMA complex which was far more stable than those of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) that have similar charge and ionic radii to Cu(II). A volume of 10 mL sample solution was loaded onto the column at 4.0 mL min−1 by using a sequential injection system (FIALab 3200) followed by elution with 1.0 mL of 2% (v/v) HNO3. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and limit of detection (LOD, 3s) of the method were 3.2% and 0.4 μg L−1, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cu(II) in fish otoliths (CRM 22), bone ash (SRM 1400) and coastal seawater and estuarine water samples. PMID:24511158

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, R.; Zoller, P.; Ritsch, H.

    1992-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission in terms of atomic wave functions is developed. Realizations of the time evolution of atomic wave functions are constructed that correspond to an ensemble of atoms driven by laser light undergoing a sequence of spontaneous emissions. The atomic decay times are drawn according to the photon count distribution of the driven atom. Each quantum jump of the atomic electron projects the atomic wave function to the ground state of the atom. Our theory is based on a stochastic interpretation and generalization of Mollow's pure-state analysis of resonant light scattering, and the Srinivas-Davies theory of continuous measurements in photodetection. An extension of the theory to include mechanical light effects and a generalization to atomic systems with Zeeman substructure are given. We illustrate the method by simulating the solutions of the optical Bloch equations for two-level systems, and laser cooling of a two-level atom in an ion trap where the center-of-mass motion of the atom is described quantum mechanically.

  11. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shuichi Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-15

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at S{sub B} steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  12. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  13. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  14. Effects of acid type and concentration on the determination of 34 elements by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hee, S.S.Q.; Macdonald, T.J.; Boyle, J.R.

    1985-06-01

    A mixed acid consisting of 11.6% HCl/2.8% HNO/sub 3/ proved superior to 2 to 10% HCl, HNO/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone in chemical compatibility and storage characteristics for simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of 33 elements admixed up to concentrations of 100 ..mu..g/mL each. A 2% aqua regia solution appeared to be adequate below 10..mu..g/mL of all these admixed elements plus silver. Use of the mixed acid generally also allowed for more reproducible interelemental k factors. Less sensitive elements and elements whose lines were in the vacuum ultraviolet were not as reproducible. A two-point standardization procedure was adequate, and k factor values agreed within 10% only over a specific concentration range. A practical procedure to define the range of determination was developed using the 11.6% HCl/2.8% HNO/sub 3/ acid solvent. 24 references, 11 tables.

  15. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  16. High-pressure combustor exhaust emissions with improved air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A high-pressure combustor segment 0.456 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was tested with specially designed air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles at inlet-air temperatures of 340 to 755 k (610 deg to 1360 R), reference velocities of 12.4 to 26.1 meters per second (41 to 86 ft/sec), and fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.020. Increasing inlet-air pressure from 4 to 20 atmospheres generally increased smoke number and nitric oxide, but decreased carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon concentrations with air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles. Emission indexes for carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were lower at 4, 10, and 20 atmospheres, and nitric oxide emission indexes were lower at 10 and 20 atmospheres with air-atomizing than with pressure-atomizing nozzles.

  17. Solvent extraction of cadmium as a previous step for its determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siles Cordero, M.T.; Garcia de Torres, A.; Cano Pavon, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A method is proposed for the solvent extraction of cadmium using 1,5-bis[1-(2-pyridyl)ethylidene] thiocarbonohydrazide (APTH) as extractant. The optimum extraction conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the effect of pH, concentration of extractant, shaking time and ionic strength. The maximum volume ratio of the aqueous to organic phase was 25:1 for a single-stage extraction of 99-100% of the metal ion. The detection limit is 0.15 ng/ml cadmium, and the calibration is linear from 0.2 to 500 ng/ml. The effect of interferences was studied and no interferences from the elements commonly found in biological materials were observed. The extraction method was applied to the determination of cadmium in some biological materials using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).

  18. Calibration graphs for Ti, Ta and Nb in sintered tungsten carbide by infrared laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanický, V; Otruba, V; Mermet, J M

    2001-12-01

    Infrared laser ablation (IR-LA) has been studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of sintered cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Fractionation of cobalt was observed. Linearity of calibration plots was verified at least up to 15% Ti, 8% Ta, and 3% Nb. Above 1% (m/m) Ti, Ta, and Nb, the repeatability of results was better than 3% R.S.D. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 3% to +/- 4% for Ti, Ta, and Nb with internal standardization by tungsten and up to +/- 5% without internal standardization. The limits of detection were 0.004% Ti, 0.001% Ta, and 0.004% Nb. Elimination of the cemented hardmetal dissolution procedure is the main advantage of this method. PMID:11769803

  19. Spontaneous emission from a single two-level atom in the presence of N initially unexcited identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1986-03-01

    The quantum-electrodynamical problem of N identical two-level atoms interacting with M field modes is considered, and an exact solution for the case of spontaneous emission from a single atom is obtained. The behavior of this system is shown to be quite different from the exponential decay of a single excited atom radiating into free space. A 'ringing' behavior at the enigmatic frequency of approximately the square root of N, which occurs when only one mode is accessible to the field, persists when many modes are present. When a continuum of modes is accessible, the long-time limit shows that the energy of the originally excited atom is equally likely to be shared by the N-1 originally unexcited atoms and the electromagnetic field when M/N approaches 1. 'Radiation suppression' occurs whenever N is much greater than 1 and M is much less than N, when the originally excited atom does not emit its energy. When M = N much greater than 1, the single atom decays monotonically to zero (and approximately exponentially), but with a decay rate that is the square root of N times the Rabi frequency. Such unexpected affects are presently within experimental range.

  20. The metamorphosis in the emission angular profile from an inverted two-level atoms system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2009-08-01

    A rich variety of angular distributions in the cooperative emission from a sphere of inverted N two-level atoms are shown to result from the eigenstructure of the complex kernel of scalar photon theory exp( ik0R)/( ik0R). This angular distribution is sensitive both to the size of the sphere and to the instant of observation of the emission.

  1. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  2. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, D. N.; Zachariadis, G. A.; Anthemidis, A. N.; Tsirliganis, N. C.; Stratis, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level).

  3. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU[center dot]Spec[trademark] column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  4. Separation techniques for the clean-up of radioactive mixed waste for ICP-AES/ICP-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, A.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-03-17

    Two separation techniques were investigated for the clean-up of typical radioactive mixed waste samples requiring elemental analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). These measurements frequently involve regulatory or compliance criteria which include the determination of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List (TAL). These samples usually consist of both an aqueous phase and a solid phase which is mostly an inorganic sludge. Frequently, samples taken from the waste tanks contain high levels of uranium and thorium which can cause spectral interferences in ICP-AES or ICP-MS analysis. The removal of these interferences is necessary to determine the presence of the EPA TAL elements in the sample. Two clean-up methods were studied on simulated aqueous waste samples containing the EPA TAL elements. The first method studied was a classical procedure based upon liquid-liquid extraction using tri-n- octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in cyclohexane. The second method investigated was based on more recently developed techniques using extraction chromatography; specifically the use of a commercially available Eichrom TRU{center_dot}Spec{trademark} column. Literature on these two methods indicates the efficient removal of uranium and thorium from properly prepared samples and provides considerable qualitative information on the extraction behavior of many other elements. However, there is a lack of quantitative data on the extraction behavior of elements on the EPA Target Analyte List. Experimental studies on these two methods consisted of determining whether any of the analytes were extracted by these methods and the recoveries obtained. Both methods produced similar results; the EPA target analytes were only slightly or not extracted. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated and found to be comparable.

  5. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-06-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed, and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methylisobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organometallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts, and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered. 227 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  7. Evaluation of sample preparation methods for the detection of total metal content using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in wastewater and sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimpe, K. M.; Ngila, J. C.; Mabuba, N.; Nomngongo, P. N.

    Heavy metal contamination exists in aqueous wastes and sludge of many industrial discharges and domestic wastewater, among other sources. Determination of metals in the wastewater and sludge requires sample pre-treatment prior to analysis because of certain challenges such as the complexity of the physical state of the sample, which may lead to wrong readings in the measurement. This is particularly the case with low analyte concentration to be detected by the instrument. The purpose of this work was to assess and validate the different sample preparation methods namely, hot plate and microwave-assisted digestion procedures for extraction of metal ions in wastewater and sludge samples prior to their inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric (ICP-OES) determination. For the extraction of As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, three acid mixtures, that is, HNO3/H2O2, HNO3/HClO4/H2O2 and aqua regia + H2O2, were evaluated. Influent wastewater spiked with the SRM (CWW-TM-B) was used for the optimization of acid mixtures affecting the extraction procedure. After sample digestion, the filtration capabilities of cellulose-acetate filter paper and the acrodisc syringe filter with the pore size of 0.45 μm were compared. In terms of performance, acrodisc syringe filter in terms of the improved recoveries obtained, was found to be the best filtration method compared to the filter paper. Based on the analytical results obtained, microwave-assisted digestion (MAD) using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was found to be the most suitable method for extraction of heavy metals and major elements in all the sample matrices. Therefore, MAD using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was used for further investigations. The precision of the developed MAD method expressed in terms of relative standard deviations (% RSD) for different metals was found to be <5%. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.12% to 2.18 μg L-1 and 0.61% to 3.43 μg L-1

  8. Auroral excitation of optical emissions of atomic and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    The O I 'green line' (1S-1D) at 5577 A and the O2 (0,0) atmosphere band at 7620 A were measured in a steady IBC II(plus) aurora simultaneously with N2 emissions and the auroral electron flux. An empirical model based on these rocket measurements shows that the principal excitation source of O2(b 1 Sigma g plus) is energy transfer from O(1D), with direct electron impact of O2 contributing less than 5 percent. While the altitude profile of the green line emission resembles that which would be produced by electron impact excitation of O2, a dissociative excitation cross section of 10 to the minus 16th power is required for this interpretation. None of the other known O(1S) excitation mechanisms are thought capable of producing the observed emission rate.

  9. The analysis of chlorine with other elements of interest in waste oil/fuels by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Tsourides, D.

    1998-12-31

    It has been said that there are more chemical analysis performed on oil/fuels than any other material. The sensitivity, linearity, multi-element capability, and relative freedom from matrix effects of ICP-AES makes it particularly suitable for elemental analysis of these samples. However, until recently the routine analysis of Chlorine had not been possible by ICP-AES. The addition of the Halogen elements, particularly Chlorine, to ICP-AES analysis is of importance to several industries that burn waste oil as fuel. The recycling and disposal of waste oil is closely regulated by metal and halogen content in all developed countries. In some countries, waste oil containing more than 1,000 ppm of Chlorine is considered hazardous waste. However, used oil may be burned as a fuel if it meets certain allowable limits. The paper describes the procedures for chlorine analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

  10. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  11. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-04-15

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-01

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures. PMID:24328147

  13. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  14. Effect of discharge parameters on emission yields in a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Mark; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    1997-05-01

    A study is performed on a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission (rf-GD-AES) source to determine the factors effecting the emission yields for both metallic and nonconductive sample types. Specifically, these studies focus on determining how the operating parameters (power and pressure) influence emission yields. The results follow predicted patterns as determined by Langmuir probe diagnostic studies of a similar source. In particular, discharge gas pressure is the key operating parameter as slight changes in pressure may significantly affect the emission yield of the analyte species. RF power is less important and is shown to produce only relatively small changes in the emission yield over the ranges typically used in rf-GD analyses. These studies indicate that the quantitative analysis of layered materials, depth-profiling, may be adversely affected if the data collection scheme, i.e. the quantitative algorithm, requires changing the pressure during an analysis to keep the operating current and voltage constant. A direct relationship is shown to exist between the Ar (discharge gas) emission intensity and that of sputtered species for nonconductors. This observance is used to compensate for differences in emission intensities observed in the analysis of various thickness nonconductive samples. The sputtered element emission signals are corrected based on the emission intensity of an Ar (1) transition, implying that quantitative analysis of nonconductive samples is not severely limited by the availability of matrix matched standards.

  15. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  16. Protecting remote atomic entanglement against spontaneous emission by separated photonic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Du, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2015-07-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics between two spatially separated atoms trapped in two separate optical cavities. Based on cavity-assisted interactions between the atoms and separated photonic pulses, we propose a scheme for the implemention of a controlled-phase-flip gate (CPF gate) between each of the atoms and the photonic pulse to protect the remote atomic quantum entanglement against the decaying caused by spontaneous emission. What we need to do is to shoot the horizontally polarized photons onto the cavity mirror successively, plus a train of Hadamard operations on the atoms, and no measurement is needed here. It is shown that the quantum entanglement of the two remote atoms can be protected effectively in this way. We also extend our scheme to the case of weak coupling and low Q cavity cases. The simplicity of the current scheme may warrant its experimental realization.

  17. Coherent x-ray emission from hollow Xe atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Kepple, P.; Dasgupta, A.; Clark, R.; Velikovich, A.; Borisov, A. B.; Rhodes, C. K.

    2004-11-01

    We investigated small Xe clusters subject to intense ultrashort laser radiation. The dynamics and evolution of the cluster plasma is described by a relativistic time-dependent 3-D molecular dynamics model and a detailed atomic physics model describing the formation of hollow Xe atoms. At a peak laser intensity of (1-5)x10^20 W/cm^2 the model predicts inversions in a number of states distributed in several ionization stages in agreement with experimental observations [1,2]. The particle simulation model suggests that at laser intensities below 10^20 W/cm^2 the outer electrons form a low-density uniform plasma, while at higher intensities the electrons may behave collectively in a manner similar to that described by the "collective oscillation model" [1,2]. [1] W. A. Schroeder, F. G. Omenetto, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, A. McPherson, C. Jordan, K. Boyer, K. Kondo, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 31, 5031 (1998) [2] W. A. Schroeder, T. R. Nelson, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, K. Boyer, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 34, 297 (2001)

  18. An analytical method for hydrogeochemical surveys: Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after using enrichment coprecipitation with cobalt and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Trace metals that are commonly associated with mineralization were concentrated and separated from natural water by coprecipitation with ammonium pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and cobalt and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The method is useful in hydrogeochemical surveys because it permits preconcentration near the sample sites, and selected metals are preserved shortly after the samples are collected. The procedure is relatively simple: (1) a liter of water is filtered; (2) the pH is adjusted; (3) Co chloride and APDC are added to coprecipitate the trace metals; and (4) later, the precipitate is filtered, dissolved, and diluted to 10 ml for a 100-fold concentration enrichment of the separated metals. Sb(III), As(III), Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Ag, V, and Zn can then be determined simultaneously by ICP-AES. In an experiment designed to measure the coprecipitation efficiency, Sb(III), Cd and Ag were recovered at 70 to 75% of their original concentration. The remaining metals were recovered at 85 to 100% of their original concentrations, however. The range for the lower limits of determination for the metals after preconcentration is 0.1 to 3.0 ??g/l. The precision of the method was evaluated by replicate analyses of a Colorado creek water and two simulated water samples. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a water reference standard (SRM 1643a) certified by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. In addition, the method was evaluated by analyzing groundwater samples collected near a porphyry copper deposit in Arizona and by analyzing meltwater from glacier-covered areas favorable for mineralization in south-central Alaska. The results for the ICP-AES analyses compared favorably with those obtained using the sequential technique of GFAAS on the acidified but unconcentrated water samples. ICP-AES analysis of trace-metal preconcentrates for hydrogeochemical surveys is more efficient than GFAAS because a

  19. Emission spectrum of holmium atoms excited during ionic sputtering of a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, S. S.; Braslavets, V. V.; Evdokimov, S. A.

    1988-08-01

    The article shows the fundamental possibility of using the bombardment of the surface of solids by kilo V ions for exciting the emission spectrum of particles of the target material and for obtaining spectroscopic data. The method is tested by studying the emission spectra of holmium as an example. It is shown that the sensitivity of the method can be substantially increased by using the so-called chemical effect, i.e., the effect of strengthening the spectral lines of sputtered excited metal atoms during bombardment of the target in the presence of oxygen. It is proposed that the chemical effect, which takes place only for atomic lines, in contrast to ionic ones, can also be used for simplifying the identification of atomic lines. It is noted that the proposed method is suitable for studying the atomic spectra of any solids, including refractory and chemically reactive substances.

  20. Directional spontaneous emission and lateral Casimir-Polder force on an atom close to a nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Clausen, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of an excited atom close to an optical nanofiber and the resulting scattering forces. For a suitably chosen orientation of the atomic dipole, the spontaneous emission pattern becomes asymmetric and a resonant Casimir-Polder force parallel to the fiber axis arises. For a simple model case, we show that such a lateral force is due to the interaction of the circularly oscillating atomic dipole moment with its image inside the material. With the Casimir-Polder energy being constant in the lateral direction, the predicted lateral force does not derive from a potential in the usual way. Our results have implications for optical force measurements on a substrate as well as for laser cooling of atoms in nanophotonic traps.

  1. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  2. Ability to Control a Titanium-Alloy Structure by Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchan, N. V.; Polkin, I. S.; Fertikov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of material structure on the analytical signal was studied using atomic emission spectroscopy with spark excitation of solids. A method for assessing the structure of the titanium alloy was proposed. It consisted of repeated analysis of a series of samples before and after heat treatment with excitation and recording of the spectrum under identical conditions followed by statistical processing of the results. The effects on the alloy structure of two heattreatment regimes, quenching and annealing, were studied. Atomic-emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma was used to control the homogeneity of the chemical composition in the test samples.

  3. Near-ionization-threshold emission in atomic gases driven by intense sub-cycle pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Chun; Travers, John C.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2016-02-01

    We study theoretically the dipole radiation of a hydrogen atom driven by an intense sub-cycle pulse. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the system is solved by ab initio calculation to obtain the dipole response. Remarkably, a narrowband emission lasting longer than the driving pulse appears at a frequency just above the ionization threshold. An additional calculation using the strong field approximation also recovers this emission, which suggests that it corresponds to the oscillation of nearly bound electrons that behave similarly to Rydberg electrons. The predicted phenomenon is unique to ultrashort driving pulses but not specific to any particular atomic structure.

  4. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters. PMID:18261510

  5. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP-AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP-AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP-AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP-AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP-AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data. PMID:27043594

  6. Method for reducing emissions utilizing pre-atomized fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

    1987-05-19

    A method is described for reducing particulate emissions during combustion of a hydrocarbon with API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 40,000 centipoise at 122/sup 0/F, paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less, aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and asphaltene content of about 50% by weight or greater. The method comprises: emulsifying such hydrocarbon to form a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume and in which emulsion the hydrocarbon has a particle size predominantly of about 50 microns in diameter or less; preheating such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion prior to combustion; and burning such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

  7. Comparison of ultrasonic and thermospray systems for high performance sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conver, Timothy S.; Koropchak, John A.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes detailed work done in our lab to compare analytical figures of merit for pneumatic, ultrasonic and thermospray sample introduction (SI) systems with three different inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instruments. One instrument from Leeman Labs, Inc. has an air path echelle spectrometer and a 27 MHz ICP. For low dissolved solid samples with this instrument, we observed that the ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and fused silica aperture thermospray (FSApT) both offered similar LOD improvements as compared to pneumatic nebulization (PN), 14 and 16 times, respectively. Average sensitivities compared to PN were better for the USN, by 58 times, compared to 39 times for the FSApT. For solutions containing high dissolved solids we observed that FSApT optimized at the same conditions as for low dissolved solids, whereas USN required changes in power and gas flows to maintain a stable discharge. These changes degraded the LODs for USN substantially as compared to those utilized for low dissolved solid solutions, limiting improvement compared to PN to an average factor of 4. In general, sensitivities for USN were degraded at these new conditions. When solutions with 3000 μg/g Ca were analyzed, LOD improvements were smaller for FSApT and USN, but FSApT showed an improvement over USN of 6.5 times. Sensitivities compared to solutions without high dissolved solids were degraded by 19% on average for FSApT, while those for USN were degraded by 26%. The SI systems were also tested with a Varian Instruments Liberty 220 having a vacuum path Czerny-Turner monochromator and a 40 MHz generator. The sensitivities with low dissolved solids solutions compared to PN were 20 times better for the USN and 39 times better for FSApT, and LODs for every element were better for FSApT. Better correlation between relative sensitivities and anticipated relative analyte mass fluxes for FSApT and USN was observed with the Varian instrument. LOD

  8. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  9. Determination of soluble toxic arsenic species in alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García Salgado, S; Quijano Nieto, M A; Bonilla Simón, M M

    2006-09-29

    A microwave-based procedure for arsenic species extraction in alga samples (Sargassum fulvellum, Chlorella vulgaris, Hizikia fusiformis and Laminaria digitata) is described. Extraction time and temperature were tested in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of the process. Arsenic compounds were extracted in 8 ml of deionised water at 90 degrees C for 5 min. The process was repeated three times. Soluble arsenic compounds extracted accounted for about 78-98% of total arsenic. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous work, where the extraction process was carried out by ultrasonic focussed probe for 30 s. Speciation studies were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-AES). The chromatographic method allowed us to separate As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in less than 13 min. The chromatographic analysis of the samples allowed us to identify and quantify As(V) in Hizikia sample and Sargasso material, while the four arsenic species studied were found in Chlorella sample. In the case of Laminaria sample, none of these species was identified by HPLC-HG-ICP-AES. However, in the chromatographic analysis of this alga by HPLC-ICP-AES, an unknown arsenic species was detected. PMID:16876177

  10. [Study of emission spectra of N atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yu, Ran; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-06-01

    The emission spectra of nitrogen (N) atom produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge in air were detected successfully at one atmosphere, and the excited transition spectral line at 674.5 nm with maximum value of relative intensity was selected to investigate the influences of air and electrical parameters on N atom relative density. The results indicate that N atom relative density in ionization region increases with the increase in power; decreases with increasing discharge gap and relative humidity; and with the increase in N2 content, the relative density of N active atom firstly increases and then decreases. Under present experimental conditions, the maximum value of N atom relative density appears at the axial distance from needle point r = 1 mm. PMID:22870624

  11. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  12. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  13. Atomic Data and Emission Line Intensities for CA VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work we calculate energy levels, transition probabilities and electron-ion collisional excitation rates for the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3) and 3s(sup 2)3p3d configurations of the silicon-like ion Ca VII. The total number of intermediate coupling levels considered is 27. Collision strengths are calculated at seven incident electron energies: 8, 10, 15, 20, 30,40 and 60 Ry, using the Distorted Wave approximation and a 5-configuration model. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities and are used to calculate level populations and line emissivities under the assumption of statistical equilibrium. Line intensity ratios are calculated and compared with observed values measured from SERTS and SOHO/CDS spectra. The diagnostic potential of Ca VII is demonstrated, with particular emphasis on the possibility to measure the Ne/Ca relative abundance through simultaneous observations of Ca VII and N VI lines. Ca VII proves to be an excellent tool for the study of the FIP effect in the solar transition region.

  14. Sampling and excitation of refractory solids with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Scheeline, A.

    1987-01-15

    Work with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source for solids analysis is reported. Argon at 3.5 torr provided the most intense analyte emission compared to several other gases. A study of the effects of sample positioning provides further understanding of the plasma motion and plasma/sample interactions. Application of the new sample positioning knowledge has resulted in significant increases in analyte emission, as is demonstrated by use of samples of tungsten powder, boron nitride, and aluminum oxide ceramics.

  15. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  16. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  17. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  19. Determination of microelements in uncontaminated natural water from the Baikal region by atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, A.I.; Chumakova, N.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, concentration by evaporation was used to determine 17 microelements (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ba, and Pb) in water from Lake Baikal and its tributaries by atomic-emission spectrometry with the arc excitation of spectra.

  20. INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY METHOD 6010 AND DIGESTION METHOD 3050

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design, execution, and results of an interlaboratory study of Method 6010, 'Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy,' are described. The study examined the application of the method to the analysis of solid-waste materials for 23 elements. Part of the interlab...

  1. Atomic emission line wavelength calculations below 2000 angstroms for Lithium II through Cobalt XXVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Atomic-emission-line wavelengths are presented which were calculated from wavelengths of previously identified transition sequences using second-degree polynomials fitted to known wave numbers by the least squares method. Wavelengths less than 2000 angstroms are included for ions from Li II to Co XXVI. The computer program written in FORTRAN 4 is also included.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Emission Cross Sections resulting from Electron Impact in the FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    The atomic oxygen emissions from astronomical sources provide valuable (perhaps unique) information on densities, gas dynamics, etc. of the atmospheres of the planets and their satellites. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum of the Earth's aurora and day glow as well as the atmospheres of Europa, Ganymede, Mars and Venus. In this poster we present our measurements of the electron impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 1000 eV impact energy. A high density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at right angles by a magnetically focused electron beam. The experimental apparatus consists of an electron impact collision chamber in tandem with a 0.2m UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  3. Emission of energetic neutral atoms from water ice under Ganymede surface-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wurz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The co-rotating plasma around Jupiter precipitates on the surfaces of the jovian moons, where it is not hindered by a local magnetic field. Precipitating ions lead to the emission of energetic neutral atoms, which are produced via backscattering and sputtering processes, from the surface. The European Space Agency's JUICE mission to Jupiter carries as part of the Particle Environment Package experiment an imaging energetic neutral atom spectrometer called the jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). When it is in orbit around Ganymede, JNA will measure the energetic neutral atom flux emitted from the surface of Ganymede in the energy range from 10 eV to 3300 eV. The surface of Ganymede consists of a large fraction of water ice. To characterize the expected energetic neutral atom fluxes from water ice due to precipitating jovian plasma, we impacted protons and singly charged oxygen ions with energies up to 33 keV on a salty water ice target kept at Ganymede surface conditions. Emitted energetic atoms were measured energy- and mass-resolved using the JNA prototype instrument. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms per incident ion in the JNA energy range. For incident protons, energetic neutral atom yields between 0.28 at 1 keV and ∼40 at 33 keV were observed. For incident singly charged oxygen ions, the observed energetic neutral atom yield ranged from 0.8 for at 3 keV to ∼170 at 23 keV.

  4. Analytical and quantitative concentration of gunshot residues (Pb, Sb, Ba) to estimate entrance hole and shooting-distance using confocal laser microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Di Peri, Giovanni Paolo; Nieddu, Antonio; Bello, Stefania; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rabozzi, Roberto; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-09-10

    The identification of gunshot residues (GSRs) on human body in firearm related fatalities may be essential for the evaluation of gunshot wounds and for the analysis of the shooting distance. The present study introduces the elemental analysis of the GSRs by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis (ICP-AES) performed on skin samples. ICP-AES was used to increase the accuracy of the analysis in gunshots fired from long and medium distance. In this experimental study, a series of 50 test shots have been performed in an open space with lateral wind protection. As target we used pig skin cut into 20 cm × 20 cm squares. The firing distances were 0.2, 5, 50, 100 and 150 cm. To exclude environmental contamination, each skin sample was carefully washed with deionized water and dried at room temperature in a closed box before the shooting test. We choose 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers handguns, loaded with different ammunitions. At ICP-AES analysis a clearly decreasing trend in the quantity and the concentration of the different elements of GSR by increasing the firing distance for both the guns used in the test was evident for every portion of skin samples analyzed. The analytical results obtained by ICP-AES confirmed very high concentrations of Pb, Sb, and Ba in the close-range shots and low concentrations of these particles in the intermediate and distant shots. In particular, the concentration of Sb, Ba, and Pb was significantly different from loose values when the firing distance was 100-150 cm for both the 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers. PMID:23890629

  5. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  6. [Artificial neural network applied for spectral overlap interference correction in ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liu, S; Zeng, X

    1997-10-01

    A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) has been applied to correcting spectral overlap interference in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Some network parameters including the range of input values and training sequence for training patterns presented to the network were discussed using simulated Ce 413.380nm and Pr 413.380nm line profiles. Results show that the noise in simulated mixture spectra will slow down the network convergence and has more influence on network prediction. PMID:15810366

  7. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  8. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, H.H.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  10. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  11. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  12. An Atomically Precise Au10 Ag2 Nanocluster with Red-Near-IR Dual Emission.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Guan, Zong-Jie; Pei, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Shang-Fu; Wan, Xian-Kai; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    A red-near-IR dual-emissive nanocluster with the composition [Au10 Ag2 (2-py-C≡C)3 (dppy)6 ](BF4 )5 (1; 2-py-C≡C is 2-pyridylethynyl, dppy=2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine) has been synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 has a trigonal bipyramidal Au10 Ag2 core that contains a planar Au4 (2-py-C≡C)3 unit sandwiched by two Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs. Cluster 1 shows intense red-NIR dual emission in solution. The visible emission originates from metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from silver atoms to phosphine ligands in the Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs, and the intense NIR emission is associated with the participation of 2-pyridylethynyl in the frontier orbitals of the cluster, which is confirmed by a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation. PMID:27305386

  13. Electron emission in H sup 0 --atom collisions: A coincidence study of the angular dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, O.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Groeneveld, K.O. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); DuBois, R.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Differential electron emission occurring as the result of fast hydrogen atom impact on helium and argon targets has been studied using standard non-coincidence and emitted electron-ionized projectile coincidence techniques. Impact energies were 0.5 and 1 MeV; electron emission was measured between approximately 20 and 2000 eV for selected laboratory emission angles ranging from 0{degree} to 180{degree}. These data demonstrate the importance of simultaneous target-projectile ionization as was previously observed for energetic He{sup +} impact. The experimental data for the helium target, when compared to PWBA calculations using hydrogenic wave functions, indicate good agreement with theory for projectile ionization and, indirectly, reasonably good agreement for target ionization. Simultaneous target-projectile ionization events were not included in the model. The argon data are compared with more sophisticated calculations for electron loss. These comparisons indicate the importance of second order effects at large emission angles.

  14. Characterization of binary silver based alloys by nanosecond-infrared-laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Ciro; Sobral, Hugo

    2013-11-01

    A nanosecond infrared laser ablation (LA) system was examined to determine the composition of several silver-copper alloys through an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Samples with different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by atomic absorption, and ICP-OES after sample digestion, and compared with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer-scanning electron microscopy (EDX-SEM). Elemental fractionation during the ablation process and within the ICP was investigated for different laser frequencies and fluences. Samples were used for optimizing and calibrating the coupling between LA to the ICP-OES system. Results obtained from the samples analysis were in agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX-SEM, showing that fractionation was not significant for laser fluences higher than 55 J cm-2.

  15. Enhanced emission from an ensemble of inverted atoms in the presence of another isotopic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-04-01

    The emission flux from a slab of two homogeneously-broadened isotope species ensembles is analyzed. Initially one of the species is coherently nearly all inverted, the atoms of the other species are in the ground state. The slab thickness is less than the wavelength of the resonant transition radiation. In particular, in a narrow band of the slab thickness centered at 237λ/500, the emission flux from the species mixture for different detunings between the two species resonance frequencies is shown to be greatly enhanced over its value where only a single species is present.

  16. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  17. Spontaneous emission of a photon: Wave-packet structures and atom-photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.V.; Efremov, M.A.; Kazakov, A.E.; Chan, K.W.; Eberly, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    2005-09-15

    Spontaneous emission of a photon by an atom is described theoretically in three dimensions with the initial wave function of a finite-mass atom taken in the form of a finite-size wave packet. Recoil and wave-packet spreading are taken into account. The total atom-photon wave function is found in the momentum and coordinate representations as the solution of an initial-value problem. The atom-photon entanglement arising in such a process is shown to be closely related to the structure of atom and photon wave packets which can be measured in the coincidence and single-particle schemes of measurements. Two predicted effects, arising under the conditions of high entanglement, are anomalous narrowing of the coincidence wave packets and, under different conditions, anomalous broadening of the single-particle wave packets. Fundamental symmetry relations between the photon and atom single-particle and coincidence wave-packet widths are established. The relationship with the famous scenario of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen is discussed.

  18. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  19. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  20. Instabilities in fluorocarbon ICP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Abada, Hana

    2000-10-01

    Several recent studies (Lieberman and al(M. A. Lieberman, A. J. Lichtenberg and A. M. Marakhtanov, App. Phys. Vol75,3617 (1999)), Tuszewski(M. Tuszewski, J. Appl. Phys. 79, 8967 (1996))) have shown the presence of instabilities in low pressure inductively coupled discharges with electronegative gases (O_2, Ar/SF_6). Lieberman and al^1 have proposed an explanation for this effect in terms of electon attachment processes causing an oscillation between capacitive and inductive coupling modes. We have observed similar instabilities in ICP fluorocarbon plasmas (CF_4, C_2F_6, CHF_3) by observing the optical emission from the plasma. In CF4 plasmas, the optical emission is modulated by up to 90% at frequencies 200-1 kHz at 1-20 mtorr with rf powers of 300 W and 500W. We have also observed an interesting phenomenon whereby inductive/capacitive oscillations occur during several hundreds of ms, in between periods of stable capactive operation lasting several hudreds of ms.

  1. Europa - Ultraviolet emissions and the possibility of atomic oxygen and hydrogen clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F.-M.; Judge, D. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Emission signals from Europa with wavelength below 800 A were detected by the Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer. In the present paper, improved procedures for data reduction are used to determine the spatial region as well as the intensity of the suggested emission sources. The observations indicate a cloud with a radius of about 1.5 Jupiter radii and an apparent brightness of approximately 10 rayleighs for a wavelength of 500 A. It is argued that neutral oxygen atoms, along with neutral hydrogen, are produced through dissociation of water ice on the surface of Europa by particle impact. Electron impact ionization excitation of oxygen atoms in the resulting cloud then gives rise to the observed emission. The present source brightness and cloud radius results are used to estimate an oxygen column density of the order of 10 trillion per sq cm, while the density of atomic hydrogen is at most 100 billion per sq cm and 1 trillion per sq cm for molecular hydrogen.

  2. Photon emission from translational energy in atomic collisions: A dynamic Casimir-Polder effect

    SciTech Connect

    Westlund, Per-Olof; Wennerstroem, H.

    2005-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using a Liouville formalism, that the relative motion of two atoms can result in the emission of photons and conversely that photons can be absorbed to excite the relative translational motion. The mechanism responsible for the energy transfer between the radiation field and the translational motion of the atoms is a dynamic version of the long-range Casimir-Polder interaction between two fixed atoms. The phenomenon is analogous to the dynamic Casimir effect discussed for moving macro- (or meso)scopic objects and we term it the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect. The absorption or emission is a two-photon process and we find that the transition probability is proportional to the spectral density of a correlation function involving the relative translational motion of two atoms. An energy transfer only occurs for photons with energies smaller than or of the same magnitude as the thermal energy. The effect provides a microscopic mechanism for establishing thermal equilibrium between the radiation field and a gas. A sufficiently large volume of gas would be perceived as a black-body radiator. Applications of the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect might be found in the microscopic description of the cosmic low-temperature black-body radiation.

  3. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  4. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  5. Two-photon-induced x-ray emission in neon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Carniato, Stephane; Simon, Marc; Taieeb, Richard

    2010-10-15

    We investigated the resonant x-ray emission from a neon atom induced by the two-photon population of a double-core-hole excited state. Two qualitatively different schemes of this process are studied: The first one involves an off-resonant intermediate single-core-hole state; the second scheme passes through a resonant core-ionized intermediate state. The numerical simulations of the resonant x-ray emission performed for different peak intensities and pulse durations show significant population of the double-core-hole final states. Therefore, rather strong two-photon absorption-induced x-ray emission is predicted for both studied schemes. Thus, high counting rates in experimental measurements are expected.

  6. Atom probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of semiconductor films on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1995-03-01

    The surface morphology and the electronic states of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir-and Mo-tips were investigated by a combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES). The overlayers were deposited on the tips while observing field emission microscope (FEM) images of the surfaces. The FEM images of thin Ge overlayers on the Ir-tips show layer-like structures. In field emission electron distribution (FEED) of a Ge overlayer on the Ir-tip, about 5 ML thick, an energy gap near the Fermi level was clearly widened by low temperature annealing. After the thickness was reduced to 3 ML by field evaporation, the energy gap still remained wide. The FEEDs of the Ge overlayers on the Mo-tips exhibit several peaks distinct from those on the Ir-tip. This may be attributed to the local strong electric field surrounding the Ge clusters formed on the Mo-tips.

  7. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  8. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  9. Evaluation of flow injection-solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of major elements in brines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Zheng, Hongtao; Belshaw, Nicholas Stanley; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the determination of major metal elements in high salinity brines was developed by solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) with flow injection analysis (FIA). The matrix interferences of major cations and anions in brines have been evaluated. It was found that high concentration of Na(+) and K(+) could interfere each other, K(+) at a concentration of 400mgL(-1) enhanced the signal intensity of Na(+) more than 20%. The effect of the anions was observed and it was noted that the signal intensity of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were suppressed significantly when the SO4(2-) reached 100mgL(-1). It was demonstrated that some low molecular weight organic substances such as formic acid, glycerol and ascorbic acid could eliminate interference of SO4(2-) even with volume percentages of 0.5%. Under the optimized condition, the proposed FIA-SCGD can determine K, Na, Ca and Mg with the limits of detection of 0.49 (K), 0.14 (Na), 11 (Ca) and 5.5 (Mg) ngmL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of 5 salt lake samples and compared with those obtained with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The advantages of small size, low energy consumption, good stability and repeatability indicated that the SCGD is promising for the determination of major ions in brine samples. PMID:27216688

  10. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-02-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g - 1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  11. Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran

    Hybrid quantum systems are promising candidates for opening new avenues for quantum technologies [G. Kurizki et. al, PNAS, 112 (13), 3866-3873 (2015)]. Hybrid atom-optomechanical (HAOM) systems set an intriguing example in this context. From the perspective of practical utilizations of these HAOM systems in future quantum devices, it is crucial to fully understand the excitation dynamics as well as the spectral features of these systems. In this poster, I'll present my calculations of single-photon time-dependent (TD) spectrum emitted by such a HAOM system in a strong atom-cavity as well as strong cavity-mechanics (strong-strong) coupling regime [``Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity'', Imran M. Mirza, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 32 (8), 1604-1614 (2015)]. In order to make the system more realistic the effects of dissipation through the mechanical oscillator, optical cavity and spontaneous emission from the two-level emitter are also incorporated. The TD spectrum reveals some novel features that are not possible to observe otherwise. For instance, time order in which different side bands appears which explains different photon-phonon interactions responsible for the production of distinct spectral resonances. .

  12. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  13. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  14. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.

    2012-01-10

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic database and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  15. A Complete Model Helium Atom: Theoretical Emissivities, the Case B Approximation, and the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. L.; Bauman, R. P.; MacAdam, K. B.; Ferland, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    We have completed the development of a new model helium atom for the spectra simulation code Cloudy. All relevant astrophysically significant processes are included, and the spectrum is solved self-consistently with the thermal and ionization structure of the simulated system. We present here an overview of the differences that distinguish our model from those by previous authors. We also compare predicted case B emissivities with those from previous works. The differences will have significant consequences for the interpretation of spectra of a wide variety of systems. We also explore deviations from the case B approximation and present an estimate of the primordial helium abundance.

  16. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-10-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  17. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  18. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  19. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  20. Determination of barium, strontium and nine minor and trace elements in impure barite and strontianite by inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry after dissolution in disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1991-10-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of barium, strontium, silicon and nine minor and trace elements of barite and strontianite associated with gangue materials. It involves dissolution of the sample by boiling under reflux with a concentrated solution of disodium ethylenedi-aminetetraacetate (EDTA-2Na) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide. Barite and strontianite dissolve quantitatively under this condition, and any associated silicate and sulphide mineral impurities, remaining insoluble, are filtered off and ignited to constant weight in a platinum crucible. Silica is determined gravimetrically by heating the residue with concentrated sulphuric and hydrofluoric acids, followed by ignition to oxides. The residue is fused with sodium bisulphate and dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid. After suitable dilution of the EDTA-2Na solution, Ba, Sr, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, La, Ni, V, Yb and Zn are determined by inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The bisulphate fusion product is separately analysed by ICP-AES, and the elements found are combined with those obtained from the EDTA-2Na solution. The replicate values of this work compare well with each other and with other values obtained by independent methods. PMID:18965264

  1. Determination of titanium atom and ion densities in sputter deposition plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, P.; Fekete, M.; Hnilica, J.; Klein, P.; Dosoudilová, L.; Dvořák, P.; Navrátil, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The thorough characterizations of deposition plasma lead to important achievements in the fundamental understanding of the deposition process, with a clear impact on the development of technology. Measurement of the spatial and, in the case of pulse excited plasma, also temporal evolution, of the concentrations of sputtered atoms and ions is a primary task in the diagnostics of any sputter deposition plasma. However, it is difficult to estimate absolute number densities of the sputtered species (atoms and ions) in ground states directly from optical emission spectroscopy, because the species in the ground levels do not produce any optical signal. A method using effective branching fractions enables us to determine the density of non-radiating species from the intensities of self-absorbed spectral lines. The branching fractions method described in the first part of this paper was applied to determine the ground state densities of the sputtered titanium atoms and ions. The method is based on fitting the theoretically calculated branching fractions to experimentally measured ratios of the relative intensities of carefully selected resonant titanium atomic and ionic lines. The sputtered species density is determined in our experimental setup with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% for the dc driven magnetron and typically 15% for time-resolved measurements of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge. In the second part of the paper, the method was applied to determine the evolution of titanium atom and ion densities in three typical cases ranging from the dc driven sputter process to HiPIMS.

  2. Measurement of Trace Metals in Tobacco and Cigarette Ash by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The ICP AES experiment reported here is suitable for use in a junior- or senior-level undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory. The objective of this experiment is to analyze trace metals present in cigarette tobacco, the cigarette filter, and the ash obtained when the cigarette is burned. Two different brands of cigarettes, one with and one without a filter, were used. The filter was analyzed before and after smoke was drawn through it. The trace metals were extracted using concentrated nitric acid at room temperature and at 100 °C respectively, to test the extraction efficiency. Some tobacco samples were spiked with ZnCl2 and FeCl3 to assess the efficiency of the recovery. Zinc and iron are shown to be present in tobacco, filter, and ash, while chromium was above the detection limit only in the ash. These metals are concentrated in the ash compared to the tobacco by factors of ˜4 (Zn), 12 17 (Fe), and ≥ 2 (Cr). If sufficient laboratory time is available, this experiment could be paired with one using atomic absorption (AA) to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of ICP when compared to AA.

  3. Carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; Mora, Juan; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the influence of carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions on the emission signal of 34 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, I, In, Ir, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pt, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Te, and Zn) in axially viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry has been investigated. To this end, atomic and ionic emission signals for diluted glycerol, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid solutions were registered and results were compared to those obtained for a 1% w w- 1 nitric acid solution. Experimental results show that the emission intensities of As, Se, and Te atomic lines are enhanced by charge transfer from carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ions. Iodine and P atomic emission is enhanced by carbon- and sulfur-based charge transfer whereas the Hg atomic emission signal is enhanced only by carbon. Though signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions is also expected for ionic emission lines of the above-mentioned elements, no experimental evidence has been found with the exception of Hg ionic lines operating carbon solutions. The effect of carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus charge transfer reactions on atomic emission depends on (i) wavelength characteristics. In general, signal enhancement is more pronounced for electronic transitions involving the highest upper energy levels; (ii) plasma experimental conditions. The use of robust conditions (i.e. high r.f. power and lower nebulizer gas flow rates) improves carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ionization in the plasma and, hence, signal enhancement; and (iii) the presence of other concomitants (e.g. K or Ca). Easily ionizable elements reduce ionization in the plasma and consequently reduce signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions.

  4. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  5. Plants as biomarkers for monitoring heavy metal contaminants on landfill sites using sequential extraction and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES).

    PubMed

    Murphy, A P; Coudert, M; Barker, J

    2000-12-01

    There have been a number of studies investigating metal uptake in plants on contaminated landfill sites, but little on their role as biomarkers to identify metal mobility for continuous monitoring purposes. Vegetation can be used as a biomonitor of site pollution, by identifying the mobilisation of heavy metals and by providing an understanding of their bioavailability. Plants selected were the common nettle (Uritica Dioica), bramble (Rubus Fruticosa) and sycamore (Acer Pseudoplatanus). A study of the soil fractionation was made to investigate the soil properties that are likely to influence metal mobility and a correlation exercise was undertaken to investigate if variations in concentration of metals in vegetation can reflect variations in concentration of the metals in soil. The soil was digested using aqua regia in a microwave closed vessel. The vegetation was digested using both microwave and a hydrogen peroxide-nitric acid mixture, refluxed on a heating block and a comparison made. The certified reference materials (CRMs) used were Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1547, peach leaves for vegetation (NIST) and for soil CRM 143R, sewage sludge-amended soil (BCR). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2-6% for the analyses. Our findings show evidence of phytoextraction by some plants, (especially bramble and nettle), with certain plants, (sycamore) exhibiting signs of phytostabilisation. The evidence suggests that there is a degree of selectivity in metal uptake and partitioning within the plant compartments. It was also possible to correlate mobility phases of certain metals (Pb, Cu and Zn) using the soil and plant record. Zn and Cu exhibited the greatest potential to migrate from the roots to the leaves, with Pb found principally in the roots of ground vegetation. Our results suggest that analysis of bramble leaves, nettle leaves and roots can be used to monitor the mobility of Pb in the soil with nettle, bramble and sycamore leaves to monitor Cu and Zn. PMID:11296751

  6. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  7. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  8. Determination of trace elements in uranium by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry using Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, E.H. van; de Loos-Vollebregt, T.C. de; Wassink, A.P.; Kalter, H.

    1992-08-01

    Trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride were analyzed by ICP-AES. The data were reduced using a Kalman filtering technique. Normally, multiple extraction steps are required for this analysis using conventional ICP-AES.

  9. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  10. Gross boron determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.F.; Johnson, D.A.; Steele, S.M.; Messick, K.; Miller, D.L.; Propp, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the analysis of boron in biological samples including urine, blood plasma, and tissues with subsequent boron determinations by ICP-AES. A comparison will be made between results obtained by this method and by the prompt-gamma technique on the same samples. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of fast noble gas atoms from an Al(1 1 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S.; Winter, H.; Winter, HP.

    2007-05-01

    Electron loss and electron emission for grazing impact of noble gas atoms with energies in the keV domain are investigated via time-of-flight spectra recorded in coincidence with the number of emitted electrons. The data is analyzed in terms of computer simulations concerning the interaction of the fast atoms with the electron gas in the selvedge of the Al(1 1 1) surface. The interaction is approximated by binary collisions of the fast atoms with Fermi electrons of the conduction band and differential cross sections obtained for electron scattering from free atoms. For an effective number of collisions of about 50 the energy loss spectra are fairly well reproduced by our calculations. We show that for our conditions the shift of the energy spectra for the emission of an additional electron from the surface is close to the work function of the target.

  12. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, A. A.; Qamar, Sajid; Atta, M. A.

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ( μg/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of ten of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) have been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD B) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision.

  13. Atom-probe and field emission electron spectroscope studies of Ge on Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1993-04-01

    The combination of an atom-probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES) was employed to investigate the electronic structure of Ge layers on an Ir substrate. Germanium forms a thin film with a fairly uniform thickness, possibly owing to a small activation energy for diffusion on Ir or the lattice matching between Ge and Ir. The FEES spectrum obtained from Ge layers thicker than 8-9 ML exhibits a semiconductive energy gap and a peak at 0.7 eV below the Fermi level as for Si on Mo. However, the minimum layer thickness to exhibit the semiconductive spectrum profile is significantly thicker than that for Si on Mo. The observed difference could be attributed to the layer structure of the deposited Ge and to the narrower energy gap of Ge than that of Si.

  14. Environmental Indicators of Metal Pollution and Emission: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, John A.; Nocito, Brian A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.; Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment enlightens students on the use of environmental indicators and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and demonstrates the ability of these monitoring tools to measure metal deposition in environmental samples (both as a result of lab-simulated and real events). In this two-part study, the initial…

  15. Transport of laser emission with broadband spectrum in optically dense atomic medium under the coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.; Popov, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents a theory describing the formation of the coherent population trapping resonance for the finite laser bandwidth in an optically-dense medium of atoms inside a buffer gas cell. The equations of the atomic density matrix are established, as well as the transfer equations of laser emission spectrum inside a cell with working and buffer gas at a determined temperature. The dependence of the quality of the coherent population trapping resonance on the laser bandwidth has been studied in the case of detecting the signal of the transmitted emission and the fluorescence signal.

  16. Separation and preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of beryllium in water samples using mixed micelle-mediated extraction and determination by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beiraghi, Assadollah; Babaee, Saeed

    2008-01-28

    In the present study a cloud point extraction process using mixed micelle of the cationic surfactant cetyl-pyridinium chloride (CPC) and non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 for extraction of beryllium from aqueous solutions is developed. The extraction of analyte from aqueous samples was performed in the presence of 1,8-dihydroxyanthrone as chelating agent in buffer media of pH 9.5. After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 0.4mL of a 60:40 methanol-water mixture containing 0.03 mL HNO(3). Then, the enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The different variables affecting the complexation and extraction conditions were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. 1.6 x 10(-4) molL(-1) 1,8-dihydroxyanthrone, 1.2 x 10(-4) molL(-1) CPC, 0.15% (v/v) Triton X-114, 50 degrees C equilibrium temperature) the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.006-80 ngmL(-1) with detection limit of 0.001 ngmL(-1) and the precision (R.S.D.%) for five replicate determinations at 18 ngmL(-1) of Be(II) was better than 2.9%. In this manner the preconcentration and enrichment factors were 16.7 and 24.8, respectively. Under the presence of foreign ions no significant interference was observed. Finally, the proposed method was successfully utilized for the determination of this cation in water samples. PMID:18190807

  17. Air pollution studies using PIXE and ICP methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stihi, Claudia; Bancuta, Anca; Popescu, I. V.; Virgolici, M.; Cimpoca, V.; Gugiu, M.; Vlaicu, Gh

    2006-05-01

    In the present work the moss biomonitoring technique and the combination of two analytical techniques - Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) [3] and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) [4] - were applied for assessing environmental situation from the point of view of air polluting along the transect from north to south of the Dambovita County. PIXE analysis at the Tandem Accelerator FN-8 of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics - Horia Hulubei of Magurele, Bucharest, allowed determination of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd and Pb in samples. ICP analyses were made using a Baird ICP2070 - Sequential Plasma Spectrometer in Targoviste and we determined in samples the concentration of Li, B, Na, and Mg together with Cd and Pb. The obtained results will permit to determine the regional extent of heavy metals and toxic elements atmospheric pollution and to identify specially affected areas and local sources of

  18. Application of ICP-SFMS, ICP-AES integrate method to the geochemical characterization of ANDRILL-MIS oceanic sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugi, F.; Castellano, E.; Marino, F.; Ghedini, C.; Severi, M.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2009-12-01

    An integrated system for the determination of 39 major and trace (including Rare Earths Elements -REE) metals in soils and marine sediments was set up by using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrophotometry (ICP - AES) devices, in order to achieve an extensive geochemical characterization. Major elements, in particular silicon, are also quantified with PIXE technique. Method selectivity, accuracy and reproducibility was evaluated analyzing six certified materials: Basalt, Hawaiian Volcanic Observatory (BHVO-1); Japanese Andesite (JA-2); Montana Soil (NIST 2711); Antarctic Sediment (CRM-MURST-ISS-A1); Antarctic Sediment (GBW 073113) e Antarctic Sediment (NIST 2702); after mineralization with fluoridric, nitric and perchloric acids on hot plate. The choice of the isotope (ICP-SFMS) or wavelength (ICP-AES) was addressed obtaining the best compromise between high sensitivity and suitable selectivity for the metal determination. Particular care was paid in optimizing analytical quantification of each species, because of the huge difference in concentration of major and trace elements in geological samples. For ICP-SFMS, high resolution (10,000 m/Δm) was selected for all metals to avoid isobaric interferences. An accurate blank evaluation was carried out, especially for metals present at sub-ppb levels in the extract solutions (REE and other trace elements). The obtained operative blank values included sample manipulation and digestion, reagent content and analytical procedures. ICP-SFMS and ICP-AES methods were applied to the characterization of the geochemical composition of sample from the first 90 m of Mc Murdo Ice Shelf (MIS) marine core, in the framework of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic DRILLing) Project. This international project aims to study the role of the Antarctic Continent within the global climatic system, by the recovery and analysis of two deep sediment cores (named MIS

  19. [A genetic algorithm approach to qualitative analysis in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Bin; Liu, Ke-ling; Li, Zhi-min; Wang, Yue-song; Huang, Tu-jiang

    2002-06-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) is used in automatic qualitative analysis by a sequential inductively coupled plasma spectrometer (ICP-AES) and a computer program is developed in this paper. No any standard samples are needed, and spectroscopic interferences can be eliminated. All elements and their concentration ranges of an unknown sample can be reported. The replication rate Pr, crossover rate Pc, and mutation rate of the genetic algorithm were adjusted to be 0.6, 0.4 and 0 respectively. The analytical results of GA are in good agreement with the reference values. It indicates that, combined with the intensity information, the GA can be applied to spectroscopic qualitative analysis and expected to become an effective method in qualitative analysis in ICP-AES after further work. PMID:12938334

  20. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  1. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN, ORGANOLEAD, AND ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a continuing evaluation of new analytical and sample preparation techniques conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the use of capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED) for the simultaneous determination of organotin, organ...

  2. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  3. ICP OES and CV AAS in determination of mercury in an unusual fatal case of long-term exposure to elemental mercury in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa

    2014-04-01

    In this work, a case of deliberate self-poisoning is presented. A 14-year-old girl suddenly died during one of the several hospitalizations. Abdominal computer tomography showed a large number of metallic particles in the large intestine. Analysis of blood and internal organs for mercury and other toxic metals carried out by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) revealed high concentrations of mercury in kidneys and liver (64,200 and 2470ng/g, respectively), less in stomach (90ng/g), and none in blood. Using cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS), high levels of mercury were confirmed in all examined materials, including blood (87ng/g), and additionally in hair. The results of analysis obtained by two techniques revealed that the exposure to mercury was considerable (some time later, it was stated that the mercury originated from thermometers that had been broken over the course of about 1 year, because of Münchausen syndrome). CV AAS is a more sensitive technique, particularly for blood samples (negative results using ICP OES), and tissue samples - with LOQ: 0.63ng/g of Hg (CV AAS) vis-à-vis 70ng/g of Hg (ICP OES). However, ICP OES may be used as a screening technique for autopsy material in acute poisoning by a heavy metal, even one as volatile as mercury. PMID:24630410

  4. Infrared laser ablation study of pressed soil pellets with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mikolás, J; Musil, P; Stuchliková, V; Novotný, K; Otruba, V; Kanický, V

    2002-09-01

    Potential of infrared laser ablation (LA) coupled with ICP-AES as a technique suitable for the determination of trace elements (Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and V) in agricultural soils was studied. Operating parameters such as laser beam energy, laser beam focusing with respect to the sample surface, and velocity of the sample translation in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam were optimized. Soil samples were mixed with powdered Ag as a binder, and an internal standard (GeO(2)), and pressed into pellets. Calibration samples were prepared by adding known amounts of oxides of elements of interest into soils of known elemental composition and then processed in the same way as the analyzed samples. Calibration curves were found to be linear at least up to several hundreds of mg kg(-1) for the elements of interest. The elemental contents obtained by using LA-ICP-AES were compared with those obtained by analysis using wet chemistry followed by ICP-AES with pneumatic nebulization (PN). The results were in good agreement. Accuracy was also tested using certified reference soils with a bias not exceeding 10% relative. PMID:12324844

  5. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-coupled three-level{Lambda}-type atom in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X. Q.; Zhang, B.; Sun, X. D.; Lu, Z. W.

    2011-05-15

    The spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level {Lambda}-type atom driven by a microwave field was studied. For the two transitions coupled to the same modified reservoir, we discussed the influence of photonic band gap and Rabi frequency of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. The emission spectrum is given for different locations of the upper band-edge frequency. With the transition frequencies moving from outside the band gap to inside, the number of peaks decreases in the emission spectrum and the multipeak structure of spectral line is finally replaced by a strong non-Lorentzian shape. With increase of the Rabi frequency of the microwave field, we find the spectral line changes from a multipeak structure to a two-peak structure, originating from the inhibition of spontaneous emission for the corresponding decay channel.

  6. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  7. Practicality of Using Oxygen Atom Emissions to Evaluate the Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    It has previously been proposed [Akasofu, 1999] that observation of the O(1S - 1D) green line from the atmospheres of extra-solar planets might be a marker for habitability. Guidance on this question is available within our own solar system. The green line is a dominant feature in the visible terrestrial nightglow, and the ultimate origin of its mesospheric emission is the three-body recombination of oxygen atoms. Until recently, it was believed that the green line was not a feature of the nightglows of the CO2 planets, Venus and Mars. It is now known that Venus at times shows green line emission with an intensity equal to terrestrial values [Slanger et al., 2001]. Furthermore, the intensity is quite variable, as is true for the much stronger O2( a-X) 1.27 μ emission. Recent observations of the Mars nightglow [Bertaux et al., 2005] give ambiguous results in the region of the O(1S-3P) line at 297.2 nm, but the same line in the dayglow is very strong, as evidenced in earlier Mariner results [Barth et al., 1971], and from the recent Mars Express data [F. Leblanc, private communication]. The O(1D-3P) 630 nm red line is a feature associated with Io, where dissociation of SO2 is a presumed source [Scherb et al., 1998]. Thus, observation of the oxygen green/red lines in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets provides insufficient information to reach conclusions about a habitable environment. Such detection would only indicate that there are oxygen-containing molecules present. Determination of an O2 column depth, by Fraunhofer A-band absorption, would be much more conclusive. Akasofu, S.-I., EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 80, 397, 1999. Barth, C.A., C.W. Hord, J.B. Pearce, K.K. Kelly, G.P. Anderson, and A.I. Stewart, Mariner 6 and 7 Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment: Upper Atmosphere Data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 2213-2227, 1971. Bertaux, J.-L., F. Leblanc, S. Perrier, E. Quemerais, O. Korablev, E. Dimarellis, A. Reberac, F. Forget, P

  8. Investigations of the use of inductively coupled plasma emissions for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, D. R.

    Investigations of applications of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) for analytical atomic emission spectroscopy are performed. Emissions below 185 nm, analysis of wear metals in lubricating oils, and use of the ICP as a selective detector for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are studied. A unique plasma coolant tube containing a side arm which allows direct observation of the discharge is used to investigate emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region between 120 and 185 nm. Emission from elements which do not emit radiation in the visible region are observed. A heated sample introduction system attached to a Babington nebulizer is investigated as a means to aerosolize lubricating oils for introduction into the ICP. This allows direct analysis of wear metals in oil samples without requiring the usual sample dilutions. The ICP is used as a selective detector for HPLC. Nucleotides separated by anion exchange chromatography are determined in the ICP by observing phosphorous emissions. Methanol and acetonitrile used for reverse phase HPLC are successfully run in the IPC.

  9. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of uranium by ICP-AES technique

    SciTech Connect

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Nadraswala, K.H.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mallapurkar, V.S.; Joshi, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    An atomic emission spectrometric method based on the use of Inductively coupled argon plasma source has been developed for the determination of ultra trace concentrations of uranium in aqueous solutions. Using the optimized experimental conditions for the ICP source, uranium can be determined at 0.05 ..mu..g/ml concentration in 0.3M HNO/sub 3/ solutions with either of the two analytical lines viz. 3859.6 A/sup 0/ or 4090.1 A/sup 0/. The precision of determinations at the lowest detection limit is better than 2% R.S.D. The uranium estimation has been corrected for the interference due to the presence of eighteen metallic elements using an inter-element correction procedure. A number of spiked samples and NBL reference samples with concomitant impurities have been analysed using the standardised procedure and good agreement has been observed with their certified values.

  10. ICP-AES Determination of Mineral Content in Boletus tomentipes Collected from Different Sites of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-mei; Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Li, Jie-qing; Wang, Yuan-zhong; Liu, Hong-gao

    2015-05-01

    P, Na, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Zn, As, Cd, Co, Cr and Ni, contents have been examined in caps and stipes of Boletus tomentipes collected from different sites of Yunnan province, southwest China. The elements were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) with microwave digestion. P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Cu were the most abundant amongst elements determined in Boletus tomentipes. The caps were richer in P, Mg, Zn and Cd, and the stipes in Ca, Co and Ni. Cluster analysis showed a difference between Puer (BT7 and BT8) and other places. The PCA explained about 77% of the total variance, and the minerals differentiating these places were P (PC1) together with Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, As and Ni, Na (PC2) together with Cd, and Zn (PC3). The results of this study imply that element concentrations of a mushroom are mutative when collected from the different bedrock soil geochemistry. PMID:26415467

  11. Evaluation of inorganic elements in cat's claw teas using ICP OES and GF AAS.

    PubMed

    Pereira, João B; Dantas, Kelly G F

    2016-04-01

    The determination of Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, P, Pb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES), and Se by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS), has been carried out in dry matter and teas from 11 samples of the cat's claw plant. The accuracy and precision values were verified against GBW 07604 (Poplar leaves) certified reference material and by the recovery test. Results showed a high content of Ca in the medicinal plant studied, followed by Mg and P. The values obtained showed that the elements studied have different concentrations depending on the method of tea preparation. The highest levels were observed in Ca and Mg, and the lowest for Se and Pb, by both infusion and decoction. Teas prepared from this plant were found to be at safe levels for human consumption, and may be suitable as sources of these elements in the human diet. PMID:26593498

  12. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  13. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26304350

  14. Revisiting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnesium with online inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shkirskiy, Viacheslav; King, Andrew D; Gharbi, Oumaïma; Volovitch, Polina; Scully, John R; Ogle, Kevin; Birbilis, Nick

    2015-02-23

    The electrochemical impedance of reactive metals such as magnesium is often complicated by an obvious inductive loop with decreasing frequency of the AC polarising signal. The characterisation and ensuing explanation of this phenomenon has been lacking in the literature to date, being either ignored or speculated. Herein, we couple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with online atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC) to simultaneously measure Mg-ion concentration and electrochemical impedance spectra during Mg corrosion, in real time. It is revealed that Mg dissolution occurs via Mg(2+) , and that corrosion is activated, as measured by AC frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz approaching DC conditions. The result of this is a higher rate of Mg(2+) dissolution, as the voltage excitation becomes slow enough to enable all Mg(2+) -enabling processes to adjust in real time. The manifestation of this in EIS data is an inductive loop. The rationalisation of such EIS behaviour, as it relates to Mg, is revealed for the first time by using concurrent AESEC. PMID:25425247

  15. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  16. The calibration of XRF polyethylene reference materials with k0-NAA and ICP-AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swagten, Josefien; Bossus, Daniël; Vanwersch, Hanny

    2006-08-01

    Due to the lack of commercially available polyethylene reference materials for the calibration of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (XRF), DSM Resolve, in cooperation with PANalytical, prepared and calibrated such a set of standards in 2005. The reference materials were prepared based on the addition of additives to virgin polyethylene. The mentioned additives are added to improve the performance of the polymers. The elements present in additives are tracers for the used additives. The reference materials contain the following elements: F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti and Zn in the concentration range of 5 mg/kg for Ti, up to 600 mg/kg for Mg. The calibration of the reference materials, including a blank, was performed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Neutron Activation Analysis ( k0-NAA). ICP-AES was used to determine the elements Na, Mg, Al, P, Ca, Ti and Zn whereas k0-NAA was used for F, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Ti and Zn. Over the complete concentration range, a good agreement of the results was found between the both techniques. This project has shown that within DSM Resolve, it is possible to develop and to calibrate homogenous reference materials for XRF.

  17. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: Spatial distributions of emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj.; Phelps, A. V.

    2009-07-01

    Spatial distributions of Hα , Hβ , and the near-uv continuum emission from the H2 aΣ3g+ state are measured and compared with a model for low-current electrical discharges in H2 at high E/N and low Nd , where E is the spatially uniform electric field, N is the gas density, and d is the electrode separation. Data are analyzed for 300Tdatoms and molecules with mean energies from 5 to 1500 eV. Electron-induced emission, dominant at low E/N and low pressures, is distinguished by its buildup toward the anode. Excitation of Hα by fast H atoms dominates at high E/N and increases toward the cathode. The observed Hα emission at low E/N is normalized to previous experiments to yield absolute experimental excitation coefficients for all E/N and Nd . Small adjustments of model parameters yield good agreement with Hα data. Cross sections are derived for excitation of the H2 near-uv continuum by H atoms. Spatial and pressure dependencies of Hα and H2 near-uv emissions agree well with a model in which reactions of H2+ , H3+ , and H+ ions with H2 lead to fast H atoms and H2 molecules, which then excite H atoms or H2 molecules.

  18. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: spatial distributions of emissions.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Z Lj; Phelps, A V

    2009-07-01

    Spatial distributions of H alpha , H beta , and the near-uv continuum emission from the H2 a ;{3}Sigma g;+ state are measured and compared with a model for low-current electrical discharges in H2 at high E/N and low Nd , where E is the spatially uniform electric field, N is the gas density, and d is the electrode separation. Data are analyzed for 300 Tdatoms and molecules with mean energies from 5 to 1500 eV. Electron-induced emission, dominant at low E/N and low pressures, is distinguished by its buildup toward the anode. Excitation of H alpha by fast H atoms dominates at high E/N and increases toward the cathode. The observed H alpha emission at low E/N is normalized to previous experiments to yield absolute experimental excitation coefficients for all E/N and Nd . Small adjustments of model parameters yield good agreement with H alpha data. Cross sections are derived for excitation of the H2 near-uv continuum by H atoms. Spatial and pressure dependencies of H alpha and H2 near-uv emissions agree well with a model in which reactions of H2+ , H3+ , and H+ ions with H2 lead to fast H atoms and H2 molecules, which then excite H atoms or H2 molecules. PMID:19658824

  19. Combustor exhaust emissions with air-atomizing splash-groove fuel injectors burning Jet A and Diesel number 2 fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Air-atomizing, splash-groove injectors were shown to improve primary-zone fuel spreading and reduce combustor exhaust emissions for Jet A and diesel number 2 fuels. With Jet A fuel large-orifice, splash-groove injectors the oxides-of-nitrogen emission index was reduced, but emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, or smoke were unaffected. Small-orifice, splash-groove injectors did not reduce oxides of nitrogen, but reduced the smoke number and carbon monoxide and unburned-hydrocarbon emission indices. With diesel number 2 fuel, the small-orifice, splash-groove injectors reduced oxides of nitrogen by 19 percent, smoke number by 28 percent, carbon monoxide by 75 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. Combustor blowout limits were similar for diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels.

  20. Excitation of O(1D) atoms in aurorae and emission of the forbidden OI 6300-A line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Roble, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The electron aurora leads to six processes capable of exciting the O(1D2) metastable state of the atomic-oxygen ground-state configuration, the parent state of the 6300-A red line. Altitude profiles of the volume emission rate resulting from each process are computed for Maxwellian electron spectra with characteristic energies between 0.1 and 2.0 keV. Since each process peaks at a different altitude, the sum or total volume emission rate extends over a wide altitude range. Measurements of 6300-A emission obtained by rocket and satellite-borne instruments are summarized, and it is shown that the chemical reaction of N(2D) with O2 is the major source of O(1D) atoms in the electron aurora. New calculations of the 6300-A:4728-A column emission-rate ratio are presented for a range of characteristic energies in an assumed Maxwellian electron spectrum. An approximate equation for the red-line emission per unit energy input is given as a function of electron-spectrum characteristic energy.

  1. Direct solid analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hardmetal precursors by laser-induced argon spark ablation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Kanický, Viktor; Mermet, Jean-Michel; Otruba, Vítezslav

    2003-12-01

    The potential of the laser-induced argon spark atomizer (LINA-Spark atomizer) coupled with ICP-AES as a convenient device for direct analysis of WC/Co powdered precursors of sintered hardmetals was studied. The samples were presented for the ablation as pressed pellets prepared by mixing with powdered silver binder containing GeO2 as internal standard. The pellets were ablated with the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) focused 16 mm behind the target surface with a resulting estimated power density of 5 GW cm(-2). Laser ablation ICP-AES signals were studied as a function of ablation time, and the duration of time prior to measurement (pre-ablation time) which was necessary to obtain reliable results was about 40 s. Linear calibration plots were obtained up to 10% (m/m) Ti, 9% Ta and 3.5% Nb both without internal standardization and by using germanium as an added internal standard or tungsten as a contained internal standard. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 6% to +/- 11% for Nb, Ta and Ti both with and without internal standardisation by Ge. A higher spread of points about the regression was observed for cobalt for which the relative uncertainty at the centroid was in the range from +/- 9% to +/- 14%. Repeatability of results was improved by the use of both Ge and W internal standards. The lowest determinable quantities calculated for calibration plots were 0.060% Co, 0.010% Nb, 0.16% Ta and 0.030% Ti with internal standardization by Ge. The LA-ICP-AES analyses of real samples led to good agreement with the results obtained by solution-based ICP determination with a relative bias not exceeding 10%. The elimination of the dissolution procedure of powdered tungsten (Nb, Ta, Ti) carbide is the principal advantage of the developed LA-ICP-AES method. PMID:14564441

  2. Identifying student and teacher difficulties in interpreting atomic spectra using a quantum model of emission and absorption of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two questionnaires, one for teachers and the other for students. By analyzing the responses, we conclude that (i) teachers lack a quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation capable of explaining the spectra, (ii) teachers and students share the same difficulties, and (iii) these difficulties concern the model of the atom, the model of radiation, and the model of the interaction between them.

  3. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  4. Atomizing characteristics of swirl can combustor modules with swirl blast fuel injectors. [in terms of NOX emission rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Cold flow atomization tests of several different designs of swirl can combustor modules were conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter duct at airflow rates (per unit area) of 7.3 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec and water flow rates of 6.3 to 18.9 g/sec. The effect of air and water flow rates on the mean drop size of water sprays produced with the swirl blast fuel injectors were determined. Also, from these data it was possible to determine the effect of design modifications on the atomizing performance of various fuel injector and air swirler configurations. The trend in atomizing performance, as based on the mean drop size, was then compared with the trends in the production of nitrogen oxides obtained in combustion studues with the same swirl can combustors. It was found that the fuel injector design that gave the best combustor performance in terms of a low NOx emission index also gave the best atomizing performance as characterized by a spray of relatively small mean drop diameter. It was also demonstrated that at constant inlet air stream momentum the nitrogen oxides emission index was found to vary inversely with the square of the mean drop diameter of the spray produced by the different swirl blast fuel injectors. Test conditions were inlet air static pressures of 100,000 to 200,000 N/sq m at an inlet air temperature of 293 K.

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  6. Zeeman effects in the hyperfine structure of atomic iodine photodissociation laser emission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Kasper, J. V. V.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of hyperfine structure in laser emission from CF3I and C2F5I photodissociation lasers. Constant magnetic fields affect the time behavior of the emission by changing the relative gains of the hyperfine transitions. Time-varying fields usually present in photodissociation lasers further complicate the emission.

  7. The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Ludmila; Leonovich, Vitaly; Tashchilin, Anatoly

    The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure was revealed at mid-latitudes. The paper presents the study results of the dependence of the observed emissions intensity from the sudden variations in the solar wind and the geomagnetic field. These results show a relationship of the emissions disturbance amplitude with the solar wind speed, as well as with the geomagnetic field variations. We used the zenith photometer optical data, the geomagnetic field and the total electron content variations obtained for the Eastern Siberia region (52(°) N, 103(°) E). The investigation was supported by the RFFI grants № 12-05-00024-а, № 13-05-00733.

  8. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis of monomethylmercury.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, René Bernard; Breidenbach, Rembert; Epema, Onno Jacob

    2007-12-01

    Optimum conditions for headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) in the analysis of monomethylmercury (MeHg) have been determined. Sodium tetra(n-)propylborate (NaBPr(4)) is used as derivatization reagent to promote volatility. A simple aluminium bar was used to cool the SPME fiber to about 2 degrees C during the equilibration phase just before extraction. HS-SPME was performed using different fibers. The 100 microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fibers showed the best results. Although the extraction efficiency for MeHg derivative of the polydimethylsiloxane-Carboxen (PDMS-CAR) fiber is similar to the other fibers, desorption of MeHg derivative from a PDMS-CAR fiber is poor. Factors affecting the HS-SPME process such as adsorption and desorption times, ionic strength (salting-out) and extraction temperature have been evaluated and optimized thoroughly. The highest extraction efficiency for the PDMS fiber was obtained by extraction at a low temperature (2 degrees C) immediately after equilibration at 30 degrees C. With the PDMS-DVB and PDMS-CAR fiber improvement of extraction efficiency at lower temperatures is negligible. Repeated extraction out of the same vial revealed that about 30% of MeHg derivative is extracted from the headspace with a PDMS fiber at 2 degrees C and about 70% with a PDMS-DVB fiber. Repeated extraction with two different fiber coatings showed that the PDMS-CAR fiber also extracts about 70% but that the desorption is incomplete. Attempts to improve the desorption failed due to degradation of the MeHg derivate at high injection temperatures. The limit of detection (3sigma) was 16 pg/L MeHg. The relative standard deviation (n = 8) for 100 pg/L of MeHg was found to be 5%. Linearity of the HS-SPME-GC-atomic emission detection method was established over at least two orders of magnitude in the range 0-2000 pg/L. Recovery of a surface water sample spiked at 2 ng/L was 85%. The

  9. Determination of traces of As, B, Bi, Ga, Ge, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si and Te in high-purity nickel using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Thangavel, S; Dash, K; Dhavile, S M; Sahayam, A C

    2015-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of traces of arsenic, boron, bismuth, gallium, germanium, phosphorus, lead, antimony, selenium, silicon and tellurium in nickel matrix. The sample was dissolved in HClO4 (~ 150°C) and nickel was settled as crystalline nickelperchlorate [Ni(ClO4)2] on cooling. The mixture was ultrasonicated and after the separation of Ni(ClO4)2, analytes of interest were determined in the supernatant using ICP-OES. Similarly, it was also found that, after the dissolution of nickel in perchloric acid, when the solution temperature was maintained at ~ 100°C, long needle like crystals of nickel perchlorate were formed. The crystals were separated from the mixture and trace elements in the supernatant were determined using ICP-OES. In both methods the matrix removal was >99% and the recoveries of analytes were in the range 92-97%. The limits of detection for As, B, Bi, Ga, Ge, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si and Te were found to be 0.18, 0.21, 0.07, 0.06, 0.25, 0.11, 0.09, 0.10, 0.17, 0.20 and 0.07 μg g(-1) respectively. The procedure was applied for the analysis of a standard reference material nickel oxide (SRM 761, Nickel Oxide No.1, NBS, USA) and the values obtained are in close agreement with the certified values. PMID:25281133

  10. Physical interaction between the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early regulatory proteins ICP0 and ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, F; Schaffer, P A

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein ICP0 enhances expression of a spectrum of viral genes alone and synergistically with ICP4. To test whether ICP0 and ICP4 interact physically, we performed far-Western blotting analysis of proteins from mock-, wild-type-, and ICP4 mutant virus-infected cells with in vitro-synthesized [35S]Met-labeled ICP0 and ICP4 as probes. The ICP4 and ICP0 polypeptides synthesized in vitro exhibited molecular weights similar to those of their counterparts in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells, and the in vitro-synthesized ICP4 was able to bind to a probe containing the ICP4 consensus binding site. Far-Western blotting experiments demonstrated that ICP0 interacts directly and specifically with ICP4 and with itself. To further define the interaction between ICP0 and ICP4, we generated a set of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-ICP0 fusion proteins that contain GST and either ICP0 N-terminal amino acids 1 to 244 or 1 to 394 or C-terminal amino acids 395 to 616 or 395 to 775. Using GST-ICP0 fusion protein affinity chromatography and in vitro-synthesized [35S]Met-labeled ICP0 and ICP4, ICP4 was shown to interact preferentially with the fusion protein containing ICP0 C-terminal amino acids 395 to 775, whereas ICP0 interacted efficiently with both the N-terminal GST-ICP0 fusion proteins and the C-terminal GST-ICP0 fusion proteins containing amino acids 395 to 775. Fusion protein affinity chromatography also demonstrated that the C-terminal 235 amino acid residues of ICP4 are important for efficient interaction with ICP0. Collectively, these results reveal a direct and specific physical interaction between ICP0 and ICP4. Images PMID:7966607