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Sample records for icy grain analog

  1. Measurements of Polyatomic Molecule Formation on an Icy Grain Analog Using Fast Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Madsunkov, S.; Shortt, B. J.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide has been produced from the impact of a monoenergetic O(P-3) beam upon a surface cooled to 4.8 K and covered with a CO ice. Using temperature-programmed desorption and mass spectrometer detection, we have detected increasing amounts of CO2 formation with O(P-3) energies of 2, 5, 10, and 14 eV. This is the first measurement of polyatomic molecule formation on a surface with superthermal atoms. The goal of this work is to detect other polyatomic species, such as CH3OH, which can be formed under conditions that simulate the grain temperature, surface coverage, and superthermal atoms present in shock-heated circumstellar and interstellar regions.

  2. Building Small Icy Bodies: the Process of Icy Grain Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Hill, Catherine Rachel; Blum, Jurgen; Heisselmann, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The material remaining in proto-planetary disks provides the ingredients from which planetessimals, and eventually comets, asteroids and planets (including their ring and moon systems) evolve. Aggregation processes are thought to proceed much more rapidly beyond snow-lines in such disks, aided by icy mantles on dust grains, but we do not know nano- and micron-scale dust combines to kilometer-sizes. Recent ALMA observations have proven the existence of snow lines in other proto-planetary systems (Qi et al Science (2013)), so it is by studying icy collisions in the laboratory that we can begin to understand the assembly of the icy bodies in our Solar System.Icy particles (between 4.7 and 10.8 mm in diameter) were collided at relative collision velocities of 0.27 - 0.51 m s-1, at 131 - 160 K, under microgravity conditions using a purpose-built experiment (Salter et al Rev Sci Inst (2010)). Bouncing was observed in the majority of collisions, across a full range of normalized impact parameters (b/R = 0.0-1.0). Coefficients of restitution were evenly spread between 0.08 and 0.65 with an average value of 0.36, leading to a minimum of 58% of translational energy being lost in the collision. The range of coefficients of restitution was attributed to the surface roughness of the particles. Analysis of particle rotation showed that up to 17% of the energy of the particles before the collision was converted into rotational energy. Temperature did not affect the coefficients of restitution over the range studied (Hill et all A&A (2015a)). The effects of chemical composition on the collisional outcomes were also studied, at relative particle impact velocities between 0.01 and 0.19 ms-1, temperatures between 131 and 160 K and a pressure of around 10-5 mbar. Overall the collisional properties of the icy particles were unchanged (Hill et al A&A (2015b)).The implications of these experimental results will be discussed in terms of our understanding of the formation and evolution of

  3. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Icy Satellite Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Aurya; Barmatz, Martin; Zhong, Fang; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    With regard to planetary science, NASA aspires to: "Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system, the potential for life elsewhere, and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space". In pursuit of such an end, the Galileo and Cassini missions garnered spectral data of icy satellite surfaces implicative of the satellites' structure and material composition. The potential for geophysical modeling afforded by this information, coupled with the plausibility of life on icy satellites, has pushed Jupiter's Europa along with Saturn's Enceladus and Titan toward the fore of NASA's planetary focus. Understanding the evolution of, and the present processes at work on, the aforementioned satellites falls squarely in-line with NASA's cited goal.

  4. Vaporization in comets - The icy grain halo of Comet West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.; Cowan, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The variation with heliocentric distance of the production rates of various species in Comet West (1975n = 1976 VI) is explained with a cometary model consisting of a CO2 dominated nucleus plus a halo of icy grains of H2O or clathrate hydrate. It is concluded that the parents of CN and C3 are released primarily from the nucleus but that the parent of C2 is released primarily from the halo of icy grains.

  5. Formation of ions and radicals from icy grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Two theoretical models for the formation of radicals from ice grains are examined to determine if this can explain the jets in comets. It is shown that the production rates for these radicals by the photolysis of molecules in the icy grains are not high enough to explain the jets. A new mechanism is proposed involving the release of cations and anions in the gas phase as the icy mantle surrounding the grains is evaporated. Solar visible radiation can then form radicals by photodetachment of the electrons from these anions. The production rate of radicals formed in this manner is in accord with the production rates of the observed radicals.

  6. Explosive desorption of icy grain mantles in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W. A.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The cycling of the condensible material in dense clouds between the gas phase and the icy grain mantles is investigated. In the model studied, desorption of the ice occurs due to grain mantle explosions when photochemically stored energy is released after transient heating by a cosmic ray particle. It is shown that, depending on the grain size distribution in dense clouds, explosive desorption can maintain up to about eight percent of the carbon in the form of CO in the gas phase at typical cloud densities.

  7. Formation of ions and radicals from icy grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher; Hendricks, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Ion and radical formation in comets are thought to occur primarily by photodissociation of gas phase molecules. Experimental evidence and theoretical calculations are presented that show that some of the radical and ions can come directly from ice grains. The experimental evidence suggest that if the frozen molecules on the surface of grains undergo direct dissociation then they may be able to release radicals directly in the gas phase. If the molecules undergo predissociation it is unlikely that they will release radicals in the gas phase since they should be quenched. Calculations of this direct photodissociation mechanism further indicate that even if the parent molecule undergoes direct dissociation, the yield will not be high enough to explain the rays structure in comets unless the radicals are stored in the grains and then released when the grain evaporates. Calculations were also performed to determine the maximum number of ions that can be stored in an icy grain's radius. This number is compared with the ratio of the ion to neutral molecular density. The comparison suggests that some of the ions observed near the nucleus of the comet could have originally been present in the cometary nucleus. It is also pointed out that the presence of these ions in icy grains could lead to radical formation via electron recombination. Finally, an avalanche process was evaluated as another means of producing ions in comets.

  8. Shock processing of icy grain mantles in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassel, George E., Jr.

    2004-08-01

    The water ice mantles on interstellar grains trap volatile molecules, such as CO and CH3OH, with an efficiency that depends on the amorphous or crystalline structure of the ice. The ice structure therefore affects the composition of comets formed from the icy grains. We present a detailed study of the processing of mantled grains by shock waves in protoplanetary disks. The grains suffer a sudden increase in temperature that can evaporate the mantles. This is followed by an extended cooling time during which the mantles recondense on timescales comparable to the crystallization timescale for hydrodynamic parameters consistent with the Jupiter-Saturn region of the solar nebula. We evaluate different scenarios for re-deposition of the mantle, and the possibility of re-trapping the co- adsorbing volatiles. The crystallization of ice and the exclusion of volatiles from the matrix may explain the volatile-depleted composition observed recently in Comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), an Oort-cloud comet originating from the Jupiter-Saturn region (Mumma et al. 2001). We demonstrate that the bulk ice desorbs for shock speeds greater than a critical value for a given preshock gas density. Crystallization of water ice is most efficient for models that completely remove and re-accrete the mantle. Weakly polar or apolar molecules such as CO will be retained, at least partially, for mantles that do not sublimate, but will be completely lost if the bulk H2O ice is removed in the shock. Strongly polar molecules such as CH3OH will participate in the hydrogen bonding network of the water ice, and will be retained for all shock models considered. We associate hydrodynamic parameters with radial positions in protoplanetary disks by means of a viscous accretion disk model (Aikawa et al. 1998). Pickett et al. (2003) show that shocks due to gravitational instabilities propagate at oblique incidence to the rotation of the disk, thereby causing the shock speeds to be much lower than the Keplerian

  9. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote

  10. Sublimating icy planetesimals as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matese, John J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of grain nucleation during novae outbursts is a major obstacle to our understanding of dust formation in these systems. How nucleation seeds can form in the hostile post-outburst environment remains an unresolved matter. It is suggested that the material for seeding the condensation of ejecta outflow is stored in a primordial disk of icy planetesimals surrounding the system. Evidence is presented that the requisite number of nucleation seeds can be released by sublimation of the planetesimals during outbursts.

  11. The Grain Evolution Model for Icy Grains Ejected from 9P/Tempel 1 by Deep Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, E.; Wooden, D. H.; Schulz, R.

    The GEM (Grain Evolution Model) is a unique model which follows the cometary icy grains from the moment of ejection until complete sublimation. The model takes into accounts the different forces acting on each and every grain from the initial distribution, as they are passing through the coma and sublimating. The GEM is sensitive to the wavelength and composition of the grains and therefore can anticipate which grains can better match the observations at a certain wavelength. The GEM can predict the brightness of the entire coma in steady state, or as in the Deep Impact Mission it can calculate the coma brightness at different cross sections of time while differentiating between the contribution of the nucleus and that of the grains. In this paper we will show that nearly pure ice grains, i.e. 1-5% of Pyroxene, match the observations from the Deep Impact Mission since they can give a reasonable explanation for the UV enhanced rapid and decline after 20-30 minutes. Furthermore nearly pure ice grains explain the sustained brightness in the UV that lasts 7-14 hours[20

  12. Laboratory Investigations of Catalysis on Grain Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. C.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.; Hallenbeck, S. L.

    1998-09-01

    We have begun a set of laboratory measurements to study the possible conversion of CO into CH_4 and other alkanes via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in the presence of interstellar dust analogs containing iron. The dust analogs are sub-micron size iron silicate smokes made in a grain condensation chamber by reacting SiH_4 with O_2 in the presence of Fe (CO)_5 . The smokes are amorphous in phase and composition; based on our gas adsorption measurements they have a surface area of near 125 m(2) g(-1) . In the catalytic experiment, a mixture of H_2 + CO (2 : 1) is continuously circulated in a closed system through 0.1 g of iron silicate smoke. The smoke is heated to near 300 C while the gas reacts for a 3 hour period. The reacted gas is condensed onto a 10 K mirror attached to the tail of a cryostat. The infrared spectrum of the condensed gas is used to identify new species formed by catalysis. There is evidence for the conversion of CO into CH_4, C_2H_6 and C_2H_4. Similarly obtained background spectra not containing the catalyst do not show the same spectral signatures. Further experiments will quantitatively determine the efficiency of this conversion to determine if grain-catalyzed reactions such as these could play an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula.NASA/Goddard

  13. Evidence for chemical processing of precometary icy grains in circumstellar environments of pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Weintraub, David A.; Rettig, Terrence W.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.; Kulesa, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad absorption feature near 2166/cm in the spectrum of the Taurus cloud cource Elias 18. This pre-main-sequence source is the second in Taurus, the third in our survey, and the fifth known in the sky to show the broad 2166/cm absorption feature. Of equal importance, this feature is not seen toward several other embedded sources in our survey, nor is it seen toward the source Elias 16, located behind the Taurus cloud. Laboratory experiments with interstellar ice analogs show that such a feature is associated with a complex C triple bonded to N containing compound (called X(C triple bonded to N)) that results from high-energy processing (ultraviolet irradiation or ion bombardment) of simple ice components into more complex, organic components. We find a nonlinear anticorrelation between the abundance of X(C triple bonded to N) and frozen CO components in nonpolar lattices. We find no correlation between the abundance of X(C triple bonded to N) and frozen CO in polar lattices. Because the abundances of frozen CO and H2O are strongly correlated with each other and with visual extinction toward sources embedded in and located behind the Taurus molecular cloud, these ice components usually are associated with intracloud material. Our results indicate that X(C triple bonded to N) molecules result from chemical processing of dust grains dominated by nonpolar icy mantles in the local environments of pre-main-sequence stars. Such processing of icy grains in the early solar system may be an important source of organic compounds observed in minor solar system bodies. The delivery of these organic compounds to the surface of the primitive Earth through comet impacts may have provided the raw materials for prebiotic chemistry.

  14. Evidence for Chemical Processing of Precometary Icy Grains In Circumstellar Environments of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teglier, Stephen C.; Weintraub, David A.; Rettig, Terrence W.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Whittet, Douglas C.; Kulesa, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad absorption feature near 2166 cm-1 in the spectrum of the Taurus cloud source Elias 18. This pre-main-sequence source is the second in Taurus, the third in our survey, and the fifth known in the sky to show the broad 2166 cm-1 absorption feature. Of equal importance, this feature is not seen toward several other embedded sources in our survey, nor is it seen toward the source Elias 16, located behind the Taurus cloud. Laboratory experiments with interstellar ice analogs show that such a feature is associated with a complex C=-N containing compound [called X(C=-N)] that results from high-energy processing (ultraviolet irradiation or ion bombardment) of simple ice components into more complex, organic components, We find a nonlinear anticorrelation between the abundance of X(C=-N) and frozen CO in non- polar lattices. We find no correlation between the abundance of X(C=-N) and frozen CO in polar lattices. Because the abundances of frozen CO and H20 are strongly correlated with each other and with visual extinction toward sources embedded in and located behind the Taurus molecular cloud, these ice components usually are associated with intracloud material. Our results indicate that X(C=-N) molecules result from chemical processing of dust grains dominated by nonpolar icy mantles in the local environments of pre-main- sequence stars. Such processing of icy grains in the early solar system may be an important source of organic compounds observed in minor solar system bodies. The delivery of these organic compounds to the surface of the primitive Earth through comet impacts may have provided the raw materials for prebiotic chemistry.

  15. Herschel-Resolved Outer Belts of Two-Belt Debris Disks--Evidence of Icy Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Farisa Y.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Werner, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-12-01

    We present dual-band Herschel/PACS imaging for 57 main sequence stars (42 A-type and 15 solar-type) with previously known warm dust (Twarm ~200K) detected and characterized by Spitzer. About half of the star-disk systems in our sample have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that suggest two-ring disk architectures that mirror that of the asteroid-Kuiper belt geometry of our own solar system. The Herschel observations at 70 and/or 100 micron spatially resolve the cold/outer dust component for 18 two-belt debris systems (15 for the first time; 10 are also resolved at 160 micron), finding evidence of planetesimals at >100 AU, i.e. larger size than assumed from a simple blackbody fit to the SED. By breaking the degeneracy between the grain properties and the dust's radial location, the resolved images help constrain the grain size distribution and hint at the dust's composition for each system. Based on the combined Spitzer/IRS+MIPS (5 to 70 micron), the Herschel/PACS (70 and/or 100 and 160 micron) dataset, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that the majority of resolved cold/outer belts of star+disk systems are well fit with a mixed ice/rock composition, rather than pure rocky grains. In the absence of spectral features for ice, we find that the behavior of the continuum can help constrain the composition of the grains well (of icy nature and not pure rocky material) given the Herschel-resolved locations of the cold/outer dust belts. We have also begin to identify the presence of candidate companions via Keck direct imaging, which may be interacting with the observed dust.

  16. Modelling of the sublimation of icy grains in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Shi, X.; Sierks, H.; Rose, M.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.

    2015-10-01

    The ESA (European Space Agency) Rosetta spacecraft was launched on 2 March 2004, to reach comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. Since March 2014, images of the nucleus and the coma (gas and dust) of the comet have been acquired by the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) camera system [1] using both, the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The orbiter will be maintained in the vicinity of the comet until perihelion (Rh=1.3 AU) or even until Rh=1.8 AU post-perihelion (December 2015). Nineteen months of uninterrupted, close-up observations of the gas and dust coma will be obtained and will help to characterize the evolution of comet gas and dust activity during its approach to the Sun. Indeed, for the first time, we will follow the development of a comet's coma from a close distance. Also the study of the dust-gas interaction in the coma will highlight the sublimation of icy grains. Even if the sublimation of icy grains is known, it is not yet integrated in a complete dust-gas model. We are using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study the gas flow close to the nucleus. The code called PI-DSMC (www.pidsmc. com) can simulate millions of molecules for multiple species.When the gas flow is simulated, we inject the dust particle with a zero velocity and we take into account the 3 forces acting on the grains in a cometary environment (drag force, gravity and radiative pressure). We used the DLL (Dynamic Link Library) model to integrate the sublimation of icy grains in the gas flowand allow studying the effect of the additional gas on the dust particle trajectories. For a quantitative analysis of the sublimation of icy, outflowing grains we will consider an ensemble of grains of various radii with different compositions [2] The evolution of the grains, once they are ejected into the coma, depends on their initial size, their composition and the heliocentric distance (because the temperature of

  17. Prebiotic chemistry in icy grain mantles in space. An experimental and observational approach.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M; Dartois, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    A compendium of different solid carbonaceous materials detected in space is presented, focussing on the search for organic matter of prebiotic interest. This journey takes us from the carbon grains likely formed in the atmospheres of evolved stars to organic grain mantles made from ice processing thought to be present in dense interstellar clouds and circumstellar regions, making a stop in solar system objects that could have delivered organic species to the early Earth. The most abundant carbon materials detected to date in space appear to be of little biological relevance. On the other hand, organic refractory residues, made in the laboratory from UV-photoprocessing followed by warm-up of interstellar ice analogs, are a hydrocarbon material rich in O and N containing chemical compounds that could act as initiators of prebiotic chemistry. A similar material might be present in dust grains inside dense clouds or circumstellar regions, some comets, and as a minor component in carbonaceous chondrites. We use infrared spectroscopy as a tool to spot organic refractory matter in various space environments. The delivery of organic materials via comets, (micro-) meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles to the primitive Earth might have contributed as a starting material for prebiotic chemistry. To test this hypothesis, it is first essential to characterize the composition of exogenous organic matter. PMID:23340705

  18. THE UPTAKE OF INTERSTELLAR GASEOUS CO INTO ICY GRAIN MANTLES IN A QUIESCENT DARK CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.

    2010-09-01

    Data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory CO Mapping Survey of the Taurus molecular cloud are combined with extinction data for a sample of 292 background field stars to investigate the uptake of CO from the gas to icy grain mantles on dust within the cloud. On the assumption that the reservoir of CO in the ices is represented well by the combined abundances of solid CO and solid CO{sub 2} (which forms by oxidation of CO on the dust), we find that the total column density (gas + solid) correlates tightly with visual extinction (A{sub V}) over the range 5 mag < A{sub V} < 30 mag, i.e., up to the highest extinctions covered by our sample. The mean depletion of gas-phase CO, expressed as {delta}(CO) = N(CO){sub ice}/N(CO){sub total}, increases monotonically from negligible levels for A{sub V} {approx}< 5 to {approx} 0.3 at A{sub V} = 10 and {approx} 0.6 at A{sub V} = 30. As these results refer to line-of-sight averages, they must be considered lower limits to the actual depletion at loci deep within the cloud, which may approach unity. We show that it is plausible for such high levels of depletion to be reached in dense cores on timescales {approx}0.6 Myr, comparable with their expected lifetimes. Dispersal of cores during star formation may be effective in maintaining observable levels of gaseous CO on the longer timescales estimated for the age of the cloud.

  19. Grain sizes, surface areas, and porosities of vapor-deposited H2O ices used to simulate planetary icy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boxe, C S; Bodsgard, B R; Smythe, W; Leu, M T

    2007-05-15

    Mean grain sizes and specific surface areas (SSAs) of ice substrates formed by vapor deposition at low temperatures are of importance in simulating external surfaces of icy satellites in the solar system. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to obtain granule sizes and to observe the phase of ice granules prepared on borosilicate, silicon, and metallic plates. Ices prepared at a temperature lower than 140 K appear to be amorphous, and their granule sizes are typically submicrometer. At slightly warmer temperatures, near 180-200 K, ice films are composed of either hexagonal or cubic granules with sizes up to a few micrometers. When briefly annealed to even warmer temperatures, ice granule sizes approach approximately 10 microm. SSAs of ice substrates were determined from BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) analysis of gas adsorption isotherms in the temperature range from 83.5 to 261 K. SSAs decrease drastically from 102 m2/g at 83.5 K to 0.87 m2/g at 150 K and further decrease slowly to 0.22 m2/g at 261 K, suggesting that the transition from amorphous to crystalline forms occurs at approximately 150 K. The overall decrease in SSAs is primarily due to metamorphism and sintering. These results are comparable to recent field and laboratory measurements. Possible implications for theoretical models of icy satellites of outer planets using remote sensing techniques are also discussed. PMID:17306289

  20. The Effects of Cracking on the Surface Potential of Icy Grains in Saturn’s E-Ring: Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Caixia; Bahr, David A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Baragiola, Raúl A.

    2016-07-01

    Within Saturn's E-ring, dust grains are coated by water vapor co-released with ice grains from the geyser-like eruptions of Enceladus. These ice-coated grains have intrinsic surface potential and interact synergistically with the ions and electrons of Saturn's magnetospheric plasmas. We perform laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of water-ice growth on the surface potential, using amorphous solid water (ASW) films. We estimate the growth of the surface potential to be ∼‑2.5 mV (Earth) yr‑1 and ‑112 mV yr‑1 for E-ring grains at ∼4.5R s and 3.95R s outside Enceladus’s plume, respectively. In addition, our measurements show that the linear relationship between the surface potential and the film thickness, as described in previous studies, has an upper limit, where the film spontaneously cracks above a porosity-dependent critical thickness. Heating of the cracked films with (and without) deposited charge shows that significant positive (and negative) surface potentials are retained at temperatures above 110 K, contrary to the minimal values (roughly zero) for thin, transparent ASW films. The significant surface potentials observed on micron-scale cracked ice films after thermal cycling, ‑(5–20) V, are consistent with Cassini measurements, which indicate a negative charge of up to ‑5 V for E-ring dust particles at ∼5R s. Therefore, the native grain surface potential resulting from water-vapor coating must be included in modeling studies of interactions between E-ring icy surfaces and Saturn's magnetospheric plasma.

  1. The Effects of Cracking on the Surface Potential of Icy Grains in Saturn’s E-Ring: Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Caixia; Bahr, David A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Baragiola, Raúl A.

    2016-07-01

    Within Saturn's E-ring, dust grains are coated by water vapor co-released with ice grains from the geyser-like eruptions of Enceladus. These ice-coated grains have intrinsic surface potential and interact synergistically with the ions and electrons of Saturn's magnetospheric plasmas. We perform laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of water-ice growth on the surface potential, using amorphous solid water (ASW) films. We estimate the growth of the surface potential to be ˜‑2.5 mV (Earth) yr‑1 and ‑112 mV yr‑1 for E-ring grains at ˜4.5R s and 3.95R s outside Enceladus’s plume, respectively. In addition, our measurements show that the linear relationship between the surface potential and the film thickness, as described in previous studies, has an upper limit, where the film spontaneously cracks above a porosity-dependent critical thickness. Heating of the cracked films with (and without) deposited charge shows that significant positive (and negative) surface potentials are retained at temperatures above 110 K, contrary to the minimal values (roughly zero) for thin, transparent ASW films. The significant surface potentials observed on micron-scale cracked ice films after thermal cycling, ‑(5–20) V, are consistent with Cassini measurements, which indicate a negative charge of up to ‑5 V for E-ring dust particles at ˜5R s. Therefore, the native grain surface potential resulting from water-vapor coating must be included in modeling studies of interactions between E-ring icy surfaces and Saturn's magnetospheric plasma.

  2. Ion-Ice Astrochemistry: Barrierless Low-Energy Deposition Pathways to HCOOH, CH3OH, and CO2 on Icy Grain Mantles from Precursor Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of very favorable reaction pathways is explored involving the deposition of ions on icy grain mantles with very low energies. Quantum chemical cluster calculations at the MP2/6-31+G** level in 4H2O clusters and at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level in 17H2O clusters indicate that HCO+ and CH3 + are able to react spontaneously with one of the water molecules in the cluster to form protonated formic acid (HCOOH2 +) and protonated methanol (CH3OH2 +), respectively. It is furthermore found that these initial adducts spontaneously transfer their excess protons to the cluster to form neutral formic acid and methanol, plus solvated hydronium, H3O+. In the final case, if a CO molecule is bound to the surface of the cluster, OH+ may react with it to form protonated carbon dioxide (HCO2 +), which then loses its proton to yield CO2 and H3O+. In the present model, all of these processes were found to occur with no barriers. Discussion includes the analogous gas phase processes, which have been considered in previous studies, as well as the competitive abstraction pathway for HCO(+) + H2O.

  3. Nondetection of continuum radiation from Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock (1983d) at 2- to 6-cm wavelengths and its implication on the icy-grain halo theory

    SciTech Connect

    De Pater, I.; Wade, C.M.; Houpis, H.L.F.; Palmer, P.

    1985-06-01

    The Comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock was observed with the VLA at 6 and 2 cm, when the comet was at geocentric distances of 0.08 and 0.035 AU, respectively, and the results are discussed. The three sigma upper limits to the flux density are 90 and 750 micro-Jy at the two wavelengths, respectively, values fully two orders of magnitude below the flux densities predicted by the icy-grain halo theory as initially developed. The corrected theory also indicates that the icy grain halo theory does not give an adequate description of the cometary environment. It is shown that the halo is either very optically thin, with a filling factor of the order of 10 to the -5th, or that the maximum size of the grain that can be lifted off the nuclear surface is only of the order of 10-100 microns. 28 references.

  4. RADIATION SYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN ICE-COATED CARBON: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR GRAINS AND ICY MOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, U.; Fulvio, D.; Baragiola, R. A.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2012-06-20

    We report the synthesis of carbon dioxide on an amorphous carbon-13 substrate coated with amorphous water ice from irradiation with 100 keV protons at 20 K and 120 K. The quantitative studies show that the CO{sub 2} is dispersed in the ice; its column density increases with ion fluence to a maximum value (in 10{sup 15} molecules cm{sup -2}) of {approx}1 at 20 K and {approx}3 at 120 K. The initial yield is 0.05 (0.1) CO{sub 2} per incident H{sup +} at 20 (120) K. The CO{sub 2} destruction process, which limits the maximum column density, occurs with an effective cross section of {approx}2.5 (4.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} at 20 (120) K. We discuss radiation-induced oxidation by reactions of radicals in water with the carbon surface and demonstrate that these reactions can be a significant source of condensed carbon dioxide in interstellar grains and in icy satellites in the outer solar system.

  5. Experimental characterization of the opposition surge in fine-grained water-ice and high albedo ice analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, B.; Pommerol, A.; Poch, O.; Gundlach, B.; Leboeuf, M.; Dadras, M.; Blum, J.; Thomas, N.

    2016-01-01

    We measured the bidirectional reflectance in the VIS-NIR spectral range of different surfaces prepared from small-grained spherical water-ice particles over a wide range of incidence and emission geometries, including opposition. We show that coherent backscattering is dominating the opposition effect on fresh sample material, but its contribution decreases when particles become more irregularly shaped and the bulk porosity increases. Strong temporal evolution of the photometric properties of icy samples, caused by particle sintering and resulting in a decrease of backscattering, is shown. The sintering of the ice particles is documented using cryo-SEM micrographs of fresh and evolved samples. To complement the photometric characterization of ices, multiple high albedo laboratory analogs were investigated to study the effects of shape, grain size distribution, wavelength and surface roughness. In addition to the main backscattering peak, the phase curves also display the effect of glory in the case of surfaces of granular surfaces formed by either spherical ice or glass particles. We show that the angular position of the glory can be used to determine accurately the average size of the particles. Reflectance data are fitted by the Hapke photometric model, the Minnaert model and three morphological models. The resulting parameters can be used to reproduce our data and compare them to the results of other laboratory experiments and astronomical observations.

  6. High-Resolution 4.7 Micron Keck/NIRSPEC Spectra of Protostars. II. Detection of the 13CO Isotope in Icy Grain Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Blake, G. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2002-09-01

    The high-resolution (R=25,000) infrared M-band spectrum of the massive protostar NGC 7538 IRS 9 shows a narrow absorption feature at 4.779 μm (2092.3 cm-1) that we attribute to the vibrational stretching mode of the 13CO isotope in pure CO icy grain mantles. This is the first detection of 13CO in icy grain mantles in the interstellar medium. The 13CO band is a factor of 2.3 narrower than the apolar component of the 12CO band. With this in mind, we discuss the mechanisms that broaden solid-state absorption bands. It is shown that ellipsoidally shaped pure CO grains fit the bands of both isotopes at the same time. Slightly worse but still reasonable fits are also obtained by CO embedded in N2-rich ices and thermally processed O2-rich ices. In addition, we report new insights into the nature and evolution of interstellar CO ices by comparing the very high resolution multicomponent solid 12CO spectrum of NGC 7538 IRS 9 with that of the previously studied low-mass source L1489 IRS. The narrow absorption of apolar CO ices is present in both spectra but much stronger in NGC 7538 IRS 9. It is superposed on a smooth broad absorption feature well fitted by a combination of CO2 and H2O-rich laboratory CO ices. The abundances of the latter two ices, scaled to the total H2O ice column, are the same in both sources. We thus suggest that thermal processing manifests itself as evaporation of apolar ices only and not the formation of CO2 or polar ices. Finally, the decomposition of the 12CO band is used to derive the 12CO/13CO abundance ratio in apolar ices. A ratio of 12CO/13CO=71+/-15 (3 σ) is deduced, in good agreement with gas-phase CO studies (~77) and the solid 12CO2/13CO2 ratio of 80+/-11 found in the same line of sight. The implications for the chemical path along which CO2 is formed are discussed. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the

  7. FORMATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE, METHANOL, ETHANOL, AND FORMIC ACID ON AN ICY GRAIN ANALOG USING FAST OXYGEN ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Madzunkov, S. M.; MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2010-03-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methanol (CH{sub 3}OH), ethanol (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH), and formic acid (HCOOH) have been formed in collisions of a superthermal, 9 eV beam of O({sup 3} P) atoms with CH{sub 4} molecules, with an over coat of CO molecules, adsorbed on a gold surface at 4.8 K. The products are detected using temperature programmed-desorption and quadrupole mass spectrometry. Identification of the species is carried out through use of the Metropolis random walk algorithm as constrained by the fractionation patterns of the detected species. Relative formation yields are reported and reaction sequences are given to account for possible formation routes.

  8. Laboratory Annealing Experiments Of Refractory Silicate Grain Analogs Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Tsukamota, Katsuo; Kaito, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    Exothermic reactions during the annealing of laboratory synthesized amorphous magnesium-bearing silicate particles used as grain analogs of cosmic dust were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in air. With infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we show that cosmic dust could possibly undergo fusion to larger particles, with oxidation of magnesium silicide and crystallization of forsterite as exothermic reactions in the early solar system. The reactions begin at approximately 425, approximately 625, and approximately 1000 K, respectively, and the reaction energies (enthalpies) are at least 727, 4151, and 160.22 J per gram, respectively. During the crystallization of forsterite particles, the spectral evolution of the 10 micrometer feature from amorphous to crystalline was observed to begin at lower temperature than the crystallization temperature of 1003 K. During spectral evolution at lower temperature, nucleation and/or the formation of nanocrystallites of forsterite at the surface of the grain analogs was observed.

  9. The Structure of Ice Nanoclusters and Thin-films of Water Ice: Implications for Icy Grains in Cold Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Blake, David; Uffindell, Christine; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in water ice (I(sub c) yields I(sub h)) is used to measure the extent to which surface structure and impurities control bulk properties. In pure crystalline (I(sub c)) water ice nanoclusters and in thin-films of impure water ice, I(sub c) yields I(sub h) occurs at lower temperatures than in thin-films of pure water ice. The disordered surface of the 20 nm diameter nanoclusters promotes transformations or reactions which would otherwise be kinetically hindered. Likewise, impurities such as methanol introduce defects into the ice network, thereby allowing sluggish structural transitions to proceed. Such surface-related phenomena play an important role in promoting chemical reactions on interstellar ice grains within cold molecular clouds, where the first organic compounds are formed.

  10. Olivine in terminal particles of Stardust aerogel tracks and analogous grains in chondrite matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Le, Loan

    2014-10-01

    The dearth of both major and minor element analyses of anhydrous silicate phases in chondrite matrix has thus far hindered their comparison to the Wild 2 samples. We present 68 analyses of olivine (Fa0-97) in the coarse-grained terminal particles of Stardust aerogel tracks and a comprehensive dataset (>103 analyses) of analogous olivine grains (5-30 μm) isolated in CI, CM, CR, CH, CO, CV3-oxidized, CV3-reduced, C3-ungrouped (Acfer 094 and Ningqiang), L/LL 3.0-4, EH3, and Kakangari chondrite matrix. These compositions reveal that Wild 2 likely accreted a diverse assortment of material that was radially transported from various carbonaceous and ordinary chondrite-forming regions. The Wild 2 olivine includes amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), refractory forsterite, type I and type II chondrule fragments and/or microchondrules, and rare relict grain compositions. In addition, we have identified one terminal particle that has no known compositional analog in the meteorite record and may be a signature of low-temperature, aqueous processing in the Kuiper Belt. The generally low Cr content of FeO-rich olivine in the Stardust samples indicates that they underwent mild thermal metamorphism, akin to a petrologic grade of 3.05-3.15.

  11. NOTE: Laboratory Studies of Catalysis of CO to Organics on Grain Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.; Nuth, J. A.; Smith, T.

    2000-05-01

    Experiments simulating heterogeneous conversion of H 2 and CO into simple hydrocarbons in astrophysical environments have been performed, utilizing realistic cosmic grain analogs of Fe-doped silicates as Fischer-Tropsch-Type catalysts. Catalysis was studied for temperatures from 470-670 K and reactant gas mixtures of H 2/CO with a ratio of 2-100. The total gas pressure was near 0.5 bar. Maximum conversion rates of a few percentage points were achieved over a 3-h time period. Major products were methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon dioxide, and water. Products were identified by IR spectroscopy.

  12. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  13. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  14. Survival of refractory presolar grain analogs during Stardust-like impact into Al foils: Implications for Wild 2 presolar grain abundances and study of the cometary fine fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Floss, C.; Haas, B. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Kearsley, A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present results of FIB-TEM studies of 12 Stardust analog Al foil craters which were created by firing refractory Si and Ti carbide and nitride grains into Al foils at 6.05 km s-1 with a light-gas gun to simulate capture of cometary grains by the Stardust mission. These foils were prepared primarily to understand the low presolar grain abundances (both SiC and silicates) measured by SIMS in Stardust Al foil samples. Our results demonstrate the intact survival of submicron SiC, TiC, TiN, and less-refractory Si3N4 grains. In small (<2 μm) craters that are formed by single grain impacts, the entire impacting crystalline grain is often preserved intact with minimal modification. While they also survive in crystalline form, grains at the bottom of larger craters (>5 μm) are typically fragmented and are somewhat flattened in the direction of impact due to partial melting and/or plastic deformation. The low presolar grain abundance estimates derived from SIMS measurements of large craters (mostly >50 μm) likely result from greater modification of these impactors (i.e., melting and isotopic dilution), due to higher peak temperatures/pressures in these crater impacts. The better survivability of grains in smaller craters suggests that more accurate presolar grain estimates may be achievable through measurement of such craters. It also suggests small craters can provide a complementary method of study of the Wild 2 fine fraction, especially for refractory CAI-like minerals.

  15. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 Angstroms, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approximately 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  16. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in the rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron-sized, nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low-frequency (approximately 0 - 100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in light of the current theories of alignment.

  17. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  18. Will Organic Synthesis Within Icy Grains or on Dust Surfaces in the Primitive Solar Nebula Completely Erase the Effects of Photochemical Self Shielding?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least 3 separate photochemical self-shielding models with different degrees of commonality. All of these models rely on the selective absorption of (12))C(16)O dissociative photons as the radiation source penetrates through the gas allowing the production of reactive O-17 and O-18 atoms within a specific volume. Each model also assumes that the undissociated C(16)O is stable and does not participate in the chemistry of nebular dust grains. In what follows we will argue that this last, very important assumption is simply not true despite the very high energy of the CO molecular bond.

  19. Phototelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and the equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much higher than the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approximately 0.09 to 8 microns radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with W radiation at 120 to 160 nm wavelengths. The measured values and the size dependence of the yields are found to be substantially different from the bulk values given in the literature.

  20. Icy Collisions - Planet Building beyond the snowline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Hill, Catherine; Heisselmann, Daniel; Blum, Juergen; Fraser, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collisions of small icy and dust particles beyond the “snow-line” are a key step in planet formation. Whilst the physical forces that underpin the aggregation of the smallest grains (van der Waals) and the largest planetessimals (gravity) are well understood, the processes involving mm - cm sized particles remain a mystery.In a unique set of experiments, we investigated low velocity collisions of dust and icy particles in this size range under microgravity conditions - utilizing parabolic flight (e.g. Salter 2009, Hill 2015 (a) & (b)). Experiments were performed at cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K) for icy aggregates and ambient as well as cryogenic temperatures (80 - 220 K) for dust aggregates.The kinetic analysis of the observed collisions of different aggregate types in different shapes and sizes revealed astonishing results - as the collisional properties of all investigated particles differ strongly from the usual assumptions in models of planet formation.Here, we present a summary of the results on the collisions of icy particles as well as first results on the collisions of dust aggregates. Focus will be on the coefficient of restitution, which measures the loss of translational energy in bouncing collisions and is a key parameter in models of planet formation.

  1. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  2. Larger Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Steven; Buratti, B. J.; Hansen, C.; Hurford, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-09-01

    Outer planets exploration in the past three decades has revealed a diverse host of large icy bodies undergoing a myriad of geological and chemical processes remarkably similar yet alien to those occurring on Earth. The most active of these, including the Galilean satellites and Saturn's moons Enceladus and Titan, are obvious targets for future robotic exploration. The broader host of satellites larger than 100 km should also figure into NASA's goals, owing to their abundance and insights they offer into past and present geological processes, Solar System formation and planetary evolution. Included in this class are the enigmatic objects Dione, with its smooth planes and fractured regions; Mimas with its giant crater Herschel; Iapetus, which has an odd shape and a mysterious equatorial ridge; Miranda, which has been subjected to drastic geologic reconfiguration; and Triton, with its geyser-like plumes. Many bodies in this class are of sufficient size and density to have hosted internal liquid water oceans in their early history, or even in the present epoch, making them targets of astrobiological interest. We discuss the importance of larger icy satellites to NASA's objectives, their importance for understanding, geology, chemistry and dynamics in the Solar System, and observational and experimental challenges that need to be addressed in the next decade.

  3. Spectral properties of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Wagner, Roland; Clark, Roger; Cruikshank, Dale; Brown, Robert; Roatsch, Thomas; Buratti, Bonnie; Matson, Dennis; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Nicholson, Phil; Baines, Kevin; Sotin, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Since 2004 Cassini is orbiting the Saturnian system with its instruments investigating the chemical and physical properties of Saturn ‘s atmosphere, its magnetosphere, its numerous satellites and rings. The VIMS instrument onboard Cassini enables not only to identify the Saturn satellites’ compositional units but also to map their distribution across the surfaces, to relate their location and extension to specific geological and/or geomorphological surface features and to characterize surface alterations induced by the space environment. Although, the VIMS spectra of the Saturnian satellites’ surfaces are dominated by H2O-ice, its distribution and physical characteristics differ distinctly from one satellite to the other. Global hemispherical differences are mostly related to the satellite’s orbital position within the Saturnian system, i.e. the distance to Saturn and its E ring, with particles originating from Saturn’s magnetosphere and/or the ice grains coming from the E ring impacting their surfaces. Often, these hemispherical differences are characterized by a dark non-icy contaminant more concentrated on their trailing hemispheres, while the more water ice-rich leading hemispheres appear covered by fresh material ejected by an impact event and/or by impacting E-ring particles. Tethys, however, situated closer to Enceladus and the E ring and deeper within Saturn’s magnetosphere, shows a more complex pattern. Compositional changes on a regional and local scale could be identified and related to the geological processes, i.e. impact cratering, tectonics, and erosion. Particularly, young impact craters and tectonic features reveal clean H2O ice of relatively large grain size while the “fresh” (unaltered) surface material offers a unique view into the crustal properties and evolution of its satellite. Whereas, prominent graben systems on Dione and Rhea are characterized by a pronounced ice signature - Ithaca Chasma on Tethys is barely recognizable

  4. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  5. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-04-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  6. Environmental Change in Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong evidence that subsurface oceans could exist within several of the outer solar system's ice-rich moons, at Jupiter (Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), Saturn (Enceladus and Titan), and Neptune (Triton). If liquid water is indeed available in these subsurface environments, then the availability of chemical energy becomes the greatest limitation on whether icy worlds could harbor life. Of these moons, the largest (Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) are expected to harbor oceans deep within, and high-pressure H2O ice phases are expected farther beneath those deep oceans. In contrast, the oceans of smaller icy worlds—Europa, Enceladus, and Triton—are plausibly in direct contact with rock below. Given that serpentinization or other water-rock geochemical activity could supply reductants directly to their oceans, these icy worlds have the greatest chance to support present-day microbial life. Each of these three icy worlds displays spectacular resurfaced terrains that are very young (crater retention ages ~10s Myr and younger), with their internal activity linked to extremes in tidal heating today and/or in the geologically recent past. However, the degree of their tidal heating may have changed greatly over time. Europa is believed to experience cyclical tidal heating and activity; Enceladus may have experienced cyclical activity or a geologically recent pulse of activity; Triton may have experienced extreme tidal heating upon its capture and orbital circularization. Such dynamic pasts would pose challenges for any life within. We consider the possible effects of severe swings in the activity level of icy worlds, specifically the implications for delivery of chemical energy to their subsurface oceans.

  7. Scattering properties of natural snow and frost - Comparison with icy satellite photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The Hapke (1986) equation is presently fit to ascertain the single-scattering albedo of the icy satellites of Uranus and Neptune and the one-term Henyey-Greenstein particle-phase function g for each of the Middleton and Mungall (1952) goniophotometric data samples. There emerge both very high single-scattering albedos and strongly forward-scattering particle phase functions; while these are in keeping with Mie theory-based theoretical considerations, they contrast with the observed backscattering behavior of icy satellites. It is suggested the icy satellite frost grains are aggregated into particles of complex texture, which produce the unusual backscattering behavior.

  8. Internal translational dynamics of large icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, A.

    2012-09-01

    Rotational dynamics is broadly used as a way to obtain some insight into the interior of solar system celestial bodies (e.g., see [4]). This is due to the fact that, to some extent, the rotational motion is affected by the internal characteristics of the body like its stratification, rheological properties, etc. Running a parallel way, some interior models of the celestial bodies also lead to the existence of another different rigid motion related with the translations of the body constituents with respect to its barycenter. It is the case, for example, of differentiated bodies containing a fluid layer enclosed between two solid layers. These kind of motions, like the rotational ones, might provide some constrains on the physical properties of the body, hence the interest in their study. This question has been recently addressed in [1] within the context of icy bodies. In that work it was established a mathematical framework, based on Lagrangian mechanics methods, that allowed the analytical modeling of the internal translational motions of a simple body differentiated into three homogeneous layers: an external ice-I layer, a subsurface ammonia-water ocean, and a rocky inner core. It was shown that the nature of the motion is oscillatory, with a single frequency, analogous to the Earth Slichter mode, that depends on the densities and masses of the layers. Although this three-layer internal structure represents a good approximation for some possible models of the interior of medium-sized icy bodies containing a subsurface ocean (e.g., see [2]), it is not the case when considering other models of larger icy bodies like Ganymede or Titan, since for them the subsurface ocean is not in contact with the rocky inner core but with a high-pressure ice layer (e.g., see [3], [5] or [6]). Bearing in mind these considerations, we aim at modeling the internal translational motions of a body composed of an ice crust, a subsurface ocean, and an inner core differentiated in two

  9. Technologies for Icy Bodies Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Anderson, F. S.; French, L. C.; Green, J. R.; Jones, J. A.; Lane, A. L.; Leger, P. C.; Zimmerman, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    Recent events in planetary exploration have profoundly changed the way both space scientists and the public regard the solar system and our place in it. These events include the Galileo data suggesting subsurface oceans in the Jovian system, ever stronger suggestions of near-surface water on Mars, as well as the complex structure observed for the Mars polar caps. And, of course, interest in icy cometary bodies is as old as humankind. Finally, the Mars north polar cap may conceivably cover and protect an ancient ocean floor, an obvious candidate ancient or extant habitat. In short, our interest in searching for life embraced early on the search for liquid water, and that has led us to an additional appreciation for water ice as both a commonplace partner with liquid water and as an issue to be addressed in the exploration of a host of interesting sites. In general, the spectrum of specialized technology for space exploration has not yet been broadened to include the requirements brought about by exploration of icy sites. We argue that technologies for access, operations, and science in icy solar system sites must be examined and their prioritized development initiated in order to successfully plan missions to these compelling sites over the next two decades. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. The tectonics of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S. L.

    The formation of tectonic structures on icy satellites may have resulted from one or more of several geologic processes: global volume change due to internal temperature change, H2O-ice phase changes, or ice-silicate differentiation; mantle convection driven by thermal or compositional heterogeneities; tidal deformation; and impact-related processes including formation of fracture systems, seismic disruption of areas antipodal to impact sites, basin collapse, and global reorientation. Observed tectonic structures and their associated volcanic deposits are classified herein into six basic assemblages: (1) pervasive troughs and scarps occurring at globally coherent orientations; (2) throughgoing troughs and bands of troughs, generally associated with volcanic materials; (3) linear to curvilinear ridges; (4) volcanically modified systems of concentric and radial scarps and furrows; (5) regional volcanic and tectonic centers; and (6) grooved terrain intimately associated with light-colored volcanic deposits. Comparison of these assemblages with predicted manifestations of different geologic processes may lead to some understanding of the relationship of volcanic and tectonic features to the endogenic and exogenic processes that have affected icy satellites.

  11. Evolution of Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Lou J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades observations combined with laboratory simulations, have revolutionized our understanding of interstellar ice and dust, the raw materials from which planets, comets and stars form. Most interstellar material is concentrated in large molecular clouds where simple molecules are formed by dust-grain and gas-phase reactions. Gaseous species striking the cold (10K) dust stick, forming an icy grain mantle. This accretion, coupled with UV photolysis, produces a complex chemical mixture containing volatile, non-volatile, and isotopically fractionated species. Ices in molecular clouds contain the very simple molecules H2O, CH3OH, CO, CO2, H2, and perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, as well as more complex species. The evidence for these compounds, as well as carbon-rich materials, will be reviewed and the possible connections with comets and meteorites will be presented in the first part of the talk . The second part of the presentation will focus on interstellar/precometary ice photochemical evolution and the species likely to be found in comets. The chemical composition and photochemical evolution of realistic interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs will be discussed. Ultraviolet photolysis of these ices produces H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, HCO, and more complex molecules. When ices representative of interstellar grains and comets are exposed to UV radiation at low temperature a series of moderately complex organic molecules are formed in the ice including: CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), and R-C=N (nitriles). Several of these are already known to be in the interstellar medium, and their presence indicates the importance of grain processing. After warming to room temperature an organic residue remains. This is composed primarily of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4), with lesser amounts of polyoxymethylene-related species (POMs), amides, and ketones. This is in sharp contrast to the organic residues produced by

  12. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  13. Cryogenic Property Measurements on Icy Compositions with Application to Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Barmatz, M.; Mitchell, K.

    2007-08-01

    Introduction and Science Motivation:We present the motivations, objectives, and preliminary experimental results for a new experimental cryo-ices initiative launched at JPL. The main motivation for this work is to fully appreciate the discoveries made by the Cassini-Huygens and Galileo missions, to prepare for the Dawn and New Horizons missions, and to look forward to potential missions to Europa, Enceladus, and Titan. This work is a joint effort among experimentalists and theorists at JPL, in collaboration with specialists in icy material properties the world over. Experimental Approach: A range of experiments are being devised which will improve our ability to model ice-rock body internal evolution and geological processes using modern synthesis and characterization techniques under cryogenic conditions. Initial experiments will involve pure water, methanol-water, ammonia-water, and ammoniawater- methanol mixtures, relevant to a range of icy satellites and processes. Ammonia is considered to play an important role in Titan cryovolcanism, whereas methanol is chosen as an experimental analog due to its ease-of-use in the laboratory. Where beneficial, we will determine basic thermophysical properties and phase diagrams using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter. Solids.We plan to analyze samples from terrestrial glaciers, which are relevant to both the terrestrial and planetary geology and geophysical communities. Terrestrial glaciers appear as realistic analogs for modeling processes taking place in the outer icy shells of icy satellites. These results will better enable us to predict the long-term evolution of terrestrial glaciers and ice shelves. Also, we will synthesize specimens with controlled microstructures by using equilibrium and non-equilibrium synthesis methods. Equilibrium methods, e.g., conventional (slow) freezing in a mold, will provide microstructural length scales in the range 0.2 to 1 mm (with and without preferred orientation, e.g., columnar

  14. ICI optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Robert A.; Duffy, Joseph F.

    1992-01-01

    Optical data storage tape is now a commercial reality. The world's first successful development of a digital optical tape system is complete. This is based on the Creo 1003 optical tape recorder with ICI 1012 write-once optical tape media. Flexible optical media offers many benefits in terms of manufacture; for a given capital investment, continuous, web-coating techniques produce more square meters of media than batch coating. The coated layers consist of a backcoat on the non-active side; on the active side there is a subbing layer, then reflector, dye/polymer, and transparent protective overcoat. All these layers have been tailored for ease of manufacture and specific functional characteristics.

  15. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  16. Cryovolcanism on the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence of past cryovolcanism is widespread and extremely varied on the icy satellites. Some cryovolcanic landscapes, notably on Triton, are similar to many silicate volcanic terrains, including what appear to be volcanic rifts, calderas and solidified lava lakes, flow fields, breached cinder cones or stratovolcanoes, viscous lava domes, and sinuous rilles. Most other satellites have terrains that are different in the important respect that no obvious volcanoes are present. The preserved record of cryovolcanism generally is believed to have formed by eruptions of aqueous solutions and slurries. Even Triton's volcanic crust, which is covered by nitrogen-rich frost, is probably dominated by water ice. Nonpolar and weakly polar molecular liquids (mainly N2, CH4, CO, CO2, and Ar), may originate by decomposition of gas-clathrate hydrates and may have been erupted on some icy satellites, but without water these substances do not form rigid solids that are stable against sublimation or melting over geologic time. Triton's plumes, active at the time of Voyager 2's flyby, may consist of multicomponent nonpolar gas mixtures. The plumes may be volcanogenic fumaroles or geyserlike emissions powered by deep internal heating, and, thus, the plumes may be indicating an interior that is still cryomagmatically active; or Triton's plumes may be powered by solar heating of translucent ices very near the surface. The Uranian and Neptunian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Triton have flow deposits that are hundreds to thousands of meters thick (implying highly viscous lavas); by contrast, the Jovian and Saturnian satellites generally have plains-forming deposits composed of relatively thin flows whose thicknesses have not been resolved in Voyager images (thus implying relatively low-viscosity lavas). One possible explanation for this inferred rheological distinction involves a difference in volatile composition of the Uranian and Neptunian satellites on one hand and of the Jovian and

  17. Cryovolcanism on the icy satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence of past cryovolcanism is widespread and extremely varied on the icy satellites. Some cryovolcanic landscapes, notably on Triton, are similar to many silicate volcanic terrains, including what appear to be volcanic rifts, calderas and solidified lava lakes, flow fields, breached cinder cones or stratovolcanoes, viscous lava domes, and sinuous rilles. Most other satellites have terrains that are different in the important respect that no obvious volcanoes are present. The preserved record of cryovolcanism generally is believed to have formed by eruptions of aqueous solutions and slurries. Even Triton's volcanic crust, which is covered by nitrogen-rich frost, is probably dominated by water ice. Nonpolar and weakly polar molecular liquids (mainly N2, CH4, CO, CO2, and Ar), may originate by decomposition of gas-clathrate hydrates and may have been erupted on some icy satellites, but without water these substances do not form rigid solids that are stable against sublimation or melting over geologic time. Triton's plumes, active at the time of Voyager 2's flyby, may consist of multicomponent nonpolar gas mixtures. The plumes may be volcanogenic fumaroles or geyserlike emissions powered by deep internal heating, and, thus, the plumes may be indicating an interior that is still cryomagmatically active; or Triton's plumes may be powered by solar heating of translucent ices very near the surface. The Uranian and Neptunian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Triton have flow deposits that are hundreds to thousands of meters thick (implying highly viscous lavas); by contrast, the Jovian and Saturnian satellites generally have plains-forming deposits composed of relatively thin flows whose thicknesses have not been resolved in Voyager images (thus implying relatively low-viscosity lavas). One possible explanation for this inferred rheological distinction involves a difference in volatile composition of the Uranian and Neptunian satellites on one hand and of the Jovian and

  18. The Scattering Properties of Natural Terrestrial Snows versus Icy Satellite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingue, Deborah; Hartman, Beth; Verbiscer, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Our comparisons of the single particle scattering behavior of terrestrial snows and icy satellite regoliths to the laboratory particle scattering measurements of McGuire and Hapke demonstrate that the differences between icy satellite regoliths and their terrestrial counterparts are due to particle structures and textures. Terrestrial snow particle structures define a region in the single particle scattering function parameter space separate from the regions defined by the McGuire and Hapke artificial laboratory particles. The particle structures and textures of the grains composing icy satellites regoliths are not simple or uniform but consist of a variety of particle structure and texture types, some of which may be a combination of the particle types investigated by McGuire and Hapke.

  19. Diagnosing Evaporation of Icy Planetesimals in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Hideko; Ishimoto, Daiki; Nagasawa, Makiko; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    It is thought that eccentricities of planetesimals are excited due to gravitational interaction with protoplanets in protoplanetary disks. As a result, bow shocks are formed around the icy planetesimals and the ice is evaporated via the shock heating. Evaporation rates and orbital evolution of such planetesimals have been investigated (Tanaka et al. 2013, Nagasawa et al. 2014). In this work, we examine a possibility of diagnosing the shock heating and evaporation of icy planetesimals, using ALMA observations of lines of molecules evaporated from the planetesimals.Evaporation of ice has been studied observationally and theoretically well, for example, at a shock front of outflows associated with young stellar objects. The evaporated molecules will be destroyed via chemical reactions with other species and/or depletion on dust grains. The evaporated molecules can survive in gas-phase for around 104years in the region hotter than their evaporation temperatures, while they freeze out immediately in the cold region. As parent species evaporated from ice, saturated nitrogen- or sulphur-bearing species and organic molecules are often considered.Our calculations show that evaporated H2S is destroyed via gas-phase reactions, and SO and then SO2 are produced via chemicalreactions. The timescale of these reactions is about 104years. Therefore, H2S and SO are good tracers of shock heating and evaporation of icy planetesimals if it occurs in the region hotter than the evaporation temperatures of H2S and SO. The evaporation temperature of SO2 is higher than those of H2S and SO.Molecular lines of H2S, SO, and SO2 have not yet been detected towards protoplanetary disks by the previous radio observations. ALMA observations with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, however, will make it possible to detect the lines of these molecules. Conditions that molecular lines of H2S and SO becomes strong enough to be detected by ALMA observations will also be discussed.

  20. OASIS: Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M.; Zheng, Y.; Balvin, M.; Southard, A. E.; Ferrance, J.; Malespin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a well established laboratory technique for detecting and analyzing organic molecules. This approach has been especially fruitful in the analysis of nucleobases, amino acids, and establishing chirol ratios [1 -3]. We are developing OASIS, Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces, for future in situ landed missions to astrochemically important icy bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and icy moons. The OASIS design employs a microfabricated, on-chip analytical column to chromatographically separate liquid ana1ytes using known LC stationary phase chemistries. The elution products are then interfaced through electrospray ionization (ESI) and analyzed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). A particular advantage of this design is its suitability for microgravity environments, such as for a primitive small body.

  1. Interstellar and Planetary Analogs in the Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the unique capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation (UV, charged particles) with molecular species (neutral molecules, radicals and ions) and carbonaceous grains in the Solar System and in the Interstellar Medium (ISM). COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber, a laboratory chamber where interstellar and planetary analogs are generated, processed and analyzed. It is composed of a pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a free jet supersonic expansion in a plasma cavity coupled to two ultrahigh-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for photonic detection and a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection. This setup allows the study of molecules, ions and solids under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate some interstellar, circumstellar and planetary physical environments providing new fundamental insights on the molecular level into the processes that are critical to the chemistry in the ISM, circumstellar and planet forming regions, and on icy objects in the Solar System. Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be discussed, in particular the progress that have been achieved in monitoring in the laboratory the formation of solid particles from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as circumstellar outflow and planetary atmospheres.

  2. The rheology of icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammis, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    High-temperature creep in orthoenstatite under conditions of controlled oxygen fugacity was studied. It was found that creep was conttrolled by the extremely thin layer of SiO2 which wetted the grain boundaries. Slight reduction of the (Mg, Fe)SiO3 enstatite during hot pressing produced microscopic particles of Fe and the thin film of intergranular SiO2. This result highlights another complication in determining the flow properties of iron bearing silicates which constitute the bulk of terrestrial planets and moons. The Phenomenon may be important in the ductile formation of any extraterrestrial body which is formed in a reducing environment. The rheology of dirty ice was studied. This involves micromechanical modeling of hardening phenomena due to contamination by a cosmic distribution of silicate particles. The larger particles are modeled by suspension theory. In order to handle the distribution of particles sizes, the hardening is readed as a critical phenomenon, and real space renormalization group techniques are used. Smaller particles interact directly with the dislocations. The particulate hardening effect was studied in metals. The magnitude of such hardening in ice and the defect chemistry of ice are studied to assess the effects of chemical contamination by methane, ammonia, or other likely contaminants.

  3. Observations of the icy universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Gerakines, Perry A.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.

    2015-08-01

    Freeze-out of the gas-phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and Solar System environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze-out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state-of-the-art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  4. Habitability potential of icy moons: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Encrenaz, Thérèse; Sohl, Frank; Hussmann, Hauke; Bampasidis, Georgios; Wagner, Frank; Raulin, François; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Lopes, Rosaly

    2014-05-01

    Looking for habitable conditions in the outer solar system our research focuses on the natural satellites rather than the planets themselves. Indeed, the habitable zone as traditionally defined may be larger than originally con-ceived. The strong gravitational pull caused by the giant planets may produce enough energy to sufficiently heat the interiors of orbiting icy moons. The outer solar system satellites then provide a conceptual basis within which new theories for understanding habitability can be constructed. Measurements from the ground but also by the Voyager, Galileo and the Cassini spacecrafts revealed the potential of these satellites in this context, and our understanding of habitability in the solar system and beyond can be greatly enhanced by investigating several of these bodies together [1]. Their environments seem to satisfy many of the "classical" criteria for habitability (liquid water, energy sources to sustain metabolism and chemical compounds that can be used as nutrients over a period of time long enough to allow the development of life). Indeed, several of the moons show promising conditions for habitability and the de-velopment and/or maintenance of life. Europa, Callisto and Ganymede may be hiding, under their icy crust, putative undersurface liquid water oceans [3] which, in the case of Europa [2], may be in direct contact with a silicate mantle floor and kept warm by tidally generated heat [4]. Titan and Enceladus, Saturn's satellites, were found by the Cassini-Huygens mission to possess active organic chemistries with seasonal variations, unique geological features and possibly internal liquid water oceans. Titan's rigid crust and the probable existence of a subsurface ocean create an analogy with terrestrial-type plate tectonics, at least surficial [5], while Enceladus' plumes find an analogue in gey-sers. As revealed by Cassini the liquid hydrocarbon lakes [6] distributed mainly at polar latitudes on Titan are ideal isolated

  5. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  6. Low thermal inertias of icy planetary surfaces. Evidence for amorphous ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, C.; Lucas, A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Thermal inertias of atmosphereless icy planetary bodies happen to be very low. Aims: We relate the thermal inertia to the regolith properties such as porosity, grain size, ice form and heat transfer processes to understand why it is low. We interpret the dichotomy in thermal inertia of the surface of Mimas in terms of changes in regolith properties. We predict how the thermal inertia of these bodies may vary with heliocentric distance depending on these properties. Methods: We combine available models of conductivity by contact or radiation to understand what heat transfer process is predominant. Results: The magnitude of the thermal inertia of a porous icy regolith is mainly governed by the crystalline or amorphous ice forms, and the quality of contacts between grains. Beyond the orbit of Jupiter, thermal inertias as low as a few tens J/m2/ K/s1/2 are difficult to reproduce with plausible porosity and grains sizes made of crystalline ice unless contacts are loose. This is, on the contrary, straightforward for regoliths of sub-cm-sized grains made of amorphous water ice. This study points out the importance of including the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties of water ice forms and the radiative conduction in thermal models of these bodies. The relatively high thermal inertia of the leading face of Mimas can be explained by a regolith of crystalline ice grains in tight contacts, which are eventually sintered by the bombardment of high energy electrons. The low thermal inertia of its trailing face is easily reproduced by a regolith of moderate porosity with sub-mm-sized grains of amorphous ice. The characteristic decrease of thermal inertia with heliocentric distance of icy atmosphereless surfaces and the very low thermal inertia of relevant trans-Neptunian objects are easily explained if amorphous ice is present at cm depths below a thin layer of crystalline ice.

  7. Phase transitions and convection in icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of solid-solid phase changes on subsolidus convection in the large icy moons of the outer solar system are considered. Phase transitions affect convection via processes that distort the phase change boundary and/or influence buoyancy through thermal expansion. Linear stability analyses are carried out for ice layers with a phase change at the midplane. Two exothermic phase transitions (ice I - ice II, ice VI - ice VIII) and two endothermic transitions (ice I - ice III, ice II - ice V) are considered. For the exothermic cases, the phase change can either impede or enhance whole-layer convection. For the endothermic cases, the phse change always inhibits whole-layer convective overturn and tends to enforce two-layer convection. These results play some constraints on possible models of icy satellite evolution and structure.

  8. Atmospheric/Exospheric Characteristics of Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Lopes, R. M.; Lorenz, R. D.; Retherford, K. D.; Schubert, G.

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheres/exospheres of icy satellites greatly vary from one to the next in terms of density, composition, structure or steadiness. Titan is the only icy satellite with a dense atmosphere comparable in many ways to that of the Earth’s atmosphere. Titan’s atmosphere prevents the surface from direct interaction with the plasma environment, but gives rise to Earth-like exchanges of energy, matter and momentum. The atmospheres of other satellites are tenuous. Enceladus’ atmosphere manifests itself in a large water vapor plume emanating from surface cracks near the south pole. Io’s SO2 atmosphere originates from volcanoes. Europa’s tenuous O2 atmosphere is produced by intense radiation bombardment. This chapter reviews the characteristics of the atmospheres of Titan, Enceladus, Io and Europa based on observations.

  9. Fluffy dust forms icy planetesimals by static compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Context. Several barriers have been proposed in planetesimal formation theory: bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift problems. Understanding the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they are fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals. Aims: We aim to reveal the pathway of dust structure evolution from dust grains to compact planetesimals. Methods: Using the compressive strength formula, we analytically investigate how fluffy dust aggregates are compressed by static compression due to ram pressure of the disk gas and self-gravity of the aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Results: We reveal the pathway of the porosity evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to form planetesimals, circumventing the barriers in planetesimal formation. The aggregates are compressed by the disk gas to a density of 10-3 g/cm3 in coagulation, which is more compact than is the case with collisional compression. Then, they are compressed more by self-gravity to 10-1 g/cm3 when the radius is 10 km. Although the gas compression decelerates the growth, the aggregates grow rapidly enough to avoid the radial drift barrier when the orbital radius is ≲6 AU in a typical disk. Conclusions: We propose a fluffy dust growth scenario from grains to planetesimals. It enables icy planetesimal formation in a wide range beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. This result proposes a concrete initial condition of planetesimals for the later stages of the planet formation.

  10. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter reference trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.; Lam, Try

    2006-01-01

    The proposed NASA Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission would have used a single spacecraft to orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa in succession. The enormous Delta-Velocity required for this mission (nearly [25 km/s]) would necessitate the use of very high efficiency electric propulsion. The trajectory created for the proposed baseline JIMO mission may be the most complex trajectory ever designed. This paper describes the current reference trajectory in detail and describes the processes that were used to construct it.

  11. Space Environmental Erosion of Polar Icy Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.; Killen, R. M.; Vondrak, R. R.; Hurley, D. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Delory, G. T.; Halekas, J. S.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    While regions at the floors of permanently shadowed polar craters are isolated from direct sunlight, these regions are still exposed to the harsh space environment, including the interplanetary Lyman-a background, meteoric impacts, and obstacle-affected solar wind. We demonstrate that each of these processes can act to erode the polar icy regolith located at or near the surface along the crater floor. The Lyman-a background can remove/erode the icy-regolith via photon stimulated desorption [1], meteoric impacts can vaporize the regolith [2], and redirected solar wind ions can sputter the ice-regolith mix [3]. As an example we shall examine in detail the inflow of solar wind ions and electrons into polar craters, One might expect such ions to flow horizontally over the crater top (see Figure). However, we find that plasma ambipolar processes act to deflect passing ions into the craters [3]. We examine this plasma process and determine the ion flux as a function of position across a notional crater floor. We demonstrate that inflowing solar wind ions can indeed create sputtering along the crater floor, effectively eroding the surface. Erosion time scales rrom sputtering will be presented. We shall also consider the effect of impact vaporization on buried icy-regolith regions. There will also be a discussion of solar wind electrons that enter into the PSR, demonstrating that these also have the ability rree surface-bound atoms via electron stimulated desorption processes [l].

  12. The shadow of Saturn's icy satellites in the E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Sremcevic, M.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze shadows that Saturnian satellites cast in the E ring, a faint, broad dust ring composed of icy grains. The brightness contrast of a moon's shadow relative to the surrounding ring allows to infer local properties of the size distribution of ring particles. We derive the shadow contrast from a large number of Cassini images of Enceladus taken in various filters in a range of phase angles 144 to 164 degrees. For Tethys and Dione we identify a clear shadow in images with phase angles larger than 160 degrees. From the data we obtain the number density of E ring grains at the orbits of Tethys and Dione relative to the one near Enceladus. The latter we constrain from the variation of the shadow contrast with color and phase angle. From the Enceladus data we construct the phase curve of the E ring dust between 144 and 164 degrees. We compare to data obtained from Earth-bound observations by de Pater et al 2004 and in situ measurements by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer onboard Cassini.

  13. UV-IR Spectra of the Icy Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Filacchione, G.; Schenk, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Noll, K. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini's multi-instrument suite allows simultaneous observations of the icy satellites of Saturn over a wide range of wavelengths. We present composite UV-IR spectra (0.1-5 microns) of the leading and trailing hemispheres of the icy moons using data from Cassini supplemented with spectra from Hubble Space Telescope (STIS). We use data of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea from the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), the Imaging Subsystem (ISS) and the Visual-Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) taken during simultaneous measurements, or using similar observational geometries. The well-studied phase curve behaviors of the satellites are utilized to readily combine Earth-based STIS data with the Cassini datasets to create composite spectra. Focusing primarily on the UV-visible region so far, we find that the spectra of all satellites are bright and spectrally relatively flat at visible wavelengths longer than 500-600 nm; shortward of 500-600 nm the surfaces become absorbing with wavelength, resulting in reddish spectra. The satellites exhibit flattish-to-bowl-shaped spectra in the ~200-350 nm range and demonstrate the 165 nm water ice absorption edge, in varying strengths. These composite spectra are used to study the system-wide surface compositions of the satellites to understand large-scale exogenic effects (e.g., E-ring grain bombardment and radiolytic processing) at a variety of regolith sensing depths, and in particular to study implications for the presence and distribution of organics, ammonia, and other non-H2O-ice species in the system.

  14. Convection in Icy Satellites: Implications for Habitability and Planetary Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state convection and endogenic resurfacing in the outer ice shells of the icy Galilean satellites (especially Europa) may contribute to the habitability of their internal oceans and to the detectability of any biospheres by spacecraft. If convection occurs in an ice I layer, fluid motions are confined beneath a thick stagnant lid of cold, immobile ice that is too stiff to participate in convection. The thickness of the stagnant lid varies from 30 to 50% of the total thickness of the ice shell, depending on the grain size of ice. Upward convective motions deliver approximately 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 13) kg yr(sup -1) of ice to the base of the stagnant lid, where resurfacing events driven by compositional or tidal effects (such as the formation of domes or ridges on Europa, or formation of grooved terrain on Ganymede) may deliver materials from the stagnant lid onto the surface. Conversely, downward convective motions deliver the same mass of ice from the base of the stagnant lid to the bottom of the satellites ice shells. Materials from the satellites surfaces may be delivered to their oceans by downward convective motions if material from the surface can reach the base of the stagnant lid during resurfacing events. Triggering convection from an initially conductive ice shell requires modest amplitude (a few to tens of kelvins) temperature anomalies to soften the ice to permit convection, which may require tidal heating. Therefore, tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection in combination may be required to permit mass transport between the surfaces and oceans of icy satellites. Callisto and probably Ganymede have thick stagnant lids with geologically inactive surfaces today, so forward contamination of their surfaces is not a significant issue. Active convection and breaching of the stagnant lid is a possibility on Europa today, so is of relevance to planetary protection policy.

  15. Modeling Icy Saturnian Satellite Compositions Using Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.

    2006-09-01

    Surface compositions among the icy Saturnian satellites range from nearly pure water ice at Mimas and Tethys to dark, nitrile-laced compounds at Phoebe and Dione. New measurements from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) coupled with laboratory measurements of relevant compounds at cryogenic temperatures, are beginning to reveal some of the subtle variations in compounds on these worlds. By comparing spectral observations for each of these moons to the others, inferences may be drawn which help to reveal their varying formation histories. Spectral modeling of Tethys observations, for example, indicates a surface dominated by water ice with only small contributions by other materials such as carbon dioxide or amorphous carbon; yet, requires an unusual mixture of grain sizes ranging from less than ten microns to as much as 2.5 millimeters in diameter. At the other extreme, Phoebe has been shown to exhibit much clearer evidence (cf. Clark et al., 2005) for a host of compounds, including iron-bearing materials, carbon dioxide, nitriles, and organics. Comparison of Cassini VIMS spectra of Phoebe, Dione, and Hyperion indicate many of the same spectral features. Mapping of these spectral features using automated feature extraction algorithms, cryogenic laboratory reflectance measurements, and standard Hapke reflectance models allows insights into the nature and distribution of these materials on the icy Saturnian satellites. In addition, this exercise allows examination of the methods and suggests ways in which the models might be improved. These include improved formulations of phase and scattering functions, as well as laboratory investigations of both pure compounds and mixtures.

  16. Investigating Saturn's Icy Moons using HST/STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Noll, K. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The inner moons of Saturn - Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea - exhibit remarkable large-scale albedo and color variations. These trends can be linked to a combination of the unique exogenic processes occurring the Saturn system, including E-ring grain bombardment and charged particle bombardment. One of the fascinating characteristics of the Saturn system is that the icy satellites, though their surface compositions are dominated by water ice, are spectrally red - they are absorbing in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength region (wavelengths <~550 nm) - a spectral feature not typical of pure water ice. In fact, the existing data show that in the UV, absorptions appear to be present superimposed on the overall red slope. Thus, though Cassini instruments have learned much about the surfaces of the icy moons, a basic question that remains is: What is their surface composition and what are the species or processes that cause these UV absorptions? Cassini's spectral coverage is lacking in precisely the near-UV wavelength regime in which the satellites appear to absorb most strongly. To resolve this issue and determine some understanding of the surface species present, we have obtained data using HST/STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). We have utilized the STIS G230L detector to obtain high SNR spectra in the 180-320 nm region along with short G430L exposures to obtain spectra in the 320-570 nm range, to completely fill in the Cassini gap in spectral coverage. Full-disk measurements have been made of the trailing and leading hemispheres of Mimas, Dione and Rhea; a spectrum of Enceladus was also obtained. We report on the results. In particular, we discuss implications for the presence of ammonia, ozone and organics.

  17. High energy electron processing of icy regoliths on Saturn's moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique space weathering phenomenon has been identified on several icy Saturnian moons. Cassini revealed anomalous lens shaped regions in both optical and thermal wavelengths, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' feature, which are centered on the leading hemispheres and approximately symmetric about the equators. In particular, the Cassini InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) measurements of thermal emission in the mid-IR showed that surface temperature variations during a diurnal cycle were smaller inside the anomalous regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. However, the mechanisms by which thermal conductivity enhancement occur lack quantitative comparison with theoretical and experimental results.Electron interactions with the grains can excite molecules, which, if near enough to an intergrain contact, can cause atoms or molecules to migrate into the contact region, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Sintering improves the thermal contact between grains, leading to increased effective thermal conductivity of the regolith. Equations previously developed to describe material behavior in nuclear reactor were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to describe the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, the unique electron energy distribution measured in the vicinity of each of the moons was used in the calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations of excited electrons in water ice were carried out to determine the length scale for an average electron excitation or ionization event. This length scale determines the distance from the primary reaction at which electrons can still be mobilized to move into the contact region

  18. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  19. Icy Schwedeneck field may provide reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Situated in an icy region of the Baltic Sea, Germany's first offshore field may provide the nation with the reference needed to encroach the arctic market. Production began last winter from one platform in the Schwedeneck-See field, located about three miles off the Baltic Coast. Total reserves have been estimated at more than 18 million bbl. Yearly production by the end of 1986 has been estimated at 294,000 bbl. The first two production platforms were installed in late 1983 in water depths ranging from 50 to 80 ft. Because of the ice hazards inherent in the Baltic, the platforms are concrete designed with steel decks.

  20. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities. PMID:12967273

  1. Discovering New Compounds on Icy Moon Surfaces with Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. L.; Wray, J. J.; Hand, K. P.; Poston, M.; Carlson, R. W.; Clark, R. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Jennings, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Spectroscopy of icy satellite surfaces can aid us in understanding sources and sinks of material in the outer solar system. The spectral complexity of the Saturnian satellite system as seen in reflected sunlight suggests additional complexity may be present at mid-infrared wavelengths from which unique compositional information can be gleaned [1]. Yet to date, Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) surface compositional studies have received little attention. We are investigating the value of mid-infrared spectroscopy for identifying non-H2O constituents of icy moon surfaces. On Iapetus' dark terrain, we find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts [2]. We attribute the 855 cm-1feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths [3]. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Because peaks can shift depending on temperature, pressure, and grain size, measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications [e.g., 4]. We measured the vacuum (P<3x10-8 torr) and low temperature (125 K) mid-infrared spectra of various fine-grained powdered silicates. We find that some of these materials do have emissivity features near 855 cm-1and match the doublet. Identifying a specific silicate would provide clues into the origin and implications of the dark material in the Saturnian system. We also report on our ongoing exploration of the CIRS icy moon dataset and plans for additional future measurements in JPL's Icy Worlds Simulation Lab. [1] Flasar, F. M., et al. (2004), Space Sci Rev, 115, 169. [2] Young, C.L., et al. (in review), ApJ Lett. [3] Christensen, P. R., et al. (2004), Sci, 306, 1733. [4] Wray, J. J., et al. (2014), DPS 46th Meeting, Vol. 46.

  2. Identifying new surface constituents of icy moons using mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2015-11-01

    Spectroscopic compositional studies of the icy satellites can help us to better understand the formation and evolution of material in the outer solar system. The spectral complexity of the Saturnian satellite system as seen in reflected visible light suggests additional complexity may be present at mid-infrared wavelengths from which unique compositional information can be gleaned [1]. In addition, the mid-infrared is the region of the stronger fundamental diagnostic vibrational modes of many compounds. However, Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) surface compositional studies have received little attention to date.We are exploring the suitability of mid-infrared spectroscopy for discovering non-H2O compounds on icy moon surfaces. On the dark terrain of Iapetus, we find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a potential doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts [2]. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths [3]. Although silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, there have been no definitive prior detections. Serpentines measured at ambient conditions have features near 855 cm-1 and 660 cm-1 [4]. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature, pressure, and grain size, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive identifications [e.g., 5].We measured the vacuum, low temperature (125 K) spectra of various fine-grained powdered silicates. We find that some of these materials do have emissivity features near 855 cm-1 and match the doublet. Identifying a specific silicate would provide clues into the sources and sinks of the dark material in the Saturnian system. We report on our ongoing exploration of the CIRS icy moon dataset and plans for future measurements in JPL’s Icy Worlds Simulation Lab.[1] Flasar, F

  3. Porosity and the ecology of icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    The case for a significant role for porosity in the structure and evolution of icy bodies in the Solar System has been difficult to establish. We present a relevant new data set and a series of structure models including a mechanical compression, not thermal creep, model for porosity that accounts satisfactorily for observed densities, moments of inertia, geologic activity, and sizes of tectonic features on icy satellites. Several types of observational data sets have been used to infer significant porosity, but until recently, alternative explanations have been preferred. Our first area of concern is the occurrence of cryovolcanism as a function of satellite radius; simple radiogenic heating models of icy satellites suggest minimum radii for melting and surface cryovolcanism to be 400 to 500 km, yet inferred melt deposits are seen on satellites half that size. One possible explanation is a deep, low conductivity regolith which lowers conductivity and raises internal temperatures, but other possibilities include tidal heating or crustal compositions of low conductivity. Our second area of concern is the occurrence and magnitude of tectonic strain; tectonic structures have been seen on icy satellites as small as Mimas and Proteus. The structures are almost exclusively extensional, with only a few possible compression Al features, and inferred global strains are on the order of 1 percent expansion. Expansions of this order in small bodies like Mimas and prevention of late compressional tectonics due to formation of ice mantles in larger bodies like Rhea are attained only in structure models including low-conductivity, and thus possibly high porosity, crusts. Thirdly, inferred moments of inertia less than 0.4 in Mimas and Tethys can be explained by high-porosity crusts, but also by differentiation of a high density core. Finally, the relatively low densities of smaller satellites like Mimas and Miranda relative to larger neighbors can be explained by deep porosity

  4. Shock synthesis of amino acids from impacting cometary and icy planet surface analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita; Price, Mark C.; Goldman, Nir; Sephton, Mark A.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Comets are known to harbour simple ices and the organic precursors of the building blocks of proteins--amino acids--that are essential to life. Indeed, glycine, the simplest amino acid, was recently confirmed to be present on comet 81P/Wild-2 from samples returned by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Impacts of icy bodies (such as comets) onto rocky surfaces, and, equally, impacts of rocky bodies onto icy surfaces (such as the jovian and saturnian satellites), could have been responsible for the manufacture of these complex organic molecules through a process of shock synthesis. Here we present laboratory experiments in which we shocked ice mixtures analogous to those found in a comet with a steel projectile fired at high velocities in a light gas gun to test whether amino acids could be produced. We found that the hypervelocity impact shock of a typical comet ice mixture produced several amino acids after hydrolysis. These include equal amounts of D- and L-alanine, and the non-protein amino acids α-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline as well as their precursors. Our findings suggest a pathway for the synthetic production of the components of proteins within our Solar System, and thus a potential pathway towards life through icy impacts.

  5. Radiation Induced Chemistry of Icy Surfaces: Laboratory Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Lignell, Antti; Li, Irene; Yang, Rui; Jacovi, Ronen

    2011-01-01

    We will discuss laboratory experiments designed to enhance our understanding the chemical processes on icy solar system bodies, enable interpretation of in-situ and remote-sensing data, and help future missions to icy solar system bodies, such as comets, Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus etc.

  6. Semi-brittle behavior of a multi-phase crust and its influence on the tectonics of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.

    2010-05-01

    Our ability to observe and interpret reasonably the tectonics of icy satellites hinges on our understanding of the viscoelastic and plastic rheologies and microstructural evolution of the material comprising their icy outer shells. The morphological diversity observed on the surfaces of the satellites may be due in part to the rheological influence of the various cryominerals that are present in addition to water ice on many of these icy bodies. Our experimental investigation explores the affects of secondary minerals on the phase behavior and physical properties (both plastic and anelastic) of ice at conditions approaching those of the icy satellites. Using uniaxial compression creep experiments (T = 230-250K; P = 0.1 and 50 MPa), we characterize the transient and steady-state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates (made via crystallization of liquid solution) of ice-I and MgSO4•11H2O ("MS11"; meridianiite) and compare them to the deformation behaviors of pure polycrystalline ice-I tested at the same conditions on the same apparatus. The ice/hydrate aggregates display a higher sensitivity to stress than does pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. One significant role that the second phase plays in ductile deformation is to pin grain growth, keeping grain sizes small and deformation within the grain/colony size sensitive creep regime. The mechanical and microstructural observations from this study indicate that the hydrate phase, which is distinctly stronger than pure ice, additionally offers a framework of support that resists ductile deformation at low stresses; the aggregates display at least an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity than do samples of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions up to 6MPa. At higher stresses, however, the hydrate phase promotes semi-brittle flow and cavitation, both of which are forms of strain weakening. Semi-brittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would decrease the depth to the brittle

  7. Saturn's icy satellites - Thermal and structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, K.; Schubert, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal history models which assume formation as homogeneous ice-silicate mixtures are constructed for the small, icy Saturnian satellites Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus, including the effects of radiogenic and accretional heating, conductive and subsolidus convective heat transfer, and lithosphgeric growth. Accretional heating is not likely to have melted the water ice in the interiors of these bodies, and solid state creep of the ice-dominated material precludes melting by radiogenic heating. The four largest satellites are sufficiently large and rich in heat-producing silicates to possess a solid state convection system beneath a rigid lithosphere, irrespective of initial conditions. The model thermal histories are qualitatively consistent with the present appearances of these satellites.

  8. Processing of icy mantles in protostellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Gerakines, P. A.; Whittet, D. C.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G.; Adamson, A. J.; Boogert, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained CO absorption profiles of several young stellar objects (YSOs), spanning a range of mass and luminosity, in order to investigate their ice mantle composition. We present the first detection of CO toward the class I YSO L1489 IRS in the Taurus dark cloud. In general, the CO profiles for YSOs show evidence for both processed and pristine ices in the same line of sight, strong indirect evidence for CO, is suggested in R CrA IRS 7, L1489 IRS, Elias 18, and GL 961E. Toward other sources (R CrA IRS 1, IRS 2, W33A, NGC 7538 IRS 9, Mon R2 IRS 2) CO is present in (nearly) pure form. We propose an evolutionary scenario to explain the chemical diversity of the icy mantles toward these objects.

  9. The Fatigue of Water Ice: Insight into the Tectonic Resurfacing of Tidally Deformed Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, N. P.; Barr, A. C.; Hirth, G.; Cooper, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Fatigue is a process that causes materials to weaken during cyclic loading and experience brittle failure at much lower applied stresses. We perform laboratory experiments to study the fatigue behavior of water ice at conditions relevant to the surfaces of icy satellites, to test the hypothesis that the lithospheres of some icy satellites are weakened by fatigue. Many icy moons of the outer solar system, such as Europa and Enceladus, experience cyclic stresses driven by tidal forces from their parent planet. Stresses generated by tides and other physical processes, such as solid-state convection of the ice shell, are weak compared to laboratory derived yield stress values of ice. The surface geology on many icy moons, however, suggests that these processes are capable of deforming the surface, suggesting that their surfaces may have been weakened. During fatigue, microcracks slowly grow under the action of cyclic loads. Cracks grow until the stress intensity reaches a critical value and the sample fractures. The rate of microcrack growth varies with material, temperature, and loading frequency, but under most conditions the growth rate can be characterized by Paris' Law. We use a servo-hydraulic loading machine to perform cyclic 4-point bending tests on polycrystalline ice samples to measure the rate of fatigue crack growth. Ice samples are formed using the standard ice method in a sample mold with dimensions of 10x4x2 cm with an average grain size of 1.2 mm. An initial flaw is cut into the sample and loaded such that the flaw experiences the maximum tensile stress in the sample. Our initial experiments were performed at T=223 K, loading frequencies of 0.5 Hz, and stress intensities ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 of the plane-strain fracture toughness. Sample compliance is used to estimate crack length according to analytical solutions [1]. Experiments show an increase in compliance with time, consistent with substantial subcritical crack growth. Future experiments will

  10. The Icy Cold Heart of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2015-11-01

    The locations of large deposits of frozen volatiles on planetary surfaces are largely coincident with areas receiving the minimum annual influx of solar energy; familiar examples include the polar caps of Earth and Mars. For planets tilted by more than 45 degrees, however, the poles actually receive more energy than some other latitudes. Pluto, with its current obliquity of 119 degrees, has minima in its average annual insolation at +/- 27 degrees latitude, with ~1.5% more energy flux going to the equator and ~15% more to the poles. Remarkably, the fraction of annual solar energy incident on different latitudes depends only on the obliquity of the planet and not on any of its orbital parameters.Over millions of years, Pluto's obliquity varies sinusoidally from 102-126 degrees, significantly affecting the latitudinal profile of solar energy deposition. Roughly 1Myr ago, the poles received 15% more energy that today while the equator received 13% less. The energy flux to latitudes between 25-35 degrees is far more stable, remaining low over the presumably billions of years since Pluto acquired its current spin properties. Like the poles at Earth, these mid latitudes on Pluto should be favored for the long-term deposition of volatile ices. This is, indeed, the location of the bright icy heart of Pluto, Sputnik Planum.Reflected light and emitted thermal radiation from Charon increases annual insolation to one side of Pluto by of order 0.02%. Although small, the bulk of the energy is delivered at night to Pluto's cold equatorial regions. Furthermore, Charon's thermal infrared radiation is easily absorbed by icy deposits on Pluto, slowing deposition and facilitating sublimation of volatiles. We argue that the slight but persistent preference for ices to form and survive in the anti-Charon Pluto's heart.

  11. Low Force Penetration of Icy Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, J. G.; Galloway, G. M.; Zacny, K.

    2016-01-01

    A percussive cone penetrometer measures the strength of granular material by using percussion to deliver mechanical energy into the material. A percussive cone penetrometer was used in this study to penetrate a regolith ice mixture by breaking up ice and decompacting the regolith. As compared to a static cone penetrometer, percussion allows low reaction forces to push a penetrometer probe tip more easily into dry regolith in a low gravity environment from a planetary surface rover or a landed spacecraft. A percussive cone penetrates icy regolith at ice concentrations that a static cone cannot penetrate. In this study, the percussive penetrator was able to penetrate material under 65 N of down-force which could not be penetrated using a static cone under full body weight. This paper discusses using a percussive cone penetrometer to discern changes in the concentration of water-ice in a mixture of lunar regolith simulant and ice to a depth of one meter. The rate of penetration was found to be a function of the ice content and was not significantly affected by the down-force. The test results demonstrate that this method may be ideal for a small platform in a reduced gravity environment. However, there are some cases where the system may not be able to penetrate the icy regolith, and there is some risk of the probe tip becoming stuck so that it cannot be retracted. It is also shown that a percussive cone penetrometer could be used to prospect for water ice in regolith at concentrations as high as 8 by weight.

  12. Heliosheath Space Environment Interactions with Icy Bodies in the Outermost Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matthew E.; Richardson, John D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are exploring the space environment of the outermost solar system at the same time that earth-based astronomy continues to discover new icy bodies, one larger than Pluto, in the transitional region outward from the Classical Kuiper Belt to the Inner Oort Cloud. Some of the Scattered Disk Objects in this region periodically pass through the heliosheath, entered by Voyager 1 in Dec. 2004 and later expected to be reached by Voyager 2, and out even beyond the heliopause into the Very Local Interstellar Medium. The less energetic heliosheath ions, important for implantation and sputtering processes, are abundant near and beyond the termination shock inner boundary, but the source region of the more penetrating anomalous cosmic ray component has not yet been found. Advantageous for modeling of icy body interactions, the measured heliosheath flux spectra are relatively more stable within this new regime of isotropic compressional magnetic turbulence than in the upstream heliospheric environment. The deepest interactions and resultant radiation-induced chemistry arise from the inwardly diffusing component of the galactic cosmic ray ions with significant intensity modulation also arising in the heliosheath beyond Voyager 1. Surface gardening by high-velocity impacts of smaller bodies (e.g., fragments of previous KBO collisions) and dust is a further space weathering process setting the time scales for long term exposure of different regolith layers to the ion irradiation. Sputtering and ionization of impact ejecta grains may provide a substantial feedback of pickup ions for multiple cycles of heliosheath acceleration and icy body interaction. Thus the space weathering interactions are potentially of interest not only for effects on sensible surface composition of the icy bodies but also for evolution of the heliosheath plasma energetic ion, and neutral emission environment.

  13. Flow and fracture of ices, with application to icy satellites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, W. B.; Stern, L. A.; Pathare, A.; Golding, N.

    2013-12-01

    Exploration of the outer planets and their satellites by spacecraft over the past 4 decades has revealed that the prevailing low temperatures in the outer solar system have not produced "dead" cryoworlds of generic appearance. Rather, there is an extraordinary diversity in average densities, presence/absence and compositions of atmospheres and planetary rings, average albedos and their seasonal changes, near-surface compositions, and surface records of impact cratering and endogenic tectonic and igneous processes. One reason for this diversity is that the icy minerals present in abundance on many of these worlds are now or once were at significant fractions of their melting temperatures. Hence, a host of thermally activated processes related to endogenic activity (such as crystal defect migration, mass diffusion, surface transport, solid-solid changes of state, and partial melting) may occur that can enable inelastic flow on the surfaces and in the interiors of these bodies. Planetary manifestations include viscous crater relaxation in ice-rich terrain, cryovolcanism, the presence of a stable subsurface ocean, and the effects of solid-ice convection in deep interiors. We make the connection between theoretical mechanisms of deformation and planetary geology through laboratory experiment. Specifically, we develop quantitative constitutive flow laws (strain rate vs. stress) that describe the effects of relevant environmental variables (hydrostatic pressure, temperature, phase composition, chemical impurities). Our findings speak to topics including (1) the behavior of an outer ice I layer, its thickness, the depth to which a stagnant lid might extend, and possibility of wholesale overturn; (2) softening effects of dissolved species such as ammonia and perchlorate; (3) hardening effects of enclathration and of rock dust; and (4) effects of grain size on strength and factors affecting grain size. Other applications of lab data include dynamics of the deep interiors of

  14. Surface Composition of the Non-Ice Component on Icy Satellites and Ring Particles in the Saturn System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. N.; Pearson, N.; Perlman, Z. S.; Bradley, E. T.; Hendrix, A.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filacchione, G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Nelson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's icy satellites and ring particle surfaces have long been known to be composed mostly of frozen water. However, all surfaces show an absorption due to a non-water-ice component whose identity has not been well understood. In the near infrared, water ice has strong absorptions which limit detectability of other trace components. Similarly, at wavelengths less than about 0.18 microns, water is very absorbing. However, in the ~0.2 to ~1 micron range, water ice has low absorption and trace components are readily detected. Classical interpretations of the UV absorber and dark material on outer Solar System satellites have been varying amounts of tholins and carbon. However, tholins have spectral structure not seen in the icy spectra in the Saturn System. Many silicates also have UV spectral structure that reject them from contributing significantly to the observed spectral signatures. We have constructed a new UV spectrometer and a new environment chamber for studying the spectral properties of materials from 0.1 to 15 microns. In our survey of the spectral properties of materials so far, we find that small amounts of metallic iron and iron oxides in the icy surfaces are compatible with and can explain the UV, visible and near-infrared spectra of icy surfaces in the Saturn system (0.12 to 5.1 microns) using data from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The wide range of observed UV-NIR (0.1-5 micron) spectral signatures provide strong constraints on composition and grain size distribution, including grain sizes of the ice. Spectra of the Saturnian rings and icy satellites indicate they have a large range of ice grain sizes, from tens of microns to sub-micron. Sub-micron ice grains create unusual spectral properties, which are seen in the spectra of the rings and satellites of Saturn and on satellites further out in the Solar System. Clark et al. (2012, Icarus v218, p831) showed that VIMS

  15. Cratering at the Icy Satellites: Experimental Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck Syal, M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    Impact cratering processes play a central role in shaping the evolution of icy satellites and in guiding interpretations of various geologic features at these bodies. Accurate reconstruction of icy satellite histories depends in large part upon observed impact crater size-frequency distributions. Determining the extent of impact-induced thermal processing and the retention rates for impact-delivered materials of interest, e.g. organics, at these outer solar system moons is of fundamental importance for assessing their habitability and explaining differing geophysical histories. Hence, knowledge of how the impact process operates in ices or ice-rich materials is critically important. Recent progress in the development of water equations of state, coupled with increasingly efficient 3-D hydrocode calculations, has been used to construct careful numerical studies of melt and vapor generation for water ice targets. Complementary to this approach is experimental work to constrain the effects of differing ice target conditions, including porosity, rock mass fraction, and impact angle. Here we report on results from hypervelocity impact experiments (v~5.5 km/s) into water ice targets, performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). The setup at the AVGR allows for the use of particulate targets, which is useful for examining the effects of target porosity. Photometry and geophysical modeling both suggest that regolith porosity at the icy satellites is significant. We use a combination of half-space and quarter-space geometries, enabling analysis of the impact-generated vapor plume (half-space geometry), along with shock wave and transient crater growth tracking in a cross-sectional view (quarter-space geometry). Evaluating the impact-generated vapor from porous (φ = 0.5) and non-porous water ice targets provides an extension to previously published vapor production results for dolomite and CO2 ice targets. For the case of a 90 degree impact into porous ice, we

  16. Low Force Icy Regolith Penetration Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, P. T.; Galloway, G. M.; Mantovani, J. G.; Zacny, K.; Zacny, Kris; Craft, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Recent data from the Moon, including LCROSS data, indicate large quantities of water ice and other volatiles frozen into the soil in the permanently shadowed craters near the poles. If verified and exploited, these volatiles will revolutionize spaceflight as an inexpensive source of propellants and other consumables outside Earth's gravity well. This report discusses a preliminary investigation of a method to insert a sensor through such a soiVice mixture to verify the presence, nature, and concentration of the ice. It uses percussion to deliver mechanical energy into the frozen mixture, breaking up the ice and decompacting the soil so that only low reaction forces are required from a rover or spacecraft to push the sensor downward. The tests demonstrate that this method may be ideal for a small platform in lunar gravity. However, there are some cases where the system may not be able to penetrate the icy soil, and there is some risk ofthe sensor becoming stuck so that it cannot be retracted, so further work is needed. A companion project (ISDS for Water Detection on the Lunar Surface) has performed preliminary investigation of a dielectric/thermal sensor for use with this system.

  17. Convection-Driven Resurfacing on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy

    2015-04-01

    Ridge and trough terrain, characterized by kilometer-scale sub-parallel ridges and troughs, is found in a variety of settings on the icy satellites of the solar system. Examples include Ganymede's grooved terrain [1], Europa's bands [2,3], Miranda's coronae [4,5], and swaths of ridges and troughs in the northern plains of Enceladus [6]. The fault spacing implies a shallow brittle/ductile depth and thus, a high thermal gradient at the time of formation [e.g., 7]. I will show that similar rheological parameters can give rise to the heat flows and deformation rates inferred for the formation of many examples of ridge and trough terrain. These results suggest that convection in ice mantles with weak surfaces can explain the formation of these terrains, just as convection in Earth's mantle, beneath a weakened crust, can drive surface deformation. References: [1] Pappalardo, R. T. et al., 2004. in Jupiter, Cambridge Univ. Press, pp.363. [2] Prockter, L. M. et al., 2002. JGR 107, 5028. [3] Stempel, M. M. et al., 2005. Icarus 177, 297. [4] Pappalardo, R. T. et al., 1997. JGR 102, 13369. [5] Hammond, N. P. and A. C. Barr, 2014. Geology 42, 931-934. [6] Bland, M. et al., 2007. Icarus 192, 92. [7] Nimmo, F. et al., 2002. GRL 29 62-1.

  18. Integrating Astrobiology Research for Exploration of Icy Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanik, I.; Russell, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this abstract is to facilitate transdisciplinary collaborations across the astrobiology community, with other science communities not currently engaged in astrobiology research in exploration of icy bodies.

  19. ICI optical data storage tape: An archival mass storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruddick, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    At the 1991 Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, ICI Imagedata presented a paper which introduced ICI Optical Data Storage Tape. This paper placed specific emphasis on the media characteristics and initial data was presented which illustrated the archival stability of the media. More exhaustive analysis that was carried out on the chemical stability of the media is covered. Equally important, it also addresses archive management issues associated with, for example, the benefits of reduced rewind requirements to accommodate tape relaxation effects that result from careful tribology control in ICI Optical Tape media. ICI Optical Tape media was designed to meet the most demanding requirements of archival mass storage. It is envisaged that the volumetric data capacity, long term stability and low maintenance characteristics demonstrated will have major benefits in increasing reliability and reducing the costs associated with archival storage of large data volumes.

  20. Towards Coupled Modelling of Accretion and Water-Rock Differentiation of Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir Otto; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    The early Solar system produced a variety of bodies with different properties. Among the small bodies, objects that contain notable amounts of water ice (Ceres, icy satellites) are of particular interest. Water-rock separation on such worlds is probable and has been confirmed in some cases. Heating by 26Al and 60Fe suffices to produce liquid water (T>273 K) even in km-sized seeds during the early accretion of icy worlds.Assuming accretion of ice and dust, the rheology is dominated by one of the two components, depending on their proportions. Two differentiation regimes arise: (a) Upon melting of an icy matrix, the dust grains settle via Stokes flow; (b) Upon melting of ice in a rocky matrix, water ascends through the matrix via Darcy flow. Prior to ice melting, porosity is reduced by creep of ice. However, there are leftover pores filled with gas. For (a) the differentiation scheme is not affected. For (b) ice melting increases the porosity of the matrix. Only a part of the void space will be filled with water. Water will percolate if the matrix (1) deforms sufficiently to close the pores filled with gas and (2) deforms further to squeeze the water out of the matrix. Temperatures of up to 700 K are needed for this. Thus, water will first migrate downwards filling the pores, vacated previously by gas. After that, it will either remain in suspension until the matrix deforms and then percolate, or will vaporise first and then fill the pores with the vapour. Subsequent matrix deformation will mobilise the vapour. On its way to the surface water will form in the cooler layers.The differentiation starts during the accretion. At the end of the accretion, a pre-differentiated structure around the centre is possible, leading to a reallocation of the heat sources and changing the temperature profile. The evolution path varies with the growth rate assumed.We couple porosity loss and water-rock differentiation of an accreting icy object in an adaptive-grid 1D numerical model

  1. Analog earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  2. Radical formation in the coma from photodissociation of ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Long ago visual observations of comets suggested that there are jets in comets but it has only been recently that A'Hearn et al. have proven that some of these jets are due to emission from the CN radical. Recent studies in the lab have shown that CN radicals can be ejected directly into the gas phase from the photolysis of frozen vapors if the parent molecular has been excited to repulsive excited state. This later observation suggests that the jets that have been observed may be due to photodissociation of icy grains in the coma. A theory of radical formation from icy grains is presented. It is shown that direct formation of free radicals in the coma is an effective way to produce radicals from icy grains in the coma. The model predicts that icy grains could produce from 6 to 800,000 OH radicals/s per grain depending upon whether the radius of the grain is 0.3 to 100 micron.

  3. Radiolysis: Icy Satellite Atmospheres and Surface Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Carlson, R. W.; Leblanc, F.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2001-11-01

    The jovian trapped particle radiation chemically alters the Galilean satellite surfaces, a process referred to as radiolysis. This leads to the chemical alteration and decomposition of the surface materials and the production of volatiles (Johnson 2001). Radiolysis likely accounts for the darkening of the polar regions of Io (Johnson 1997), the O2 (Calvin et al 1996), peroxide (Carlson et al 1999a) and, possibly, O3 (Noll et al 1996) in icy satellite surfaces, the radiolytic sulfur cycle on Europa (Carlson et al 1999b), the production of O2 (Hall et al. 1995) and alkali atmospheres (Brown and Hill, 1996) and, possibly, the production of the CO2 atmosphere at Callisto (Carlson 1999). Results for the radiolytic processing of likely surface materials will be used to create atmospheric models and to describe surface aging. Emphasis will be on Europa's surface and atmosphere. Brown, M.E. and R.E. Hill Nature 380,229(1996) Calvin, W., et al. GRL 23, 673(1996) Carlson, R.W., Science 283,820(1999) Carlson, R.W. et al., Science 286, 97(1999a) Carlson, R.W., et al. Science 283, 2062(1999b Hall, D.T. et al. Nature 373, 677(1995) Johnson, R.E., Icarus 128, 469 (1997) 469- 471. Johnson, R.E., et al., GRL 25, 3257(1998) Johnson, R.E., In,Chemical Dynamics in Extreme Environments (R.Dessler,Ed)390 (2001) Noll, K.S. et al., Science 273, 607(1996)

  4. The Cold and Icy Heart of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The locations of large deposits of frozen volatiles on planetary surfaces are largely coincident with areas receiving the minimum annual influx of solar energy. Thus we have the familiar polar caps of Earth and Mars, but cold equatorial regions for planets with obliquities between 54 and 126 degrees. Furthermore, for tilts between 45-66 degrees and 114-135 degrees the minimum incident energy occurs neither at the pole nor the equator. We find that the annual average insolation is always symmetric about Pluto's equator and is fully independent of the relative locations of the planet's pericenter and equinoxes. Remarkably, this symmetry holds for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and obliquities, and so we provide a short proof in the margin of this abstract. The current obliquity of Pluto is 119 degrees, giving it minima in average annual insolation at +/- 27 degrees latitude, with ~1.5% more flux to the equator and ~15% more to the poles. But the obliquity of Pluto also varies sinusoidally from 102-126 degrees and so, over the past million years, Pluto's annual equatorial and polar fluxes have changed by +15% and -13%, respectively. Interestingly, the energy flux received by latitudes between 25-35 degrees remains nearly constant over the presumably billions of years since Pluto acquired its current orbit and spin properties. Thus these latitudes are continuously cold and should be favored for the long-term deposition of volatile ices; the bright heart of Pluto, Sputnik Planum, extends not coincidentally across these latitudes. Reflected light and emitted thermal radiation from Charon increases annual insolation to one side of Pluto by of order 0.02%. Although small, the bulk of the energy is delivered at night to Pluto's cold equatorial regions. Furthermore, Charon's thermal IR is delivered very efficiently to icy deposits. Over billions of years, ices have preferentially formed and survived in the anti-Charon hemisphere.

  5. The Cold and Icy Heart of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The locations of large deposits of frozen volatiles on planetary surfaces are largely coincident with areas receiving the minimum annual influx of solar energy. Thus we have the familiar polar caps of Earth and Mars, but cold equatorial regions for planets with obliquities between 54 and 126 degrees. Furthermore, for tilts between 45-66 degrees and 114-135 degrees the minimum incident energy occurs neither at the pole nor the equator. We find that the annual average insolation is always symmetric about Pluto's equator and is fully independent of the relative locations of the planet's pericenter and equinoxes. Remarkably, this symmetry holds for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and obliquities, and so we provide a short proof in the margin of this abstract. The current obliquity of Pluto is 119 degrees, giving it minima in average annual insolation at /- 27 degrees latitude, with ~1.5% more flux to the equator and ~15% more to the poles. But the obliquity of Pluto also varies sinusoidally from 102-126 degrees and so, over the past million years, Pluto's annual equatorial and polar fluxes have changed by 15% and -13%, respectively. Interestingly, the energy flux received by latitudes between 25-35 degrees remains nearly constant over the presumably billions of years since Pluto acquired its current orbit and spin properties. Thus these latitudes are continuously cold and should be favored for the long-term deposition of volatile ices; the bright heart of Pluto, Sputnik Planum, extends not coincidentally across these latitudes. Reflected light and emitted thermal radiation from Charon increases annual insolation to one side of Pluto by of order 0.02%. Although small, the bulk of the energy is delivered at night to Pluto's cold equatorial regions. Furthermore, Charon's thermal IR is delivered very efficiently to icy deposits. Over billions of years, ices have preferentially formed and survived in the anti-Charon hemisphere.

  6. Geologic Landforms and Processes on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    1998-01-01

    During the first reconaissence of the satellites of the outer solar system conducted by the Voyager missions (1979-1989), a surprising diversity of unusual geologic landforms were observed, in some cases with bewildering complexity (e.g., Triton). Impact features were certainly expected but the variety of volcanic, diapiric, tectonic, impact, and erosional landforms was only remotely suggested by some early theoretical works. These diagnostic features are manifestations of the internal composition, thermal history, and dynamical evolution of these bodies. It is the job of the geologist to interpret the morphology, stratigraphy, and composition of these deposits and structures to ascertain what materials were mobilized in the interior, in what amount, and the mechanism and cause of their mobilization. In this chapter, we review what is know about these features and what constraints can be placed on composition and thermal history. Particular emphasis is placed on volcanic features, as these are most directly related to satellite composition and thermal history. The surface spectra, high albedos, and low bulk densities of the satellites of the outer solar system indicate that water and other ices are abundant on these bodies, particularly on their surfaces. Ices, particularly water ice, are less dense than silicates and will tend to float and form crusts during differentiation or partial melting of the interior. Ices therefore take the place of silicates as 'crust-forming' minerals and dominate geologic processes on icy satellites. Melted ices form magma bodies, and sometimes are extruded as lavas, an unusual but still valid perspective for terrestrial geologists. The unusual properties of some ices, including their low melting temperatures, and low strengths (as well as the decrease in density on the freezing of water ice), will ultimately be very important in interpreting this record.

  7. Geologic Evolution of Saturn's Icy Moon Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Stephan, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Neukum, G.; Porco, C. C.

    2013-10-01

    Tethys, 1072 km in diameter, is a mid-sized icy moon of Saturn imaged for the first time in two Voyager flybys [1][2][3]. Since July 2004, its surface has been imaged by the Cassini ISS cameras at resolutions between 200 and 500 m/pxl. We present results from our ongoing work to define and map geologic units in camera images obtained preferentially during Cassini’s Equinox and Solstice mission phases. In the majority of Tethys’ surface area a densely cratered plains unit [1][2][3][this work] is abundant. The prominent graben system of Ithaca Chasma is mapped as fractured cratered plains. Impact crater and basin materials can be subdivided into three degradational classes. Odysseus is a fresh large impact basin younger than Ithaca Chasma according to crater counts [4]. Heavily degraded craters and basins occur in the densely cratered plains unit. A smooth, less densely cratered plains unit in the trailing hemisphere was previously identified by [2] but mapping of its boundaries is difficult due to varying viewing geometries of ISS images. To the south of Odysseus, we identified a cratered plains unit not seen in Voyager data, characterized by remnants of highly degraded large craters superimposed by younger fresher craters with a lower crater density compared to the densely cratered plains unit. Its distinct linear northern contact with the densely cratered plains suggests a tectonic origin. Sets of minor fractures can be distinguished in the densely cratered plains, and locally, features of mass wasting can be observed. References: [1] Smith B. A. et al. (1981), Science 212, 163-191. [2] Smith B. A. et al. (1982), Science 215, 504-537. [3] Moore J. M. and Ahern J. L. (1983), JGR 88 (suppl.), A577-A584. [4] Giese B. et al. (2007), GRL 34, doi:10.1029/2007GL031467.

  8. Phoebe and the Icy Saturnian Satellites: Implications for Satellite Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2004-11-01

    Phoebe's retrograde, eccentric and inclined orbit marks it as an object captured from heliocentric orbit. Accordingly, its composition may be indicative of its origin in the solar nebula. Analogous arguments have been made extensively in connection with the origin of Pluto-Charon (see, e.g., McKinnon et al. 1997) as well as Triton (McKinnon and Mueller 1989). Indeed, the demarcation between nebula and subnebula objects has led a number of workers (see, e.g., Johnson et al. 1987; Lunine et al. 1993; Podolak et al. 1993) to argue that the regular satellites of the giant planets did not derive the bulk of their material directly from heliocentric orbit. The recent Cassini flyby of Phoebe has yielded a mass for this object of GM = 0.5527 ± 0.001 km3/s2 Jacobson et al. 2004 (this conference). Its density of 1.6 g/cm3 indicates a rock to ice ratio of at least 50 % (Porco et al. 2004; Science, to be submitted). Phoebe's high rock/ice ratio when compared to the icy Saturnian satellites reinforces the argument that Phoebe is an object that formed in heliocentric orbit and became captured. Yet, given that it may be misleading to lump together satellites with quite different formation histories, we refine the comparison on the basis of models for regular satellite formation. Because it derives condensables directly from heliocentric orbit and fails to consider planetesimals, the model of Canup and Ward (2002) does not provide a context for understanding such compositional differences. We will therefore discuss two models of satellite formation we are developing, which differ mainly in their treatment of turbulence (decaying vs steady). In both models the inner (located inside Titan's orbit), icy Saturnian satellites represent a second generation of objects. Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a,b) has these satellites forming 104-10^5 years after Titan as the disk became optically thin and water rich due to preferential gas drag loss of silicates as Saturn cooled. On the other hand

  9. Phoebe and the Icy Saturnian Satellites: Implications for Satellite Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Phoebe's retrograde, eccentric and inclined orbit marks it as an object captured from heliocentric orbit. Accordingly, its composition may be indicative of its origin in the solar nebula. Analogous arguments have been made extensively in connection with the origin of Pluto-Charon (see, e.g., McKinnon et al. 1997) as well as Triton (McKinnon and Mueller 1989). Indeed, the demarcation between nebula and subnebula objects has led a number of workers (see, e.g., Johnson et al. 1987; Lunine et al. 1993; Podolak et al. 1993) to argue that the regular satellites of the giant planets did not derive the bulk of their material directly from heliocentric orbit. The recent Cassini flyby of Phoebe has yielded a mass for this object of GM = 0.5527 ± 0.001 km3/s2 Jacobson et al. 2004. Its density of 1.6 g/cm3 indicates a rock to ice ratio of at least 50 % (Porco et al. 2004; Science, to be submitted). Phoebe's high rock/ice ratio when compared to the icy Saturnian satellites reinforces the argument that Phoebe is an object that formed in heliocentric orbit and became captured. Yet, given that it may be misleading to lump together satellites with quite different formation histories, we refine the comparison on the basis of models for regular satellite formation. Because it derives condensables directly from heliocentric orbit and fails to consider planetesimals, the model of Canup and Ward (2002) does not provide a context for understanding such compositional differences. We will therefore discuss two models of satellite formation we are developing, which differ mainly in their treatment of turbulence (decaying vs steady). In both models the inner (located inside Titan's orbit), icy Saturnian satellites represent a second generation of objects. Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a,b) has these satellites forming 104-10^5 years after Titan as the disk became optically thin and water rich due to preferential gas drag loss of silicates as Saturn cooled. On the other hand, the gas

  10. Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify New Compounds on Icy Moon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Young, Cindy L.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2014-11-01

    We are exploring the value of mid-infrared spectroscopy for identifying non-H2O constituents of icy moon surfaces. Recently we reported evidence for a new emissivity feature identified on Iapetus using Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer [1]. This 11.7 μm feature is consistent with emissivity minima (transparency features) of very fine-grained silicates. Its position and shape may be diagnostic of silicate type, but most lab data at these wavelengths have been acquired using coarser grains and/or at Earth surface pressures and temperatures. Infrared spectra can change substantially under low-temperature, vacuum conditions [e.g., 2,3].We prepared sieved (<0.4 mm) and very fine-grained (few μm) powders of six different silicates and measured their VNIR (0.35-2.5 μm) reflectance spectra under ambient air, and mid-IR (1.2-20 μm) spectra in a purged N2 glovebox. All silicates exhibited mid-IR transparency features (and loss of other features) in micronized form that were not observed for the coarser grain sizes. Muscovite, a phyllosilicate mineral possibly similar to those tentatively identified on Europa [4], provided the closest match to Iapetus in the mid-IR--although clear VNIR features of muscovite have not been identified on Iapetus [5]--and therefore we measured muscovite across the same wavelength range under Iapetus-like conditions (T=125 K, P<3x10^-8 torr). We will report on our ongoing analysis and plans for additional future measurements in JPL’s Icy Worlds Simulation Lab. [1] Young, C.L., et al. (2014), Workshop on the Habitability of Icy Worlds, Abstract #4038.[2] Logan, L.M., et al. (1973), J. Geophys. Res., 78(23), 4983-5003.[3] Donaldson Hanna, K.L., et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00H05.[4] Shirley, J.H., et al. (2013), AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract #P54A-07.[5] Clark, R.N., et al. (2012), Icarus, 218, 831-860.

  11. Triptycene analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy (Inventor); Perchellet, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention provides analogs of triptycene which are useful as anticancer drugs, as well as for other uses. The potency of these compounds is in a similar magnitude as daunomycin, a currently used anticancer drug. Each compound of the invention produces one or more desired effects (blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting nucleic acid or protein syntheses, decreasing the proliferation and viability of cancer cells, inducing DNA fragmentation or retaining their effectiveness against multidrug-resistant tumor cells).

  12. Throughput Performance of MC-CDMA HARQ Using ICI Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kaoru; Nakajima, Akinori; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Multi-carrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) is a promising wireless access technique for the next generation mobile communications systems, in which broadband packet data services will dominate. Hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) is an indispensable error control technique for high quality packet data transmission. The HARQ throughput performance of multi-code MC-CDMA degrades due to the presence of residual inter-code interference (ICI) after frequency-domain equalization (FDE). To reduce the residual ICI and improve the throughput performance, a frequency-domain soft interference cancellation (FDSIC) technique can be applied. An important issue is the generation of accurate residual ICI replica for FDSIC. In this paper, low-density parity-check coded (LDPC-coded) MC-CDMA HARQ is considered. We generate the residual ICI replica from a-posteriori log-likelihood ratio (LLR) of LDPC decoder output and evaluate, by computer simulation, the throughput performance in a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel. We show that if the residual ICI is removed, MC-CDMA can provide a throughput performance superior to orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM).

  13. Constraints on the nanoscale minerals on the surface of Saturnian icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Hsu, H.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-phase iron particles embedded into the surfaces of Saturn's icy moons as well as in the ring material have been proposed to explain the infrared spectra obtained by Cassini VIMS. Because the continuous influx of interplanetary fast impactors into the Saturnian system erodes any exposed surface, a certain amount of the embedded nano-particles will be ejected into the Saturnian magnetosphere and speed up to velocities high enough to be detected by the Cassini dust detector CDA. Thus, the analysis of the so-called stream particles provides constraints on the amount and the composition of any nano-phase material within the surfaces of the icy moons. Nanoparticles registered by the Cassini dust detector are most likely composed of silica (SiO2). Their dynamical properties indicate that they are relics of E ring dust grains. In this talk we will show that the Cassini stream particle measurements provide strong constraints for the composition and size distribution of any embedded nano-material.

  14. NASA Mars 2007 Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm and Icy Soil Acquisition Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Robert G.; Shiraishi, Lori; Robinson, Matthew; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Chu, P. C.; Wilson, J. J.; Davis, K. R.; Paulsen, G.; Kusack, A. G.; Archer, Doug; Smith, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars 2007 Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm (RA) and associated Icy Soil Acquisition Device (ISAD) is to acquire samples of Martian dry and icy soil (DIS) by digging, scraping, and rasping, and delivering them to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer and the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer. The RA will also position (1) the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) in the DIS; (2) the TECP at various heights above the surface for relative humidity measurements, and (3) the Robotic Arm Camera to take images of the surface, trench, DIS samples within the ISAD scoop, magnetic targets, and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace. The RA/ISAD will also be used to generate DIS piles for monitoring; conduct DIS scraping, penetration, rasping, and chopping experiments; perform compaction tests; and conduct trench cave-in experiments. Data from the soil mechanics experiments will yield information on Martian DIS properties such as angle of repose, cohesion, bearing strength, and grain size distribution.

  15. Morphology and Scaling of Ejecta Deposits on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Ridolfi, Francis J.; Bredekamp, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Continuous ejecta deposits on Ganymede consist of two major units, or facies: a thick inner hummocky pedestal facies, and a relatively thin outer radially scoured facies defined also by the inner limit of the secondary crater field. Both ejecta facies have a well-defined power-law relationship to crater diameter for craters ranging from 15 to approx. 600 km across. This relationship can be used to estimate the nominal crater diameter for impact features on icy satellites (such as palimpsests and multiring basins) for which the crater rim is no longer recognizable. Ejecta deposits have also been mapped on 4 other icy satellites. Although morphologically similar to eject deposits on the Moon, ejecta deposits for smaller craters are generally significantly broader in extent on the icy satellites, in apparent defiance of predictions of self-similarity. A greater degree of rim collapse and enlargement on the Moon may explain the observed difference.

  16. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  17. Potential Biospheres of the icy world in our solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Baqué, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    The challenge in astrobiology and planetary research in the near future is to realize space missions to study the habitability of Mars and the icy moons of the Jovian and Saturnian systems. Mars is an interesting object to search for habitable environments and for fossilized (and potentially present) life because of its past water driven wet history. On the other hand the Jovian moon Europa and the Saturnian moon Enceladus are promising candidates, where liquid water oceans beneath the surface are expected. These oceans can be habitable environments and the next challenge is to search there for present life. Some examples on potential biospheres and their biosignatures in Mars-like environments and in environmental conditions with reference to the icy moons will be given, which might exist in such kind of icy environments.

  18. Contributions of icy planetesimals to the Earth's early atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Owen, T C; Bar-Nun, A

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on the trapping of gases by ice forming at low temperatures implicate comets as major carriers of the heavy noble gases to the inner planets. These icy planetesimals may also have brought the nitrogen compounds that ultimately produced atmospheric N2. However, if the sample of three comets analyzed so far is typical, the Earth's oceans cannot have been produced by comets alone, they require an additional source of water with low D/H. The highly fractionated neon in the Earth's atmosphere may also indicate the importance of non-icy carriers of volatiles. The most important additional carrier is probably the rocky material comprising the bulk of the mass of these planets. Venus may require a contribution from icy planetesimals formed at the low temperatures characteristic of the Kuiper Belt. PMID:11599179

  19. Asteroid Icy Regolith Excavation and Volatile Capture Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mantovani, James; Swanger, Adam; Townsend, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Icy regolith simulants will be produced in a relevant vacuum environment using various minerals, including hydrated minerals, that are found in C-type meteorites and in other types of planetary regolith. This will allow us to characterize the mechanical strength of the icy regolith as a function of ice content using penetration, excavation, and sample capture devices. The results of this study will benefit engineers in designing efficient regolith excavators and ISRU processing systems for future exploration missions to asteroids and other planetary bodies.

  20. ICI and Penspen in Nigerian and Qatari methanol deals

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-03-11

    The U.K. consulting and engineering company Penspen Ltd. (London) has signed a second joint venture agreement in Qatar and has selected the ICI (London) methanol process. The technology will also be used in a world-scale methanol plant in Nigeria that Penspen is helping to set up. Under the first agreement, signed on January 1 with Qatar General Petroleum Corp. (QGPC), a 50/50 venture is being formed to build a $370-million, 2,000-m.t./day methanol plant at Umm Said. ICI will provide its low-pressure technology and help market 75% of the output. Completion is due late 1994.

  1. Novel in situ chemical sensing technologies for icy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadham, Jemma; Mowlem, Matthew; Beaton, Alex; Bagshaw, Elizabeth; Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Telling, Jon; Hawkings, Jon; Tranter, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    A dramatic development in subglacial science in recent decades has been the considerable international effort aimed at improving understanding of the hidden subglacial aquatic environments beneath ice sheets. These include a diverse range of lakes, rivers, shallow and deep sediments. Technology challenges associated with the exploration of these and other icy environments are substantial because of their remote nature, extreme conditions and the requirement for sterile/clean access and sampling. In situ sensors provide an alternative to sample recovery and return for monitoring in situ conditions and are available for many analytes, but they are frequently unsuitable for deployment in icy environments. Low temperatures, freeze-thaw cycles, remote locations, low concentration and low ionic strength meltwaters challenge technologies designed for non cryospheric systems. The UK NERC- funded DELVE programme (DeEveLopment and Validation of in situ chemical sensors for icy Ecosystems) was launched with the goal of developing and testing the first suite of geochemical sensors for icy ecosystems, with a focus on redox sensitive species and dissolved nutrients. All sensors were subject to testing at low temperatures, including freeze-thaw cycling, and the response to low concentration and low ionic strength was quantified. Here we report high resolution, continuous data derived from a suite of biogeochemical sensors which were deployed to a large proglacial river draining the Greenland Ice Sheet during the 2015 melt season. These data show that these sensors have strong potential for more challenging deployment to the basal regions of ice sheets.

  2. 9 CFR 83.5 - Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI). 83.5 Section 83.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS...

  3. 9 CFR 83.5 - Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI). 83.5 Section 83.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS...

  4. 9 CFR 83.5 - Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI). 83.5 Section 83.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.5...

  5. 9 CFR 83.5 - Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI). 83.5 Section 83.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS...

  6. Workshop on Europa's Icy Shell: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Europa's Icy Shell: Past, Present, and Future, February 6-8,2004, Houston, Texas. Administration and publications support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Department at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  7. 9 CFR 83.5 - Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate Certificate of Inspection (ICI). 83.5 Section 83.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS...

  8. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  9. The interesting case of the Iota-Cygnids (525 ICY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreić, Željko; Šegon, Damir; Vida, Denis; Novoselnik, Filip; Skokić, Ivica

    2014-01-01

    One of the showers recently reported by the Croatian Meteor Network, the Iota-Cygnids (525 ICY), is described. From the 40 available orbits, the mean orbit of the shower and some other parameters were obtained. The Iota-Cygnids were detected from October 16 (Sol.Lon. = 203◦) to November, 19th (Sol.Lon. = 237◦), with a slightly higher activity around October 31 (Sol.Lon. = 218◦). The possible parent body is Asteroid 2001 SS287, with DSH = 0.16, indicating that 525 ICY is probably asteroidal in origin. However, a few more asteroids have DSH < 0.20, so the question of the parent body requires a more detailed study to be solved. In depth analysis of IAU MDC has found two showers that are quite similar to the 525 ICY: 83 OCG and 282 DCY. By gathering additional data outside the IAU MDC, we found out that 282 DCY is a rediscovery of 83 OCG. Also, 525 ICY is identical to 83 OCG, but this fact was not recognized before, probably due to incorrect coordinates for the 83 OCG radiant in the IAU MDC database and the lack of information about the activity period of the showers in the IAU MDC database.

  10. Neutral atmosphere near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the formation and dynamics of the rarefied gas envelope near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Being the most massive icy moon, Ganymede can form a rarefied exosphere with a relatively dense near-surface layer. The main parent component of the gas shell is water vapor, which enters the atmosphere due to thermal degassing, nonthermal radiolysis, and other active processes and phenomena on the moon's icy surface. A numerical kinetic simulation is performed to investigate, at the molecular level, the formation, chemical evolution, and dynamics of the mainly H2O- and O2-dominant rarefied gas envelopes. The ionization processes in these rarefied gas envelopes are due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun and the magnetospheric plasma. The chemical diversity of the icy moon's gas envelope is attributed to the primary action of ultraviolet solar photons and plasma electrons on the rarefied gas in the H2O- or O2-dominant atmosphere. The model is used to calculate the formation and development of the chemical diversity in the relatively dense near-surface envelope of Ganymede, where an important contribution comes from collisions between parent molecules and the products of their photolysis and radiolysis.

  11. Investigation of the properties of icy lunar polar regolith simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Craig; Kömle, Norbert; Leibniz, Otto; Morales-Calderon, Odalys; Gao, Yang; Richter, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    As icy regolith is believed to exist in the subsurface of permanently shadowed areas near the lunar south pole, there is a growing interest in obtaining samples from these polar regions. To qualify for spaceflight, sampling instruments must demonstrate their ability to operate in the expected environment. However, there is currently no quantitative data detailing the extent and distribution of ice in polar regolith. While work has been done to determine the effects of water ice content in simulants such as JSC-1A, to date there has been no investigation into the properties of icy simulants of the regolith believed to be found at lunar polar regions. A series of experiments has therefore been conducted to determine the properties of icy NU-LHT-2M lunar highland simulant, an approximation of lunar polar regolith, at varying degrees of saturation. A number of procedures for preparing the simulant were tested, with the aim of defining a standardised technique for the creation of icy simulants with controlled water contents. Saturation of the highland simulant was found to occur at a water mass content between 13% and 17%, while cone penetration tests demonstrated that a significant increase in penetration resistance occurs at 5 ± 1%. Uniaxial compression tests showed an increase in regolith strength with water mass and density, which slows down as the saturation level is reached. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of the properties of icy lunar polar regolith simulants, which can be expanded upon to further the understanding of its properties for use in future instrumentation testing.

  12. Biosignature detection at an Arctic analog to Europa.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Damhnait F; Pappalardo, R T; Anderson, M S; Grasby, S E; Mielke, R E; Wright, K E; Templeton, A S

    2012-02-01

    The compelling evidence for an ocean beneath the ice shell of Europa makes it a high priority for astrobiological investigations. Future missions to the icy surface of this moon will query the plausibly sulfur-rich materials for potential indications of the presence of life carried to the surface by mobile ice or partial melt. However, the potential for generation and preservation of biosignatures under cold, sulfur-rich conditions has not previously been investigated, as there have not been suitable environments on Earth to study. Here, we describe the characterization of a range of biosignatures within potentially analogous sulfur deposits from the surface of an Arctic glacier at Borup Fiord Pass to evaluate whether evidence for microbial activities is produced and preserved within these deposits. Optical and electron microscopy revealed microorganisms and extracellular materials. Elemental sulfur (S⁰), the dominant mineralogy within field samples, is present as rhombic and needle-shaped mineral grains and spherical mineral aggregates, commonly observed in association with extracellular polymeric substances. Orthorhombic α-sulfur represents the stable form of S⁰, whereas the monoclinic (needle-shaped) γ-sulfur form rosickyite is metastable and has previously been associated with sulfide-oxidizing microbial communities. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed mineral deposition on cellular and extracellular materials in the form of submicron-sized, needle-shaped crystals. X-ray diffraction measurements supply supporting evidence for the presence of a minor component of rosickyite. Infrared spectroscopy revealed parts-per-million level organics in the Borup sulfur deposits and organic functional groups diagnostic of biomolecules such as proteins and fatty acids. Organic components are below the detection limit for Raman spectra, which were dominated by sulfur peaks. These combined investigations indicate that sulfur mineral deposits may contain

  13. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Far Ultraviolet Reflectance Spectra to Constrain the Non-Ice Material in Saturn’s Rings and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eric Todd; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The FUV spectra of Saturn’s icy ring particles and moons show the presence of an absorbing constituent that presumably is delivered to the system via micrometeoroid bombardment. Understanding the properties of the non-icy material plays into broader questions regarding the age and evolution of the rings. The FUV spectrum contains a water ice absorption edge at 165 nm. The reflectance shortward of the water ice absorption edge is determined by the composition and abundance of the non-icy material whereas the reflectance longward of the absorption edge is determined by both water ice and non-icy material. We have taken two approaches to constrain the properties of the non-ice component of the rings using FUV spectra taken by the Cassini UVIS. In one approach we compare the ring particle Bond albedo, A0, to spectral models with varying abundances and compositions of non-ice components. We first determine A0, across the water ice absorption edge using the classical Chandrasekhar radiative transfer model for the C Ring and Cassini Division with the scattering function replaced by a self-gravity wake model for the A and B rings. We then compare the retrieved values of A0, to spectral models of intimate mixtures where the free parameters are the fractional abundances of the ice and non-ice constituents, grain size, and grain asymmetry parameter for scattering. In the second approach we compare FUV color ratios (180/155 nm) across Saturn’s rings, as well as to icy moons, in order to investigate relative variations in water ice abundance in these objects. We find that A0, longward of the absorption edge peaks in the outer B ring and reaches a minimum in the C Ring and Cassini Division, consistent with the purest water ice being found in the B Ring and the most polluted in the C Ring and Cassini Division.

  14. Organic Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Deamer, David W.; Elsila, Jamie; Zare, Richard N.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comets and carbonaceous micrometeorites may have been significant sources of organic compounds on the early Earth. Ices on grains in interstellar dense molecular clouds contain a variety of simple molecules as well as aromatic molecules of various sizes. While in these clouds the icy grains are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic radiation which produces more complex organic molecules. ID We have run laboratory simulations to identify the types of molecules which could have been generated photolytically in pre-cometary ices. Experiments were conducted by forming various realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ices with and without polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at approx. 10 K under high vacuum irradiated with LTV light from a hydrogen plasma lamp: The residue that remained after warming to room temperature was analyzed by HPLC, and by laser desorption mass spectrometry. The residue contains several classes of compounds which may be of prebiotic significance.

  15. Organic Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Deamer, David W.; Elsila, Jamie; Zare, Richard N.

    2001-01-01

    Comets and carbonaceous micrometeorites may have been significant sources of organic compounds on the early Earth. Ices on grains in interstellar dense molecular clouds contain a variety of simple molecules as well as aromatic molecules of various sizes. While in these clouds the icy grains are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic radiation which produces more complex organic molecules. We have run laboratory simulations to identify the types of molecules which could have been generated photolytically in pre-cometary ices. Experiments were conducted by forming various realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ices with and without polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at approx. 10 K under high vacuum irradiated with UV light from a hydrogen plasma lamp. The residue that remained after warming to room temperature was analyzed by HPLC, and by laser desorption mass spectrometry. The residue contains several classes of compounds which may be of prebiotic significance.

  16. Compositions of Oceans on Icy Solar System Bodies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Interior oceans may exist on at least several solar system bodies: Europa, Enceladus, Ganymede, Titan and Triton. Compositions of the oceans could reflect bulk chemistries on the bodies, degree and timing of differendentition, current temperature and pressure conditions, and chemical exchanges between icy shells, liquid layers, and suboceanic solids (rocks, sediments, ices and clathrates). Observational signs are sparse and modeling is the major approach to evaluate oceanic compositions. On Europa, a presence of S(VI) species and CO2 at endogenic surface features [1] suggests sulfates and C species (organic and/or inorganic) in the ocean. The detection of NaCl and Na2CO3/NaHCO3-bearing grains emitted from Enceladus [2] implies the dominance of Na, Cl and carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the past and/or present alkaline fluids in the interior. These observations are consistent with independent models for water-rock interaction [3]. Evaluated low contents of other elements (Mg, Fe, Ca, K, S, P, etc.) in initial oceanic waters [3] are accounted for by low solubilities of minerals deposited from water solutions (serpentine, saponite, magnetite, carbonates, sulfides and phosphates). Oceanic redox states are affected by the composition of accreted ices and rocks, hydrogen production through oxidation of solids (mainly Fe-Ni metal) by water and an efficiency of H2 escape. Formation of a sulfate-bearing ocean (as on Europa) through oxidation of sulfides could have been driven by radiolytically-formed oxidants (H2O2, O2), high-temperature (>500 K) hydrothermal activity and H2 escape. Formation of sulfate facilitates leaching of Mg from minerals leading to the Mg-SO4-Na-Cl ocean. Although some of these factors could have played roles on the Galilean satellites, formation of sulfate-bearing oceans beyond Jupiter is unlikely. Accretion of cometary-type ices on moons allows an existence of water-methanol-ammonia liquids at ~153 K, although ammonia could have been sequestered in

  17. Jupiter Icy Moons Tidal Signatures and Ocean Mapping from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X.; Bar-Server, Y. E.; Folkner, W. M.; Williams, J. G.; Zumberge, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Following the Galileo spacecraft encounters with Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, evidence emerged suggesting that these Galilean moons of Jupiter may have liquid oceans underneath their icy shells. Detection of the oceans on one or all three moons will have profound implications on probability of life beyond the Earth. The icy satellites also have tidal environments that are among the strongest in the solar system. The leading time-varying tidal forcing term on the surface of Europa is at least 9 times larger than those on the inner planets. Tidal forcing on the surfaces of Ganymede and Callisto are about 10% and 7%, respectively, of that on Europa. Since a planetary body with internal fluid deforms more than an otherwise solid body, tidal measurements offer exciting opportunities to detect the oceans.

  18. Certification of ICI 1012 optical data storage tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    ICI has developed a unique and novel method of certifying a Terabyte optical tape. The tape quality is guaranteed as a statistical upper limit on the probability of uncorrectable errors. This is called the Corrected Byte Error Rate or CBER. We developed this probabilistic method because of two reasons why error rate cannot be measured directly. Firstly, written data is indelible, so one cannot employ write/read tests such as used for magnetic tape. Secondly, the anticipated error rates need impractically large samples to measure accurately. For example, a rate of 1E-12 implies only one byte in error per tape. The archivability of ICI 1012 Data Storage Tape in general is well characterized and understood. Nevertheless, customers expect performance guarantees to be supported by test results on individual tapes. In particular, they need assurance that data is retrievable after decades in archive. This paper describes the mathematical basis, measurement apparatus and applicability of the certification method.

  19. Crustal failure on icy Moons from a strong tidal encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Giannella, David; Shaw, John G.; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and Moons should have been more common than grazing or normal impacts. Using a mass spring model within an N-body simulation, we simulate the deformation of the surface of an elastic spherical body caused by a close parabolic tidal encounter with a body that has similar mass as that of the primary body. Such an encounter can induce sufficient stress on the surface to cause brittle failure of an icy crust and simulated fractures can extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Strong tidal encounters may be responsible for the formation of long graben complexes and chasmata in ancient terrain of icy Moons such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  20. Laboratory Simulations of Ammonia-Rich Oceans in Icy Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, S. D.; Brown, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Improved equations of state for ammonia-water solutions are important for properly understanding the interiors of large icy satellites hosting deep interior oceans. Titan is the primary example of such a world, but water-rich dwarf planets Measurements of solution density are now possible at relevant pressures (above approx. 250 megapascals) using the Simulator for Icy World Interiors. Analysis of sound velocity measurements in aqueous magnesium sulfate obtained in our laboratory, shows a correction on the order of 5% to 700 megapascals (7 kilobar) from -20 to 100 C and to 3 m (approx. 30 percentage by weight) concentration. Accurate prediction of density as a function of pressure, temperature, and ammonia concentration are needed for interpretation of remote observations to address questions of interior liquid layer depth, composition, and fluid dynamics.

  1. Geology and Composition of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; et al.

    The Galileo spacecraft has provided tremendous insight into the geologies and compositions of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter. Callisto's surface is covered by smooth dark material that may be sublimation-derived. Ganymede's ancient dark terrain is heterogeneous in albedo at small scales and is modified by tectonism, ejecta blanketing, and mass wasting. Compositional data from the NIMS infra-red spectrometer indicate the presence of CO, SO, and S-H species and tholins in the dark materials on Callisto and Ganymede. Ganymede's ice-rich grooved terrain is pervasively deformed by extensional tectonism along with horizontal shearing. Europa's icy surface is young and potentially geologically active today, and may hide a subsurface ocean. Chaotic features are probably due to diapirically driven disruption along with localized partial melting, consistent with solid-state convection within a floating ice shell. NIMS analyses reveal asymmetric ice absorption bands which imply hydrated minerals (salts and/or sulfuric acid) in Europa's darker areas.

  2. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  3. High Latitude Scintillations during the ICI-4 Rocket Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Moen, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first results from the Norwegian ICI-4 sounding rocket campaign in February 2015. The ICI-4 was launched into F-region auroral blobs from the Andøya Space Center. The multi needle langmuir probe (m-NLP) on board the rocket sampled the ionospheric density structures at a sub-meter spatial resolution. A multi-phase screen model has been developed to estimate the scintillations from the density measurements acquired on-board spacecrafts. The phase screen model is validated and the comparison of the estimated values with scintillations measured by ground receivers during the campaign will be presented. A combination of scintillation receivers in Svalbard and surrounding areas as well as all sky imagers at Ny Ålesund, Longyerbyen, and Skibotn are used to improve the performance of the model.

  4. Decision-aided ICI mitigation with time-domain average approximation in CO-OFDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongliang; Cai, Jiaxing; Ye, Xin; Lu, Jin; Cao, Quanjun; Guo, Shuqin; Xue, Lin-lin; Qin, Yali; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-07-01

    We introduce and investigate the feasibility of a novel iterative blind phase noise inter-carrier interference (ICI) mitigation scheme for coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) systems. The ICI mitigation scheme is performed through the combination of frequency-domain symbol decision-aided estimation and the ICI phase noise time-average approximation. An additional initial decision process with suitable threshold is introduced in order to suppress the decision error symbols. Our proposed ICI mitigation scheme is proved to be effective in removing the ICI for a simulated CO-OFDM with 16-QAM modulation format. With the slightly high computational complexity, it outperforms the time-domain average blind ICI (Avg-BL-ICI) algorithm at a relatively wide laser line-width and high OSNR.

  5. JUICE: A European Mission to Jupiter and its Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witasse, O.; Altobelli, N.; Barabash, S.; Bruzzone, L.; Dougherty, M.; Erd, C.; Fletcher, L.; Gladstone, R.; Grasset, O.; Gurvits, L.; Hartogh, P.; Hussmann, H.; Iess, I.; Langevin, Y.; Palumbo, P.; Piccioni, G.; Sarri, G.; Titov, D.; Wahlund, J.-E.

    2015-10-01

    JUICE -JUpiter ICy moons Explorer -is the first large mission in the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme[1]. The mission was selected in May 2012 and adopted in November 2014. The implementation phase starts in July 2015, following the selection of the prime industrial contractor. Planned for launch in June 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in October 2029, it will spend at least three years making detailed observations of Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa.

  6. Icy Soil Acquisition Device for the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Philip; Wilson, Jack; Davis, Kiel; Shiraishi, Lori; Burke, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The Icy Soil Acquisition Device is a first of its kind mechanism that is designed to acquire ice-bearing soil from the surface of the Martian polar region and transfer the samples to analytical instruments, playing a critical role in the potential discovery of existing water on Mars. The device incorporates a number of novel features that further the state of the art in spacecraft design for harsh environments, sample acquisition and handling, and high-speed low torque mechanism design.

  7. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  8. MIDAS: Advanced Remote Sensing for the Exploration of Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieboldt, S. E.; Wong, M. H.; Adamkovics, M.; Delory, G. T.; de Pater, I.; Manga, M.; Lipps, J. H.; Dalton, J. B.; Pitman, J.; Kendrick, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) is a diffraction-limited, wide-field imaging spectrometer that utilizes distributed apertures and optical interferometer techniques to achieve simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution. Here we describe the results of a science and technical feasibility study of MIDAS prototypes funded under the NASA High Capability Instrument Concepts and Technology (HCICT) program as a potential science payload for missions to the outer planets and their icy satellites. The high spatial resolution capabilities of MIDAS combined with nm spectral resolution will greatly advance our understanding of icy satellite surface composition in terms of minerals, organics, volatiles, and their mixtures. From 100 km mapping orbits, cm-scale imagery from MIDAS could revolutionize our understanding of the geology, dynamics, and history of icy moon surfaces. From higher orbits, MIDAS can engage in global, high resolution imaging spectroscopy with m-scale resolution for months at a time. Beyond traditional remote sensing, MIDAS is well suited to active techniques, including remote Raman, Fluorescence, and IR illumination investigations, in order to resolve surface composition and explore otherwise dim regions.

  9. Enhanced Tidal Deformation in Icy Satellites with Subsurface Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, S.; Matsuyama, I.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tidal dissipation is a major heat source for the icy satellites of the giant planets. Several icy satellites likely possess a subsurface ocean underneath an ice shell. Previous studies of tidal dissipation on icy satellites, however, have either assumed a static ocean, or ignored the effect of the ice lid on subsurface ocean dynamics. In this study, we examine inertial effects on tidal deformation of satellites with a dynamic ocean overlain by an ice lid based on viscoelasto-gravitational theory. Although ocean dynamics is treated in a simplified fashion, we find a resonant configuration when the phase velocity of ocean gravity waves is similar to that of the tidal bulge. This condition is achieved when a subsurface ocean is thin (<1 km). The enhanced deformation (increased h2 and k2 Love numbers) near the resonant configuration would lead to enhanced tidal heating in the solid lid. A static ocean formulation gives an accurate result only if the ocean thickness is much larger than the resonant thickness. The resonant configuration strongly depends on the properties of the shell; a thicker shell and a more rigid shell leads to a thinner resonant thickness. This result demonstrates the importance of the presence of a shell on tidal dissipation.

  10. Tidal resonance in icy satellites with subsurface oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Shunichi; Matsuyama, Isamu; Nimmo, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Tidal dissipation is a major heat source for the icy satellites of the giant planets. Several icy satellites likely possess a subsurface ocean underneath an ice shell. Previous studies of tidal dissipation on icy satellites, however, have either assumed a static ocean or ignored the effect of the ice lid on subsurface ocean dynamics. In this study, we examine inertial effects on tidal deformation of satellites with a dynamic ocean overlain by an ice lid based on viscoelasto-gravitational theory. Although ocean dynamics is treated in a simplified fashion, we find a resonant configuration when the phase velocity of ocean gravity waves is similar to that of the tidal bulge. This condition is achieved when a subsurface ocean is thin (<1 km). The enhanced deformation (increased h2 and k2 Love numbers) near the resonant configuration would lead to enhanced tidal heating in the solid lid. A static ocean formulation gives an accurate result only if the ocean thickness is much larger than the resonant thickness. The resonant configuration strongly depends on the properties of the shell, demonstrating the importance of the presence of a shell on tidal dissipation.

  11. IR reflectance spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates. Implications for Saturn's icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, A.; Grasset, O.; Le Menn, E.; Bezacier, L.; Bollengier, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Tobie, G.

    2012-04-01

    A CO2 spectral band was discovered by VIMS on the Saturn's satellites Dione, Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe [1]. The band position on the three first satellites corresponds to CO2 trapped in a complex material, but no indication exists whether this latter is water ice or some mineral or complex organic compound [1]. On Phoebe, the CO2 spectral band is consistent with solid CO2 or CO2 molecules trapped in the small cages of a clathrate hydrate structure [2]. It is thought that clathrate hydrates could play a significant role in the chemistry of the solar nebula [3] and in the physical evolution of astrophysical objects [4]. But so far, no clathrate hydrate structure has been observed in astrophysical environments. Moreover, identification of molecules trapped in a clathrate hydrate structure is extremely difficult because of the strong IR vibration modes of the water ice matrix. In this work, experimental IR reflectance spectra for CO2 clathrate hydrates are studied on grains and films. Clathrates are synthesized in a high pressure autoclave at low temperatures. IR spectral analysis is made with a low pressure and low temperature cryostat. These experimental conditions - 80 < T < 110 K, P~10-5 bar - are relevant to icy moons' surfaces. We have observed that the IR reflectance, in the spectral region (3 - 5 μm) characterized by H2O and CO2 high absorption coefficients, is strongly dependent on physical (size, surface) and optical (n and k) properties of the samples. The impact of these parameters on the CO2 clathrate IR reflectance spectrum will be presented. A comparison between the absorption bands of CO2 clathrate hydrates obtained in our lab and CO2 absorption bands as detected by VIMS on the icy satellites of Saturn will be shown. This experimental work confirms that VIMS data are not consistent with the presence of structure I CO2 clathrate hydrates on the surface of the icy moons. Possibility of having metastable structure II still remains unsolved and will be

  12. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2013-03-01

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  13. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  14. Experimental constraints on the chemical evolution of icy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H P; Williams, Q; Ryerson, F J

    2000-01-18

    The inferred internal structure of large icy satellites hinges on the degree to which their rock component has been hydrated: this is due to the low density of hydrated silicates relative to anhydrous silicates. Accordingly, interior models of icy satellites have varied greatly in their estimates of ice thickness due to uncertainties in the density of the underlying rock. Furthermore, as both H{sub 2}O (potentially liquid) and organic materials are likely to be present, icy moons have been postulated to be possible hosts for extraterrestrial life; therefore, the stability of organic material under relevant hydrothermal conditions is an important issue. For example, Ganymede, Titan, and Triton are similar in that high pressure hydrothermal processing of silicates has likely been important in their chemical evolution. With mean densities between 1.8 and 2.1 g/cm{sup 3}, compositional models of these bodies incorporate approximately 50--80% silicate minerals by weight, with ices constituting the remaining mass. Moment of inertia constraints on the internal structure of Ganymede demonstrate that differentiation between rock and ice has occurred: such differentiation has also likely occurred in Titan and Triton. During accretion and differentiation (which could be ongoing), the silicate fraction of their interiors would have interacted with aqueous fluids at moderate to high temperatures and pressures. Indeed, a strong magnetic field appears to be generated by Ganymede implying that interior temperatures are high enough (in excess of 1,000 K) to maintain a liquid iron alloy in this satellite. High temperature/pressure hydrothermal processing at rock-water interfaces would profoundly influence the bulk mineralogy and internal structure of these bodies: the degree of hydration of the rocky fraction of these bodies has been a source of ongoing uncertainty. Surprisingly few phase equilibria data exist for compositions of relevance to hydrothermal interactions on icy

  15. Icy Dwarf Planets: Colored popsicles in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi

    2015-08-01

    In 1992 the discovery of 1992 QB1 was the starting signal of a race to characterize the trans-Neptunian belt. The detection of icy “asteroids”, similar to Pluto, in the outer Solar System had been largely hypothesized but it had also being an elusive goal. This belt was considered by the planetary scientists as the icy promised land, the largest reservoir of primordial ices in the Solar System.From 1992 to 2005 about 1000 trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs had been discovered and a lot of “first ever” science had been published: 1996 TO66, first ever detection of the water ice bands in a TNO's spectrum; 1998 WW31, first detection of a binary; first estimation of size and albedo from thermal and visible observations, Varuna; discovery of Sedna, at that moment “the coldest most distant place known in the Solar System”2005 was the year of the discovery of three large TNOs: (136108) Haumea, (136472) Makemake and (136199) Eris (a.k.a 2003 EL61, 2005 FY9 and 2003 UB313). These three big guys entered the schoolyard showing off as colored popsicles and making a clear statement: “We are special”, and sure they are!The discovery of these large TNOs resulted in 2006 in the adoption by the IAU of a new definition of planet and in the introduction of a new category of minor bodies: the “dwarf planets”. With only three members at this moment (although this can change anytime) the exclusive club of the icy dwarf planets is formed by the TNOs at the higher end of the size distribution. By virtue of their size and low surface temperatures, these bodies can retain most of their original inventory of ices. As a consequence, their visible and near-infrared spectra show evidences of water ice, nitrogen, methane and longer chains of hydrocarbons. Moreover, they have high geometric albedo in the visible. Also the accretional and radiogenic heating for these bodies was likely more than sufficient to have caused their internal differentiation.In this talk we will

  16. Studies of solid carbon dioxide in interstellar ice analogs subject to thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas W.

    2010-09-01

    Solid CO2 has been detected in many lines of sight in the interstellar medium from infrared observatories. Spectral profiles from space-based observatories have suggested that CO2 on icy grain mantles is mixed with other common molecules such as H2O and CH 3OH in interstellar regions and that thermal annealing has occurred. The vibrational mode at 658 cm-1 (15.2 mum) is suspected to be a powerful diagnostic tool as to the composition of species on icy grain mantles as well as thermal histories. However, previous studies have not systematically investigated ice composition and temperature. Laboratory spectra of interstellar ice analogs have been created in this study order to better understand the physical properties of solid CO2 in these interstellar environments. Existing databases of ice composition studies and effects of ice thermal history were updated in this study to include a more systematic approach. The 658 cm-1 (15.2 mum) bending mode feature of CO2 is examined here and the subsequent astrophysical implications stated. In the first set of experiments, 47 mixtures of H2O,CH3OH, andCO2 were slowly warmed and mid-infrared absorption spectra were recorded at 5K intervals. The second set of experiments involved examining the CO2 bending mode feature of 10 different CO2-containing ice mixtures at different temperatures where ice segregation was suspected. In these experiments, the ice mixtures were slowly heated to the desired temperature for increasing time intervals before cooling down and recording mid-IR absorption spectra. These studies may be used to analyze IR data from space-based observatories such as the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as well other future IR observations of the interstellar medium. Finally, mass spectroscopy measurements were taken from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments performed on several binary mixtures of H2O + CO2 and CH 3OH + CO2. Physical properties such as desorption energy of CO2 can be

  17. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  18. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  19. Grain size-sensitive creep in ice II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kubo, T.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    Rheological experiments on fine-grained water ice II at low strain rates reveal a creep mechanism that dominates at conditions of low stress. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we observed that a change in stress exponent from 5 to 2.5 correlates strongly with a decrease in grain size from about 40 to 6 micrometers. The grain size-sensitive creep of ice II demonstrated here plausibly dominates plastic strain at the low-stress conditions in the interior of medium- to large-sized icy moons of the outer solar system.

  20. Grain size-sensitive creep in ice II.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B; Stern, Laura A; Kirby, Stephen H

    2006-03-01

    Rheological experiments on fine-grained water ice II at low strain rates reveal a creep mechanism that dominates at conditions of low stress. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we observed that a change in stress exponent from 5 to 2.5 correlates strongly with a decrease in grain size from about 40 to 6 micrometers. The grain size-sensitive creep of ice II demonstrated here plausibly dominates plastic strain at the low-stress conditions in the interior of medium- to large-sized icy moons of the outer solar system. PMID:16513977

  1. Modeling Radar Scatter from Icy and Young Rough Lunar Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas (Tommy); Ustinov, Eugene; Spudis, Paul; Fessler, Brian

    2012-01-01

    For lunar orbital synthetic aperture radars, such as the Chandrayaan Mini-RF operating at S- band (13-cm) wavelength and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mini-RF operating at S- band and X-band (3-cm) wavelengths, it is important to understand the radar backscattering characteristics of the icy and young, rough craters. Assuming a mixing model consisting of diffuse and quasi-specular scattering components, we have modeled the opposite-sense circular (OC) and same-sense circular (SC) backscattering characteristics. The specular component, consisting of only OC echoes, represents the echoes from the surface and subsurface layers that are oriented perpendicular to the radar's line-of-sight. The diffuse component, consisting of both SC and OC echoes, represents the echoes associated with either rocks or ice. Also, diffuse echoes have backscatter that is proportional to the cosine of the incidence angle. We modeled how these two (specular and diffuse) radar scattering components could be modulated by factors such as surface roughness associated with young craters. We also modeled how ice radar scattering components could be modulated by a thin regolith covering, and/or by the situation where ice occupies small patches within a larger radar pixel. We tested this modeling by examining 4 nonpolar craters and 12 polar craters using LRO Mini-RF data. Results indicate that icy and young rough craters can be distinguished based upon their SC enhancements (Alpha) and OC enhancements (Gamma). In addition, we also examined the craters that have unusual circular polarization ratios (CPRs) that likely result from a double bounce mode of scattering. Blocky fresh craters, icy craters, and craters exhibiting double bounce scattering can be separated based on the values of Alpha, Gamma, the ratio of Alpha/Gamma and the weighted sum of Alpha and Gamma.

  2. Methone as an icy cosmic model of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    Developed by the wave comparative planetology conception on priorities of structures (shapes) of celestial bodies over their inner processes [1, 2 & others] is supported by recently imaged small icy saturnian satellites Methone (Fig. 1). With its size about 3 km and thus negligible inner energy it has very spectacular shape of an egg and no traces of impacts (what very surprises impact planetologists!). Any body moving in non-circular keplerian orbit with periodically changing accelerations is a subject of an inertia-gravity forces action (Fig. 3). This action inevitably results in oscillations of body shells. An interference of these oscillations, having in rotating bodies four ortho- and diagonal directions, makes their shapes and structures. The longest fundamental wave 1 forms the tectonic dichotomy - an opposition of convex and concave hemispheres-segments (Fig. 7-9). At Earth they are the Pacific and continental hemispheres. The first overtone wave 2 twice-shorter and long πR brings antipodean tectonic sectors of different levels but joining in an octahedron (Fig.. 4-6, 10-11). At Earth one of examples of such antipodean sectors are the pressed in Arctic and bulging Antarctic. Long ago known, this opposition was very intriguing but never was adequately explained. For the small bodies - asteroids also was noticed an opposition of a sharp (convex) and blunt (concave) ends. Recently obtained an image of a miniature icy saturnian satellite Methone confirms principles of the wave planetology. Having length only about 3 km (radius 1.6 ± 0.6 km) it shows an opposition of convex and flat sides (the fundamental dichotomy) and sharp and blunt ends (a second order dichotomy). In this sense it presents a small cosmic model of Earth. It orbits Saturn between orbits of Mimas and Enceladus, close to the first. One might suspect that Enceladus' gaseous plumes (Fig. 2) could finally accumulate themselves in a small icy body - Methone.

  3. Channel Capacity of MC-CDMA and Impact of Residual ICI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Koichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki; Nakagawa, Masao

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), which uses a number of narrowband orthogonal sub-carriers, is a promising transmission technique. Also multi-carrier code division multi-access (MC-CDMA), which combines OFDM and frequency-domain spreading, has been attracting much attention as a future broadband wireless access. It was shown that MC-CDMA has lower channel capacity than OFDM, due to inter-code interference (ICI) resulting from orthogonality distortion caused by frequency-selective fading. Recently, many ICI cancellers have been proposed to mitigate the effect of ICI. In this paper, we derive a channel capacity expression for MC-CDMA assuming perfect ICI cancellation taking into account both frequency diversity gain and space diversity gain and compare it to that of OFDM. Furthermore, we derive a channel capacity expression for the case of imperfect ICI cancellation to discuss the impact of the residual ICI.

  4. Space Environment Measurements for Icy Surfaces in the Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    There are dozens of icy satellites orbiting the giant planets and trillions of icy comets populating the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud. Such objects are likely to be common throughout other planetary systems, particularly those now known to have giant plants. Interactions of the local space environment with these bodies must be taken in account for proper interpretation of photometric and spectroscopic measurements related to surface composition. Most of these bodies either are known to have, or likely have, tenuous atmospheres of volatile gases produced by internal outgassing and surface sublimation, sputtering from charged particle and UV irradiation, and diffuse dust clouds produced from meteoritic impacts. Whether or not Pluto counts as a small icy planet or a big comet, its thin and variable atmosphere also allows direct surface exposure to the space environment. Even glacial ices on the surface of (e.g., Snowball) Earth may have been exposed to much of the interplanetary solar UV flux at early times when an effective ozone shield was absent, and the Mars atmosphere is thin enough today for direct irradiation of polar cap ices by high energy cosmic ray and solar flare ions. Planetary magnetic fields reduce exposure to interplanetary charged particles but add irradiation by magnetospheric plasma and energetic particles. At Europa the intense surface irradiation from the Jovian magnetosphere might play a role via radiolytic chemistry in possible evolution of life within the putative sub-surface ocean. Although an armada of spacecraft have been measuring for many years the parameters of the solar UV, plasma, energetic particle, and dust environments of rocky bodies, large and small, in the inner solar system near Earth's orbit around the Sun, only six spacecraft with varying capabilities (Pioneer 10/11, Voyager 1/2, Galileo Orbiter, Cassini Orbiter) have yet ventured into the domain of the icy bodies near and beyond the orbit of Jupiter. The first five have

  5. Radio Science Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Castillo, J. C.; Folkner, W. M.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schubert, G.; Spilker, T. R.; Tyler, G. L.

    2003-01-01

    Radio Science experiments have been conducted on most deep space missions leading to numerous scientific discoveries. A set of concepts and approaches are proposed for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) to apply Radio Science tools to investigate the interior structures of the Galilean Satellites and address key questions on their thermal and dynamical evolution. Measurements are identified that utilize the spacecraft's telecommunication system. Additional instruments can augment these measurements in order to leverage observational synergies. Experiments are also offered for the purpose of investigating the atmospheres and surfaces of the satellites.

  6. Sounding of Icy Galilean Satellites by Surface Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Banerdt, W. B.; Johnson, T. V.; Russell, C. T.; Kivelson, M. G.; Davis, P. M.; Vidale, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Several independent geological and geophysical investigations suggest that Europa and Ganymede contain subsurface oceans. Using Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a primary signal, the magnetometer experiment onboard Galileo has measured secondary induction signals emanating from Europa, Ganymede, and surprisingly Callisto. The strong electromagnetic induction from these moons suggests that large global electrical conductors are located just below their icy crusts. A detailed analysis reveals that global salty oceans with salinity similar to the Earth's ocean and thicknesses in the range of approx. 6-100 kms can explain the induction observed by the Galileo magnetometer. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. A Power Conversion Concept for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is a bold new mission under development by the Office of Space Science at NASA Headquarters. ITMO is examining the potential of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology to efficiently deliver scientific payloads to three Jovian moons: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. A critical element of the NEP vehicle is the reactor power system, consisting of the nuclear reactor, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). The emphasis of this paper is on the non-nuclear elements of the reactor power system.

  8. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  9. Proposal of ICI cancellation using opposite weightings on symmetric subcarrier pairs in CO-OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xuemei; Deng, Mingliang; Zeng, Dengke; Yang, Heming; Qiu, Kun

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel ICI cancellation using opposite weighting on symmetric subcarrier pairs to combat the linear phase noise of laser source and the nonlinear phase noise resulted from the fiber nonlinearity. We compare the proposed ICI cancellation scheme with conventional OFDM and the ICI self-cancellation at the same raw bit rate of 35.6 Gb/s. In simulations, the proposed ICI cancellation scheme shows better phase noise tolerance compared with conventional OFDM and has similar phase noise tolerance with the ICI self-cancellation. The laser linewidth is about 13 MHz at BER of 2 × 10-3 with ICI cancellation scheme while it is 5 MHz in conventional OFDM. We also study the nonlinearity tolerance and find that the proposed ICI cancellation scheme is better compared with the other two schemes which due to the first order nonlinearity mitigation. The launch power is 7 dBm for the proposed ICI cancellation scheme and its SNR improves by 4 dB or 3 dB compared with the ICI self-cancellation or conventional OFDM at BER of 1.1 × 10-3, respectively.

  10. Benzene Formation on Interstellar Icy Mantles Containing Propargyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, B.; Mukherjee, R.; Subramanian, K. P.; Banerjee, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Propargyl alcohol (CHCCH2OH) is a known stable isomer of the propenal (CH2CHCHO) molecule that was reported to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). At astrochemical conditions in the laboratory, icy layers of propargyl alcohol grown at 85 K were irradiated by 2 keV electrons and probed by a Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer in the mid-infrared (IR) region, 4000-500 cm-1. Propargyl alcohol ice under astrochemical conditions was studied for the first time; therefore, IR spectra of reported amorphous (85 K) and crystalline (180 K) propargyl alcohol ices can be used to detect its presence in the ISM. Moreover, our experiments clearly show benzene (C6H6) formation to be the major product from propargyl alcohol irradiation, confirming the role of propargyl radicals (C3H3) formed from propargyl alcohol dissociation that was long expected based on theoretical modeling to effectively synthesize C6H6 in the interstellar icy mantles.

  11. Interplanetary Dust Particles As Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, Pierre; Marsset, Michael; Beck, Pierre; Binzel, Richard; Birlan, Mirel; Brunetto, Rosario; DeMeo, Francesca; Djouadi, Zahia; Dumas, Christophe; Merouane, Sihane; Mousis, Olivier; Zanda, Brigitte

    2015-11-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  12. The icy Jovian satellites after the Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The icy satellites of Jupiter, Callisto, Ganymede, Europa and Amalthea have diverse and remarkable characteristics. Their initial compositions were determined by conditions in the circum-Jovian nebula, just as the planets' initial properties were governed by their formation within the circumsolar nebula. The satellites subsequently evolved under the complex interplay of orbital and geophysical processes, especially the effects of orbital resonances, tides, internal differentiation and heat. The history and character of the satellites can be inferred from consideration of the formation of planets and the satellites, from studies of their plausible orbital evolution, from measurements of geophysical properties, especially gravitational and magnetic fields, from observations of the compositions and geological structure of their surfaces and from theoretical modeling of the processes that connect these lines of evidence. The three large icy satellites probably contain significant liquid water: Europa has a deep liquid water ocean under a thin surface layer of ice; Ganymede and Callisto likely have relatively thin liquid water layers deep below their surfaces. Models of formation are challenged by the surprising properties of the outermost and innermost of the group: Callisto is partially differentiated, with rock and ice mixed through much of its interior; and tiny Amalthea also appears to be largely composed of ice. Each of the four moons is fascinating in its own right, and the ensemble provides a powerful set of constraints on the processes that led to their formation and evolution.

  13. Interplanetary Dust Particles as Samples of Icy Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Brunetto, R.; Demeo, F. E.; Djouadi, Z.; Dumas, C.; Merouane, S.; Mousis, O.; Zanda, B.

    2015-06-01

    Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution. However, while some meteorites are known to sample the surfaces of metallic, rocky and hydrated asteroids (about one-third of the mass of the belt), the low-density icy asteroids (C-, P-, and D-types), representing the rest of the main belt, appear to be unsampled in our meteorite collections. Here we provide conclusive evidence that the surface compositions of these icy bodies are compatible with those of the most common extraterrestrial materials (by mass), namely anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Given that these particles are quite different from known meteorites, it follows that the composition of the asteroid belt consists largely of more friable material not well represented by the cohesive meteorites in our collections. In the light of our current understanding of the early dynamical evolution of the solar system, meteorites likely sample bodies formed in the inner region of the solar system (0.5-4 AU) whereas chondritic porous IDPs sample bodies that formed in the outer region (>5 AU).

  14. Oceans and Internal Structures of the Large Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, S.; Brown, J.; Choukroun, M.; Sotin, C.

    2013-12-01

    We predict water ice freezing and constrain geothermal gradients in the interiors of the large icy satellites Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan using thermodynamic and phase-boundary data for MgSO4 and ammonia solutions, including new results for ammonia. Accounting for available measurements of gravitational moments of inertia leads to estimates of the depths to silicate boundaries. In the case of Ganymede we also compute the size of an iron-bearing core. The new equations of state allow us to assess the influence of ocean salinity on the thickness of layers of ice I-III-V-VI in the interiors of these objects, and on associated ocean dynamics. Ocean compositions with salt and ammonia have less high-pressure ice, and can exist in the presence of ice III. In some model oceans high-pressure ice phases become buoyant relative to surrounding fluids, implying frazil-like upward snows, interlayered liquids and ices, and fluids in direct contact with rock. We discuss the relative roles of dissolved constituents in the large icy satellites, the consequences for their habitability, and prospects of future missions for testing these predictions. Schematic of interior structure for Ganymede showing dense fluids under high pressure ices and directly in contact with rock. We use available thermodynamic properties for relevant fluids and solids materials us to calculate self-consistent depths for the various layers (approximate values shown here).

  15. Chemical Processes in the Icy Plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.; Goldstein, R.

    2012-12-01

    The icy plumes from Saturn's moon Enceladus are unusual phenomena that have raised several challenging questions about the relationship of this small satellite to its surrounding environment. In addition, they offer a unique window to probe the interior structure and composition of this icy satellite. Measurements of the neutral and ion composition of the plumes by instruments aboard Cassini reveal the presence of water group species, nitrogen-bearing molecules, and other species that are the major volatiles in cometary ices. Our cometary coma model with chemistry (SUISEI) has been adapted to study this problem. SUISEI produces abundances of the gas species; velocities of the bulk gas, light atomic and molecular hydrogen with escape, and electrons; gas and electron temperatures; column densities to facilitate comparison with observations; energy budget quantities; attenuation of the solar irradiance; and other quantities that can be related readily to the in situ measurements. Likely ion-molecule chemistry and other issues are discussed to gain a perspective on our current understanding of Enceladus. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge funding and support from the SwRI Internal Research and Development Program, the NASA Cassini (CAPS) Mission, and the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program.

  16. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image, taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa. It shows an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs can be resolved down to blocks the size of a house. A fracture that runs horizontally across and just below the center of the Europa image is about the width of a freeway.

    North is to the top right of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The image covers an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  17. BENZENE FORMATION ON INTERSTELLAR ICY MANTLES CONTAINING PROPARGYL ALCOHOL

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, B.; Mukherjee, R.; Subramanian, K. P.; Banerjee, S. B.

    2015-01-10

    Propargyl alcohol (CHCCH{sub 2}OH) is a known stable isomer of the propenal (CH{sub 2}CHCHO) molecule that was reported to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). At astrochemical conditions in the laboratory, icy layers of propargyl alcohol grown at 85 K were irradiated by 2 keV electrons and probed by a Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer in the mid-infrared (IR) region, 4000-500 cm{sup –1}. Propargyl alcohol ice under astrochemical conditions was studied for the first time; therefore, IR spectra of reported amorphous (85 K) and crystalline (180 K) propargyl alcohol ices can be used to detect its presence in the ISM. Moreover, our experiments clearly show benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) formation to be the major product from propargyl alcohol irradiation, confirming the role of propargyl radicals (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) formed from propargyl alcohol dissociation that was long expected based on theoretical modeling to effectively synthesize C{sub 6}H{sub 6} in the interstellar icy mantles.

  18. Interstellar chemical differentiation across grain sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J. X.; He, J. H.; Li, Aigen

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of ion accretion and size-dependent dust temperatures on the abundances of both gas-phase and grain-surface species. While past work has assumed a constant areal density for icy species, we show that this assumption is invalid and the chemical differentiation over grain sizes is significant. We use a gas-grain chemical code to demonstrate this numerically for two typical interstellar conditions: a dark cloud (DC) and a cold neutral medium (CNM). It is shown that, although the grain-size distribution variation (but with the total grain surface area unchanged) has little effect on the gas-phase abundances, it can alter the abundances of some surface species by up to ∼2-4 orders of magnitude. The areal densities of ice species are larger on smaller grains in the DC model as a consequence of ion accretion. However, the surface areal density evolution tracks are more complex in the CNM model due to the combined effects of ion accretion and dust temperature variation. The surface areal density differences between the smallest ( ∼ 0.01 μm) and the biggest ( ∼ 0.2 μm) grains can reach ∼1 and ∼5 orders of magnitude in the DC and CNM models, respectively.

  19. Emergence of Habitable Environments in Icy World Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Finding habitable worlds is a key driver of solar system exploration. Many solar system missions seek environments providing liquid water, energy, and nutrients, the three ingredients necessary to sustain life [1]. Such environments include hydrothermal systems, spatially confined systems where hot aqueous fluid circulates through rock by convection. Hydrothermal activity may be widespread in the solar system. Most solar system worlds larger than 200 km in radius are icy moons and dwarf planets, likely composed of an icy, cometary mantle surrounding a rocky, chondritic core [2]. By improving an icy world evolution code [3] to include the effects of core fracturing and hydrothermal circulation, I show that several icy moons and dwarf planets likely have undergone extensive water-rock interaction [4,5]. This supports observations of aqueous products on their surfaces [6,7]. I simulated the alteration of chondritic rock [8] by pure water or fluid of cometary composition [9] to show that aqueous alteration feeds back on geophysical evolution: it modifies the fluid antifreeze content, affecting its persistence over geological timescales; and the distribution of radionuclides, whose decay is a chief heat source on dwarf planets [10]. Hydrothermal circulation also efficiently transports heat from the core into the ocean, thereby increasing ocean persistence [4]. Thus, these coupled geophysical-geochemical models provide a comprehensive picture of icy world evolution and the emergence of liquid environments in chemical disequilibrium with underlying rock in their interiors. Habitable settings also require a suitable supply of bioessential elements; but what constitutes "suitable"? I sought to quantify the bulk elemental composition of hydrothermal microbial communities, collected in hot spring sediments and mats at Yellowstone National Park, USA. To do so, one must minimize the contribution of non-biological material to the samples analyzed. This was achieved using a

  20. Grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  1. To melt is not enough: Retention of volatile species through internal processing in icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, G.; Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-07-01

    The outer Solar System hosts a vast population of small icy bodies, considered to be primitive remnants from the planet-formation epoch. Early thermal and collisional processes affected such planetesimals to varying degrees depending on the time scale and dynamics of early planet growth. Recent observations have revealed that many large (>˜1000 km in diameter) transneptunian objects (TNOs) exhibit features of crystalline water ice in their surface spectra [1], as well as spectral features of more volatile ices, such as methane or hydrated ammonia [2]. These telltale observations should be accounted for when considering the alteration history and bulk processing of dwarf planets and their icy progeny. We will discuss preliminary calculations of early evolution scenarios for small icy-rocky bodies formed beyond the water-ice snow line. Such objects should also contain non-negligible fractions of pre-organic volatile compounds. The volatile composition and interior structure of these objects may change considerably due to internal heating and/or collisional modification prior to settling in their current (relatively quiescent) dynamical niches. Our initial model for the objects in question is that of a porous aggregate of various volatile compounds (as ices or trapped gases) and refractory silicate-metal solid grains, comprising the bulk matrix [3]. Chemical compositions for these objects are taken from existing simulations of chemical and dynamical evolution of disk material [4]. The key volatile species (e.g., H_2O, CO, CO_2, NH_3, CH_4, and CH_3OH) are also the most commonly observed in comets [5], which are remnants of such an early planetesimal population. Thermal and chemical internal evolution is examined self-consistently, as the abundances and locations of all species evolve, and we record mass ratios, temperatures, pressures, and porosity variations. The presence of volatile species in the interior can affect the overall heat balance and accompanied phase

  2. Interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    There are few aspects of interstellar grains that can be unambiguously defined. Very little can be said that is independent of models or presuppositions; hence issues are raised and questions categorized, rather than providing definitive answers. The questions are issues fall into three general areas; the general physical and chemical nature of the grains; the processes by which they are formed and destroyed; and future observational approaches.

  3. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the

  4. Compositional Diversity of Small Icy Objects Beyond Saturn's Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, W. M.

    2006-05-01

    This talk will review what observations are revealing about compositions of the diverse zoo of icy bodies beyond Saturn's orbit. The primary tool to investigate their compositions has been near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of their surfaces, benefiting from vibrational absorption bands in many cryogenic outer solar system materials. This technique has led to numerous important discoveries, including H2O ice on the surfaces of satellites of Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto; CH4 and N2 ices on the surfaces of Pluto and Triton; CH4 on the surfaces of the new icy planets 2005~FY9 and 2003~UB313; CO2 ice on the surfaces of Triton and uranian satellites; CO ice on the surfaces of Triton and Pluto; and water ice on the surfaces of a number of trans-neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs. Additional tantalizing evidence for more complex organic ices has been seen in several TNO spectra, and evidence is widespread for very complex organic residues (tholins) which produce characteristic reddish slopes in visible wavelength spectra of almost all outer solar system objects. Spectroscopic observations can also constrain thermodynamic properties, such as between various crystalline and amorphous states, between ices mixed at macroscopic or molecular levels, and between ices at different temperatures. Quantitative estimates of ice abundances are also possible. However, reflectance spectroscopy does have significant limitations, which will be discussed. Needs for additional laboratory studies in support of future observations will also be mentioned, including those of NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper belt. In addition to spectroscopic techniques, other, somewhat less direct techniques have bearing on compositions of outer solar system objects, including measurements of densities by means of independent mass and size estimates, of atmospheres using occultation studies, and of albedos via combined thermal emission and visible reflectance photometry. These studies

  5. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  6. An Icy Kuiper Belt Around the Young Solar-type Star HD 181327

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F.; Roberge, A.; Donaldson, J; Schneider, G.; Maddison, S. T.; Menard, F.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Matthews, G. S.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Barrado, D.; Duchene, G.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Grady C. A.; Meeus,G.; Pantin, E.; Williams, J. P.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. HD 181327 is a young main sequence F5/F6 V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (age approx.. 12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at radius approx.. 90 AU, presumed to result from collisions in a population of unseen planetesimals. Aims. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. Methods. We obtained far-infrared photometric observations of HD 181327 with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, complemented by new 3.2 mm observations carried with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST/NICMOS scattered light images that allow the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties to be broken. We then use the radiative transfer code GRaTeR to compute a large grid of models, and we identify the grain models that best reproduce the spectral energy distribution (SED) through a Bayesian analysis. We attempt to detect the oxygen and ionized carbon fine-structure lines with Herschel/PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. Results. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected with Herschel/PACS completing nicely the SED in the far-infrared. The disk is marginally resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium integration of the gas spectral lines only provides upper limits on the [OI] and [CII] line fluxes.We show that the HD 181327 dust disk consists of micron-sized grains of porous amorphous silicates and carbonaceous material surrounded by an important layer of ice, for a total dust mass of approx.. 0.05 Solar Mass (in grains up to 1 mm). We discuss evidences that the grains consists of fluffy aggregates. The upper limits on the gas atomic lines do not provide unambiguous constraints: only if the PAH abundance is high, the gas mass must be lower than approx. 17 Solar Mass. Conclusions. Despite the weak

  7. 77 FR 55452 - Lynn Canal-Icy Strait Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Forest Service Lynn Canal-Icy Strait Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lynn Canal-Icy Strait Resource Advisory Committee (LC-IS RAC) will meet... health and water quality on National Forest System lands. DATES: The meeting will be held September...

  8. Investigation of Celestial Solid Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Our far infrared studies of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic aerogel grains have demonstrated that the mm and sub-mm wave absorption produced by the fundamental two level systems (TLS) mechanism represents a more significant contribution for these open grain structures than for bulk amorphous silicate grains. We found that the region with the anomalous temperature dependence of the spectral index due to the TLS excitations can extend in a fluffy material up to 80 per cm, which is well beyond its typical upper limit for bulk glasses. Currently there is no theoretical explanation for this surprising result. The effects of reduced dimensionality on the optical properties of carbonaceous grains have been studied with a systematic investigation of carbon aerogels. This spectroscopic approach has permitted a more reliable determination of the single grain mass normalized absorption coefficient based on the experimentally determined characteristics of the fluffy material rather than on first principles calculations involving the bulk properties of the substance. Our finding is that the electrical connectivity of the material is the main factor affecting its far infrared absorption coefficient. Another one of the main constituents of the interstellar dust, amorphous ice, has been investigated in the mm-wave region both in the high (HDA) and low (LDA) density amorphous phases and as a function of impurities. We found that doping either phase with ionic (LiCl) or molecular (methanol) impurities decreases the difference in the mm-wave absorption coefficient between the HDA and LDA ice phases so that the HDA spectrum can be used as an analog for impure ice absorption in the far infrared spectral region.

  9. Measurements of the organic composition of cometary grains with the COSIMA TOF-SIMS instrument onboard the ROSETTA spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, H.; Le Roy, L.; Briani, G.; Bardyn, A.; Briois, C.; Fray, N.; Thirkell, L.; Engrand, C.; Hilchenbach, M.

    2013-12-01

    , polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, amino acids...) has been prepared on ground instruments similar to the space COSIMA instrument. We also tested the analytical capabilities of COSIMA on laboratory analogs of cometary organic matter synthesized from heating and/or photolysis of icy mixtures (inspired from the classical Greenberg yellow stuff experiments), as well as on natural proxy such as insoluble organic matter from carbonaceous chondrites (Murchison & Orgueil) and kerogen. This talk will show the hopes and limitations in term of analytical capabilities of the COSIMA instrument, and the expected science return for our understanding of the origin of comets and their astrobiological relevance.

  10. Compositional Remote Sensing of Icy Planets and Satellites Beyond Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.

    2002-01-01

    The peak of the solar energy distribution occurs at visual wavelengths and falls off rapidly in the infrared. This fact, improvements in infrared detector technology, and the low surface temperatures for most icy objects in the outer solar system have resulted in the bulk of telescopic and spacecraft observations being performed at visual and near-infrared wavelengths. Such observations, begun in the early 1970's and continuing to present, have provided compositional information regarding the surfaces of the satellites of Saturn and Uranus, Neptune's moon Triton, Pluto, Pluto's moon Charon, Centaur objects, and Kuiper belt objects. Because the incident sunlight penetrates the surface and interacts with the materials present there, the measured reflected sunlight contains information regarding the surface materials, and the ratio of the reflected to incident sunlight provides a mechanism of identifying the materials that are present.

  11. The long-period librations of large synchronous icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yseboodt, Marie; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2014-11-01

    A moon in synchronous rotation has longitudinal librations because of its non-spherical mass distribution and its elliptical orbit around the planet. We study the long-period librations of the Galilean satellites and Titan and include deformation effects and the existence of a subsurface ocean. We take into account the fact that the orbit is not keplerian and has other periodicities than the main period of orbital motion around Jupiter or Saturn due to perturbations by the Sun, other planets and moons. An orbital theory is used to compute the orbital perturbations due to these other bodies. For Titan we also take into account the large atmospheric torque at the semi-annual period of Saturn around the Sun.We numerically evaluate the amplitude and phase of the long-period librations for many interior structure models of the icy moons constrained by the mass, radius and gravity field.

  12. Dynamical tides in icy satellites with subsurface oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, M.; Rivoldini, A.; Trinh, A.; Van Hoolst, T.

    2015-10-01

    Subsurface oceans are a generic feature of large icy bodies, if not now, then at some point in their past evolution. Various datasets already point to the existence of oceans within Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan,Enceladus, and Mimas, while other bodies like Ceres,Pluto, and Triton await their turn. Subsurface oceans partially decouple the crust and thus greatly enhance tidal effect, unless the crust is very thick and hard. Dynamical effects are usually neglected when computing tidal deformations of solid bodies. It is well known,however, that various oscillation modes have a ma- jor impact on tidal dissipation within shallow surface oceans [1]. We show here that the dynamical Love numbers of a non-rotating body exhibit a simple resonant behavior if the ocean is very shallow. We also examine how the resonance is affected by rotation.

  13. Thermo-Chemical Convection in Europa's Icy Shell with Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, L.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Europa's icy surface displays numerous pits, uplifts, and chaos terrains that have been suggested to result from solid-state thermal convection in the ice shell, perhaps aided by partial melting. However, numerical simulations of thermal convection show that plumes have insufficient buoyancy to produce surface deformation. Here we present numerical simulations of thermochemical convection to test the hypothesis that convection with salinity can produce Europa's pits and domes. Our simulations show that domes (200-300 m) and pits (300-400 m) comparable to the observations can be produced in an ice shell of 15 km thick with 5-10% compositional density variation if the maximum viscosity is less than 10(exp 18) Pa sec. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. Mobility of icy sand packs, with application to Martian permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Pathare, A.V.; Stern, L.A.; Lenferink, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    [1] The physical state of water on Mars has fundamental ramifications for both climatology and astrobiology. The widespread presence of "softened" Martian landforms (such as impact craters) can be attributed to viscous creep of subsurface ground ice. We present laboratory experiments designed to determine the minimum amount of ice necessary to mobilize topography within Martian permafrost. Our results show that the jammed-to-mobile transition of icy sand packs neither occurs at fixed ice content nor is dependent on temperature or stress, but instead correlates strongly with the maximum dry packing density of the sand component. Viscosity also changes rapidly near the mobility transition. The results suggest a potentially lower minimum volatile inventory for the impact-pulverized megaregolith of Mars. Furthermore, the long-term preservation of partially relaxed craters implies that the ice content of Martian permafrost has remained close to that at the mobility transition throughout Martian history. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  16. Surface radiation environment of Saturn's icy moon Mimas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Kollmann, P.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.; Krupp, N.

    2012-09-01

    The majority of the large icy satellites that orbit Jupiter and Saturn are embedded within the magnetospheres of their respective parent bodies. The inner regions of these magnetospheric environments are characterized by populations of trapped charged particles, from thermal plasma to high energy energetic ions and electrons. Moons orbiting within these magnetospheres are therefore often subject to continuous bombardment by multiple particle species over a wide range of energies. It is known that such bombardment may induce chemical alterations within icy surfaces through the process of radiolysis, an effect which has the potential to significantly change surface and near-surface composition over typical geological timescales. In order to make quantifiable predictions on the surface composition of these moons, it is therefore critical to have a detailed measure of deposited dose into the surface from the relevant magnetospheric particle species. Saturn's innermost large moon Mimas orbits within one of the harshest radiation environments of the Saturnian magnetosphere and remote sensing observations of the moon have revealed a surface that displays strong signs of magnetospheric weathering. It is therefore of great interest to further quantify the interaction of magnetospheric particles with the Mimantean surface, particularly with regards to determining which bombarding species dominate at different moon surface locations and surface depths and to compare this with remote sensing observations. We will present dose-depth profiles for the nearsurface which have been computed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code and representative energetic electron and proton spectra derived from measurements made by the MIMI-LEMMS particle instrument on the Cassini spacecraft.

  17. A Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microorganisms on Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindensmith, C. A.; Nadeau, J. L.; Deming, J. W.; Showalter, G. M.; Rider, S.; Bedrossian, M.

    2015-12-01

    Holography is a well-established imaging technique that uses the interference of light to record and reproduce three-dimensional images of objects. Its use began in the 1960s with the invention of the laser. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has several advantages over ordinary imaging microscopy which make it ideal for field and astrobiology use, including no need for focus or scanning so that instruments are readily made autonomous. DHM can produce simultaneous bright-field and quantitative phase-contrast images of the same field, providing additional information about transparent objects, e.g., refractive index and/or thickness; thus it inherently supports effective label-free imaging. We have built a fieldable DHM for detection of microorganisms in bodies of water and in brines collected from sea ice. Ice that appears solid to the eye contains interconnected brine-filled microscopic pores and veins which are occupied by populations of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The presence of life in "solid" ice has important implications for exploration of icy worlds, where it is unlikely that the first missions will be able to access the subsurface oceans. Using this new instrument, we examined several dozen samples from three different sites around Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, mixed populations of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms were observed. Many of the organisms were motile immediately upon extraction from sea ice, and others became motile after warming or addition of sugars and/or amino acids. Meaningful motility was readily distinguished from turbulence or fluid flow. The spatial resolution of the instrument was better than 1 μm, leading to unambiguous recognition of subcellular structures in eukaryotes, including nuclei and chloroplasts. We present mission scenrios for both orbiters and landers in which DHM may be used as a valuable complement to chemical-based life detection techniques for discovery of cellular life on icy worlds.

  18. Dielectric properties of Jovian satellite ice analogs for subsurface radar exploration: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinelli, Elena; Cosciotti, Barbara; Di Paolo, Federico; Lauro, Sebastian Emanuel; Mattei, Elisabetta; Orosei, Roberto; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2015-09-01

    The first European mission dedicated to the exploration of Jupiter and its icy moons (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer—JUICE) will be launched in 2022 and will reach its final destination in 2030. The main goals of this mission are to understand the internal structure of the icy crusts of three Galilean satellites (Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) and, ultimately, to detect Europa's subsurface ocean, which is believed to be the closest to the surface among those hypothesized to exist on these moons. JUICE will be equipped with the 9 MHz subsurface-penetrating radar RIME (Radar for Icy Moon Exploration), which is designed to image the ice down to a depth of 9 km. Moreover, a parallel mission to Europa, which will host onboard REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface) equipped with 9MHz and 60MHz antennas, has been recently approved by NASA. The success of these experiments strongly relies on the accurate prediction of the radar performance and on the optimal processing and interpretation of radar echoes that, in turn, depend on the dielectric properties of the materials composing the icy satellite crusts. In the present review we report a complete range of potential ice types that may occur on these icy satellites to understand how they may affect the results of the proposed missions. First, we discuss the experimental results on pure and doped water ice in the framework of the Jaccard theory, highlighting the critical aspects in terms of a lack of standard laboratory procedures and inconsistency in data interpretation. We then describe the dielectric behavior of extraterrestrial ice analogs like hydrates and icy mixtures, carbon dioxide ice and ammonia ice. Building on this review, we have selected the most suitable data to compute dielectric attenuation, velocity, vertical resolution, and reflection coefficients for such icy moon environments, with the final goal being to estimate the potential capabilities of the radar missions as a

  19. Analogous corticocortical inhibition and facilitation in ipsilateral and contralateral human motor cortex representations of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Muellbacher, W; Boroojerdi, B; Ziemann, U; Hallett, M

    2001-11-01

    How the human brain controls activation of the ipsilateral part of midline muscles is unknown. We studied corticospinal and corticocortical network excitability of both ipsilateral and contralateral motor representations of the tongue to determine whether they are under analogous or disparate inhibitory and facilitatory corticocortical control. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to unilateral focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the tongue primary motor cortex were recorded simultaneously from the ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles. Single-pulse TMS was used to assess motor threshold (MT) and MEP recruitment. Paired-pulse TMS was used to study intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between the conditioning stimulus (CS) and the test stimulus (TS), and at different CS and TS intensities, respectively. Focal TMS invariably produced MEPs in both ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles. MT was lower and MEP recruitment was steeper when recorded from the contralateral muscle group. ICI and ICF were identical in the ipsilateral and contralateral representations, with inhibition occurring at short ISIs (2 and 3 ms) and facilitation occurring at longer ISIs (10 and 15 ms). Moreover, changing one stimulus parameter regularly produced analogous changes in MEP size bilaterally, revealing strong linear correlations between ipsilateral and contralateral ICI and ICF (P < 0.0001). These findings indicate that the ipsilateral and contralateral representations of the tongue are under analogous inhibitory and facilitatory control, possibly by a common intracortical network. PMID:11779968

  20. An Icy Kuiper-Belt Around the Young Solar-Type Star HD 181327

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F.; Roberge, A.; Donaldson, J.; Schneider, G.; Maddison, S. T.; Menard, F.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Mathews, G. S.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Barrado, D.; Duchene, G.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Grady, C. A.; Meeus, G.; Pantin, E.; Williams, J. P.; Woitke, P.

    2011-01-01

    HD 181327 is a young Main Sequence F5/F6 V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (age approx 12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at approx90 AU, presumed to result from collisions in a populat.ion of unseen planetesimals. Aims. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in great details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. Methods. We obtained far-IR photometric observations of HD 181327 with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, complemented by new 3.2 nun observations carried with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST /NICMOS scattered light images that break the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties. We then use the radiative transfer code GRaTer to compute a large grid of dust models, and we apply a Bayesian inference method to identify the grain models that best reproduce the SED. We attempt to detect the oxygen and ionized carbon fine-structure lines with Herschel/PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. Results. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected with Herschel/PACS completing nicely the SED in the far-infrared. The disk is marginally resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium integration of the gas spectral lines only provides upper limits on the [OI] and [CII] line fluxes. We show that the HD 181327 dust disk consists of micron-sized grains of porous amorphous silicates and carbonaceous material surrounded by an import.ant layer of ice for a total dust mass of approx 0.05 stellar Mass. We discuss evidences that the grains consists of fluffy aggregates. The upper limits on the gas atomic lines do not provide unambiguous constraints: only if the PAH abundance is high, the gas mass must be lower than approx 17 Stellar Mass Conclusions. Despite the weak constraints on the gas disk, the age of HD 181327 and the properties of the

  1. Interpretation of spectrophotometric surface properties of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by laboratory simulations of cometary analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Bernhard; Pommerol, Antoine; Poch, Olivier; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    The OSIRIS imaging system [1] onboard European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission has been orbiting the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) since August 2014. It provides an enormous quantity of high resolution images of the nucleus in the visible spectral range. 67P revealed an unexpected diversity of complex surface structures and spectral properties have also been measured [2].To better interpret this data, a profound knowledge of laboratory analogs of cometary surfaces is essential. For this reason we have set up the LOSSy laboratory (Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials) to study the spectrophotometric properties of ice-bearing cometary nucleus analogs. The main focus lies on the characterization of the surface evolution under simulated space conditions. The laboratory is equipped with two facilities: the PHIRE-2 radio-goniometer [3], designed to measure the bidirectional visible reflectance of samples under a wide range of geometries and the SCITEAS simulation chamber [4], designed to study the evolution of icy samples subliming under low pressure/temperature conditions by hyperspectral imaging in the VIS-NIR range. Different microscopes complement the two facilities.We present laboratory data of different types of fine grained ice particles mixed with non-volatile components (complex organic matter and minerals). As the ice sublimes, a deposition lag of non-volatile constituents is built-up on top of the ice, possibly mimic a cometary surface. The bidirectional reflectance of the samples have been characterized before and after the sublimation process.A comparison of our laboratory findings with recent OSIRIS data [5] will be presented.[1] Keller, H. U., et al., 2007, Space Sci. Rev., 128, 26[2] Thomas, N. , 2015, Science, 347, Issue 6220, aaa0440[3] Jost, B., submitted, Icarus[4] Pommerol, A., et al., 2015. Planet Space Sci 109:106-122.[5] Fornasier, S., et al., in press. Icarus, arXiv:1505.06888

  2. Polymerization of Building Blocks of Life on Europa and Other Icy Moons

    PubMed Central

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The outer Solar System may provide a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life. Remote sensing data from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the jovian icy moons—Europa, Ganymede, and possibly Callisto—may harbor liquid water oceans underneath their icy crusts. Although compositional information required for the discussion of habitability is limited because of significantly restricted observation data, organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Universe. Recently, in situ spacecraft measurements and experiments suggest that amino acids can be formed abiotically on interstellar ices and comets. These amino acids could be continuously delivered by meteorite or comet impacts to icy moons. Here, we show that polymerization of organic monomers, in particular amino acids and nucleotides, could proceed spontaneously in the cold environment of icy moons, in particular the jovian icy moon Europa as a typical example, based on thermodynamic calculations, though kinetics of formation are not addressed. Observed surface temperature on Europa is 120 and 80 K in the equatorial region and polar region, respectively. At such low temperatures, Gibbs energies of polymerization become negative, and the estimated thermal structure of the icy crust should contain a shallow region (i.e., at a depth of only a few kilometers) favorable for polymerization. Investigation of the possibility of organic monomer polymerization on icy moons could provide good constraints on the origin and early evolution of extraterrestrial life. Key Words: Planetary science—Europa—Planetary habitability and biosignatures—Extraterrestrial life—Extraterrestrial organic compounds. Astrobiology 15, 430–441. PMID:26060981

  3. Polymerization of Building Blocks of Life on Europa and Other Icy Moons.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Jun; Kitadai, Norio

    2015-06-01

    The outer Solar System may provide a potential habitat for extraterrestrial life. Remote sensing data from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the jovian icy moons--Europa, Ganymede, and possibly Callisto--may harbor liquid water oceans underneath their icy crusts. Although compositional information required for the discussion of habitability is limited because of significantly restricted observation data, organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Universe. Recently, in situ spacecraft measurements and experiments suggest that amino acids can be formed abiotically on interstellar ices and comets. These amino acids could be continuously delivered by meteorite or comet impacts to icy moons. Here, we show that polymerization of organic monomers, in particular amino acids and nucleotides, could proceed spontaneously in the cold environment of icy moons, in particular the jovian icy moon Europa as a typical example, based on thermodynamic calculations, though kinetics of formation are not addressed. Observed surface temperature on Europa is 120 and 80 K in the equatorial region and polar region, respectively. At such low temperatures, Gibbs energies of polymerization become negative, and the estimated thermal structure of the icy crust should contain a shallow region (i.e., at a depth of only a few kilometers) favorable for polymerization. Investigation of the possibility of organic monomer polymerization on icy moons could provide good constraints on the origin and early evolution of extraterrestrial life. PMID:26060981

  4. Comparative study of icy patches on comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklay, Nilda; Pommerol, Antoine; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Sunshine, Jessica; Sierks, Holger; Pajola, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    Cometary missions Deep Impact, EPOXI and Rosetta investigated the nuclei of comets 9P/Tempel 1, 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko respectively. Bright patches were observed on the surfaces of each of these three comets [1-5]. Of these, the surface of 67P is mapped at the highest spatial resolution via narrow angle camera (NAC) of the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS, [6]) on board the Rosetta spacecraft. OSIRIS NAC is equipped with twelve filters covering the wavelength range of 250 nm to 1000 nm. Various filters combinations are used during surface mapping. With high spatial resolution data of comet 67P, three types of bright features were detected on the comet surface: Clustered, isolated and bright boulders [2]. In the visible spectral range, clustered bright features on comet 67P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [2, 4] while isolated bright features on comet 67P have flat spectra [4]. Icy patches observed on the surface of comets 9P and 103P display bluer spectral slopes than the average surface [1, 5]. Clustered and isolated bright features are blue in the RGB composites generated by using the images taken in NIR, visible and NUV wavelengths [2, 4]. This is valid for the icy patches observed on comets 9P and 103P [1, 5]. Spectroscopic observations of bright patches on comets 9P and 103P confirmed the existence of water [1, 5]. There were more than a hundred of bright features detected on the northern hemisphere of comet 67P [2]. Analysis of those features from both multispectral data and spectroscopic data is an ongoing work. Water ice is detected in eight of the bright features so far [7]. Additionally, spectroscopic observations of two clustered bright features on the surface of comet 67P revealed the existence of water ice [3]. The spectral properties of one of the icy patches were studied by [4] using OSIRIS NAC images and compared with the spectral properties of the active regions observed

  5. Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer: mission status after the Definition Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Dmitri; Barabash, Stas; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Dougherty, Michele; Erd, Christian; Fletcher, Leigh; Gare, Philippe; Gladstone, Randall; Grasset, Olivier; Gurvits, Leonid; Hartogh, Paul; Hussmann, Hauke; Iess, Luciano; Jaumann, Ralf; Langevin, Yves; Palumbo, Pasquale; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Sarri, Giuseppe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Witasse, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE), the ESA first large-class mission within the Cosmic Vision Program 2015-2025, was adopted in November 2014. The mission will perform detailed investigations of Jupiter and its system with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. The overarching theme for JUICE is: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. At Ganymede, the mission will characterize in detail the ocean layers; provide topographical, geological and compositional mapping of the surface; study the physical properties of the icy crusts; characterize the internal mass distribution, investigate the exosphere; study Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field and its interactions with the Jovian magnetosphere. For Europa, the focus will be on the non-ice chemistry, understanding the formation of surface features and subsurface sounding of the icy crust over recently active regions. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early solar system. JUICE will perform a multidisciplinary investigation of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions will be elucidated. JUICE will study the moons' interactions with the magnetosphere, gravitational coupling and long-term tidal evolution of the Galilean satellites. JUICE highly capable scientific payload includes 10 state-of-the-art instruments onboard the spacecraft plus one experiment that uses the spacecraft telecommunication system with ground-based radio telescopes. The remote sensing package includes a high-resolution multi-band visible imager (JANUS) and spectro-imaging capabilities from the

  6. Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment at the Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; DeAngelis, E.; Argan, A.; Fierro, D.; Vertolli, N.; Danduras, I.; Selci, S.; Leoni, R.; Sheer, J.

    2012-04-01

    GENIE (Ganymede Europa Neutral Imaging Experiment) (energy range 10 eV - 10 keV) is a high-angular-resolution detector, based on the ToF technique. Its objective is to map the origin sites of the most energetic neutral particles of the icy moons' exospheres, in order to investigate the interaction between the surface and the environment. The investigation of plasma interaction with the Jupiter's moons and the processes responsible for surface space weathering is one of the coolest topics of the proposed Cosmic Vision mission JUICE since it directly relates to energy exchange within the Jupiter's system, to the moon evolution and finally to the habitability in the harsh radiative environment. Icy surfaces of the Jupiter's moons are continuously irradiated by intense ion fluxes of H+, O+ and S+ in the energy range from keV to MeV. These ions are expected to impact the moon icy surface producing relevant and observable effects such as particles release and chemical and structural modifications of the surface. In particular, the plasma impacting onto the surface causes, via ion-sputtering, radiolysis and backscattering processes, release of neutrals that constitute the exospheres. The energy spectrum of this particle population peaks in the eV range with a non-negligible tail up to hundred eVs. The knowledge of the effectiveness of these processes in this environment is important in order to understand the evolution of the moons and their interactions within the Jupiter's system. The detection of neutral atoms above few 10 eVs (LENA) is a way to univocally relate the exosphere to surface features and to monitor instantaneously the effect of plasma precipitation onto the surface. Thus, GENIE is fully complementary to INM spectrometer, devoted to infer exospheric composition and density. Coupled measurements of LENA and gas composition will improve our knowledge in surface release mechanisms. The observation of LENA at different latitudes and longitudes, resulting in a 2

  7. JUICE: a European mission to Jupiter and its icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, D.; Erd, C.; Duvet, L.; Wielders, A.; Torralba-Elipe, I.; Altobelli, N.

    2013-09-01

    JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) is the first L-class mission selected for the ESA's Cosmic Vision programme 2015-2025 which has just entered the definition phase. JUICE will perform detailed investigations of Jupiter and its system in all their inter-relations and complexity with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. Investigations of Europa and Callisto will complete a comparative picture of the Galilean moons. By performing detailed investigations of Jupiter's system, JUICE will address in depth two key questions of the ESA's Cosmic Vision programme: (1) What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? and (2) How does the Solar System work? The overarching theme for JUICE has been formulated as: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. At Ganymede the mission will characterize in detail the ocean layers; provide topographical, geological and compositional mapping of the surface; study the physical properties of the icy crusts; characterize the internal mass distribution, investigate the exosphere; study Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field and its interactions with the Jovian magnetosphere. For Europa, the focus will be on the non-ice chemistry, understanding the formation of surface features and subsurface sounding of the icy crust over recently active regions. Callisto will be explored as a witness of the early solar system. JUICE will perform a comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants including exoplanets. The circulation, meteorology, chemistry and structure of the Jovian atmosphere will be studied from the cloud tops to the thermosphere. The focus in Jupiter's magnetosphere will include an investigation of the three dimensional properties of the magnetodisc and in-depth study of the coupling processes within the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Aurora and radio emissions and their response to the solar wind will be

  8. Comparative relief-forming potential of rocky terrestrial planets and icy saturnian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Comparative relief-forming potential of rocky terrestrial planets and icy saturnian satellites. G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] states that "orbits make structures". Its third theorem ("Celestial bodies are granular") is to say that sizes of tectonic granules are inversely proportional to orbital frequencies: higher frequency - smaller granule, and vice versa, lower frequency - larger granule. Thus, Mercury is very fine-grained, Venus fine-grained, Earth medium-grained, Mars coarse-grained. The following row of granule sizes confirms it: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2 (R-a planet radius). A geometrical model of this presents a circle with inscribed in it standing waves: for Mercury 16 waves, for Venus 6 waves, for Earth 4 waves (a cross!), for Mars 2 waves [4]. This geometrization is rather descriptive as it shows how waves amplitudes increase with the Solar distance and oscillations around a circle (wave heights) can be measured [5]. These heights are as follows: Mercury 2πR/64.08, Venus 2πR/24.34, Earth 2πR/16.44, Mars 2πR/8.8. These heights reduced to the Earth's one (taken as 1) are as follows: Mercury 0.256, Venus 0.675, Earth 1.0, Mars 1.868. Now we are looking at the real relief ranges (spans). They are as follows in km: Mercury ~5 (a bit less than 5 km according to one laser altimetry profile by Messenger spacecraft in 2007), Venus ~14, Earth ~20, Mars ~30. This last figure may be increased by heights of collapsed cones of huge marcian volcanoes having calderas radii 40-50 km and presumed slope angle 5-6 degrees that gives additional 4-5 km for the martian relief range making it ~35 km. Taking the Earth range as 1, one gets the following row of relative heights: Mercury 0.25, Venus 0.7, Earth 1.0, Mars 1.75. Comparing two rows of relative heights (theoretic and real) one sees that they are rather similar: Mercury 0.256 (0.25), Venus 0

  9. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  10. Analog synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  11. The alteration of icy samples during sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungas, G.; Bearman, G.; Beegle, L. W.; Hecht, M.; Peters, G. H.; Glucoft, J.; Strothers, K.

    2006-12-01

    Valid in situ scientific studies require both that samples be analyzed in as pristine condition as possible and that any modification from the pristine to the sampled state be well understood. While samples with low to high ice concentration are critical for the study of astrobiology and geology, they pose problems with respect to the sample acquisition, preparation and distribution systems (SPAD) upon which the analytical instruments depend. Most significant of the processes that occur during SPAD is sublimation or melting caused by thermal loading from drilling, coring, etc. as well as exposure to a dry low pressure ambient environment. These processes can alter the sample, as well as generating, meta-stable liquid water that can refreeze in the sample transfer mechanisms, interfering with proper operation and creating cross-contamination. We have investigated and quantified loss of volatiles such as H2O, CO, CO2, and organics contained within icy and powdered samples when acquired, processed and transferred. During development of the MSL rock crusher, for example, ice was observed to pressure-fuse and stick to the side even at -70C. We have investigated sublimation from sample acquisition at Martian temperature and pressure for a samples ranging from 10 to 100 water/dirt ratios. Using the RASP that will be on Phoenix, we have measured sublimation of ice during excavation at Martian pressure and find that the sublimation losses can range from 10 to 50 percent water. It is the thermal conductivity of the soil that determines local heat transport, and how much of the sample acquisition energy is wicked away into the soil and how much goes into the sample. Modeling of sample acquisition methods requires measurement of these parameters. There is a two phase model for thermal conductivity as a function of dirt/ice ratio but it needed to be validated. We used an ASTM method for measuring thermal conductivity and implemented it in the laboratory. The major conclusion is

  12. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Electrical Systems Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will send a spacecraft to explore three of Jupiter s moons (Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa), all of which show evidence of containing vast subterranean oceans beneath their icy surfaces. The evidence of these oceans was discovered by Galileo, and the moons are believed to have the three essential ingredients for life: water, energy, and the necessary chemical elements. Galileo has shown that melted water on Europa has been in contact with the surface of the moon in geologically recent times, and may still lie relatively close to the surface. This project will also introduce a revolutionary new form of electric propulsion powered by a nuclear fission reactor. This electric propulsion is called ion propulsion. It was used on a previous mission called Deep Space 1, proving that ion propulsion works for interplanetary travel. Since JIMO will be traveling farther from the sun, solar power will be difficult to supply the electric energy demanded by the mission. Therefore a nuclear reactor and a thermo-electric converter system will be necessary. Besides making the trip to three of Jupiter's moons - one after the other - a realistic possibility, this new form of power and propulsion opens up the rest of the outer solar system for future exploration. JIMO will fulfill its goals by exploring Europa first, with subsequent trips to the moons Callisto and Ganymede in order to provide comparisons key to understanding the evolution of all three. In order to ensure the stability and proper preparation of the electrical system on JIMO, the High Power AC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Test Bed is being developed. The testing on.this AC PMAD will consist of electrical performance verification of candidate power system components. Examples of these components are: high power AC switchgear, high power ACDC converters, AC power distribution units, DC power distribution units, etc. Throughout the course of the summer the over

  13. Icy Satellite Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Mission has turned our view of Saturn's icy moons from scientific sketches to fully realized worlds. Among the major discoveries are: Activity on Enceladus and associated plumes that originate in small hot spots on its south pole and that appear to be modulated by tidal forces; a liquid subsurface water ocean on Enceladus that is a habitable environment; several new moons; debris rings associated with moons; a unique equatorial ridge on Iapetus; the identity of new constituents on the moons including carbon dioxide ice on most of them and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)on Iapetus; differentiated or partially differentiated interiors; nano-iron on the surfaces of the moons and in the rings; volatile segregation on Iapetus and Hyperion; and a bewildering array of geologic processes on the small moons. But our new view of these icy worlds has spawned new questions. Among these unanswered questions are: How variable are the plumes? Have any other moons had activity similar to that on Enceladus and did it continue up to the recent past? How much dust do the moons contribute to the region around Saturn? What caused the ridge on Iapetus? What are the interiors of the moons like? How differentiated and compensated are they? Five additional targeted flybys, two of Dione and three of Enceladus, have been designed to answer these questions and will be implemented during the remainder of the Solstice Mission. The Dione flybys both include gravity passes to determine its state of differentiation. One of the flybys is optimized to measure the fields and particle environment around Dione. One of the two remote-sensing flybys of Enceladus will scrutinize the south polar region to further understand the size, temperature, and variability of the emitting areas, while the other will observe the north pole to determine why it is so different from the south. The third Enceladus flyby involves an unprecedented pass less than 50 km above the surface into the midst of

  14. Defining the Contribution of Fragmentation to Icy World Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. C.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    The fracture and failure of the outer planet satellites' icy shells are not only an observable record of stress and activity throughout their evolution, they are also key mechanisms in the interaction of surface and subsurface material and thus crucial aspects of the study of crustal overturn and ice shell habitability. Recent work suggests that Europa's chaos terrain formation may include a collapse phase, with the eventual appearance of the chaos terrain determined in part by fracture density in the ice. Similarly, Enceladus' subdued south polar terrain is now known to exist above a trapped south polar sea. With this in mind, the work to be presented combines fractal analysis and a novel fragmentation physics model to characterize the transition from fractured ice to fragmented/collapsed ice and thus, implications for crustal overturn in Europa's ice shell using terrestrial glaciological studies to develop and test plausible processes. While intuition may suggest that ice "explosions" and simple elastic crack propagation are different, a fast-propagating fracture or other abrupt shift to the status quo (e.g., thinned shell) of the system is in effect very similar, as damage radiates through the system. In studying the size distribution of fragments in Europa's chaos regions, it is possible to back out physical properties of the ice, e.g., material strength, cohesion properties and most importantly, energy necessary to create such a fragmentation event. Fragmentation theory describes the breakage of a body into several pieces. When integrated, our models of crack propagation and fragmentation account for the three modes of fracturing: initiation, propagation, and interaction, and allows for characterization of the energy necessary for fragmented topography (e.g., chaos) to form within an ice shell to better understand the implications for surface overturn. We have modeled fracture formation and coalescence into fragments that results in a similar distribution to

  15. Sputtering processes - Erosion and chemical change. [magnetospheric ion bombardment of planetary atmospheric ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Brown, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory data and models of sputter-induced erosion and chemical alterations in ice films are reviewed and the results are applied to icy grains and satellites exposed to magnetospheric ion bombardment. It is shown that the source of the plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is likely to be the sputter erosion of the icy objects in this region and the sputter erosion and possible stabilization of the E-ring are considered. Ion-induced polymerization is discussed as a source of the darkened rings of Uranus.

  16. Sputtering processes - Erosion and chemical change. [Magnetospheric ion bombardment of planetary atmospheric ice grains

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lanzerotti, L.J.; Brown, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory data and models of sputter-induced erosion and chemical alterations in ice films are reviewed and the results are applied to icy grains and satellites exposed to magnetospheric ion bombardment. It is shown that the source of the plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is likely to be the sputter erosion of the icy objects in this region and the sputter erosion and possible stabilization of the E-ring are considered. Ion-induced polymerization is discussed as a source of the darkened rings of Uranus. 78 references.

  17. Grain Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  18. Thermal formation of methylammonium methylcarbamate in interstellar ice analogs: a glycine salt precursor under VUV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvernay, Fabrice; Borget, Fabien; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Theule, Patrice; Dhendecourt, Louis; Chiavassa, Thierry

    Dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) play an important role in dense molecular clouds chemistry of providing a surface (catalyst) upon which atoms and molecules can freeze out, forming icy mantles. Dense molecular clouds are characterized by low temperature (10 -50 K) and represent the birth sites of stars. After a gravitationnal breakdown, a part of the dense molecular cloud collapses toward the formation of star and subsequently a protoplanetary disk from which planets, asteroids and comets will appear. During this evolution, interstellar or-ganic material inside ices undergoes different range of chemical alterations (thermal cycling process, ultraviolet photons, electron scattering and cosmic rays irradiation) hence increasing the molecular complexity before their incorporation inside precometary ices. To date, it is supposed that comets could have delivered to the early Earth the organic materials essential to a prebiotic chemistry, one of the prerequisites toward the origin of living systems. The for-mation of prebiotical molecules such as the simplest amino acids (glycine) is proposed in this current study mainly based on laboratory experiments simulating the chemistry occuring on ices within protostellar environments. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are used to monitor the thermal formation of glycine isomer form: the methylammonium methylcarbamate [CH3NH3+][CH3NHCOO-] in interstellar ice analogs made up of two astrophysical relevant molecules: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methylamine (CH3NH2). Using infrared spectroscopy, we study the photochemical behaviour of a pure sample of methylammonium methylcarbamate under vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) field. We show that a glycine isomer salt could readily enter into the composition of ices in colder region of protostellar environments. Upon ultraviolet irra-diation, this latter can undergo an isomerization process induced by photons yielding a glycine salt: the methylammonium glycinate [CH3NH3+][NH2CH2

  19. THz and mid-IR spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs: methyl and carboxylic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; McGuire, B A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in astrochemistry concerns the synthesis and survival of complex organic molecules (COMs) throughout the process of star and planet formation. While it is generally accepted that most complex molecules and prebiotic species form in the solid phase on icy grain particles, a complete understanding of the formation pathways is still largely lacking. To take full advantage of the enormous number of available THz observations (e.g., Herschel Space Observatory, SOFIA, and ALMA), laboratory analogs must be studied systematically. Here, we present the THz (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) spectra of astrophysically-relevant species that share the same functional groups, including formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and acetone ((CH3)2CO), compared to more abundant interstellar molecules such as water (H2O), methanol (CH3OH), and carbon monoxide (CO). A suite of pure and mixed binary ices are discussed. The effects on the spectra due to the composition and the structure of the ice at different temperatures are shown. Our results demonstrate that THz spectra are sensitive to reversible and irreversible transformations within the ice caused by thermal processing, suggesting that THz spectra can be used to study the composition, structure, and thermal history of interstellar ices. Moreover, the THz spectrum of an individual species depends on the functional group(s) within that molecule. Thus, future THz studies of different functional groups will help in characterizing the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium (ISM). PMID:25302394

  20. Two-dimensional grain growth in rapidly solidified succinonitrile films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M.; Rajan, K.; Glicksman, M.; Fradkov, V.; Nordberg, J.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics and topological mechanisms of normal grain growth have been examined through in situ dynamic studies on rapidly solidified succinonitrile (SCN). The in situ studies allowed for continuous monitoring of the evolution of individual grains during growth. We have assessed the Mullins—Von Neumann topological grain growth law and the Burke—Turnbull parabolic rate law and have determined rate constants that describe grain growth. This work demonstrates that both laws are both obeyed globally and consistently. These in situ studies permit one to follow the unit operations associated with grain growth kinetics. This article demonstrates the usefulness of succinonitrile as a model analog system for studying grain growth.

  1. Large Collisions on Icy and Rocky Bodies with Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, E.; Stewart, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we investigate the outcome of collisions between icy-rocky planetary embryos with strength. In the inner solar system, impacts between embryos are hypothesized to generate crustal dichotomies on global scales, e.g., the Borealis Basin on Mars. In the Kuiper Belt, such global scale collisions differ from the inner solar system in important ways. First, bodies are less massive and their mutual collision velocities are smaller in amplitude compared to the inner solar system. As a result, the amount of direct shock heating is small and very localized. Strength is an important factor because shear heating is a process that can deposit energy more deeply into the final body. With a small gravitational potential, the post impact shape of the body may exhibit features related to residual strength. The variety of possible post-impact structures depends on the pre-impact thermal state and level of differentiation of the silicate-ice mixture and impact conditions. Here, we focus on collisions scenarios proposed for the origin of the Pluto system using the CTH shock physics code. We report on the magnitude of thermal processing and residual strength for varying assumptions about initial conditions.

  2. Oxidants on Small Icy Bodies and Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Liang, M.

    2007-12-01

    Oxidants such as O2, O3, H2O2 and SO4 are known to be on the surface of icy bodies in the outer solar system and they may be an important source of energy for the subterranean biosphere. During Proterozoic time, Earth experienced "Snowball Earth" events, associated with the nearly complete shutdown of the hydrological cycle. During such long and severe glacial intervals, a weak hydrological cycle coupled with photochemical reactions involving water vapor would give rise to the sustained production of hydrogen peroxide. The photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide has been proposed previously as the primary mechanism for oxidizing the surface of Mars. During a Snowball, hydrogen peroxide could be stored in the ice; it would then be released directly into the ocean and the atmosphere upon melting and could mediate global oxidation events in the aftermath of the Snowball, such as that found in the geological record. There are implications for the evolution of oxygen-mediating and utilizing enzymes and thereby paved the way for the eventual appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  3. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Icy Worlds: Moving and Grooving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reports from the conference session entitled Icy Worlds: Moving and Grooving, include:Mass Anomalies on Ganymede; Europan Chaos and Lenticulae: A Synthesis of Size, Spacing, and Areal Density Analyses; Thermal and Topographic Tests of Europa Chaos Formation Models; Flexure of Europa s Lithosphere Due to Ridge-Loading; Ridges on Europa: Origin by Incremental Ice-Wedging ; Convergent Boundaries on Europa: a Numerical Approach to Euler Pole Analysis and Its' Implications for Plate Reconstruction; Numerical Simulations of Subsolidus Convection in the Ice Shell of Europa: Implications for the Thermal Evolution and Present State; Effects of Plasticity on Convection in an Ice Shell: Implications for Europa; Non-Newtonian Convection and Compositional Buoyancy: Advances in Modeling Convection and Dome Formation on Europa; Convective Instability in Ice I: Application to Callisto and Ganymede; Crater Size Distributions on Callisto: A Galileo SSI Summary; Neutron Diffraction Studies of Planetary Ices; and H2O2 Synthesis Induced by Irradiation of H2O with Energetic H+ and Ar+ Ions at Various Temperatures.

  4. Erosion rates during rapid deglaciation in Icy Bay, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, MichèLe; Hallet, Bernard

    2006-06-01

    Contemporary glacial erosion rates based on sediment yields in southeast Alaska merit considerable attention because they are unsurpassed worldwide, and they significantly exceed long-term exhumation rates in the region. Two issues are likely to contribute to these high rates: contemporary sediment yields in fjords (1) have generally been overestimated by failing to account for the considerable input of subaerially derived material and (2) are exceptionally high because tidewater glaciers in southeast Alaska have been anomalously dynamic and erosive during the past century of rapid retreat. To investigate these influences and to quantify the rate at which Tyndall Glacier erodes its basin we present seismic data defining the volume of sediments in Taan Fjord, Icy Bay. We subtract the contribution of subaerially derived sediments from the fjord sediment package to determine the sediment yield directly from Tyndall Glacier during the most recent period of retreat: 1962-1999. Using a numerical model of proglacial glacimarine sedimentation, we then calculate the annual sediment yield from, and the corresponding erosion rate of, Tyndall Glacier during this period, which averages 28 ± 5 mma-1. A strong correlation emerges between glacial retreat rates and glacial sediment yields, implying that most contemporary sediment yield data from retreating tidewater glaciers may correspond to contemporary erosion rates that are a factor of 3.5 ± 1.5 higher than in the long term. Hence we estimate the long-term erosion rate for Tyndall Glacier to be 9 ± 2 mma-1.

  5. 10 years of mapping the icy saturnian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Porco, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini spacecraft started its tour through the Saturnian system in July 2004. The Imaging Science Subsystem onboard the orbiter con-sists of a high-resolution Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) with a focal length of 2000 mm and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with a focal length of 200 mm [1]. One of the main objectives of the Cassini mission is to investigate the icy Saturnian satellites. These satellites were imaged in many flybys during the no-minal mission between 2004 and 2008. The imaging campaign continued during the first extended mission (''Equinox mission'') between 2008 and 2010 and continues during the current second extended mission (''Solstice mission''). It is now possible to image also the Northern parts of the Icy satellites which were not illuminated during the nominal mission. Mosaicking: The image data processing chain con-sists of the same steps as described in [2]: radiometric calibration, geometric correction, map projection, and mosaicking. Spacecraft position and camera pointing data are available in the form of SPICE kernels (http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov). While the orbit information is sufficiently accurate to be used directly for mapping purposes, the pointing information must be corrected using limb fits (semi-controlled mosaics) or by photo-grammetric bundle adjustment (controlled mosaics). The coordinate system adopted by the Cassini mis-sion for satellite mapping is the IAU ''planetographic'' system, consisting of planetographic latitude and posi-tive West longitude. The surface position of the prime meridian as defined by the IAU cartography working group [3] is defined by small craters. New values for the rotational parameter W0 which defines the location of the prime meridian at January 1, 2000 were calcula-ted based on the high-resolution mosaics to be consis-tent with this definition [4] and approved by the IAU [3]. Cartographic maps: Three different quadrangle schemes were used for the generation of the maps and the atlases [5]: • A

  6. A Power Conversion Concept for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission is currently under study by the Office of Space Science under the Project Prometheus Program. JIMO is examining the use of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) to carry scientific payloads to three Jovian moons. A potential power system concept includes dual 100 kWe Brayton converters, a deployable pumped loop heat rejection subsystem, and a 400 Vac Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) bus. Many trades were performed in aniving at this candidate power system concept. System-level studies examined design and off-design operating modes, determined startup requirements, evaluated subsystem redundancy options, and quantified the mass and radiator area of reactor power systems from 20 to 200 kWe. In the Brayton converter subsystem, studies were performed to investigate converter packaging options, and assess the induced torque effects on spacecraft dynamics due to rotating machinery. In the heat rejection subsystem, design trades were conducted on heat transport approaches, material and fluid options, and deployed radiator geometries. In the PMAD subsystem, the overall electrical architecture was defined and trade studies examined distribution approaches, voltage levels, and cabling options.

  7. Plume Collection Strategies for Icy World Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neveu, M.; Glavin, D. P.; Tsou, P.; Anbar, A. D.; Williams, P.

    2015-01-01

    Three icy worlds in the solar system display evidence of pluming activity. Water vapor and ice particles emanate from cracks near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plume gas contains simple hydrocarbons that could be fragments of larger, more complex organics. More recently, observations using the Hubble and Herschel space telescopes have hinted at transient water vapor plumes at Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres. Plume materials may be ejected directly from possible sub-surface oceans, at least on Enceladus. In such oceans, liquid water, organics, and energy may co-exist, making these environments habitable. The venting of habitable ocean material into space provides a unique opportunity to capture this material during a relatively simple flyby mission and return it to Earth. Plume collection strategies should enable investigations of evidence for life in the returned samples via laboratory analyses of the structure, distribution, isotopic composition, and chirality of the chemical components (including biomolecules) of plume materials. Here, we discuss approaches for the collection of dust and volatiles during flybys through Enceladus' plume, based on Cassini results and lessons learned from the Stardust comet sample return mission. We also highlight areas where sample collector and containment technology development and testing may be needed for future plume sample return missions.

  8. Longitudinal asymmetry of craters' density distributions on the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliwa-Kopystynski, Jacek; Banaszek, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Crater's density distribution versus satellitographical longitude was searched for seven icy satellites: two of Jupiter (Ganymede and Callisto) and five of Saturn (Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and Iapetus). Craters were classified according to their size. Four bins of the craters' diameter were used. Density distributions were found in the longitudinal sectors of the near-equatorial stripes that circumscribe the satellites. The size distributions (R-plots) were done independently for each of the eight longitudinal sectors of the satellites. Searching for the leading/trailing (apex/antapex) and the near-side/far-side asymmetry was done. It was found that the crater density is longitudinally asymmetric for all seven satellites being studied. However, the apex-antapex asymmetry is much less pronounced than predicted by theory of Zahnle et al. (2003), for impacts on the satellites by ecliptic comets. We conclude that the impact craters observed on the considered satellites are mostly originated from planetocentric swarm of debris. In that case longitudinal asymmetry is not expected, as stated by Horedt and Neukum (1984a, b). However, cratering longitudinal asymmetry that we observe for Mimas perfectly agrees with calculations of Alvarellos et al. (2005). It is very likely that important part of craters on Mimas were formed due to impacts of ejecta originated from crater Herschel.

  9. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation

    PubMed Central

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented. PMID:26858981

  10. Synthesis of novel ICIE16/BSG and ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglasses and description of ionic release kinetics upon immersion in SBF fluid: Effect of nitridation.

    PubMed

    Orgaz, Felipe; Amat, Daniel; Szycht, Olga; Dzika, Aleksandra; Barba, Flora; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2016-03-01

    A novel bioactive glass scaffold ICIE16/BSG has been prepared from a mixture of two different melt-derived glasses: a silicate bioglass (ICIE16) and a borosilicate bioglass (BSG). Combined processing techniques (gel casting and foam replication) were used to form three-dimensional, interconnected porous monolith scaffolds (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. They were then nitrided with a hot ammonia flow as described in (Aleixandre et al., 1973) [3] and (Nieto, 1984) [4] to synthesize the ICIE16/BSG-NITRI bioglass (Orgaz et al., 2016) [1]. Herein we present a flow chart summarizing the forming process, plus images of the resulting scaffold after sintering and drying. Bioactivity was characterized in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to seven days. Data of ionic release kinetics upon SBF immersion are presented. PMID:26858981

  11. Analog synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Sarpeshkar, R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog–digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA–protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  12. Analog pulse processor

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  13. Challenges in Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same…

  14. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  15. Fuel Cell Simulations of Geochemical Energetics on Rocky/Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, L. M.; Chellamuthu, P.; Kanik, I.

    2014-02-01

    Fuel cell experiments simulating the emergence of bioenergetics will not only be informative for the origin of life on Earth, but may help determine whether it is possible for life to have emerged in hydrothermal environments on icy worlds.

  16. SatStress: A Web-Accessible Model of Viscoelastic Tidal Stresses in Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Z. A.; Mullen, M. E.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-03-01

    We develop a viscoelastic treatment of the membrane stresses present on the surfaces of icy satellites, based on the gravitational potential, and describe the benefits of making the model and its source code publicly available via the WWW.

  17. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  18. Search for Evidence of Life in Icy Bodies - Enceladus Sample Return Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanik, Isik

    2016-07-01

    Beyond Earth, are there modern habitats elsewhere in the Solar System with necessary conditions, organic matter, water, energy, and nutrients to sustain life, and do organisms live there now? Water dominates the composition of Icy Worlds. Since life follows water on Earth, life might exist in Icy Worlds. Enceladus, as an icy world, appears to satisfy the necessary conditions for life, based on detailed examination by the Cassini spacecraft. Careful chemical characterization of plume materials is the most direct way to determine if this habitable environment is inhabited, and, if not, why not. This characterization requires laboratory analysis of returned samples. Finding and confirming new found life require comprehensive sample analyses collected from icy bodies such as Enceladus. In this presentation, we argue that sample return is necessary because the search for biomarkers is too complex and too "path dependent" to be conducted in situ. The habitability of Icy worlds such as Enceladus and Europa the accessibility of samples in the plume make this types of missions a high priority for astrobiology. Our mission concept, called "LIFE", will follow up on recent discoveries by conducting a more detailed in situ investigation of the organics in the plume and by returning samples to Earth for a search for biomarkers as evidence of life - or perhaps only prebiotic evolution. Sample return missions from icy world can be very costly; however, given the existence of a plume (as for Enceladus), the cost of returning samples can be substantially reduced by a flyby sample return.

  19. Meat analog: a review.

    PubMed

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers. PMID:24915320

  20. Division of Icy Bodies into Groups Based on Surface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Rabinowitz, D. L.; Tourtellottte, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    We propose the division of the icy bodies in the outer Solar System into five groups based on their surface properties. This division can be equivalently made by three definitions involving: size/orbit/color; measured surface properties; the physical mechanisms that reprocess the surfaces. Our first group is the Small/Red bodies (including the red Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects, and Scattered Disk Objects) which are 1.5 mag. These surfaces all have albedo <16; percent, and have lost their volatile ices by Jeans escape with cosmic rays reddening the remaining ices. Our second group is the Small/Gray bodies (including the gray Centaurs, Scattered Disk Objects, and Trojans) which are <800; km in diameter and with B-R<1.5 mag. These surfaces all have very low albedo (<6; percent) because their surface ices have been lost due to heating by the Sun at some time in their past orbital history leaving only their original rocky material to cover the surface. Our third group is the Intermediate bodies (Quaoar, Orcus, and Charon) with diameters 800-1400 km. Their surfaces have lost some of the volatile ices (methane and nitrogen in particular) to Jeans escape, while the remaining ices contain ammonia and crystalline water ice with some cryovolcanism. Our fourth group is the Large bodies (Pluto, Eris, Sedna, Triton, and 2005 FY9) with diameters >1400; km. These bodies are large enough to support active cryovolcanism plus seasonal frost formation/sublimation and are large enough so that the methane and nitrogen ices dominate because they have not been lost to Jeans escape. Our fifth group is the Collisional bodies (including the 2003 EL61 collisional family) which all have similar orbits. Their surfaces all have very neutral colors, low opposition surges, and relatively high albedos, because the volatile ices were all lost during the collision leaving a young surface with only water ice.

  1. New Approach to Icy Satellite Tidal Response Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2009-09-01

    Based on the experimental determination of ice anelasticity over a wide frequency range, as well as previous studies of ice primary creep, Castillo-Rogez et al. (2009) inferred that, in most situations, the response of planetary ices to tidal stress is anelastic. As a result, tidal models assuming a viscoelastic, Maxwellian response can lead to erroneous estimates of tidal dissipation by several orders of magnitude. Numerous measurements show that the transient response of rock and ice during primary creep can be fitted with the Andrade model. Measurements of the response of ice to cyclic stress also demonstrate that the Andrade model can accurately match the ice attenuation behavior observed for a wide range of frequencies encompassing satellites tides. Input to the Andrade model can be inferred from the frequency-dependence of the attenuation observed in the transient regime. It also requires a good understanding of the nature and properties of the microstructural features involved in the internal friction. Fortunately, numerous laboratory measurements have been reported in the literature for a variety of deformation regimes. Thus it is possible to make an educated guess about the ice attenuation behavior expected as a function of context. I will introduce a preliminary version of a new dissipation model applicable to icy satellites and present the measurement roadmap undertaken in the JPL Planetary Tides Simulation Facility to establish empirical forms of the Andrade model as a function of temperature, stress, composition, microstructure and its evolution with time, over a frequency range that encompasses the anelastic and viscoelastic regimes of a variety of ices. Acknowledgement: This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech under a contract with NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged. JPL Research and Technology Development program acknowledged.

  2. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  3. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  4. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  5. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 exists in the surfaces of the icy Galilean and Saturnian satellites [1-6], yet despite its discovery over a decade ago on Ganymede, and five years ago on the Saturnian satellites, its nature is still debated [7]. On the Galilean satellites Callisto and Ganymede, the CO2 that is detected is bound to, or trapped within, the non-ice materials that prevent it from sublimating or otherwise escaping from the surface. On Europa, it resides within both the ice and nonice materials [8,9]. While greater abundances of CO2 may exist in the interiors of these moons, or small amounts may be continually created through particle bombardment of the surface, the observed CO2 is only a trace material, with a few hundred molecules responsible for the deepest absorption features and an estimated molar abundance of 0.1% [2; 10-12]. Yet its presence may provide essential clues to processes that shape the surfaces of the moon [13] and potentially key to understanding the composition of potential oceans in the subsurfaces. We continue measurements of the infrared properties associated with CO2 adsorbed onto nonice materials under pressures and at temperatures relevant to these icy satellites using bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy from ~ 1.5 to 5.5 μm. Previous measurements, using transmission spectroscopy, demonstrated both a compositional and a temperature dependence on the spectral signature of adsorbed CO2 [14]. Bidirectional spectroscopy enables detection of lower concentrations of adsorbate on fine-grained materials such as clays due to their large surface area to volume ratios and thus large surface areas that may be covered by adsorbate [15]. The effectiveness of transmission spectroscopy was also limited by the strong absorption of light within the pressed sample and its impermeability, which limited the coverage by adsorbate to the pellet’s outer surface. All measurements demonstrate that CO2 adsorbs onto montmorillonite clays, possibly due to its quadrupole moment

  6. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  7. A numerical study on collisions of icy bodies using SPH method combined with GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Ida, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have worked on the collisions of icy bodies using Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) method combined with Gravity PipE (GRAPE) in order to understand the basic behavior of icy bodies during impacts. Collisions of Mars-size rocky bodies have been investigated well, because those collisions are related to the origin of the moon and the formation of the terrestrial planets. On the other hand, collisions of icy bodies have not been studied yet, although these collisions would frequently occur in the solar and extra-solar systems, such as the formation of icy exoplanets. Through our research, we figure out the effect of ice during impact in detail. Our SPH code has two special features. First, GRAvity PipE computer (GRAPE) is used, which calculates the gravitational force of each particle up to 100 times faster than usual computers. Second, SESAME equation of state database is used to build a realistic model, taking into account the effect of phase change. In this research, we focused on differences and similarities between collisions of icy bodies and those of rocky ones, such as a merging criterion. Agnor & Asphaug (2004) have shown that a collision of rocky Mars-size protoplanets leads to an inelastic collision when its relative velocities are smaller than 1.4-1.5v, 1.1-1.2v, 1.1-1.2v when its impact angles are 30, 45, and 60 degrees, respectively. Here, v means escape velocity. The same calculations for icy bodies are performed in our numerical code. They have shown that the merging criterion of icy bodies is the same as that of rocky bodies. In addition to the merging criterion, we also clarify the relationship between impact parameters and the change of solid, liquid/vapor mass ratio due to impacts.

  8. Radar Sounding for Planetary Subsurface Exploration: Translating the Mars Experience to Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of the subsurface of Mars using radar sounding began with MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) on Mars Express in 2005 and continued with SHARAD (Shallow Radar) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2006. These instruments have been operating continuously since, providing a rich legacy of science return and observational experience in the highly variable environments and target sets at Mars. New missions to the icy moons of Jupiter, ESA's JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) and NASA's Europa Mission, will both carry radar sounders to probe the subsurface of several of the icy moons (Ganymede, Europa and Callisto by JUICE; Europa by the Europa Mission). The success of the Mars sounders demonstrated the scientific value of the technique and provided confidence that sounding of the icy moons is a promising endeavor. Icy targets at Mars have proven especially amenable to penetration by radar sounding. The polar layered deposits of Mars have been probed to their base (2-4 km deep) by MARSIS, operating at frequencies of 1.3-5.5 MHz. SHARAD, operating with a wider bandwidth at 15-25 MHz, provides higher vertical resolution that allows detection and imaging of fine details of interior layering in the ice deposits. The sounder planned for the Europa mission, REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding, Ocean to Near-Surface), will utilize simultaneous dual frequency signals to obtain complementary deep sounding and high-vertical-resolution shallow observations. Co-located observations by MARSIS and SHARAD also demonstrate that high surface roughness (relative to the radar wavelength) affects the strength of the penetrating signals, and thus the capability to detect deep or low-contrast subsurface interfaces. The icy moon sounders' wavelengths were selected, in part, to mitigate against this degradation of signals by the anticipated rough surfaces of Jupiter's moons. This paper will discusss these and other examples of lessons

  9. The effects of laterally varying icy shell structure on the tidal response of Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, J. M.; A, G.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the long-sought objectives of an icy moon orbiter or fly-by mission, has been to use tidal observations to help determine the existence of a liquid ocean and characteristics of the overlying icy shell. The radio science component of such a mission could be used to estimate the tidal potential Love number k2 for gravity. And if there is an on-board laser altimeter, it could be used to determine the radial displacement Love number h2. Knowledge of either of those Love numbers could provide information on the presence of an ocean beneath the icy outer shell, and the two Love numbers could be combined to place constraints on the thickness of the icy shell. Though if a subsurface ocean exists, complications could conceivably arise if the icy outer shell has significant lateral variations in elastic thickness or shear modulus, or if the ocean is not global in extent so that the icy shell is grounded in places but floating in others. In these cases, the tidal deformation pattern would not be represented as the sum of degree 2 harmonics, and so the results could not be characterized in terms of a single Love number. In this study, by solving a set of tidal loading problems with laterally variable icy shell structures (for which the existence of an ocean layer is assumed), we investigate how those structures might complicate the interpretation of the tide measurements, and we discuss how to extract information regarding the interior structure of Ganymede and Europa from measurements of their tidal response.

  10. GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

  11. Iceless Icy Moons: Is the Nice Model In Trouble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-05-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) stated that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts is calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). Our preliminary results show that there is about an order-of-magnitude uncertainty in the mass striking the satellites during the LHB, with NK12's estimate at the upper end of the range. We will discuss how the mass influx depends on the velocity and mass distributions of the impactors. The Nice model lives. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus, in press, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103512000310 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  12. Cryovolcanic Conduit Evolution and Eruption on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    In silicate volcanism, such as on Earth or Io, eruptions typically result from fracture formation caused by interaction of tectonic stresses with inflating, pressurized magma sources, leading to transport of melt through an evolving conduit. On icy satellites the paradigm may be similar, resulting from some combination of tidal stresses and expansion of freezing water within, or near the base of, an ice shell. Such a fracture will result in eruption if mass continuity can be established, with buoyancy aided by exsolution and expansion of dissolved volatiles. After onset, conduit shape evolves due to: (1) shear-stresses or frictional erosional; (2) wallrock "bursting" due to massive wall stresses; (3) wall melting or condensation of particles due to heat transfer; or (4) changes in applied stresses. Preliminary thermodynamic and fluid mechanical analysis suggests some initial cooling during ascent resulting from exsolution and expansion of volatiles, thermally buffered by freezing, Conduit contraction may occur, and so evolution towards a deep, gas-filled plume chamber is difficult to accommodate without evoking a co-incidental process. Conduit flaring occurs near the surface where velocities are greatest, enhancing erosion. Here, viscous dissipative heating exceeds adiabatic cooling, and so some boiling (a few wt%) may occur. In contrast with silicate volcanism, decompression to below the triple point will occur within conduit, vent or jet, resulting in rapid freezing and boiling of the remaining water at a 6.8:1 ratio. Subsequent isentropic or adiabatic expansion within erupting jets may result in a few percent net of condensation or sublimation. These effects combined lead to ~4:1-7:1 solid:vapor ratios in the jet for most eruption conditions. These figures are consistent with the ~6:1 inferred in Enceladus' jets, supporting the hypothesis that the Enceladus plume draws from a subsurface body of liquids through a conduit. Similar results are anticipated if

  13. Lunar magnetism, space weathering, and icy satellite interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, Douglas

    An enduring mystery since Apollo is that, in spite of the Moon's lack of a global magnetic field, the surface is nevertheless dotted with regional magnetic fields strong enough to be detected from orbit. Did the Moon once have an intrinsic global field that magnetized parts of the crust but has since decayed away? This is a question of fundamental importance to understanding the formation and evolution of solid planetary bodies, and yet it remains unanswered due in part to limitations in our knowledge of these crustal magnetic anomalies. Adding to the puzzle, many of these magnetic anomalies are accompanied by enigmatic optical features, known as swirls, which may hold the key to understanding "space weathering"---a process by which airless bodies change color over time due to exposure to solar wind and micrometeoroids. Here we show both that swirl morphology provides information about the structure of the underlying magnetic sources, and that the color of the lunar surface varies systematically with latitude in a way that allows us to distinguish between the effects of solar wind ion and micrometeoroid bombardment, addressing a decades-old problem in remote sensing, and aiding in the interpretation of the spectra of airless bodies throughout the solar system. The remarkable diversity of the outer solar system's satellites provides important clues about the formation and evolution of the solar system. Many of the satellites have surprisingly young surfaces, owing in some cases to on-going geologic activity. Moreover, the existence of subsurface oceans within some of the satellites raises the intriguing possibility of extant habitable environments in the outer solar system. Determining the properties of their ice shells and the structures of their deep interiors places fundamental constraints on how the icy satellites formed and evolved, and on what governs their behavior today. Using gravity and topography data from Cassini, we develop analytical models showing

  14. Studying the Surfaces of the Icy Galilean Satellites With JIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L.; Schenk, P.; Pappalardo, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Geology subgroup of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Science Definition Team (SDT) has been working with colleagues within the planetary science community to determine the key outstanding science goals that could be met by the JIMO mission. Geological studies of the Galilean satellites will benefit from the spacecraft's long orbital periods around each satellite, lasting from one to several months. This mission plan allows us to select the optimal viewing conditions to complete global compositional and morphologic mapping at high resolution, and to target geologic features of key scientific interest at very high resolution. Community input to this planning process suggests two major science objectives, along with corresponding measurements proposed to meet them. Objective 1: Determine the origins of surface features and their implications for geological history and evolution. This encompasses investigations of magmatism (intrusion, extrusion, and diapirism), tectonism (isostatic compensation, and styles of faulting, flexure and folding), impact cratering (morphology and distribution), and gradation (erosion and deposition) processes (impact gardening, sputtering, mass wasting and frosts). Suggested measurements to meet this goal include (1) two dimensional global topographic mapping sufficient to discriminate features at a spatial scale of 10 m, and with better than or equal to 1 m relative vertical accuracy, (2) nested images of selected target areas at a range of resolutions down to the submeter pixel scale, (3) global (albedo) mapping at better than or equal to 10 m/pixel, and (4) multispectral global mapping in at least 3 colors at better than or equal to 100 m/pixel, with some subsets at better than 30 m/pixel. Objective 2. Identify and characterize potential landing sites for future missions. A primary component to the success of future landed missions is full characterization of potential sites in terms of their relative age, geological interest, and

  15. Grain growth and experimental deformation of fine-grained ice aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sabrina; de Bresser, Hans; Spiers, Chris; Durham, William B.; Stern, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Ice is one of the most abundant materials in our solar system. It is the principal constituent of most of the moons of the outer solar system. Thus, the flow behavior of ice is of great interest when studying geodynamic processes on icy moons. Grain growth is an elementary process that is assumed to be important in the ice sheet layering of planetary moons, where temperatures 100-273 K exist. We concentrate on the questions to what extent grain growth may influence the evolution of strength of deforming ice and if the grain growth process is independent or dependent of deformation. The answers to these questions will help us to quantitatively test the hypothesis that the progressive evolution of the grain (crystal) size distribution of deforming and recrystallizing ice directly affects its rheological behaviour in terms of composite grain-size-sensitive (GSS) and grain-size-insensitive (GSI) creep, and that this might, after time, result in a steady state balance between mechanisms of GSS and GSI creep. We performed static grain growth experiments at different temperatures and a pressure (P) of 1 atm, and deformation experiments at P = 30-100 MPa starting in the GSS-creep field. The starting material ice Ih has a grain size < 2 μm and was generated by a special pressure-release technique described by Stern et al. (1997) resulting in dense ice aggregates. The ice grains of the polycrystalline starting samples were randomly oriented and the material has a porosity of < 0.5%. For the grain growth tests a Hart Scientific temperature bath was filled with d-Limonene as cooling medium. The ice specimens were put into sealed alumina cylinders. For the grain growth tests, temperatures (T) between 213 K and 268 K were chosen. The durations of these tests varied between one day and two weeks. For the deformation experiments, temperatures of > 170 K and strain rates between 10-8 s-1 and 10-4 s-1 were chosen. Grain sizes, grain size distributions and grain topologies were

  16. Phloem transport of arsenic species from flag leaf to grain during grain filling

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Norton, Gareth J.; Deacon, Claire; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2011-09-20

    Strategies to reduce arsenic (As) in rice grain, below concentrations that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of As accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, retranslocation of As species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated. Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analog) on grain As accumulation in arsenite-treated panicles was examined. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently retranslocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly retranslocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no retranslocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic As remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain As in arsenite-treated panicles. Three-dimensional SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains. These results demonstrate that inorganic As is poorly remobilized, while organic species are readily remobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic As may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters.

  17. Phloem Transport of Arsenic Species from Flag Leaf to Grain During Grain Filling

    SciTech Connect

    A Carey; G Norton; C Deacon; K Scheckel; E Lombi; T Punshon; M Guerinot; A Lanzirotti; M Newville; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Strategies to reduce arsenic (As) in rice grain, below concentrations that represent a serious human health concern, require that the mechanisms of As accumulation within grain be established. Therefore, retranslocation of As species from flag leaves into filling rice grain was investigated. Arsenic species were delivered through cut flag leaves during grain fill. Spatial unloading within grains was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography. Additionally, the effect of germanic acid (a silicic acid analog) on grain As accumulation in arsenite-treated panicles was examined. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were extremely efficiently retranslocated from flag leaves to rice grain; arsenate was poorly retranslocated, and was rapidly reduced to arsenite within flag leaves; arsenite displayed no retranslocation. Within grains, DMA rapidly dispersed while MMA and inorganic As remained close to the entry point. Germanic acid addition did not affect grain As in arsenite-treated panicles. Three-dimensional SXRF microtomography gave further information on arsenite localization in the ovular vascular trace (OVT) of rice grains. These results demonstrate that inorganic As is poorly remobilized, while organic species are readily remobilized, from leaves to grain. Stem translocation of inorganic As may not rely solely on silicic acid transporters.

  18. Polar Gateways to Exploration of Icy Worlds in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Benson, R. F.; Bindschadler, R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Green, J. L.; Bilitza, D.; Ng, C.; Greeley, R.; Reinisch, B. W.; Gogineni, P. S.; Clem, J. M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    The polar cryosphere and ionosphere of Earth provide unique testbeds for active radio sounding and are gateways to exploration of other icy worlds in the solar system such as Europa and Titan. In the context of the International Polar Year and the International Heliophysical Year we are planning coordinated measurements of Antarctic ice sheet stratigraphy, the bottomside polar ionosphere, the polar magnetosphere, and high energy cosmic ray showers from ground level to about 40 km altitude. The analogous environment at Europa is the extremely thin neutral atmosphere but comparably dense ionosphere formed by interaction of the extremely intense radiation environment of the Jovian magnetosphere with surface ices of Europa. The effort proposed to NASA centers around Antarctic circumpolar balloon flights at high altitude during IPY-IHY, and thereafter, of a new radio sounder instrument called the Balloon Adaptable Radio Ice-Ionosphere Sounder (BARIIS) as an add-on package to available cosmic ray balloon payloads. This instrument would simultaneously sound at MHz radio frequencies, above and below ionospheric cutoff, the subsurface ice below the balloon ground track and the bottomside ionosphere above the balloon. Carried out in conjunction with direct cosmic ray shower measurements by the primary balloon payload, ground digisonde measurements, and geospace satellite monitoring of space weather, the ionospheric sounding is expected to improve knowledge of polar D region response to short-term cosmic ray variations during the few weeks of each flight. Correlative measurements will be made by the balloon and ground stations in conjunction with those of the comparable Radio Plasma Imager instrument on the IMAGE satellite in the polar magnetosphere. For the Antarctic cryosphere the subsurface ice sounding offers the prospect of new discoveries and improved measurements for Europa-like features such as isochronal layers, subglacial lakes and ice streams, while also

  19. Surfaces and exospheres of the icy Galilean moons - an integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Wurz, Peter; Vorburger, Audrey; Tulej, Marek; Pommerol, Antoine; Scheer, Jürgen; Thomas, Nicolas; Mousis, Olivier; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Lammer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) will investigate Jupiter and its system with particular emphasis on Ganymede as a planetary body and potential habitat. Europa and Callisto flybys will allow for a comparative picture of the icy Galilean moons. As part of the scientific preparation work for JUICE, we examine the requirements and expected science results related to the Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM), which belongs to the Particle Environment Package on board JUICE. Models of the exosphere profiles at Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto allow us to optimize the design of NIM, but the reliability of the models is limited because the properties of icy surfaces, in particular sputtering and sublimation parameters for icy regolith mixed with carbonates or salts, are not well known. We therefore have started a series of lab experiments with icy regolith subjected to ion and UV irradiation in a cold vacuum. Currently, we perform irradiation experiments of pure water ice with H+ and O+ ions. In the coming years, we will expand the experiments to more complex cases (including UV-radiation, temperature cycles and chemical impurities such as O2, C, S, CO2, SO2, and Na) relevant for Galilean moons. The results will constrain exosphere models and will enable the scientific community to better link exosphere measurements with processes in the ice and observed surface features.

  20. Modelling Ocean Dissipation in Icy Satellites: A Comparison of Linear and Quadratic Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, H.; Matsuyama, I.

    2015-12-01

    Although subsurface oceans are confirmed in Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, and strongly suspected in Enceladus and Titan, the exact mechanism required to heat and maintain these liquid reservoirs over Solar System history remains a mystery. Radiogenic heating can supply enough energy for large satellites whereas tidal dissipation provides the best explanation for the presence of oceans in small icy satellites. The amount of thermal energy actually contributed to the interiors of these icy satellites through oceanic tidal dissipation is largely unquantified. Presented here is a numerical model that builds upon previous work for quantifying tidally dissipated energy in the subsurface oceans of the icy satellites. Recent semi-analytical models (Tyler, 2008 and Matsuyama, 2014) have solved the Laplace Tidal Equations to estimate the time averaged energy flux over an orbital period in icy satellite oceans, neglecting the presence of a solid icy shell. These models are only able to consider linear Rayleigh friction. The numerical model presented here is compared to one of these semi-analytical models, finding excellent agreement between velocity and displacement solutions for all three terms to the tidal potential. Time averaged energy flux is within 2-6% of the analytical values. Quadratic (bottom) friction is then incorporated into the model, replacing linear friction. This approach is commonly applied to terrestrial ocean dissipation studies where dissipation scales nonlinearly with velocity. A suite of simulations are also run for the quadratic friction case which are then compared to and analysed against recent scaling laws developed by Chen and Nimmo (2013).

  1. Properties of filamentary sublimation residues from dispersions of clay in ice. [on Martian poles, comet nuclei, and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Sutton, S.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from experimental studies of the formation of ice mixed with mineral particles in an effort to simulate similar processes on natural surfaces such as at the Martian poles, on comet nuclei and on icy satellites. The study consisted of low-pressure, low-temperature sublimations of water ice from dilutions of water-clay (montmorillonite and Cabosil) dispersions of various component ratios. Liquid dispersions were sprayed into liquid nitrogen to form droplets at about -50 C. Both clay-water dispersions left a filamentary residue on the bottom of the Dewar after the water ice had sublimated off. The residue was studied with optical and SEM microscopy, the latter method revealing a high electrical conductivity in the residue. The results suggest that the sublimation of the water ice can leave a surface crust, which may be analogous to processes at the Martian poles and on comet nuclei. The process could proceed by the attachment of water molecules to salt crystals during the hottest part of the Martian year. The residue remaining was found to remain stable up to 370 C, be porous, and remain resilient, which could allow it to insulate ice bodies such as comets in space.

  2. A Submersible, Off-Axis Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microbial Motility and Morphology in Aqueous and Icy Environments.

    PubMed

    Lindensmith, Christian A; Rider, Stephanie; Bedrossian, Manuel; Wallace, J Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Showalter, G Max; Deming, Jody W; Nadeau, Jay L

    2016-01-01

    Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology's near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM) that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples taken directly from sea ice at several locations near Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, the appearance and motility of eukaryotes were conclusive signs of life. The appearance of prokaryotic cells alone was not sufficient to confirm life, but when prokaryotic motility occurred, it was rapid and conclusive. Warming the samples to above-freezing temperatures or supplementing with serine increased the number of motile cells and the speed of motility; supplementing with serine also stimulated chemotaxis. These results show that DHM is a useful technique for detection of active organisms in extreme environments, and that motility may be used as a biosignature in the liquid brines that persist in ice. These findings have important implications for the design of missions to icy environments and suggest ways in which DHM imaging may be integrated with chemical life-detection suites in order to create more conclusive life detection packages. PMID:26812683

  3. A Submersible, Off-Axis Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microbial Motility and Morphology in Aqueous and Icy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lindensmith, Christian A.; Rider, Stephanie; Bedrossian, Manuel; Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Showalter, G. Max; Deming, Jody W.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology’s near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM) that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples taken directly from sea ice at several locations near Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, the appearance and motility of eukaryotes were conclusive signs of life. The appearance of prokaryotic cells alone was not sufficient to confirm life, but when prokaryotic motility occurred, it was rapid and conclusive. Warming the samples to above-freezing temperatures or supplementing with serine increased the number of motile cells and the speed of motility; supplementing with serine also stimulated chemotaxis. These results show that DHM is a useful technique for detection of active organisms in extreme environments, and that motility may be used as a biosignature in the liquid brines that persist in ice. These findings have important implications for the design of missions to icy environments and suggest ways in which DHM imaging may be integrated with chemical life-detection suites in order to create more conclusive life detection packages. PMID:26812683

  4. Modeling Kuiper belt objects Charon, Orcus and Salacia by means of a new equation of state for porous icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Prialnik, Dina

    2015-01-01

    We use a one-dimensional adaptive-grid thermal evolution code to model Kuiper belt objects Charon, Orcus and Salacia and compare their measured bulk densities with those resulting from evolutionary calculations at the end of 4.6 Gyr. Our model assumes an initial homogeneous composition of mixed ice and rock, and follows the multiphase flow of water through the porous rocky medium, consequent differentiation and aqueous chemical alterations in the rock. Heating sources include long-lived radionuclides, serpentinization reactions, release of gravitational potential energy due to compaction, and crystallization of amorphous ice. The density profile is calculated by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium to be maintained through changes in composition, pressure and temperature. To this purpose, we construct an equation of state suitable for porous icy bodies with radii of a few hundred km, based on the best available empirical studies of ice and rock compaction, and on comparisons with rock porosities in Earth analog and Solar System silicates. We show that the observed bulk densities can be reproduced by assuming the same set of initial and physical parameters, including the same rock/ice mass ratio for all three bodies. We conclude that the mass of the object uniquely determines the evolution of porosity, and thus explains the observed differences in bulk density. The final structure of all three objects is differentiated, with an inner rocky core, and outer ice-enriched mantle. The degree of differentiation, too, is determined by the object's mass.

  5. Modeling KBOs Charon, Orcus and Salacia by means of a new equation of state for porous icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, U.; Prialnik, D.

    2015-10-01

    We use a one-dimensional adaptive-grid thermal evolution code to model intermediate sized Kuiper belt objects Charon, Orcus and Salacia and compare their measured bulk densities with those resulting from evolutionary calculations at the end of 4.6 Gyr. Our model assumes an initial homogeneous composition of mixed ice and rock, and follows the multiphase flow of water through the porous rocky medium, consequent differentiation and aqueous chemical alterations in the rock. Heating sources include long-lived radionuclides, serpentinization reactions, release of gravitational potential energy due to compaction, and crystallization of amorphous ice. The density profile is calculated by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium to be maintained through changes in composition, pressure and temperature. To this purpose, we construct an equation of state suitable for porous icy bodies with radii of a few hundred km, based on the best available empirical studies of ice and rock compaction, and on comparisons with rock porosities in Earth analog and Solar System silicates. We show that the observed bulk densities can be reproduced by assuming the same set of initial and physical parameters, including the same rock/ice mass ratio for all three bodies. We conclude that the mass of the object uniquely determines the evolution of porosity, and thus explains the observed differences in bulk density. The final structure of all three objects is differentiated, with an inner rocky core, and outer ice-enriched mantle. The degree of differentiation, too, is determined by the object's mass.

  6. Digital and analog communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  7. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  8. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  9. Enantiomeric Excesses Induced in Amino Acids by Ultraviolet Circularly Polarized Light Irradiation of Extraterrestrial Ice Analogs: A Possible Source of Asymmetry for Prebiotic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modica, Paola; Meinert, Cornelia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Nahon, Laurent; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = -0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = -2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  10. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent E-mail: ldh@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-06-10

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee {sub L}) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee {sub L} that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee {sub L} in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee {sub L} = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee {sub L} = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee {sub L} depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  11. Whole Grains and Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber. Some examples of refined grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Most refined grains are enriched , which means that ... grains. Some examples of enriched grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Eating whole grains provides important health benefits: Many ...

  12. Regional geology and stratigraphy of Saturn's icy moon Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Stephan, Katrin; Schmedemann, Nico; Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Neukum, Gerhard; Porco, Carolyn C.

    2013-04-01

    Tethys, with a diameter of 1060 km one of the 6 mid-sized icy moons of Saturn, was imaged for the first time in the early 1980ies by the cameras aboard the two Voyager spacecraft at resolutions of 1 km/pxl and lower [1][2][3]. These images show that most of Tethys is densely cratered and displays two major landmarks: the ~ 400 km large impact structure Odysseus and the huge graben system of Ithaca Chasma [1][2]. Since July 2004, Cassini has been in orbit about Saturn and has made several close passes at Tethys, providing an almost complete global image coverage at regional scale (200 - 500 m/pxl). However, varying viewing geometries between images taken during different orbits still impede the identification and mapping of geologic units. In this work we present an update of Tethys' regional geology and stratigraphy, based on Cassini ISS images. Crater distribution measurements, by us and in comparison with measurements of other groups [4], are used to support stratigraphic findings. Most of Tethys' surface consists of a hilly, rugged, heavily cratered plains unit, as identified in Voyager images [1][2][3]. A smooth, less densely cratered plains unit in the trailing hemisphere was previously observed by [2] which is also identifiable in Cassini ISS, but its exact boundaries are difficult to map due to varying viewing geometries of ISS observations. Another sparsely cratered plains unit not seen in Voyager images can be located to the south of Odysseus. It features remnants of highly degraded large craters superimposed by younger fresher craters with a lower crater density compared to the heavily cratered plains. Its distinct linear northern contact with the heavily cratered plains suggests an origin related to tectonism. Again, varying viewing conditions hamper to map the exact boundaries of this unit. The prominent graben system of Ithaca Chasma represents fractured cratered plains. The high resolution of Cassini ISS images reveals that tectonism on Tethys is more

  13. Unveiling the evolution and formation of icy giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andrea; Bocanegra, Tatiana; Bracken, Colm; Costa, Marc; Dirkx, Dominic; Gerth, Ingo; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos; Labrianidis, Christos; Laneuville, Matthieu; Luntzer, Armin; MacArthur, Jane; Morschhauser, Achim; Nordheim, Tom; Sallantin, Renaud; Tlustos, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    The planet Uranus is one of two ice giants in the solar system, both of which have only been visited only once by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. Therefore, a dedicated mission to an ice giant is crucial to deepen our knowledge of the formation, evolution and current characteristics of such a planet and its system. We present the science objectives, architecture rationale and system design for a mission to the Uranian system. We conducted a detailed study on how to best fulfill the primary science goal, namely: To investigate Uranus and its system as an archetype for ice giants. To this end, we formulated specific science questions leading to measurement requirements and, finally, instrument requirements and suitable instruments. The primary science questions relate to investigating Uranus' deep interior and outer layers as these are directly related to the primary science goal. Additionally, investigations of the moons, rings and the magnetosphere will provide complementary observations of the Uranian system specifically and icy giants in general. A trade-off between several mission architectures was performed, such as an orbiter with an atmospheric entry probe and a flyby mission. In this process, the relative importance of the science questions, the capabilities of each concept to carry a certain payload and its capability to answer the science questions in the given architecture were traded off. Similarly, the feasibility of each concept from an engineering point-of-view was assessed, taking into account matters such as complexity, cost and risk. The results are presented as a function of relative engineering and science score weights, providing an envelope of optimal mission selections over a range of mission scenarios. We conclude that a Uranus orbiter with a single entry probe and an extended moon tour fulfills the primary science goal in an optimal manner. The mission scenario is based on a launch date in 2026 on an Ariane 5 ECA launcher and arrival at Uranus in

  14. The cryo-penetrator: an approach to exploration of icy bodies in the solar system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Reinert, R. P.

    The nuclei of comets and the small icy moons of the outer planets are thought to be the most primitive objects in the solar system. Because of their pristine nature, in-situ measurements of composition, temperature, and mechanical properties will be a powerful tool in realization of one of NASA's major objectives: determination of the Solar System's origins and evolution. Cryo penetrators are specifically optimized for penetration and operation in icy bodies at temperatures below 150K. The CRAF studies were directed at investigation of comet nuclei, but the same design should be applicable to the icy moons of the outer planets and, with appropriate delivery systems, to the Martian polar caps. The paper describes the design of a cryopenetrator based on the CRAF configuration and designed for in-situ measurements of a comet nucleus as part of the Comet Nucleus Penetrator Discovery mission. The ROSETTA nucleus rendezvous mission is another potential cryo penetrator application.

  15. Kidnapping small icy asteroids in Earth near encounter to harbour life and to deflect trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The inter-planetary flight for human being is under danger because of unscreened and lethal solar flare radioactive showers. The screening of the astronauts by huge superconducting magnetic fields is unrealistic by many reasons. On the contrary the ability to reach nearby icy asteroids, to harbour there a complete undergound room where ecological life systems are first set, this goal may offer a later natural and safe currier for future human stations and enterprise. The need to deflect such a small size (a few thousands tons objects) maybe achieved by micro nuclear engines able to dig the asteroid icy skin, to heat and propel the soil by a synchronous jet engine array, bending and driving it to any desired trajectories. The need for such a wide collection of icy asteroid stations, often in a robotic ibernated state, it will offer the safe help station, raft in the wide space sea, where to collect material or energy in long human planetary travels.

  16. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO): An Element of the Prometheus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    The Prometheus Program s Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project is developing a revolutionary nuclear electric propulsion space system that would return scientific data from the icy Galilean satellites, Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. This space system could also be used for future solar system exploration missions. Several major achievements occurred during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY 04). These include the addition of Department of Energy Naval Reactors (DOENR) and Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) to the JIMO team, completion of the Science Definition Team s final report, generation of the Government and industry team trade studies and conceptual designs, and numerous technology demonstrations. The sections that follow detail these accomplishments.

  17. An Overview of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Mission, Environments, and Materials Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Congress authorized NASA's Prometheus Project in February 2003, with the first Prometheus mission slated to explore the icy moons of Jupiter with the following main objectives: (1) Develop a nuclear reactor that would provide unprecedented levels of power and show that it could be processed safely and operated reliably in space for long-duration. (2) Explore the three icy moons of Jupiter -- Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa -- and return science data that would meet the scientific goals as set forth in the Decadal Survey Report of the National Academy of Sciences.

  18. Interstellar condensed (icy) amino acids and precursors: theoretical absorption and circular dichroism under UV and soft X-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Pieve, F.; Avendaño-Franco, G.; De Proft, F.; Geerlings, P.

    2014-05-01

    The photophysics of interstellar ices and condensed molecules adsorbed on grains is of primary importance for studies on the origin of the specific handedness of complex organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and of the homochirality of the building blocks of life. Here, we present quantum mechanical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory for the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) of isovaline and its chiral precursor 5-ethyl-5-methylhydantoin, both observed in meteoritic findings. The systems are considered in their geometrical conformation as extracted from a full solid (icy) matrix, as a shortcut to understand the behaviour of molecules with fixed orientation, and/or taking into account the full solid matrix. In the context of a possible `condensation-warming plus hydrolysis-recondensation' process, we obtain that: (i) for low-energy excitations, the `condensed' precursor has a stronger CD with respect to the amino acid, suggesting that the handedness of the latter could be biased by asymmetric photolysis of the precursor in cold environments; (ii) enantiomeric excess could in principle be induced more efficiently in both systems for excitation at higher energies (VUV). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy and related CD results could serve as support for future experiments on ionization channels.

  19. Reasoning through Instructional Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to account for students' assessments of the plausibility and applicability of analogical explanations, and individual differences in these assessments, by analyzing properties of students' underlying knowledge systems. We developed a model of explanation and change in explanation focusing on knowledge elements that provide a…

  20. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  1. Learning by Analogical Bootstrapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miao, Chun-Hui; Kurtz, Kenneth J.; Gentner, Dedre

    2001-01-01

    Reports on research into whether mutual alignment of partially known situations can be an effective strategy when compared to the common procedure of drawing analogies from a well understood situation to one that is poorly understood. Results suggest that such mutual alignment is an effective means of promoting insight. (MM)

  2. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  3. An Interesting Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Jose M.; Fernandez, Isabel

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this note is to give some insight into the formal unity of a very applicable area of mathematics by showing an interesting analogy between the weak part of the Rouche-Frobenius theorem and the existence result for the initial value problem for the general first-order linear two-dimensional PDE.

  4. How Analogy Drives Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadter, Doug

    2004-05-05

    Many new ideas in theoretical physics come from analogies to older ideas in physics. For instance, the abstract notion of 'isospin' (or isotopic spin) originated in the prior concept of 'spin' (quantized angular momentum); likewise, the concept of 'phonon' (quantum of sound, or quantized collective excitation of a crystal) was based on the prior concept of 'photon' (quantum of light, or quantized element of the electromagnetic field). But these two examples, far from being exceptions, in fact represent the bread and butter of inventive thinking in physics. In a nutshell, intraphysics analogy-making -- borrowing by analogy with something already known in another area of physics -- is central to the progress of physics. The aim of this talk is to reveal the pervasiveness -- indeed, the indispensability -- of this kind of semi-irrational, wholly intuitive type of thinking (as opposed to more deductive mathematical inference) in the mental activity known as 'doing physics'. Speculations as to why wild analogical leaps are so crucial to the act of discovery in physics (as opposed to other disciplines) will be offered.

  5. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  6. The dust halo of Saturn's largest icy moon, Rhea.

    PubMed

    Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Beckmann, U; Coates, A J; Crary, F; Dandouras, I; Dikarev, V; Dougherty, M K; Garnier, P; Hansen, C J; Hendrix, A R; Hospodarsky, G B; Johnson, R E; Kempf, S; Khurana, K K; Krimigis, S M; Krüger, H; Kurth, W S; Lagg, A; McAndrews, H J; Mitchell, D G; Paranicas, C; Postberg, F; Russell, C T; Saur, J; Seiss, M; Spahn, F; Srama, R; Strobel, D F; Tokar, R; Wahlund, J-E; Wilson, R J; Woch, J; Young, D

    2008-03-01

    Saturn's moon Rhea had been considered massive enough to retain a thin, externally generated atmosphere capable of locally affecting Saturn's magnetosphere. The Cassini spacecraft's in situ observations reveal that energetic electrons are depleted in the moon's vicinity. The absence of a substantial exosphere implies that Rhea's magnetospheric interaction region, rather than being exclusively induced by sputtered gas and its products, likely contains solid material that can absorb magnetospheric particles. Combined observations from several instruments suggest that this material is in the form of grains and boulders up to several decimetres in size and orbits Rhea as an equatorial debris disk. Within this disk may reside denser, discrete rings or arcs of material. PMID:18323452

  7. The ICI-WARM Non-Proprietary Regional Frequency Analysis Tool Using the Method Of L-Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannettone, J. P.; Wright, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICI-WaRM) is currently developing a non-proprietary Regional Frequency Analysis (RFA) tool to be used to answer the following questions: "How rare is the current drought?", "How likely is it that the drought will end in X months?", "How large a drought should we plan for?", and "How rare is the drought of record?". The method of L-moments is used, which is analogous to using regular moments except they are calculated using equations that represent linear combinations of the sample data elements. The advantages are increased robustness with respect to outliers, the ability to characterize a wider range of frequency distributions, and less bias. Sites are first lumped into homogeneous regions. Regional L-moments and rainfall frequency distributions are estimated. Individual site statistics can then be obtained by multiplying the regional growth curve by the site's average annual rainfall. This method allows the inclusion of sites with short record lengths, few rain gage stations, missing data, and/or higher variability due to topography. An example is given in Fig. 1, which shows an attempt to fit a GEV distribution to an individual site's growth curve (Fig. 1a) compared to an improved fit of the GEV to the growth curve of the corresponding homogeneous region (Fig. 1b), particularly within the portion of the curve that represents extreme events. The location of the 100-year event is shown on each graph for reference purposes. In addition to GEV, the software can attempt to fit 13 other frequency distributions. The end products of the ICI-WaRM Regional Frequency Analysis tool include estimates of the intensity of rainfall events for individual sites and rainfall intensity probably maps for a particular region for any rain event frequency, duration, and starting month. Current and future applications of this software include an attempt to construct a continental drought atlas of South America (a

  8. It's Far, It's Small, It's Cool: It's an Icy Exoplanet!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    Using a network of telescopes scattered across the globe, including the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO La Silla (Chile), astronomers [1] discovered a new extrasolar planet significantly more Earth-like than any other planet found so far. The planet, which is only about 5 times as massive as the Earth, circles its parent star in about 10 years. It is the least massive exoplanet around an ordinary star detected so far and also the coolest [2]. The planet most certainly has a rocky/icy surface. Its discovery marks a groundbreaking result in the search for planets that support life. ESO PR Photo 03a/06 ESO PR Photo 03a/06 Artist's Impression of the Newly Found Exoplanet The new planet, designated by the unglamorous identifier of OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, orbits a red star five times less massive than the Sun and located at a distance of about 20,000 light years, not far from the centre of our Milky Way galaxy. Its relatively cool parent star and large orbit implies that the likely surface temperature of the planet is 220 degrees Centigrade below zero, too cold for liquid water. It is likely to have a thin atmosphere, like the Earth, but its rocky surface is probably deeply buried beneath frozen oceans. It may therefore more closely resemble a more massive version of Pluto, rather than the rocky inner planets like Earth and Venus. "This planet is actually the first and only planet that has been discovered so far that is in agreement with the theories for how our Solar System formed ", said Uffe Gråe Jørgensen (Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark), member of the team. The favoured theoretical explanation for the formation of planetary systems proposes that solid 'planetesimals' accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas - to form giant planets - if they are sufficiently massive. Around red dwarfs, the most common stars of our Galaxy, this model favours the formation of Earth- to Neptune-mass planets being between 1 and 10 times the Earth

  9. ICI 182,780 has agonistic effects and synergizes with estradiol-17 beta in fish liver, but not in testis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patrícia IS; Singh, Pratap B; Condeça, João B; Teodósio, Helena R; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino VM

    2006-01-01

    Background ICI 182,780 (ICI) belongs to a new class of antiestrogens developed to be pure estrogen antagonists and, in addition to its therapeutic use, it has been used to knock-out estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER) actions in several mammalian species. In the present study, the effects and mechanism of action of ICI were investigated in the teleost fish, sea bream (Sparus auratus). Methods Three independent in vivo experiments were performed in which mature male tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) or sea bream received intra-peritoneal implants containing estradiol-17 beta (E2), ICI or a combination of both compounds. The effects of E2 and ICI on plasma calcium levels were measured and hepatic and testicular gene expression of the three ER subtypes, ER alpha, ER beta a and ER beta b, and the estrogen-responsive genes, vitellogenin II and choriogenin L, were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in sea bream. Results E2 treatment caused an increase in calcium levels in tilapia, while ICI alone had no noticeable effect, as expected. However, pretreatment with ICI synergistically potentiated the effect of E2 on plasma calcium in both species. ICI mimicked some E2 actions in gene expression in sea bream liver upregulating ER alpha, vitellogenin II and choriogenin L, although, unlike E2, it did not downregulate ER beta a and ER beta b. In contrast, no effects of E2 or ICI alone were detected in the expression of ERs in testis, while vitellogenin II and choriogenin L were upregulated by E2 but not ICI. Finally, pretreatment with ICI had a synergistic effect on the hepatic E2 down-regulation of ER beta b, but apparently blocked the ER alpha up-regulation by E2. Conclusion These results demonstrate that ICI has agonistic effects on several typical estrogenic responses in fish, but its actions are tissue-specific. The mechanisms for the ICI agonistic activity are still unknown; although the ICI induced up-regulation of ER alpha mRNA could be one of the factors contributing

  10. Hypothetical Inverted Critical Zones for Subsurface Biospheres on Desert Planets and Icy Ocean Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Earth as a model for cave habitable real-estate does not encompass other possibilities including desert planets like Mars, or icy ocean worlds viewed as planetary-scale water-filled caves in water ice bedrock which will have inverted Critical Zones.

  11. Inverse theory resolution analysis in planning radio science gravity investigations of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, A.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of an icy satellite's interior relates fundamentally to its composition, thermal structure, formation and evolution history, and prospects for supporting life. Gravity measurements via radio Doppler information during spacecraft flybys constitute an important tool to infer gross interior structure. Liquid water and ice layers have previously been inferred for the interiors of Jupiter's icy satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto on the basis of magnetic field measurements by the Galileo probe. On Europa and Callisto induced magnetic field signatures measured by the Galileo probe provided strong evidence for an ionic aqueous ocean. Among the chief goals of the proposed Europa Clipper mission in returning to Europa is characterizing the structure of the moon's icy shell. A geophysical inverse theory resolution analysis can be calculated at the pre-measurement mission planning stage, contributing planning considerations from the point of view of the search for mass anomalies in the ice shell (meteorites or diapiric upwellings) or near the H2O/rock interface (seamounts). The analysis allows us to assess the location-varying resolution of an icy moon's interior density anomaly distribution that can be estimated from radio Doppler measurements. It considers the tradeoff between the resolution of the estimated density anomaly distribution and its estimation uncertainty, and investigates issues in distinguishing between ocean anomalies (e.g., seamounts) and mass anomalies within or near the surface of the ice layer. We apply the resolution analysis to proposed Europa Clipper trajectories and past Galileo spacecraft trajectories about Europa and Ganymede.

  12. Astrobiological and Geological Implications of Convective Transport in Icy Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Zhong, Shi-Jie; Barr, Amy

    2005-01-01

    The oceans of large icy outer planet satellites are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. The goal of our project has been to develop models of ice convection in order to understand convection as an astrobiologically relevant transport mechanism within icy satellites, especially Europa. These models provide valuable constraints on modes of surface deformation and thus the implications of satellite surface geology for astrobiology, and for planetary protection. Over the term of this project, significant progress has been made in three areas: (1) the initiation of convection in large icy satellites, which we find probably requires tidal heating; (2) the relationship of surface features on Europa to internal ice convection, including the likely role of low-melting-temperature impurities; and (3) the effectiveness of convection as an agent of icy satellite surface-ocean material exchange, which seems most plausible if tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection work in combination. Descriptions of associated publications include: 3 published papers (including contributions to 1 review chapter), 1 manuscript in revision, 1 manuscript in preparation (currently being completed under separate funding), and 1 published popular article. A myriad of conference abstracts have also been published, and only those from the past year are listed.

  13. Channel Estimation and ISI/ICI Cancellation for MIMO-OFDM Systems with Insufficient Cyclic Prefix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yi-Jen; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Chang, Ting-Wei

    In multi-input multi-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) systems, the multipath components whose delays exceed cyclic prefix (CP) cause inter-symbol interference (ISI) and inter-carrier interference (ICI), which may degrade system performance severely. In this paper, we propose a joint channel estimation and ISI/ICI cancellation scheme in which a limited CP is used in a trade-off against high-rate performance in MIMO-OFDM systems. A channel estimation scheme based on the criterion of Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm can be proposed through the use of a training symbol. The EM algorithm uses an iterative procedure to estimate channel parameters and can estimate channel impulse response (CIR) accurately enough to mitigate ISI/ICI influences. Through the accurate CIR estimation, an efficient method has been developed to counteract ISI/ICI influences in signal detection in the case where the inserted CP length is less than the CIR length. Simulation results show that the proposed method can significantly enhance the overall MIMO-OFDM system performance after only a few iterations.

  14. The effects of laterally varying icy shell structure on the tidal response of Ganymede and Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Wahr, J.; Zhong, S.

    2014-03-01

    We use a finite-element model to solve for the response of Ganymede and Europa to tidal forcing from Jupiter, using various icy shell models with laterally variable (3-D) structure. In all cases, the shell is assumed to be underlain by a liquid-water ocean. Icy shells with laterally varying thickness are derived from a thermal conduction model. Three-dimensional shear modulus profiles for the shell are built either from a conduction model or, for Europa, by assuming a hemispherical difference in composition. Icy shell structures with a nonglobal ocean are built for Ganymede. Using these shell structures to calculate the tidal response of Ganymede and Europa, we conclude the following: (1) the presence of lateral variations in thickness or in shear modulus would not degrade future attempts to use tidal observations to decide on the existence or absence of a liquid ocean and to determine the mean icy shell thickness. (2) Given accurate enough observations, the presence of lateral variations in thickness or in shear modulus could be determined by searching for nondegree-2 components in the tidal response. (3) In the absence of significant viscous convective flow in the shell, the effects of a laterally varying shear modulus on the tidal response would be smaller than those of a laterally varying shell thickness. (4) If the shell is partially grounded, tidal observations of either gravity or uplift would be able to roughly differentiate regions where the ice is grounded from those where it is floating.

  15. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  16. Analogy Construction versus Analogy Solution, and Their Influence on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Itay, Yifat; Kaniel, Shlomo; Ben-Amram, Einat

    2006-01-01

    This study compares transfer performed by subjects trained to solve verbal analogies, with transfer by subjects trained to construct them. The first group (n = 57) received instruction in a strategy to solve verbal analogies and the second group (n = 66) was trained in strategies for constructing such analogies. Before and after intervention, all…

  17. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  18. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  19. It's Far, It's Small, It's Cool: It's an Icy Exoplanet!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    Using a network of telescopes scattered across the globe, including the Danish 1.54m telescope at ESO La Silla (Chile), astronomers [1] discovered a new extrasolar planet significantly more Earth-like than any other planet found so far. The planet, which is only about 5 times as massive as the Earth, circles its parent star in about 10 years. It is the least massive exoplanet around an ordinary star detected so far and also the coolest [2]. The planet most certainly has a rocky/icy surface. Its discovery marks a groundbreaking result in the search for planets that support life. ESO PR Photo 03a/06 ESO PR Photo 03a/06 Artist's Impression of the Newly Found Exoplanet The new planet, designated by the unglamorous identifier of OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, orbits a red star five times less massive than the Sun and located at a distance of about 20,000 light years, not far from the centre of our Milky Way galaxy. Its relatively cool parent star and large orbit implies that the likely surface temperature of the planet is 220 degrees Centigrade below zero, too cold for liquid water. It is likely to have a thin atmosphere, like the Earth, but its rocky surface is probably deeply buried beneath frozen oceans. It may therefore more closely resemble a more massive version of Pluto, rather than the rocky inner planets like Earth and Venus. "This planet is actually the first and only planet that has been discovered so far that is in agreement with the theories for how our Solar System formed ", said Uffe Gråe Jørgensen (Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark), member of the team. The favoured theoretical explanation for the formation of planetary systems proposes that solid 'planetesimals' accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas - to form giant planets - if they are sufficiently massive. Around red dwarfs, the most common stars of our Galaxy, this model favours the formation of Earth- to Neptune-mass planets being between 1 and 10 times the Earth

  20. The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) on the JUICE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, L.; Plaut, J.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Bovolo, F.; Campbell, B. A.; Castelletti, D.; Gim, Y.; Ilisei, A. M.; Kofman, W. W.; Komatsu, G.; McKinnon, W. B.; Mitri, G.; Moussessian, A.; Notarnicola, C.; Orosei, R.; Patterson, G. W.; Pettinelli, E.; Plettemeier, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Radar for Icy Moon Exploration (RIME) is one of the main instruments included in the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) ESA mission. It is a radar sounder designed for studying the subsurface geology and geophysics of Galilean icy moons (i.e., Ganymede, Europa and Callisto) and for detecting possible subsurface water. RIME is designed for penetration of the icy moons up to a depth of 9 km. Two main operation scenarios are foreseen for RIME: i) flyby observations of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto (from a distance of 1000 km to the closest approach of about 400 km); and ii) circular orbital observations around Ganymede at 500 km of altitude. According to these scenarios, RIME is designed to explore the icy shell of the Galilean icy satellites by characterizing the wide range of compositional, thermal, and structural variation found in the subsurface of these moons. RIME observations will profile the ice shells of the Galilean icy satellites with specific focus on Ganymede given the circular orbital phase. The acquired measures will provide geological context on hemispheric (thousands of km), regional (hundreds of km with multiple overlaps), and targeted (tens of km) scales appropriate for a variety of hypothesis tests. RIME will operate in a single frequency band, centred at 9 MHz. The frequency was selected as the result of extensive study of penetration capabilities, surface roughness of the moons, Jovian radio noise, antenna accommodation, and system design. The 9 MHz frequency provides penetration capabilities and mitigation of surface scattering (which can cause signal loss and clutter issues), at the expense of mapping coverage, as it is likely to obtain high SNR observations only on the anti-Jovian side of the target moons. The RIME antenna is a 16 m dipole. The chirp pulse bandwidth is up to 3 MHz, which provides vertical resolution of about 50 m in ice after side lobe weighting. RIME will also operate with 1 MHz bandwidth to reduce data volume when

  1. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  2. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  3. Grain Handling and Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Troy G.; Minor, John

    This text for a secondary- or postecondary-level course in grain handling and storage contains ten chapters. Chapter titles are (1) Introduction to Grain Handling and Storage, (2) Elevator Safety, (3) Grain Grading and Seed Identification, (4) Moisture Control, (5) Insect and Rodent Control, (6) Grain Inventory Control, (7) Elevator Maintenance,…

  4. Heating and melting of small icy satellites by the decay of 26Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, D.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    We study the effect of radiogenic heating due to 26Al on the thermal evolution of small icy satellites. Our object is to find the extent of internal melting as a function of the satellite radius and of the initial 26Al abundance. The implicit assumption, based on observations of young stars, is that planet and satellite accretion occurred on a time scale of approximately 10(6) yr (comparable with the lifetime of 26Al). The icy satellites are modeled as spheres of initially amorphous ice, with chondritic abundances of 40K, 232Th, 235U, 238U, corresponding to an ice/dust mass ratio of 1. Evolutionary calculations are carried out, spanning 4.5 x 10(9) yr, for different combinations of the two free parameters. Heat transfer by subsolidus convection is neglected for these small satellites. Our main conclusion is that the initial 26Al abundance capable of melting icy bodies of satellite size to a significant extent is more than 10 times lower than that prevailing in the interstellar medium (or that inferred from the Ca-Al rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite, approximately 7 x 10(-7) by mass). We find, for example, that an initial 26Al mass fraction of approximately 4 x 10(-8) is sufficient for melting almost completely icy spheres with radii of 800 km, typical of the larger icy planetary satellites. We also find that for any given 26Al abundance, there is a narrow range of radii below which only marginal melting occurs and above which most of the ice melts (and refreezes later). Since extensive melting may have important consequences, such as differentiation, gas release, and volcanic activity, the effect of 26Al should be included in future studies of satellite interiors.

  5. Heating and melting of small icy satellites by the decay of 26Al.

    PubMed

    Prialnik, D; Bar-Nun, A

    1990-05-20

    We study the effect of radiogenic heating due to 26Al on the thermal evolution of small icy satellites. Our object is to find the extent of internal melting as a function of the satellite radius and of the initial 26Al abundance. The implicit assumption, based on observations of young stars, is that planet and satellite accretion occurred on a time scale of approximately 10(6) yr (comparable with the lifetime of 26Al). The icy satellites are modeled as spheres of initially amorphous ice, with chondritic abundances of 40K, 232Th, 235U, 238U, corresponding to an ice/dust mass ratio of 1. Evolutionary calculations are carried out, spanning 4.5 x 10(9) yr, for different combinations of the two free parameters. Heat transfer by subsolidus convection is neglected for these small satellites. Our main conclusion is that the initial 26Al abundance capable of melting icy bodies of satellite size to a significant extent is more than 10 times lower than that prevailing in the interstellar medium (or that inferred from the Ca-Al rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite, approximately 7 x 10(-7) by mass). We find, for example, that an initial 26Al mass fraction of approximately 4 x 10(-8) is sufficient for melting almost completely icy spheres with radii of 800 km, typical of the larger icy planetary satellites. We also find that for any given 26Al abundance, there is a narrow range of radii below which only marginal melting occurs and above which most of the ice melts (and refreezes later). Since extensive melting may have important consequences, such as differentiation, gas release, and volcanic activity, the effect of 26Al should be included in future studies of satellite interiors. PMID:11538079

  6. Neural Analog Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1982-07-01

    Neural Analog Information Processing (NAIP) is an effort to develop general purpose pattern classification architectures based upon biological information processing principles. This paper gives an overview of NAIP and its relationship to the previous work in neural modeling from which its fundamental principles are derived. It also presents a theorem concerning the stability of response of a slab (a two dimensional array of identical simple processing units) to time-invariant (spatial) patterns. An experiment (via computer emulation) demonstrating classification of a spatial pattern by a simple, but complete NAIP architecture is described. A concept for hardware implementation of NAIP architectures is briefly discussed.

  7. Laboratory Simulated Impact Shock on Ices relevant to Planetary icy Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Khare, B. N.; McKay, C. P.; Ishihara, T.

    2006-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer planets show impact cratering features and it is recognised that this process may have played a crucial role in the formation and evolution of icy bodies. The effect of impact by extraterrestrial objects into the surface is commonly related to physical changes. Most of the research applied to impacts on ices has been developed to study and understand the cratering formation process and their physical, geophysical characteristics. Chemical changes and synthesis occurring on icy planetary surfaces are generally explained by the influence of UV photons and high-energy charged particles on ices. Nonetheless, impact process onto ices could be a source of local or global endogenic process and could be especially advantageous as an efficient energy source for driving interesting chemistry. Impacts can ensure that icy surfaces are eventually exposed, for a limited period of time, to aqueous melt in impact craters and ejecta and one can imagine that impurities included in the ice may undergo hydrolysis and other reactions under such conditions. Upon impact, the kinetic energy of the bolide is transferred to the ground liberating a great deal of stress energy which could initiate in situ a diverse series of chemical reactions in the fracture zone beneath the crater (Borucki et al., 2002; Jones and Lewis, 1987). Here we present a new approach testing in laboratory the chemistry conducted by impacts into planetary ices and we report the first experimental results. We have irradiated with a powerful pulsed laser icy mixtures of pure water ices containing CO2, Na2CO3, CH3OH and CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 at 77K. GC-MS and FTIR analyses show that hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and methanol are formed in irradiated H2O / CO2 ices. Ice containing sodium carbonate generates under simulated impact CO and CO2 which are also produced in impacted H2O / CH3OH and H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 ices. But, in both latter icy mixtures, methane and more complex

  8. FREE TRANSLATIONAL OSCILLATIONS OF ICY BODIES WITH A SUBSURFACE OCEAN USING A VARIATIONAL APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Escapa, A.; Fukushima, T.

    2011-03-15

    We analyze the influence of the interior structure of an icy body with an internal ocean on the relative translational motions of its solid constituents. We consider an isolated body differentiated into three homogeneous layers with spherical symmetry: an external ice-I layer, a subsurface ammonia-water ocean, and a rocky inner core. This composition represents icy bodies such as Europa, Titania, Oberon, and Triton, as well as Pluto, Eris, Sedna, and 2004 DW. We construct the equations of motion by assuming that the solid constituents are rigid and that the ocean is an ideal fluid, the internal motion being characterized by the relative translations of the solids and the induced flow in the fluid. Then we determine the dynamics of the icy body using the methods of analytical mechanics, that is, we compute the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy, and obtain the Lagrangian function. The resulting solution of the Lagrange equations shows that the solid layers perform translational oscillations of different amplitudes with respect to the barycenter of the body. We derive the dependence of the frequency of the free oscillations of the system on the characteristics of each layer, expressing the period of the oscillations as a function of the densities and masses of the ocean and the rocky inner core, and the mass of the icy body. We apply these results to previously developed subsurface models and obtain numerical values for the period and the ratio between the amplitudes of the translational oscillations of the solid components. The features obtained are quite different from the cases of Earth and Mercury. Our analytical formulas satisfactorily explain the source of these differences. When models of the same icy body, compatible with the existence of an internal ocean, differ in the thickness of the ice-I layer, their associated periods experience a relative variation of at least 10%. In particular, the different models for Titania and Oberon exhibit a

  9. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  10. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-04-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  11. Antarctic Space Analog Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, E. K. Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Holland, Albert W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to examine group dynamics and individual performance in extreme, isolated environments and identify human factors requirements for long-duration space missions using data collected in an analog environment. Specifically, we wished to determine: 1) the characteristics of social relations in small groups of individuals living and working together in extreme, isolated environments, and 2) the environmental, social and psychological determinants of performance effectiveness in such groups. These two issues were examined in six interrelated studies using data collected in small, isolated research stations in Antarctica from 1963 to the present. Results from these six studies indicated that behavior and performance on long-duration space flights is likely to be seasonal or cyclical, situational, social, and salutogenic in nature. The project responded to two NASA program emphases for FY 1997 as described in the NRA: 1) the primary emphasis of the Behavior and Performance Program on determining long-term individual and group performance responses to space, identifying critical factors affecting those responses and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in behavior and performance, and developing and using ground-based models and analogs for studying space-related behavior and performance; and 2) the emphasis of the Data Analysis Program on extended data analysis. Results from the study were used to develop recommendations for the design and development of pre-flight crew training and in-flight psychological countermeasures for long-duration manned space missions.

  12. Compositional Impact of Io Volcanic Emissions on Jupiter's Magnetosphere and the Icy Galilean Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Fegley, Bruce; Lipatov, Alexander; Richardson, John; Sittler, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The magnetospheric ion population of Jupiter is dominated by the 1000 kg/s of iogenic material constantly ejected by IO volcanism as neutral gas (approx. 1 kg/s goes out as high speed dust grains), subsequent atmospheric losses to the IO torus, and radial transport of torus ions throughout the magnetosphere. As that magnetosphere is greatly distended in radial size by the iogenic plasma loading, so are surfaces of the other Galilean moons also significantly, and perhaps even dominantly, affected by iogenic plasma bombardment, e.g. at the level up to 0.2 kg/s heavy ions (mostly O and S) onto Europa as per local plasma ion measurements. In comparison, cometary impacts onto IO deliver about 0.02 kg/s of impact ejecta to Europa via ballistic transfer through the Jupiter system. The magnetosphere of this system operates as a powerful engine to produce and transport ions from the IO source to the surfaces of these other moons, and any future orbiter missions to these moons must account for surface distributions of the iogenic material and its chemical effects before real assessments can be made of sensible chemical materials otherwise arising from primordial formation and subsequent evolution of these moons. This is a fundamental problem of space weathering that must be addressed for all planetary bodies with thin atmospheres and direct surface exposure to their space plasma environments. Long-standing debates from Galileo Orbiter measurements about the origins of hydrate sulfates at Europa present examples of this problem, as to whether the sulfates arise from oceanic minerals or from iogenic sulfur chemistry. Any orbiter or landed mission to Europa for astrobiological investigations would further need to separate the potential chemical biosignatures of life or its precursors from the highly abundant background of iogenic material. Although no single ion carries a tag identifying it as of iogenic or other origin, the elemental abundance distributions of ions to be

  13. Ion processing of ices and the origin of SO2 and O3 on the icy surfaces of the icy jovian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Ding, J. J.; Domaracka, A.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Palumbo, M. E.; Rothard, H.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new experimental results relative to 144 keV S9+ or Ar9+ ion implantation in targets made of oxygen rich frozen gases (O2, CO2) and mixtures with water ice. Spectra in the UV (200-400 nm) range have been obtained before and after implantation. The targets have been selected because they can be representative of the parent molecules from which SO2 and O3, observed to be present on the surfaces of Jupiter's icy Moons, could be formed due to radiolysis induced by the abundant magnetospheric ions. The results indicate that sulfur dioxide is not detectable after sulfur implantation in oxygen bearing species. Ozone is formed after argon and sulfur ion implantation. Sulfur implantation in O2 and CO2 targets also induces the formation of a band centered at about 255 nm (that we tentatively attribute to SO3- radicals). In the mixtures with water the band appears initially at the same wavelength and shifts to about 247 nm at higher ion fluences possibly indicating the formation of sulfite (HSO3-) ions. An absorption band observed on Ganymede is well fitted by using three components: ozone, sulfite ions and a not identified component having an absorption band centered at 298 nm. In all of the studied cases ion implantation produces a spectral reddening over the investigated spectral range (200-400 nm) that well mimics the observed spectral slopes of Jupiter's icy satellites.

  14. Crustal Failure in Large Icy Bodies from a Strong Tidal Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Giannella, David; Shaw, John

    2015-11-01

    Close tidal encounters among large planetesimals and satellites are more common than grazing or direct impacts. Using a mass spring model simulation, we look at the deformation of the surface of an elastic spherical body caused by a nearly parabolic close tidal encounter with a body that has mass similar to that of the primary body. We delineate a regime for tidal encounters that induce sufficient stress on the surface for brittle failure of an icy crust. Simulated cracks caused by extension of the crust extend a large fraction of the radius of body. Tidal encounters give an alternative mechanism for formation of long graben complexes and chasma on icy satellites such as Dione, Tethys, Ariel and Charon.

  15. Icy Galilean satellite reflectance spectra - Less ice on Ganymede and Callisto?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation of reflectance spectra of the icy Galilean satellites, taking account of the depth of the 3-micron fundamental water ice absorption feature and the shorter wavelength bands, suggests lower ice abundances for Ganymede and Callistro than previously supposed, provided that the ice is segregated from the nonicy material. Data are consistent with a 50 percent areal coverage of ice on Ganymede and 10 percent on Callistro, the rest of the surface being covered by carbonaceous chondrite-like material with strong 3-micron absorption due to bound water. The analysis indicates a homogeneous icy surface for Europa, and the possible presence on all three objects of small quantities of surface sulfuric acid.

  16. Distinct Aqueous and Hydrocarbon Cryovolcanism on Titan and Other Icy Satellites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Furfaro, R.; Candelaria, P.

    2010-12-01

    Almost as soon as low-temperature solar nebula condensation sequences were first computed, it was realized that icy satellites have an internal heat source in long-lived radioactivities and could undergo differentiation; furthermore, freezing-point depressants, such as ammonia, and apolar gases, such as methane, could enable icy satellites to undergo aqueous cryovolcanism. The subsequent recognition of tidal and gravitational potential energy sources increased expectations for cryovolcanism. Voyager imaging and discovery of apparent cryovolcanic landforms—best exhibited by Triton, more ambiguous elsewhere-- motivated studies of the phase relations, phase densities and other thermodynamic properties, solid- and liquid-state rheologies, and possible cryovolcanic eruptive behaviors and landform characteristics. Ironically, the closer we examined Jovian icy moons with Galileo, the rarer cryovolcanic landforms appeared to be, with only a few compelling and very well characterized cases found mainly on Europa. Compelling examples of effusive cryovolcanism mainly occupied local topographic lows, whereas cases not in low spots tended to exhibit signs of explosive emplacement. Spectacular evidence of explosive cryovolcanism or geyser-like behavior was found by Cassini on Enceladus, but most other icy Saturnian moons did not reveal any compelling indicators of eruptions. Titan has so far been a mixed case, where some indicators of cryovolcanism have been reported, but there is scant compelling evidence for the process. We think that the sparseness of compelling effusive cryovolcanic features on icy satellites is because free, unreacted ammonia is less common than previously thought, and the main aqueous liquids are salt-water solutions denser than ice I; hence, they tend not to erupt, or they erupt only if driven by gas exsolution; even then, a thin ice shell and high heat flow is needed to allow aqueous liquids near enough to the surface to erupt. On satellites with thick

  17. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven.

    The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site.

    This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Decimeter-Wavelength Polarimetric Radar Imaging of the Icy Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Madsen, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging radars with wavelengths in the range of 10 cm to 1 m can deeply penetrate the surface of an icy body, revealing details of the geomorphology, local structure, and electrical properties of the upper layers. Radar studies of icy surfaces on Earth have used the polarization state of backscatter echoes at multiple frequencies to characterize the surface and subsurface properties of glaciers, showing relatively smooth surfaces on the scale of radar wave-lengths, and subsurface scattering from volume scatterers consistent with ice pipes and lenses. These volume scattering effects are evident in enhanced polarization ratios over a limited range of backscatter incidence angles. The Galilean satellites exhibit similarly enhanced polarization ratios and volumetric scattering effects, but the observations are limited in angular resolution, leading to ambiguity in interpreting the scattering mechanisms and their structural implications.

  19. Incorporating Density Properties of MgSO4 Brines Into Icy World Ocean Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.; Vance, S.

    2011-12-01

    The structure and flow of the subsurface oceans in icy worlds depends on the sources of buoyancy within these oceans. Buoyancy is determined by the equation of state, in which density is a nonlinear function of temperature, salinity, and pressure. Equations of state for terrestrial seawater (with Na and Cl as the principal dissolved species) are well-developed, but icy world oceans may contain a different balance of species, including Na, Mg, SO4, and NH4 (Kargel et al, 2000). Recent work by Vance and Brown (2011, pers. comm.) has mapped out the density and thermodynamic properties of MgSO4 brines under icy world conditions. We have developed code to incorporate this equation of state data for MgSO4 brines into two different ocean simulation models. First, we investigate a single-column convection model, which is able to find the equilibrium structure and heat transport of an icy world ocean. We explore the heat transport through the ocean subject to a variety of assumptions about ocean salinity and seafloor heat and salt flux. We resolve the paradox posed by Vance and Brown (2004): warm salty MgSO4 brine emitted by a seafloor hydrothermal system may be positively buoyant at the seafloor, but become negatively buoyant (sinking) at lower pressure. How does heat escape the ocean, if it cannot be transported by convection? Second, we add MgSO4 dynamics to a full 3-D time-dependent general circulation model (the MIT GCM), which is able to simulate both the global-scale circulation of the world's ocean and investigate the highly turbulent dynamics of buoyant hydrothermal systems. We ask, "Are buoyancy-driven flows in a MgSO4 brine ocean significantly different than similarly-driven flows in terrestrial seawater?"

  20. Tidal dissipation in the large icy satellites: implications for their thermal evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Mocquet, A.; Sotin, C.

    2003-04-01

    Tidal dissipation is a large heat source that controls the thermal evolution of several bodies of the Solar system, notably Europa and Titan. In order to investigate how tidal heating affects the present and past thermal states of these icy satellites, we perform numerical calculations of tidal dissipation distribution for different internal structures and different viscoelastic properties of their interiors. The numerical method is developed after the elastic formulation of free spheroidal oscillations of a compressible self-gravitating planet and adapted to a tidally forced viscoelastic response of the body. We test systematically the dependence of tidal dissipation on the rheological parameters namely, the viscosity eta, the shear modulus μ, and the bulk modulus K, as well as on the orbital parameters, i.e. the eccentricity e and the forcing frequency ω. The effects of tidal dissipation on heat balance in the outer icy layers are investigated with a 2D thermal convection model. We show that the tidal dissipation in the icy layers of Europa and Titan is very large, and that it allows for the long-term existence of a subsurface ocean below a convective ice I layer. We are also investigating thermal evolution models of the rocky core to address the question of tidal dissipation in the silicates. Although tidal dissipation in the rocky core is not required for an ocean to exist, it may provide an additional heating source for seafloor volcanism to occur. In addition, we show that the tidal dissipation in a floating icy layer mainly depends on its viscous structure and that the lateral viscosity variations modify the local dissipation and the value of the global dissipation up to 30%.

  1. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose–Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  2. Marketing Farm Grain Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridenour, Harlan E.

    This vocational agriculture curriculum on grain marketing contains three parts: teacher guide, student manual, and student workbook. All three are coordinated and cross-referenced. The course is designed to give students of grain marketing a thorough background in the subject and provide practical help in developing grain marketing strategies for…

  3. Grain structure and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chapter 4 covers general information about structure and composition of cereal grains as well as the unique features of each cereal grain. Cereal grains are the fruits of cultivated grasses and members of Gramineae family. The fruit of a cereal is botanically known as caryopsis, featured by fusion...

  4. A passive probe for subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Vance, Steve; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmitter failure. The interferometric reflectometer could operate with electrically short antennas, thus extending ice depth measurements to lower frequencies, and potentially providing a deeper view into the ice shells of jovian moons.

  5. The cryo-penetrator: An approach to exploration of icy bodies in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Reinert, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclei of comets and the small icy moons of the outer planets are thought to be the most primitive objects in the solar system. Because of their pristine nature, in-situ measurements of composition, temperature, and mechanical properties will be a powerful tool in realization of one of NASA's major objectives: determination of the Solar System's origins and evolution. Cryo penetrators are a new class of penetrator vehicle investigated intensively since 1985 for NASA's Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission. They are specifically optimized for penetration and operation in icy bodies at temperatures below 150 degrees K. The CRAF studies were directed at investigation of comet nuclei, but the same design should be applicable to the icy moons of the outer planets and, with appropriate delivery systems, (similar to those envisioned for NASA's MESUR mission) to the Martian polar caps. This paper describes the design of a cryopenetrator based on the CRAF Configuration and designed for in-situ measurements of a comet nucleus as part of the Comet Nucleus Penetrator (CNP) Discovery mission. The ROSETTA nucleus rendezvous mission recently selected by ESA is another potential cryo penetrator application.

  6. Brine Pockets in the Icy Shell on Europa: Distribution, Chemistry, and Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu; Shock, E. L.; Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    On Earth, sea ice is rich in brine, salt, and gas inclusions that form through capturing of seawater during ice formation. Cooling of the ice over time leads to sequential freezing of captured sea-water, precipitation of salts, exsolution of gases, and formation of brine channels and pockets. Distribution and composition of brines in sea ice depend on the rate of ice formation, vertical temperature gradient, and the age of the ice. With aging, the abundance of brine pockets decreases through downward migration. De- spite low temperatures and elevated salinities, brines in sea ice provide a habitat for photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organisms. On Europa, brine pockets and channels could exist in the icy shell that may be from a few km to a few tens of km thick and is probably underlain by a water ocean. If the icy shell is relatively thick, convection could develop, affecting the temperature pattern in the ice. To predict the distribution and chemistry of brine pockets in the icy shell we have combined numerical models of the temperature distribution within a convecting shell, a model for oceanic chemistry, and a model for freezing of Europan oceanic water. Possible effects of brine and gas inclusions on ice rheology and tectonics are discussed.

  7. Thickness Constraints on the Icy Shells of the Galilean Satellites from a Comparison of Crater Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    A thin outer ice shell on Jupiter's large moon Europa would imply easy exchange between the surface and any organic or biotic material in its putative subsurface ocean. The thickness of the outer ice shell is poorly constrained, however, with model-dependent estimates ranging from a few kilometers of depths of impact craters on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto that reveal two anomalous transitions in crater shape with diameter. The first transition is probably related to temperature-dependent ductility of the crust at shallow depths (7-8 km on Europa). The second transition is attributed to the influence of subsurface oceans on all three satellites, which constrains Europa's icy shell to be at least 19 km thick. The icy lithospheres of Ganymede and Callisto are equally ice-rich, but Europa's icy shell has a thermal structure about 0.25-0.5 times the thickness of Ganymede's or Callisto's shells, depending on epoch. The appearances of the craters on Europa are inconsistent with thin-ice-shell models and indicate that exchange of oceanic and surface material could be difficult.

  8. Heating and melting of small icy satellites by the decay of Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiogenic heating due to Al-26 on the thermal evolution of small icy satellites is studied. The object is to find the extent of internal melting as a function of the satellite radius and of the initial Al-26 abundance. The implicit assumption, based on observations of young stars, is that planet and satellite accretion occurred on a time scale of about 10 to the 6th yr (comparable with the lifetime of Al-26. The icy satellites are modeled as spheres of initially amorphous ice, with chondritic abundances of K-40, Th-232, U-235, and U-238, corresponding to an ice/dust mass ratio of 1. Evolutionary calculations are carried out, spanning 4.5 x 10 to the 9th yr, for different combinations of the two free parameters. Heat transfer by subsolidus convection is neglected for these small satellites. The main conclusion is that the initial Al-26 abundance capable of melting icy bodies of satellite size to a significant extent is more than 10 times lower than that prevailing in the interstellar medium (or that inferred from the Ca-Al rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite, about 7 x 10 to the -7th by mass).

  9. Analog and digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baher, H.

    The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

  10. Granular fingers on jammed systems: new fluidlike patterns arising in grain-grain invasion experiments.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S F; Couto, M S; Atman, A P F; Alves, S G; Bernardes, A T; de Resende, H F V; Souza, E C

    2007-08-10

    In this Letter we report spontaneous pattern formation in dense granular assemblies confined to a Hele-Shaw cell and quasistatic regime. Varied unexpected patterns, ranging from rounded to fingered, are observed due to the displacement of one granular material by another. Computer simulations reproduce the major features observed in these experiments. Two mechanisms are responsible for the pattern formation: crystallization of the injected grains and plastic deformation of the displaced grains. The experiment suggests analogies with viscous fingering and jamming transition experiments. PMID:17930866

  11. Laboratory simulation of impacts shocks on icy surfaces: application to Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Khare, B. N.; McKay, C. P.

    Impact processing is an energy source that may have contributed to the supply of organic compounds in the planetary environments of our solar system. Numerous studies related to impact events and organic synthesis have focused on the chemistry occurring in the atmospheres of the early Earth and Titan (McKay and Borucki, 1997; Jones and Lewis, 1987; Borucki et al., 1984). Here we consider their implication for the chemistry occurring on the surface. Recently, it has been suggested that meteorite impacts could be an energy source for organic synthesis in ices (Borucki et al., 2002; McDonald et al., 1996). There is a great interest in meteorite impacts on icy surfaces of the saturnian and jovian moons because their ice crusts may contain carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen-bearing compounds that could participate in synthesizing prebiotic molecules. In Europa, hypervelocity meteorite impacts and fracture may release tidal and tectonic stresses into the icy crust in the form of electrical discharges. Such discharges may provide enough energy for in situ synthesis of organic solids and could be correlated with the orange-brown material observed in Europa in regions located at impact sites (Borucki et al., 2002). Here we investigate by laboratory experiments the possible contribution of meteorite impact as an energy to drive chemical reactions in Europa's icy shell. Shocks during impacts are simulated by energy deposition from a Neodymium-YAG laser emitting a pulse energy of 0.65 J/pulse at a wavelength of 1064 nm. We conduct a series of experiments irradiating ice mixtures of H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 at 77K under vacuum. The volatile products of the irradiated ice are then analyzed by GC-MS. This experimental study could be applicable to other icy moons like Titan. Indeed organics accumulated on Titan's surface layer could have been subjected to impact processing (Artemieva et al., 2003;Thompson and Sagan, 1991) and even participate in the formation of products relevant to life

  12. Fractal analysis on Enceladus: a global ocean underneath the icy crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Cremonese, Gabriele; Simioni, Emanuele; Massironi, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Plumes of water have been observed erupting from Enceladus' south polar terrain providing direct evidence of a reservoir of liquid below the surface, that could be considered global or just a small body of water concentrated at its south pole. Gravity data collected during the spacecraft's several close flyby over the south polar region determined that the icy shell above the liquid ocean must be 30-40 km thick extending from the south pole up to 50°S (Iess et al. 2014). The hypothesis of a global ocean beneath the icy crust has been raised even in a recent paper of Thomas et al. (2015) thanks to the measurements of the very slight wobble that Enceladus displays as it orbits Saturn. In this work we support the hypothesis of the presence of an ocean layer using the fractal percolation theory. This method allowed us to estimate the icy shell thickness values in different regions of Enceladus from the south polar terrain up to the north pole. The spatial distribution of fractures on Enceladus has been analyzed in terms of their self-similar clustering and a two-point correlation method was used to measure the fractal dimension of the fractures population (Mazzarini, 2004, 2010). A self-similar clustering of fractures is characterized by a correlation coefficient with a size range defined by a lower and upper cut-off, that represent a mechanical discontinuity and the thickness of the fractured icy crust, thus connected to the liquid reservoir. We mapped the fractures on Enceladus surface based on April 2010 global mosaic from Cassini mission and applied the fractal method firstly to the south polar terrain finding indeed a fractal correlation of fractures and providing an ice shell thickness of ~40 km. Then, we analyzed fractures of four different regions around the equator and around the north pole inferring an overall ice shell thickness ranging from 35 to 45 km. Our results are in agreement with the gravity observations (Iess et al., 2014) and the mechanical models

  13. Phase behavior and thermodynamic modeling of ices - implications for the geophysics of icy satellites. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based observations and space missions to the outer Solar System (Voyager, Galileo, Cassini-Huygens) have evidenced recent geologic activity on many satellites of the giant planets. The diversity in surface expression of these icy moons’ activity is striking: from a scarred and young surface on Europa,1 with hydrated salts that may originate from a liquid layer buried at depth,2 to the South Polar plumes of Enceladus,3 where water ice particles are expelled along with a myriad of more complex molecules,4 to Titan, largest satellite of Saturn, with a dense atmosphere and a hydrocarbon cycle similar to the hydrological cycle on Earth.5 Large icy moons, i.e. with a radius greater than 500 km, share two particularities: a high content in water (on the order of a 30-70% bulk composition), and an interior segregated between a water-dominated mantle and a silicate-dominated core. The many forms water may have beneath the surface (ice polymorphs, liquid, hydrated compounds) bear a crucial role in the detected or alleged activity, and in the potential for astrobiological relevance. Indeed, any endogenic activity can only be approached through geophysical modelling of the internal structure and the thermal evolution. Current internal structure models for the icy moonse.g.,6 rely mainly on the contribution of each internal layer to the moment of inertia, generating non-unique solutions due to the large variability in density of H2O-bearing phases. Thermal evolution models,e.g.,7 can help constrain further the internal structure and geophysical activity, by starting with a given initial composition and state and investigating the thickening of icy layers through time. However, such models require both observational datasets and a precise description, as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition, of the thermophysical properties of the individual layers. Over the past century, experimental studies have provided a comprehensive view of the phase diagram of

  14. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  15. Pictorial Analogies XII: Stoichiometric Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Pictorial analogies that demonstrate concepts of amounts allow instructors to teach that in stoichiometric problems, the number--or moles--of molecules of a chemical is what matters, even though it must be measured in masses or volumes. Analogies to stoichiometric relationships include the ratio of four wheels to one body in making wagons and…

  16. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  17. Conjecturing via Reconceived Classical Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyeong-Hwa; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is believed to be an efficient means of problem solving and construction of knowledge during the search for and the analysis of new mathematical objects. However, there is growing concern that despite everyday usage, learners are unable to transfer analogical reasoning to learning situations. This study aims at facilitating…

  18. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2014-01-01

    Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

  19. Refractory Organic Compounds in Enceladus' Ice Grains and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Khawaja, N.; Hsu, H. W.; Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) generates time-of-flight mass spectra of individual grains impinging on the instruments target-plate. Following the analysis of salt rich ice grains emitted by Enceladus that indicated a salt-water ocean in contact with the moon's rocky core [1,2] a recent CDA analysis of nano-phase silica particles pointed at hydrothermal activity at the moon's rock/water interface [3]. The results imply temperatures above 80 - 90°C and alkaline pH values around 10 reminiscent of alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth like the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. In this context the compositional analysis of organic components in CDA mass spectra of the ejected ice grains is of particular relevance. A multitude of volatile organic species has already been identified in the gas component of the plume [4]. As expected, we find more complex organic molecules in ice grains than in the gas indicating aromatic species, amines, and carbonyl group species. The composition of organic-bearing ice grains displays a great diversity indicating a variety of different organic species in varying concentrations. Recent spatially resolved CDA in situ measurements inside Enceladus' plume indicate that these organic compounds are especially frequent in 'young' ice grains that have just been ejected by high velocity jets. We investigate the implications of our findings with respect to ice grain formation at the water surface and inside the icy vents. We constrain the generation of organic compounds at the rock/water interface in the light of hydrothermal activity and the potential for the formation of life precursor molecules in Enceladus' ocean. Ref:[1] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098-1101 (2009). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 474, 620-622 (2011). [3]. Hsu, Postberg, Sekine et al., Nature, 519, 207-210 (2015). [4] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487-490 (2009).

  20. Habitability of the giant icy moons: current knowledge and future insights from the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasset, O.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Titov, D.; Erd, C.; Bunce, E.; Coustenis, A.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A.; Fletcher, L.; van Hoolst, T.; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Krupp, N.; Tortora, P.; Tosi, F.; Wielders, A.

    2012-09-01

    Large satellites of gas giants, at orbits beyond the snow-line, such as Jupiter or Saturn, can contain a large amount of water (almost 45% in mass). Hydrospheres are extremely thick, ~600 km for Ganymede and Callisto, and may possess liquid layers below the icy crust. Thus, the Galilean satellites provide a conceptual basis within which new theories for understanding habitability can be constructed. Measurements from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft revealed the potential of these satellites in this context. The JUpiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE) will greatly enhance our understanding of their potential habitability. It is known, even at Earth where life mostly depends on solar energy, that habitats exist deep in the oceans in eternal darkness feeding on chemical energy. Aqueous layers are suspected below the icy crusts of the moons, which possess similar physical characteristics than Earth's deep oceans. Since they are certainly very stable through time, and because complex chemistry and energy sources may be available, life may have originated within such subsurface habitats despite the hostile surface conditions. Liquid water reservoirs have been proposed on Ganymede, Europa and Callisto from geophysical models, based on Galileo observations. These oceans that are covered by ice shells exist independently of the input of stellar energy, and are located well outside the conventional habitable zone of the Sun. Considering the pressure range encountered within the icy moons, four different scenarios can be defined. These result from varying thicknesses of the water ice layers and the liquid ocean with respect to the silicate floor (Figure 1). Case 2 in Figure 1 is highly probable for the largest moons (Ganymede and Callisto), while case 3 is more probable for Europa and smaller icy moons if they host liquid reservoirs such as has been discovered at Enceladus. Europa's ocean is unique because it may be in contact with the rock layer. This substrate may be

  1. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on consolidated Soil Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferlin, K.; Heimberg, M.; Thomas, N.

    2007-08-01

    Heat transport in porous media such as soils and regolith is significantly reduced compared to the properties of compact samples of the same material. The bottle neck for solid state heat transport is the contact area between adjacent grains. For "dry" and unconsolidated materials the contact areas and thus the thermal conductivity are extremely small. Sintering and cementation are two processes that can increase the cross section of interstitial bonds signifcantly. On Mars, cementation can be caused by condensation of water or carbon dioxide ice from the vapor phase, or from salts and minerals that fall out from aqueous solutions. We produced several artificially cemented samples, using small glass beads of uniform size as soil analog. The cementation is achieved by initially molten wax that is mixed with the glass beads while liqiud. The wax freezes preferably at the contact points between grains, thus minimizing surface energy, and consolidates the samples. The thermal conductivity of these samples is then measured in vacuum. We present the results of these measurements and compare them with theoretical models. The observed range of thermal conductivity values can explain some, but not all of the variations in thermal intertia that can be seen in TES remote sensing data.

  2. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Prialnik, Dina

    2016-04-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution scenarios and follow the evolution for the age of the Solar System, testing the present day model results against the available observational constraints. Our model shows the present configuration to be differentiated into a pure icy mantle, several tens of km thick, overlying a rocky core, composed of dehydrated rock at the center and hydrated rock in the outer part. For Enceladus, it predicts a higher rock/ice mass ratio than previously assumed and a thinner ice mantle, compatible with recent estimates based on gravity field measurements. Although, obviously, the model cannot be used to explain local phenomena, it sheds light on the internal structure invoked in explanations of localized features and activities.

  3. Shock vaporization and the accretion of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The known properties of water and ice over a wide range of pressures and temperatures are applied to describe constraints on the shock vaporization processes for water and ice in the solar system. In particular, the role of impact vaporization acting during the formation of the Jovian and Saturnian satellites is examined in an attempt to explain the observed density in terms of composition of these rock and ice objects. A possible model of accretion of icy satellites is considered which predicts that the amount of ice devolatilization is related to planetary size.

  4. Large Impact Features on Saturn's Middle-sized Icy Satellites: Global Image Mosaics and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2003-01-01

    With the approach of Cassini to the Saturn system, attention naturally focuses on the planet, its rings and Titan, but the Saturn system is also populated by a number of smaller satellites. The seven middle-sized icy satellites, along with those of Uranus, (between 400 and 1500 km wide) are distinctly different geophysically and geologically from their much larger Galilean-class brethren [e.g., 1]. Topographic mapping of these bodies is a critical part of understanding their geologic evolution. Here we describe our recent efforts to map the topography of these satellites using Voyager data.

  5. Onset of convection and differentiation in the hydrated cores of icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Reynard, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn have revealed that the three large Jovian icy moons and Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, are at least partly differentiated. Their normalized moments of inertia are smaller than 2/5, which is the value for undifferentiated moons. We present new simulations of the thermal evolution, dehydration process, differentiation, and onset of convection in the hydrated cores of large icy satellites. The motivation is to investigate whether convection can start before dehydration starts in the cores. Such a process would prevent differentiation. The viscosity of antigorite, the hydrated silicate supposed to compose the hydrated cores, is strongly non-Newtonian and weakly temperature-dependent. The cores are volumetrically heated by natural radioactivity. We have adapted the theory developed for non-Newtonian fluids heated from below [1] to the case of volumetrically heated fluids. A recent review [2] of the physical parameters relevant to the thermal evolution of hydrated cores made of antigorite provides values quite different from those used in previous studies [3,4], which seriously modifies the results of previous simulations including the predicted present interior structure of the large icy satellites. The numerical simulations presented in this study suggest that the inner part of the hydrated core of icy moons would dehydrate for a large range of parameters, the most important of which is the amount of 40K. The outer core would remain hydrated. It is shown that convection could start in the outer core for large values of internal heating. Implications for subsequent thermal evolution are being investigated. [1] Solomatov V.S. (1995) Scaling of temperature and stressdependent viscosity convection; Phys. Fluids 7, 266; doi: 10.1063/1.868624. [2] Reynard B. (2012) Serpentine in active subduction zones. Lithos, doi: 10.1016/j.lithos.2012.10.012 [3] Grinrod P.M., A.D. Fortes, F. Nimmo, D.L. Feltham

  6. Electric Propulsion Technology Development for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During 2004, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter project, a part of NASA's Project Prometheus, continued efforts to develop electric propulsion technologies. These technologies addressed the challenges of propelling a spacecraft to several moons of Jupiter. Specific challenges include high power, high specific impulse, long lived ion thrusters, high power/high voltage power processors, accurate feed systems, and large propellant storage systems. Critical component work included high voltage insulators and isolators as well as ensuring that the thruster materials and components could operate in the substantial Jupiter radiation environment. A review of these developments along with future plans is discussed.

  7. Radio Sounding Techniques for the Galilean Icy Moons and their Jovian Magnetospheric Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Markus, Thursten; Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Reinich, Bodo W.; Song, Paul; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Cooper, John F.; Taylor, William W. L.; Garcia, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's topside ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to Jupiter's icy moons and the surrounding Jovian magnetosphere will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the surfaces of the moons vary in response to magnetic-field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans and from the plasma flows and ionospheric currents themselves. Radio sounding from 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide the global electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. While radio sounding requires high transmitter power for subsurface sounding, little power is needed to probe the electron density and magnetic field intensity near the spacecraft. For subsurface sounding, reflections occur at changes in the dielectric index, e.g., at the interfaces between two different phases of water or between water and soil. Variations in sub-surface conductivity of the icy moons can be investigated by radio sounding in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 50 MHz, allowing the determination of the presence of density and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts. The detection of subsurface oceans underneath the icy crusts of the Jovian moons is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. Preliminary modeling results show that return signals are clearly distinguishable be&een an ice crust with a thickness of

  8. Efficacy of a rubber outsole with a hybrid surface pattern for preventing slips on icy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Hsu, Jennifer; Li, Yue; Maki, Brian E

    2015-11-01

    Conventional winter-safety footwear devices, such as crampons, can be effective in preventing slips on icy surfaces but the protruding studs can lead to other problems such as trips. A new hybrid (rough and smooth) rubber outsole was designed to provide high slip resistance without use of protruding studs or asperities. In the present study, we examined the slip resistance of the hybrid rubber outsole on both dry (-10 °C) and wet (0 °C) icy surfaces, in comparison to three conventional strap-on winter anti-slip devices: 1) metal coils ("Yaktrax Walker"), 2) gritted (sandpaper-like) straps ("Rough Grip"), and 3) crampons ("Altagrips-Lite"). Drag tests were performed to measure static (SCOF) and dynamic (DCOF) coefficients of friction, and gait trials were conducted on both level and sloped ice surfaces (16 participants). The drag-test results showed relatively high SCOF (≧0.37) and DCOF (≧0.31) values for the hybrid rubber sole, at both temperatures. The other three footwear types exhibited lower DCOF values (0.06-0.20) when compared with the hybrid rubber sole at 0 °C (p < 0.01). Slips were more frequent when wearing the metal coils, in comparison to the other footwear types, when descending a slope at -10 °C (6% of trials vs 0%; p < 0.05). There were no other significant footwear-related differences in slip frequency, distance or velocity. These results indicate that the slip-resistance of the hybrid rubber sole on icy surfaces was comparable to conventional anti-slip footwear devices. Given the likely advantages of the hybrid rubber sole (less susceptibility to tripping, better slip resistance on non-icy surfaces), this type of sole should contribute to a decrease in fall accidents; however, further research is needed to confirm its effectiveness under a wider range of test conditions. PMID:26154199

  9. The radar-glory theory for icy moons with implications for radar mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1987-01-01

    The anomalous radar echoing properties of three ice-clad moons of Jupiter appear to be due to glory-like backscattering from buried craters. The enormous glare from these sources would impair geologic studies based on standard methods of radar mapping. It is not known whether similar or different problems will arise in the radar study of other icy surfaces in the outer solar system, or of the unseen surface of Titan. In any event, the results from the moons of Jupiter illustrate the role of exploratory measurements and the importance of possible bistatic radar-mapping techniques based on the use of separated transmitters and receivers.

  10. Flux of icy asteroids towards the habitable zone in binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bancelin, David; Bazso, Akos; Eggl, Siegfried

    2015-08-01

    From studies of habitability in our solar system we can conclude that a fraction of the water on Earth was transported via asteroids and comets to our planet. Assuming that other planetary systems would need similar water-bringing-scenarios we studied the efficiency of the water transport in binary star systems where we considered S-type planetary motion. We will show a detailed analysis of the dynamcial perturbations in the disk for different binary-planet configurations and analyse the efficiency of water transport via icy asteroids into the circumstellar habitable zone.

  11. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  12. An investigation into the cardiac and pulmonary beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity of ICI 66,082 in man.

    PubMed

    Marlin, G E; Kumana, C R; Kaye, C M; Smith, D M; Turner, P

    1975-04-01

    1 Oral ICI 66,082 (200 mg) or water (control treatment) were each administered to six healthy volunteers. 2 The heart rate (HR) and peak flow rate (PFR) were measured at rest and during vigorous exercise before and at intervals up to 24 h after each treatment. 3 ICI 66,082 produced significant reductions in exercise HR at all times compared with the changes after the control treatment (P less than 0.001), whereas with resting HR, corresponding significant reductions only occurred at 2,3 and 4 h (P less than 0.05). 4 Although there was no change in resting PFR, significant reductions in exercise PFR, compared with the changes after the control treatment, occurred at all times excepting at 2 h after ICI 66,082 (P less than 0.025). 5 The findings are consistent with ICI 66,082 possessing partial cardioselectivity. 6 Plasma levels and renal excretion of the drug were determined. Urinary recovery was variable which, together with the plasma concentration/effect relationships obtained, raise the possibility that ICI 66,082 is metabolized in man. PMID:1234497

  13. An investigation into the cardiac and pulmonary beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity of ICI 66,082 in man.

    PubMed Central

    Marlin, G E; Kumana, C R; Kaye, C M; Smith, D M; Turner, P

    1975-01-01

    1 Oral ICI 66,082 (200 mg) or water (control treatment) were each administered to six healthy volunteers. 2 The heart rate (HR) and peak flow rate (PFR) were measured at rest and during vigorous exercise before and at intervals up to 24 h after each treatment. 3 ICI 66,082 produced significant reductions in exercise HR at all times compared with the changes after the control treatment (P less than 0.001), whereas with resting HR, corresponding significant reductions only occurred at 2,3 and 4 h (P less than 0.05). 4 Although there was no change in resting PFR, significant reductions in exercise PFR, compared with the changes after the control treatment, occurred at all times excepting at 2 h after ICI 66,082 (P less than 0.025). 5 The findings are consistent with ICI 66,082 possessing partial cardioselectivity. 6 Plasma levels and renal excretion of the drug were determined. Urinary recovery was variable which, together with the plasma concentration/effect relationships obtained, raise the possibility that ICI 66,082 is metabolized in man. PMID:1234497

  14. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  15. Solving a problem by analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    1999-03-01

    This note is a description of a student solution to a problem. I found the solution exciting because it exemplifies the kind of solution by analogy that Feynman describes in The Feynman Lectures on Physics.

  16. Evaluating countermeasures in spaceflight analogs.

    PubMed

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-04-15

    Countermeasures are defined as solutions to prevent the undesirable physiologic outcomes associated with spaceflight. Spaceflight analogs provide a valuable opportunity for the evaluation of countermeasures because they allow for the evaluation of more subjects, more experimental control, and are considerably less expensive than actual spaceflight. The various human analogs have differing strengths and weaknesses with respect to the development and evaluation of countermeasures. The human analogs are briefly reviewed with a focus on their suitability for countermeasure evaluation. Bed rest is the most commonly used analog for evaluating countermeasures. While countermeasures are typically developed to target one or maybe two particular physiologic issues, it is increasingly important to evaluate all of the organ systems to discern whether they might be unintended consequences on nontargeted tissues. In preparation for Mars exploration it will be necessary to fully integrate countermeasures to protect all organ systems. The synergistic and antagonistic effects of multiple countermeasures needs to be the focus of future work. PMID:26662054

  17. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  18. The Robustness of Acoustic Analogies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Lele, S. K.; Wei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic analogies for the prediction of flow noise are exact rearrangements of the flow equations N(right arrow q) = 0 into a nominal sound source S(right arrow q) and sound propagation operator L such that L(right arrow q) = S(right arrow q). In practice, the sound source is typically modeled and the propagation operator inverted to make predictions. Since the rearrangement is exact, any sufficiently accurate model of the source will yield the correct sound, so other factors must determine the merits of any particular formulation. Using data from a two-dimensional mixing layer direct numerical simulation (DNS), we evaluate the robustness of two analogy formulations to different errors intentionally introduced into the source. The motivation is that since S can not be perfectly modeled, analogies that are less sensitive to errors in S are preferable. Our assessment is made within the framework of Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy, in which different choices of a base flow used in constructing L give different sources S and thus different analogies. A uniform base flow yields a Lighthill-like analogy, which we evaluate against a formulation in which the base flow is the actual mean flow of the DNS. The more complex mean flow formulation is found to be significantly more robust to errors in the energetic turbulent fluctuations, but its advantage is less pronounced when errors are made in the smaller scales.

  19. Cartographic Mapping of the Icy Satellites Using ISS and VIMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Thomas, P. C.

    The sizes and shapes of six icy Saturnian satellites have been measured from Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) data, employing limb coordinates and stereogram-metric control points. Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea are well described by triaxial ellipsoids; Iapetus is best represented by an oblate spheroid. The ISS acquired many high-resolution images (<1 km/pixel) during close flybys of the medium-sized icy Saturnian satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Iapetus, and Phoebe). We combined these images with lower-resolution coverage and a few images taken by Voyager cameras to produce high-resolution mosaics of these satellites. The global mosaics are the baseline for high-resolution atlases. The atlases consist of 15 tiles each for Enceladus, Dione, and Tethys, whereas the Iapetus, Mimas, and Phoebe atlases consist of 3, 1, and 1 tile, respectively. The nomenclature used in these atlases was suggested by the Cassini-ISS team and approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The whole atlases are available to the public through the Imaging Team's website (http://ciclops.org/maps/) and from the Planetary Data System (PDS, http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/). Additionally to ISS, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft detected the chemical and physical surface properties of the Saturnian satellites. Multiple VIMS observations were combined into global VIMS maps representing the VIMS coverage achieved during the nominal Cassini mission. Progressed mapping has been done for the satellites Dione, Rhea, and Enceladus.

  20. The ammonia-water system and the chemical differentiation of icy satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogenboom, D.L.; Kargel, J.S.; Consolmagno, G.J.; Holden, T.C.; Lee, L.; Buyyounouski, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery of the first high-pressure polymorphs of ammonia hydrates: ammonia monohydrate II and ammonia dihydrate II. The subsolidus transitions and melting curves of these substances are shown by their volume-temperature functions; uncalibrated calorimetry corroborates these phase changes. From 20 to 300 MPa ammonia dihydrate and ice melt at a eutectic to form water-rich liquids; at lower and higher pressures, ammonia dihydrate melts incongruently to ammonia-rich liquids. The new data are consistent with independently known thermodynamic parameters of the ammonia-water system. These results fill in an important region of pressure-temperature space not previously studied; a body of previous data reported by other investigators covers a complementary region (higher pressures), but in the light of the new data those earlier results now appear to have been misinterpreted. We show that a suitable reinterpretation of the previous data supports the identification of at least one high-pressure polymorph of each compound. The behavior of the system H2O-NH3in many ways follows that of MgO-SiO2, and the roles of ammonia-water in icy satellite evolution may parallel those of magnesium silicates in Earth's structure, volcanism, and deep mantle tectonism. Pressure-related effects, including a pressure influence on the ammonia content of cryomagmas, might be significant in determining some potentially observable aspects of cryovolcanic morphologies, surface compositions, and interior structures of icy satellites. ?? 1997 Academic Press.

  1. Thermophysical Property Variations on Saturn's icy moons: A system-wide perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C. J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Verbiscer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Thermal inertia variations have been observed on icy satellite surfaces throughout the Saturnian system, causing night and daytime temperature variations across the satellites. The most notable are the two 'Pac-Man' anomalies on Mimas and Tethys: distinct regions of high thermal inertia at low latitudes on the leading hemisphere of both satellites, which results in warmer nighttime and cooler daytime temperatures (by ~15 K) than their surroundings. Only subtle differences in surface color had previously been observed in the same region [1]. It is believed that the bombardment of the surface by high-energy electrons alters the surface of Mimas and Tethys, resulting in these high thermal inertia regions. Subtler differences in thermal inertia across other icy satellite surfaces have also been observed. For example: preliminary investigations show Dione may also display a thermal inertia variation that is similar to, but weaker than, Mimas and Tethys' anomalies. Initial investigations have also reveled that the ejecta from Rhea's bright crater Inktomi (14.1 S and 112.1 W) displays higher thermal inertia than its surroundings.

  2. Pilot-Assisted Adaptive Channel Estimation for Coded MC-CDMA with ICI Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Tatsunori; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    One of the promising wireless access techniques for the next generation mobile communications systems is multi-carrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA). MC-CDMA can provide good transmission performance owing to the frequency diversity effect in a severe frequency-selective fading channel. However, the bit error rate (BER) performance of coded MC-CDMA is inferior to that of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) due to the residual inter-code interference (ICI) after frequency-domain equalization (FDE). Recently, we proposed a frequency-domain soft interference cancellation (FDSIC) to reduce the residual ICI and confirmed by computer simulation that the MC-CDMA with FDSIC provides better BER performance than OFDM. However, ideal channel estimation was assumed. In this paper, we propose adaptive decision-feedback channel estimation (ADFCE) and evaluate by computer simulation the average BER and throughput performances of turbo-coded MC-CDMA with FDSIC. We show that even if a practical channel estimation is used, MC-CDMA with FDSIC can still provide better performance than OFDM.

  3. Interstellar grain chemistry and the composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1988-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle infrared, the spectral region most diagnostic of molecular vibrations. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources are now available. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of lab ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the icy materials frozen on the cold dust grains present in the interior of molecular clouds. In the experiments described, the assumption is made that cometary ices are similar to interstellar ices. As an illustration of the processes which can take place as an ice is irradiated and subsequently warmed, the infrared spectra is presented of the mixture H2O:CH3OH:CO:NH3:C6H14 (100:50:10:10:10). Apart from the last species, the ratio of these compounds is representative of the simplest ices found in interstellar clouds.

  4. JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (juice): AN ESA L-Class Mission Candidate to the Jupiter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, M. K.; Grasset, O.; Erd, C.; Titov, D.; Bunce, E. J.; Coustenis, A.; Blanc, M.; Coates, A. J.; Drossart, P.; Fletcher, L.; Hussmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Krupp, N.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Tortora, P.; Tosi, F.; Van Hoolst, T.

    2012-04-01

    The overarching theme for JUICE is: The emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Humankind wonders whether the origin of life is unique to the Earth or if it occurs elsewhere in our Solar System or beyond. To answer this question, even though the mechanisms by which life originated on Earth are not yet clearly understood, one can assume that the necessary conditions involve the simultaneous presence of organic compounds, trace elements, water, energy sources and a relative stability of the environment over time. JUICE will address the question: Are there current habitats elsewhere in the Solar System with the necessary conditions (water, biological essential elements, energy and stability) to sustain life? The spatial extent and evolution of habitable zones within the Solar System are critical elements in the development and sustainment of life, as well as in addressing the question of whether life developed on Earth alone or whether it was developed in other Solar System environments and was then imported to Earth. The focus of JUICE is to characterise the conditions that may have led to the emergence of habitable environments among the Jovian icy satellites, with special emphasis on the three ocean-bearing worlds, Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto. Ganymede is identified for detailed investigation since it provides a natural laboratory for analysis of the nature, evolution and potential habitability of icy worlds in general, but also because of the role it plays within the system of Galilean satellites, and its unique magnetic and plasma interactions with the surrounding Jovian environment. For Europa, where two targeted flybys are planned, the focus will be on the chemistry essential to life, including organic molecules, and on understanding the formation of surface features and the composition of the non water-ice material, leading to the identification and characterisation of candidate sites for future in situ exploration. Furthermore, JUICE will provide

  5. Ionization chemistry in the H2O-dominant atmospheres of the icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-08-01

    The main pathways of the ionization chemistry for pure H2O- and mixed H2O+O2+CO2+NH3+CH4 atmospheres which are representative for neutral and ionized atmospheres of the icy bodies in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are discussed. The gaseous envelopes of the icy moons of the giant planets are formed usually due to the surface radiolysis by the solar UV radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma (Johnson, 1990). The standard astrochemical UMIST2005 (UDFA05) network is used to infer the main chemical pathways of ionization chemistry in the pure or with admixtures of other volatile molecules water vapor atmospheres. In case of the H2O- dominant atmosphere the parent H2O molecules are easily dissociated and ionized by the solar UVradiation and the energetic magnetospheric electrons. These impact processes result in the formation of the secondary neutral and ionized products - chemically active radicals O and OH, and H+, H2+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions. Secondary ions have admixture abundances in the H2O-dominant atmospheres, because they are efficiently transformed to H3O+ hydroxonium ions in the fast ion-molecular reactions. The major H3O+ hydroxonium ion does not chemically interact with other neutrals, and is destroyed in the dissociative recombination with thermal electrons mainly reproducing the chemically simple H, H2, O, and OH species. In case of the mixed H2O+O2-dominant atmosphere corresponding to the near-surface atmospheres of icy moons (Shematovich et al., 2005), the ionization chemistry results in the formation of the second major ion O2+ - because ion of molecular oxygen has the lower ionization potential comparing with other parent species -H2, H2O, CO2. The H+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions can be easily converted to O2+ ions through the ion-molecular reactions. In case of significant admixture of molecular hydrogen it is possible to transfer the O2+ ions to the O2H+ ions through the fast reaction with H2 and further to the H3O+ ions through the ion

  6. Preliminary Measurements on the Mechanical Properties of Clathrate Hydrates with Implications for the Internal Dynamics of Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M. B.; Castillo, J. C.; Sotin, C.

    2008-12-01

    Surface features potentially associated with cryovolcanism have been identified on Titan, and the processes taking place beneath the surface are likely associated with the dissociation of clathrate hydrates and the release of methane. On Enceladus, the South Pole plume discovered by the Cassini-Huygens mission contains a large proportion of volatiles, in amounts consistent with models of clathrate hydrates dissociation at depth (Kieffer et al., Science 314, 1764-1766, 2006). The stability of clathrate hydrates is relatively well constrained in pure and mixed gas systems (e.g., Sloan, Clathrate hydrates of natural gases, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1998). Recent measurements of clathrate destabilization in presence of ammonia, a likely component of Titan's interior, led to the development of a new model of cryovolcanism (Choukroun et al., Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., #1837, Houston, 2008). Internal dynamics relies on ice convection at depth on Titan and Enceladus (e.g., Tobie et al., Icarus 175, 496-502, 2005), and on relatively large tidal stresses on Enceladus. Clathrates are expected to destabilize when subject to stress (Durham et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B4), 2182, 2003). Therefore, addressing the mechanical properties of clathrate hydrates in these environments is a necessary step toward better understanding cryovolcanic processes. We have developed a new apparatus for growing clathrate hydrates samples with controlled geometry, composition, and grain size. This system consists of a high-pressure autoclave and a cooling system and supports gas pressures up to 500 bars, and temperatures within the range -50 - 150 °C. We have started the production of clathrate hydrates of CH4, CO2, and N2 with this system, with the purpose to test their mechanical properties using an Instron compression system (Castillo-Rogez et al., submitted to J. Geophys. Res.; Castillo-Rogez et al., this meeting). We will present initial measurements on the creep response and on the

  7. Dielectric characterization of ice/MgSO4ṡ11H2O mixtures as Jovian icy moon crust analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinelli, Elena; Lauro, Sebastian Emanuel; Cosciotti, Barbara; Mattei, Elisabetta; Di Paolo, Federico; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    One of the main objectives of proposed missions to the icy Jovian moons is to prove the existence of the postulated subsurface ocean on Europa using radar sounders. The success of these missions will rely on the ability of the radar signals to penetrate ten kilometers of icy material that could potentially contain various types of impurities. In this work we quantify the impact of magnesium sulfate hydrates on the electrical properties of water ice by performing a series of dielectric measurements on different ice/MgSO4ṡ11H2O mixtures as a function of frequency and at temperatures comparable with those expected on the icy satellite surfaces. Our results indicate that the salt only affects the real part of permittivity of the mixtures, whereas the imaginary part, hence the attenuation, does not significantly differ from that of pure ice. This means that in some regions signal penetration may be better than previously thought.

  8. Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces: A liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer for future in situ small body missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Martin, Mildred; Zheng, Yun; Balvin, Manuel; Southard, Adrian E.; Feng, Steven; Ferrance, Jerome; Kotecki, Carl; Malespin, Charles; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is an important laboratory technique for the detection and analysis of organic molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. This approach has been especially fruitful in the analysis of nucleobases, amino acids, and measuring amino acid enantiomeric ratios in extraterrestrial materials. We are developing OASIS, Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces, for in situ analysis on future landed missions to astrochemically important icy bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and icy moons. The OASIS design employs a microfabricated, on-chip analytical column to chromatographically separate liquid analytes using known LC stationary phase chemistries. The elution products are then interfaced through spray ionization and analyzed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). A particular advantage of our design is its suitability for microgravity environments, such as for a primitive small body.

  9. Impact of Universal Plasma and Energetic Particle Processes on Icy Bodies of the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Richardson, J. D.; Hill, M. E.; Sturner, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of space plasma and energetic particle interactions with icy bodies of the outer solar system is simplified when there is commonality of the underlying source, acceleration, and transport processes in spatially distinct regions from the supersonic heliosphere through the heliosheath into the local interstellar medium (LISM). Current trends in the Voyager heliosheath measurements suggest strong commonality to processes in the LISM. The Fisk-Gloeckler "universal" spectrum at suprathermal energies apparently plays a strong role in coupling the plasma and high energy particle regimes in the spatial and energetic transitions from the outer heliosphere to the LISM. Dominant processes in consecutive energy regimes project to varying effects versus irradiation depth on exposed upper surfaces of airless small icy bodies and to upper atmospheres of larger bodies such as Titan and Pluto. Relative absence of the universal suprathermal spectrum in the mid-heliospheric region of the classical Kuiper Belt may profoundly affect surface color diversity of icy bodies in this region.

  10. Detection of insects in grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detecting insects hidden inside kernels of grain is important to grain buyers because internal infestations can result in insect fragments in products made from the grain, or, if the grain is stored before use, the insect population can increase and damage the grain further. In a study in the Unite...

  11. Impact chemistry of methanol: Implications for volatile evolution on icy satellites and dwarf planets, and cometary delivery to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Genda, Hidenori; Muto, Yuta; Sugita, Seiji; Kadono, Toshihiko; Matsui, Takafumi

    2014-11-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is one of the primordial volatiles contained within icy solids in the outer solar nebula. This paper investigates the impact chemistry of CH3OH ice through a series of impact experiments. We discuss its fate during the accretion and evolution stages of large icy bodies, and assess the possibility of intact delivery of cometary volatiles to the lunar surface. Our experimental results show that the peak shock pressures for initial and complete dissociation of CH3OH ice are approximately 9 and 28 GPa, respectively. We also found that CO is more abundant than CH4 in the gas-phase products of impact-induced CH3OH dissociation. Our results further show that primordial CH3OH within icy planetesimals could have survived low-velocity impacts during accretion of icy satellites and dwarf planets. These results suggest that CH3OH may have been a source of soluble reducing carbon and that it may have acted as antifreeze in liquid interior oceans of large icy bodies. In contrast, CH3OH acquired by accretion on icy satellites and Ceres would have been dissociated efficiently by subsequent impacts, perhaps during the heavy bombardment period, owing to the expected high impact velocities. For example, if Callisto originally contained CH3OH, cometary impacts during the late heavy bombardment period would have resulted in the formation of a substantial atmosphere (ca. ⩾10-4 bar) composed of CO, H2, and CH4. To account for the current CO levels in Titan's atmosphere, the CH3OH content in its crust may have been much lower than that typical of comets. Our numerical simulations also indicate that intact delivery of cometary CH3OH to the lunar surface would not have occurred, which suggests that CH3OH found in a persistently-shadowed lunar region probably formed through low-temperature surface chemistry on regolith.

  12. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  13. Sodium Salts in Ice Grains from Enceladus' Plumes: Evidence for an Ocean below the Moon's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.; Brillantov, N.; Beinsen, A.; Abel, B.; Buck, U.; Srama, R.

    2008-12-01

    One key requirement for the formation of life on Enceladus, is liquid water below its icy surface. Although measurements and model calculations for Enceladus plume source suggest temperatures close to the melting point, direct evidence for liquid water has not been produced so far. We present compositional measurements by Cassini's dust detector of ice particles emitted from Saturn's cryo-volcanic moon Enceladus into the E ring. Since sodium is considered as crucial tracer for an Enceladus ocean, our detection of sodium salts within the grains provide the first evidence for mineral enriched liquid water below the moon's icy surface. In nearly all particles detected in situ by the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft, we found sodium (Na) in varying concentrations. Most spectra also show potassium (K) in lower abundance. In mass spectra that are particularly sodium rich, sodium salts (like NaCl and NaHCO3) are identified as Na bearing components. This is only possible if the plume source is liquid water that is or has been in contact with the rocky material of Enceladus' core. The abundance of minerals as well as the inferred basic pH value of those grains exhibit a compelling similarity with the predicted composition of an Enceladus ocean. As for terrestrial oceans, sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) are expected to be the most abundant components, followed by hydrogen carbonate (HCO3-). From the compositional analysis, models for grain production and ejection can be derived which give new insights into dynamic, subsurface processes.

  14. Producing and recognizing analogical relations.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, Regina; Hayes, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is an important component of intelligent behavior, and a key test of any approach to human language and cognition. Only a limited amount of empirical work has been conducted from a behavior analytic point of view, most of that within Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which views analogy as a matter of deriving relations among relations. The present series of four studies expands previous work by exploring the applicability of this model of analogy to topography-based rather than merely selection-based responses and by extending the work into additional relations, including nonsymmetrical ones. In each of the four studies participants pretrained in contextual control over nonarbitrary stimulus relations of sameness and opposition, or of sameness, smaller than, and larger than, learned arbitrary stimulus relations in the presence of these relational cues and derived analogies involving directly trained relations and derived relations of mutual and combinatorial entailment, measured using a variety of productive and selection-based measures. In Experiment 1 participants successfully recognized analogies among stimulus networks containing same and opposite relations; in Experiment 2 analogy was successfully used to extend derived relations to pairs of novel stimuli; in Experiment 3 the procedure used in Experiment 1 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations; in Experiment 4 the procedure used in Experiment 2 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations. Although not every participant showed the effects predicted, overall the procedures occasioned relational responses consistent with an RFT account that have not yet been demonstrated in a behavior-analytic laboratory setting, including productive responding on the basis of analogies. PMID:19230515

  15. Theory of diffusion-accommodated grain rotation in columnar polycrystalline microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovan, D.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S. R.; Materials Science Division

    2001-10-09

    A dynamical theory of grain rotation in columnar polycrystalline microstructures is developed based on the theory of diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding by Raj and Ashby. The driving force for rotation of any given grain is given by the aggregate torque on the grain, i.e., by the weighted sum of the energy derivatives with respect to the misorientations of all the grain boundaries delimiting the grain. Analogous to the Raj-Ashby theory, grain rotation is viewed as a sliding problem on the periphery of the grain; the necessary changes in the grain shape during rotation are assumed to be accommodated by diffusion either through the grain boundaries or through the grain interiors. Our main result is an analytic expression for the rate of rotation of a grain of arbitrary shape as a function of the grain size and temperature. This expression reduces to an earlier result of Harris et al. for the special case of a regular-hexagonal grain shape.

  16. All About the Grains Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Grains Group? Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is ... bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that ...

  17. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  18. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  19. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  20. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  1. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  2. Presolar Grains in Indarch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Nittler, L. R.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1995-09-01

    We report results for the EH(4) Indarch. Earlier work [1] found 20 micrometers clumps of sub-micron SiC whose presolar nature was inferred from step-wise combustion, noble gas [2], and ion probe isotopic measurements. Our results indicate that the clumps were an artifact of sample preparation. Our sample was first cleaned using 6N HCl, and water and isopropanol rinses, then powdered and reacted with HCl-HF/HCl, KOH, and H3BO3-HCl/HCl giving a C-rich residue 1.14 wt.% of the original. X-ray mapping showed SiC grains and 5x as many Si3N4 grains, but no fine-grained clumps. Large (6 micrometers to 20 micrometers) C-rich spheroids were also present. The sample was further treated with KOH/HNO3 and NH3H2O; attempts to do density-separates were unsuccessful. An aliquot was treated with perchloric acid and separated into <1 micrometers and >1 micrometer fractions. SEM-EDS measurements of 73 (<1 micrometer) grains showed 44 SiC, 19 Si3N4, 4 C only, and 6 C with minor Si (both the C and Si in these particles are isotopically normal). A similar distribution of species was found for 37 (>1 micrometer) grains with the addition of 2 spinel and one Al2O3 grains. The whole rock concentration of SiC was 5.8 ppm, higher than previous determinations [1,3,9]. Confirming earlier suggestions [1,2], we find that SiC in Indarch is much finer-grained than in Murchison; about 2/3 of the mass is in grains <=0.3 micrometers compared to only about 4% for Murchison. This may represent size-sorting in the nebula or selective destruction of fine-grained material. Ion probe measurements of 22 (1-3 micrometers) grains gave isotopic results in the range previously measured for Murchison SiCs [4]. Several normal Si3N4 grains (>1 micron) were measured; probably exsolution products similar to those in Qingzhen [7]. Ion mapping was used to search for presolar oxide grains using previously developed techniques [5]. Seven candidate grains out of ~1000 were found. Multiple imaging confirmed an ^(16)O/^(18

  3. Estimations on the Interior of Small Icy Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Leitner, Johannes J.; Firneis, Maria G.; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade small icy bodies have become more and more important for the search for potential habitats in the Solar System. This development was primarily attributable to the indications for Europa's subsurface ocean (e.g., Carr et al., 1998) and the detection of Enceladus' plume (Porco et al., 2006). These observations showed that liquid water can exist under certain circumstances even far beyond the classical habitable zone (Kasting et al., 1993). Additionally, the subsurface water reservoirs may contain a significant amount of ammonia which causes the fluid to stay liquid even below 0°C. If liquid water is in contact with the rocky layer, erosion or similar interaction processes will take place and enrich the water with possible nutrients for potential life forms in this habitat. Therefore, especially the water/rock boundary zone seems highly interesting for astrobiological studies. We developed a three and four layer model for the interior of small icy bodies, i.e. icy moons, TNOs, and asteroids as small as 200 km in radius. The simulations are based on three different scenarios which consider the diverse interior structures of three selected prototype satellites (Io, Europa, and Titan). On average, the water layer represents approximately 20 % of the bodies' radii for the Europa- and Titan-like model. In contrast, for the Io-like scenario, in which we do not include a global subsurface ocean, just Io, the Moon, Vesta, and Hygiea fit into the model. This may indicate that water/ice-regions or even liquid water shells are far more common in the Solar System than previously assumed. Furthermore, we estimate the bodies' dimensionless moment of inertia and compare our results to observed values as far as they are available. Moreover, the physical conditions at the bottom of the bodies' potential subsurface ocean and the thickness of each layer will be estimated. This study will give us a good overview about the distribution of potential liquid water

  4. Thermodynamic Equations of State for Aqueous Solutions Applied to Deep Icy Satellite and Exoplanet Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, S.; Brown, J. M.; Bollengier, O.; Journaux, B.; Sotin, C.; Choukroun, M.; Barnes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Supporting life in icy world or exoplanet oceans may require global seafloor chemical reactions between water and rock. Such interactions have been regarded as limited in larger icy worlds such as Ganymede and Titan, where ocean depths approach 800 km and GPa pressures (>10katm). If the oceans are composed of pure water, such conditions are consistent with the presence of dense ice phases V and VI that cover the rocky seafloor. Exoplanets with oceans can obtain pressures sufficient to generate ices VII and VIII. We have previously demonstrated temperature gradients in such oceans on the order of 20 K or more, resulting from fluid compressibility in a deep adiabatic ocean based on our experimental work. Accounting for increases in density for highly saline oceans leads to the possibility of oceans perched under and between high pressure ices. Ammonia has the opposite effect, instead decreasing ocean density, as reported by others and confirmed by our laboratory measurements in the ammonia water system. Here we report on the completed equation of state for aqueous ammonia derived from our prior measurements and optimized global b-spline fitting methods We use recent diamond anvil cell measurements for water and ammonia to extend the equation of state to 400°C and beyond 2 GPa, temperatures and pressures applicable to icy worlds and exoplanets. Densities show much less temperature dependence but comparabe high-pressure derivatives to previously published ammonia-water properties derived for application to Titan (Croft et al. 1988). Thermal expansion is in better agreement with the more self-consistent equation of state of Tillner-Roth and Friend (1998). We also describe development of a planetary NaCl equation of state using recent measurements of phase boundaries and sound speeds. We examine implications of realistic ocean-ice thermodynamics for Titan and exoplanet interiors using the methodology recently applied to Ganymede for oceans dominated by MgSO4. High

  5. Interactions Between Neutral Gas Clouds and Plasma Near the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.

    2007-05-01

    Neutral gas clouds associated with icy satellites are intimately tied to the magnetospheric plasma in which they are formed and reside. Plasma interactions can create the clouds, remove material from them, and make it possible for us to observe them. At Europa, for example, energetic ions incident on the icy surface eject hydrogen and oxygen formed from the dissociation of water (Johnson et al. 1982). The hydrogen escapes, but the O2remains gravitationally bound, forming an atmosphere. This atmosphere then interacts with the thermal plasma in Jupiter's magneotpshere: the O2is dissociated by the electrons resulting in emissions from atomic oxygen which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Hall et al. 1995; Hansen et al. 2005). Charge exchange with magnetospheric ions and electron-impact ionization removes atoms and molecules from Europa's atmosphere and exosphere, and contributes fresh ions to the plasma (Saur et al. 1998; Shematovich et al 2005). At Enceladus, where 150-300 kg/s of H2O gas is supplied by the south pole plume (Hansen et al. 2006; Burger et al. 2007), charge exchange reactions between the plasma and H2O produce fresh pickup ions which slow and deflect the plasma (Tokar et al. 2006; Pontius and Hill 2006) and induce perturbations in Saturn's magnetic field (Dougherty et al. 2006; Khurana et al. 2006). The neutrals created in these charge exchange reactions either escape from Saturn entirely or are redistributed throughout the inner magnetosphere forming gas clouds which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Johnson et al. 2006). I will describe the interaction processes between the neutral atoms and molecules in icy satellite atmospheres and exospheres, and discuss differences between the processes imporant in Jupiter's magnetosphere, where the plasma content is greater than the neutral content, and Saturn's magnetosphere, which is dominated by neutrals. References: Burger et al., JGR, 2007, in press. Dougherty et al., Science, 311, 1406, 2006

  6. Tectonics of icy satellites driven by melting and crystallization of water bodies inside their ice shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephanie Ann

    Enceladus and Europa are icy satellites that currently support bodies of liquid water in the outer solar system Additionally, they show signs of being geologically active. Developing numerical models informed by observations of these icy satellites allows for the development of additional constraints and an improved understanding of the tectonics and evolution of icy satellites. The formation mechanisms for both chaos and ridges on Europa are thought to involve water as albedo changes observed in association with them imply the deposition of salt-rich water near these features. Ridges are the most ubiquitous feature on Europa and are described as central troughs flanked by two raised edifices, range in height from tens to hundreds of meters. Europan ridges can extend hundreds of km continuously along strike but are only about 2 km across. A model of a crystallizing dike--like water intrusion is able to match the overall morphology of ridges, and is consistent the long continuous strike. However, the intrusion of a large volume of water is required to match the most common heights of the ridges. Chaos on Europa is defined as a large area of disrupted ice that contain blocks of pre-existing material separated by a hummocky matrix. A proposed mechanism for the formation of Chaos is that a region of heterogeneous ice within the shell is melted and then recrystallizes. Comparing the model results with the geology of Thera Macula, a region where it has been proposed that Chaos is currently forming, suggests that additional processes may be needed to fully understand the development of Chaos. Water-rich plumes erupt from the south pole of Enceladus, suggesting the presence of a pressurized water reservoir. If a pressurized sea is located beneath the south polar terrain, its geometry and size in the ice shell would contribute to the stress state in the ice shell. The geometry and location of such an ocean, as well as the boundary conditions and thickness of an ice shell

  7. Model of explosive eruptions of water vapor and dust on icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, E. G.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of generating water vapor and other gaseous products during nonvolcanic explosive eruptions in lithospheres of icy satellites is discussed. Explosive eruptions of ice, with its fragmentation into micro-and nanofragments, can occur in the extensive deep layers of such icy satellites as Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus, etc., if giant cracks are episodically formed in the lithospheres of these satellites. Such cracks can be produced by tidal forces, synchronous resonances of satellites, or especially powerful impacts. The model is based on the recently obtained experimental evidence that explosive ice instability (Bridgman effect) is formed at a strong nonuniform compression in the regions of high pressures and low temperatures. Water films, the thicknesses of which reach several microns, can be formed during the process of the mutual friction of ice fragments during their quasi-liquid flow at the instant of an explosive eruption. About 1-10 dm3 of a water film can be produced in 1 m3 of erupted ice fragments. Water vapor can be formed from a water film when this water boils up after a rapid pressure drop as a result of an ice-water mixture eruption from cracks. A certain amount of gaseous products in the form of hydrogen, oxygen, and ammonia molecules and radicals on their basis can be generated during the sputtering induced by electrons and ions and the dissociation of nanofragments of ice during the process of ice explosive fragmentation as a result of fracto-, tribo-, and secondary emission. The estimates indicate that the volume of water vapor erupted on satellites can be larger than that of discharged ionized gases by a factor of not less than 105-107. Water vapor and microscopic ice fragments can be erupted from cracks in the lithospheres of small Enceladus-type satellites at velocities higher than the second cosmic velocity. Gaseous products generated in such episodic processes can, most probably, substantially contribute to the density of the

  8. Grain Surface Chemistry and the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Submicron sized dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium. In particular they provide surface where active chemistry can take place. At the low temperatures (-10 K) of the interstellar medium, colliding gas phase species will stick, diffuse, react, and form an icy mantle on these dust grains. This talk will review the principles of grain surface chemistry and delineate important grain surface routes, focusing on reactions involving H, D, and O among each other and with molecules such as CO. Interstellar ice mantles can be studied through the fundamental vibrations of molecular species in the mid-infrared spectra of sources embedded in or located behind dense molecular clouds. Analysis of this type of data has provided a complex view of the composition of these ices and the processes involved. Specifically, besides grain surface chemistry, the composition of interstellar ices is also affected by thermal processing due to nearby newly formed stars. This leads to segregation between different ice components as well as outgassing. The latter results in the formation of a so-called Hot Core region with a gas phase composition dominated by evaporated mantle species. Studies of such regions provide thus a different view on the ice composition and the chemical processes involved. Interstellar ices can also be processed by FUV photons and high energy cosmic ray ions. Cosmic ray processing likely dominates the return of accreted species to the gas phase where further gas phase reactions can take place. These different chemical routes towards molecular complexity in molecular clouds and particularly regions of star formation will be discussed.

  9. Desorption from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, A.; Jura, M.; Omont, A.

    1985-01-01

    Different desorption mechanisms from interstellar grains are considered to resolve the conflict between the observed presence of gaseous species in molecular clouds and their expected depletion onto grains. The physics of desorption is discussed with particular reference to the process of grain heating and the specific heat of the dust material. Impulsive heating by X-rays and cosmic rays is addressed. Spot heating of the grains by cosmic rays and how this can lead to desorption of mantles from very large grains is considered. It is concluded that CO depletion on grains will be small in regions with A(V) less than five from the cloud surface and n(H) less than 10,000, in agreement with observations and in contrast to expectations from pure thermal equilibrium. Even in very dense and obscured regions and in the absence of internal ultraviolet sources, the classical evaporation of CO or N2 and O2-rich mantles by cosmic rays is important.

  10. Digital plus analog output encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafle, R. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The disclosed encoder is adapted to produce both digital and analog output signals corresponding to the angular position of a rotary shaft, or the position of any other movable member. The digital signals comprise a series of binary signals constituting a multidigit code word which defines the angular position of the shaft with a degree of resolution which depends upon the number of digits in the code word. The basic binary signals are produced by photocells actuated by a series of binary tracks on a code disc or member. The analog signals are in the form of a series of ramp signals which are related in length to the least significant bit of the digital code word. The analog signals are derived from sine and cosine tracks on the code disc.

  11. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  12. Ice megadunes on Mars: analogy with Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herny, Clémence; Massé, Marion; Bourgeois, Olivier; Carpy, Sabrina; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Appéré, Thomas; Smith, Isaac; Spiga, Aymeric; Rodriguez, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Mass and energy balance of ice sheets are driven by complex interactions between the atmosphere and the cryosphere. Feedbacks between katabatic winds and the cryosphere may lead to the formation of sedimentation waves, so-called megadunes, at the surface of ice sheets. These have been first described in Antarctica. Here we use topographic data, optical images, and spectroscopic data acquired by Mars orbiters. We show that the surface of the Martian North Polar Cap displays two superimposed sets of sedimentation waves with differing wavelengths. These sedimentation waves have similarities with Antarctic ice megadunes regarding their surface morphology, texture, grain size, and internal stratigraphic architecture. Their shallow-dipping upwind sides, their tops and the intervening troughs are covered by young ice and occasional sastrugi fields, indicative of net accumulation. On the other hand, their steep-dipping downwind sides either expose exhumed layers of dusty old ice or correspond to smooth surfaces of coarse-grained ice, indicative of net ablation or reduced net accumulation associated with sublimation and metamorphism. These surface characteristics and the internal stratigraphic architecture revealed by radar sounding are consistent with the interpretation that both sets of Martian sedimentation waves grow and migrate upwind in response to the development of periodic accumulation/ablation patterns controlled by katabatic winds. The smaller waves, characterized by reduced net accumulation on their downwind sides, are probably analogous to the Antarctic megadunes that have been described so far. On the other hand, a terrestrial equivalent remains to be discovered for the larger ones, characterized by net ablation on their downwind sides. The recognition of these sedimentation waves provides the basis for the development of a common model of ice/wind interaction at the surface of Martian and terrestrial ice sheets and for future investigations on the respective

  13. Analog enhancement of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Nachazel, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows how analog methods for edge sharpening, contrast enhancement, and expansion of the range of gray levels of particular interest are effective for easy on-line application to video viewing of X-ray roentgenograms or to fluoroscopy. The technique for analog enhancement of radiographic images is a modified version of the system designed by Fuchs et al. (1972), whereby an all directional second derivative signal called detail signal is used to produce both vertical and horizontal enhancement of the image. Particular attention is given to noise filtration and contrast enhancement. Numerous radiographs supplement the text.

  14. Analog video to ARINC 818

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Many commercial and military aircraft still use analog video, such as RS-170, RS-343, or STANEG 3350. Though the individual digital components many be inexpensive, the cost to certify and retrofit an entire aircraft fleet may be prohibitively expensive. A partial or incremental upgrade program where analog cameras remain in use but data is converted and processed digitally can be an attractive option. This paper describes Great River Technology's experience in converting multiple channels of RS-170 and multiplexing them through a concentrator to put them onto a single fiber or cable. The paper will also discuss alternative architectures and how ARINC 818 can be utilized with legacy systems.

  15. Geology of the Icy Galilean Satellites: Understanding Crustal Processes and Geologic Histories Through the JIMO Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueredo, P. H.; Tanaka, K.; Senske, D.; Greeley, R.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the geology, style and time history of crustal processes on the icy Galilean satellites is necessary to understanding how these bodies formed and evolved. Data from the Galileo mission have provided a basis for detailed geologic and geo- physical analysis. Due to constrained downlink, Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) data consisted of global coverage at a -1 km/pixel ground sampling and representative, widely spaced regional maps at -200 m/pixel. These two data sets provide a general means to extrapolate units identified at higher resolution to lower resolution data. A sampling of key sites at much higher resolution (10s of m/pixel) allows evaluation of processes on local scales. We are currently producing the first global geological map of Europa using Galileo global and regional-scale data. This work is demonstrating the necessity and utility of planet-wide contiguous image coverage at global, regional, and local scales.

  16. Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

  17. Chemical Schemes for Surface Modification of Icy Satellites: A Road Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delitsky, Mona L.; Lane, Arthur L.

    1997-01-01

    The icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter are subject to magnetospheric plasma ion bombardment, which induces chemical changes within the ice. The possible detection of CO2 on the surface of Ganymede by the Galileo spacecraft makes for a more complicated chemistry and increases the number of chemical compounds that may then be present. We outline chemical schemes for the irradiation of pure and mixed ices H2O/CO2 and suggest species which observers may detect on Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, such as C3O2, H2CO3, H2O2, CO3, HO2, CO, H2CO, CH2CO, as well as K2O, KOH, and SO3, from plasma implantation. Column abundances of compounds in the ice are calculated using a specified energy input and G values (yield per 100 eV).

  18. Infrared Spectral Studies of the Thermally-Driven Chemistry Present on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of Jupiters icy satellites has revealed that even though their surfaces arc composed mostly of water ice, molecules such as SO2, CO2, H2O2. O2, and O3 also are present. On Europa, a high radiation flux is believed to play a role in the formation of many of the minor species detected, and numerous laboratory studies have been devoted to explore this hypothesis. In this presentation we will discuss some of our recent research on another alteration pathway, thermally-driven chemical reactions, which are also important for understanding the chemical evolution of Europa's surface and sub-surface ices. We will focus on the infrared spectra of and reactions between H2O, SO2 and H2O2, at 80 - 130 K.

  19. The Early Climate History of Mars: "Warm and Wet" or "Cold and Icy"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James

    2013-04-01

    The Amazonian climate (last ~66% of history) was much like today, a cold and dry climate regime, characterized by the latitudinal migration of surface ice in response to variations in spin-axis/orbital parameters. But what characterized the Noachian climate (first ~20% of history)? Some data support a "warm and wet" early Mars, but this evidence has been challenged. New models of early Mars climate (Forget, Wordsworth et al.) find that for atmospheric pressures greater than a few hundred millibars, surface temperatures vary with altitude due to atmosphere-surface thermal coupling: an adiabatic cooling effect (ACE) results in deposition of snow and ice at high altitudes, in contrast to Amazonian conditions. Without other warming mechanisms, no combination of parameters lead to mean annual surface temperatures (MAT) consistent with widespread liquid water anywhere on the planet. The ACE causes southern highland region temperatures to fall significantly below the global average leading to a "Noachian Icy Highlands" scenario: Water is transported to the highlands from low-lying regions due to the ACE and snows out to form an extended H2O ice cap at the southern pole, and altitude-dependent snow and ice deposits down to lower southern latitudes. Could the predictions of this "Noachian Icy Highlands" model be consistent with the many lines of evidence traditionally cited for a "warm, wet" early Mars? Perturbing this predominant Noachian environment with punctuated impacts and volcanism/greenhouse gases would lead to raising of global surface temperatures toward the melting point of water, with the following consequences: 1) ice above the surface ice stability line undergoes rapid altitude/latitude dependent warming during each Mars summer; 2) meltwater runoff from the continuous ice sheet drains and flows downslope to the edge of the ice sheet, where meltwater channels encounter cratered terrain, forming closed-basin and open-basin lakes; 3) seasonal top-down heating and

  20. The Existence of Ferroelectric Ice on Icy Bodies in Space: a Neutron Diffraction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    The complex behavior of water and the unusual properties of ferroelectric ice XI continue to attract much interest. Whether ice in the space exists as ice XI, is an important question, because long range electrostatic forces caused by the ferroelectricity might be an important factor for planet formation. From neutron diffraction experiments, we found the temperature and pressure conditions for the transformation of the largest fraction of ice into ferroelectric ice. It suggests that myriad big icy-bodies, which exist as dwarf planets and Kuiper Belt Object, consist of thick ferroelectric-ice surface. Furthermore, we report spectral and vibrational properties of ferroelectric ice investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and infrared absorption measurements. Because the spectral properties of ferroelectric ice are clearly different from those of ordinary ice, the distinct ferroelectric ice in the universe is detectable using infrared telescopes and planetary exploration.

  1. Cassini finds an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere at Saturn's icy moon Rhea.

    PubMed

    Teolis, B D; Jones, G H; Miles, P F; Tokar, R L; Magee, B A; Waite, J H; Roussos, E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Johnson, R E; Tseng, W-L; Baragiola, R A

    2010-12-24

    The flyby measurements of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn's moon Rhea reveal a tenuous oxygen (O(2))-carbon dioxide (CO(2)) atmosphere. The atmosphere appears to be sustained by chemical decomposition of the surface water ice under irradiation from Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This in situ detection of an oxidizing atmosphere is consistent with remote observations of other icy bodies, such as Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede, and suggestive of a reservoir of radiolytic O(2) locked within Rhea's ice. The presence of CO(2) suggests radiolysis reactions between surface oxidants and organics or sputtering and/or outgassing of CO(2) endogenic to Rhea's ice. Observations of outflowing positive and negative ions give evidence for pickup ionization as a major atmospheric loss mechanism. PMID:21109635

  2. Optical analogs of model atoms in fields

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1991-05-02

    The equivalence of the paraxial wave equation to a time-dependent Schroedinger equation is exploited to construct optical analogs of model atoms in monochromatic fields. The approximation of geometrical optics provides the analog of the corresponding classical mechanics. Optical analogs of Rabi oscillations, photoionization, stabilization, and the Kramers-Henneberger transformation are discussed. One possibility for experimental realization of such optical analogs is proposed. These analogs may be useful for studies of quantum chaos'' when the ray trajectories are chaotic. 9 refs.

  3. Terrestrial analogs for space exploration habitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.; Brown, Jeri W.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) can use early earth-based analogs to simulate many aspects of space flight missions and system operation. These analogs can thus provide information supporting future missions to the moon and to Mars. A study was performed to investigate the potential of terrestrial analogs in simulating human space exploration missions. The study resulted in preliminary requirements and concepts for analog habitation systems, and further study in this area is necessary for SEI terrestrial analog development.

  4. Impact jetting water ice, with application to the accretion of icy planetesimals and Pluto

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, W.B. )

    1989-11-01

    Jetting can occur during oblique impacts of water ice bodies at relative velocities at low as {approximately}500 m s{sup {minus}1}, because of the low Hugoniot elastic limit and high compressibility of ice compared to rock. In jetted ice, incipient melting, complete melting, and incipient vaporization occur, upon release to low pressure, at impact velocities of 1.3, 2.0, and 2.7 km s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, much less than the 3.4, 4.4, and 5.3 km s{sup {minus}1} required in head-on collisions. Uncertainties in the shock equation-of-state may allow complete melting during jetting at relative velocities as low as 1.2 km s{sup {minus}1}. Because jet speeds exceed impact speeds, often by a factor of several, during the accretion of icy bodies greater than a few 100 km in radius there any be a significant loss of icy material. This is more true if the accreting body is large enough to differentiate so that its surface layers are closer to pure ice in composition, and especially true if bodies of comparable size are involved, which emphasizes the obliqueness of the collision. The author suggests that it is jetting during a Charon-forming collision (and not vaporization) that may account for Pluto-Charon's relatively large rock/ice ratio, should the C/O ratio of the solar nebula turn out too low to sufficiently raise the rock/ice ratio of outer solar nebula condensates by formation of non-condensable CO.

  5. Life detection strategy for Jovian's icy moons: Lessons from subglacial Lake Vostok exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, Sergey; Alekhina, Irina; Marie, Dominique; Petit, Jean-Robert

    2010-05-01

    The objective was to estimate the microbial content of accretion ice originating from the subglacial Lake Vostok buried beneath 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet with the ultimate goal to discover microbial life in this extreme icy environment. The DNA study constrained by Ancient DNA research criteria was used as a main approach. The flow cytometry was implemented in cell enumerating. As a result, both approaches showed that the accretion ice contains the very low unevenly distributed biomass indicating that the water body should also be hosting a highly sparse life. Up to now, the only accretion ice featured by mica-clay sediments presence allowed the recovery a pair of bacterial phylotypes. This unexpectedly included the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus and one more unclassified phylotype both passing numerous contaminant controls. In contrast, the deeper and cleaner accretion ice with no sediments presence and near detection limit gas content gave no reliable signals. Thus, the results obtained testify that the search for life in the Lake Vostok is constrained by a high chance of forward-contamination. The subglacial Lake Vostok seems to represent the only extremely clean giant aquatic system on the Earth providing a unique test area for searching for life on icy worlds. The life detection strategy for (sub)glacial environments elsewhere (e.g., Jovian's Europa) should be based on stringent decontamination procedures in clean-room facilities, establishment of on-site contaminant library, implementation of appropriate methods to reach detection level for signal as low as possible, verification of findings through ecological settings of a given environment and repetition at an independent laboratory within the specialized laboratory network.

  6. Degradation and hydrogen and oxygen release via electron bombardment of icy Jovian satellite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T. M.; Grieves, G.; Alexandrov, A.; Paty, C.

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the low-energy (5-100 eV) electron-induced degradation of low temperature ice characteristic of icy Jovian satellite surfaces. Specifically, we examined the yields and energy distributions of the primary neutral and cationic fragments leaving the surface as a function of impinging electron energy, ice phase and surface temperature. We find a large proton yield and formation and desorption of H (2S) and H2 (^{1}Σg+). These neutrals were detected using laser resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization. The threshold electron energy is 6.5 eV and the energy distributions of the desorption products are non-thermal indicating surface exciton decay. Proton production and release has a threshold energy of 22 eV and involves two-hole states which Coulomb explode. Other desorption products include O (3P), O (1D) and O2. The formation of O2 is enhanced in porous media and involves a molecular precursor. The overall cross sections for producing the above mentioned products, particularly O2, increase as the ice temperature rises from 90 to 150 K. This is due to the increased excited state lifetimes associated with the disrupted hydrogen bonding network at elevated temperatures and enhanced precursor formation at temperatures above 120 K. In general, the yields of protons are high enough to provide a significant source of ions to the near space environments of Jupiter's icy moons and potentially to the Jovian magnetosphere. In the case of direct proton ejection, this source term may be as effective as hydrogen atom emission followed by gas-phase ionization. No oxygen ions are emitted from the ice due to the high solvation forces. These results, in conjunction with modeling studies of Ganymede's magnetospheric interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere, indicate that oxygen ions are likely present in Ganymede's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  7. Global Topographic Mapping Of Saturn's Midsize Icy Satellites: System-wide Thermal And Impact Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    2010-10-01

    Cassini stereo coverage of Saturn's 6 largest midsized icy satellites has been used to produce the first global topographic maps of major icy bodies. All except Iapetus have dynamic topography of -5 to +5 km (excepting the largest basins). Apparently all except Iapetus have been topographically reset by global heating events capable of erasing or preventing the 10's of kilometers of regional relief observed on that outer moon. In contrast to Tethys, Dione features no deep large basins and exhibits lower relief generally, and extensive crater relaxation specifically. Apparently Dione remained hot even longer than Tethys, despite geologic and topographic evidence for smooth volcanic-style plains and tectonic disruption on both satellites. No deep basins are evident on Rhea either. On Rhea, the leading side features a generally much smoother texture at length-scales of 100 km than does the (faulted) trailing hemisphere, suggesting that the leading hemisphere also experienced more pervasive heating than the trailing. On Mimas, an irregular region near the antipode to Herschel exhibits lower crater depths than elsewhere, a possible signature of seismic focusing of the type seen on Mercury. Basin disruption effects appear to be limited. The most prominent occur around Evander (Dione) and southeast of Odysseus (Tethys) , where radial "gouge” erased the preexisting cratering record in favor of much smaller densely packed craters in an annulus around the basin which terminates at a circumferential ridge up to 2 km high! This may be a ring structure or distal ejecta ridge. Radial grooves may also occur near ancient relaxed basins on Dione and Rhea. Grooves 2-3 km deep on Mimas extend nearly globally but their relationship to Herschel is uncertain. Enceladus topography is dominated by pervasive resurfacing and by large-scale depressions (or dimples) that are plausibly due to isostatic variations in shell thickness.

  8. Numerical simulations of marine hydrothermal plumes for Europa and other icy worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jason C.; Lenferink, Erik

    2012-11-01

    The liquid water interiors of Europa and other icy moons of the outer Solar System are likely to be driven by geothermal heating from the sea floor, leading to the development of buoyant hydrothermal plumes. These plumes potentially control icy surface geomorphology, and are of interest to astrobiologists. We have performed a series of simulations of these plumes using the MIT GCM ocean circulation model. We assume here that Europa’s ocean is deep (of order 100 km) and unstratified, and that plume buoyancy is controlled by temperature, not composition. Our experiments explore a limited region of parameter space, with ocean depth H ranging from 50 to 100 km deep, source heat flux Q between 0.1 and 10 GW, and Coriolis parameter f corresponding to Europa latitudes between 9° and 47°. As predicted by earlier work, the plumes in our simulations form narrow cylindrical chimneys (a few km across) under the influence of the Coriolis effect. These plumes broaden over time until they become baroclinically unstable, breaking up into cone-shaped eddies when they become 10-35 km in diameter; the shed eddies are of a similar size. Large-scale currents in the region of the plume range between 1 and 5 cm/s; temperature anomalies in the plume far from the seafloor are tiny, varying between 10 and 180 μK. Variations in plume size, shape, speed, and temperature are in excellent agreement with previous laboratory tank experiments, and in rough agreement with theoretical predictions. Plume dynamics and geometry are controlled by a “natural Rossby number” which depends strongly on depth H and Coriolis parameter f, but only weakly on source heat flux Q. However, some specific theoretical predictions are not borne out by these simulations: this may occur because the plumes are “reingesting” their own emissions, a process not considered in our earlier theory.

  9. Troughs in Ice Sheets and Other Icy Deposits on Mars: Analysis of Their Radiative Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, A.; Kargel, J.; Lewis, K.; MacAyeal, D.; Pfeffer, T.; Zwally, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    It has long been known that groove-like structures in glaciers and ice sheets can trap more incoming solar radiation than is the case for a 'normal' flat, smooth surface. In this presentation, we shall describe the radiative regimes of typical scarps and troughs on icy surfaces of Mars, and suggest how these features originate and evolve through time. The basis of our analysis is the radiation balance model presented by Pfeffer and Bretherton. Their model considers the visible band radiation regime of a V-shaped groove on a terrestrial ice surface, and shows that absorbed energy can be enhanced by up to 50 percent for grooves with small opening angles and with typical polar values of the solar zenith angle. Our work extends this model by considering: (a) departures from V-shaped geometry, (b) both englacial and surficial dust and debris, and (c) the infrared spectrum. We apply the extended model to various features on the Martian surface, including the spiral-like scarps on the Northern and Southern ice sheets, the large-scale chasms (e.g., Chasm Borealis), and groove-like lineations on valley floors thought to be filled with mixtures of dust and icy substances. In conjunction with study of valley-closure experiments, we suggest that spiral-like scarps and chasms are stable features of the Martian climate regime. We also suggest that further study of scarps and chasms may shed light on the composition (i.e., relative proportions of water ice, carbon-dioxide ice and dust) of the Martian ice sheets and valley fills.

  10. Troughs in Ice Sheets and Other Icy Deposits on Mars: Analysis of Their Radiative Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, A.; Kargel, J.; Lewis, K.; MacAyeal, D.; Pfeffer, T.; Zwally, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that groove-like structures in glaciers and ice sheets can trap more incoming solar radiation than is the case for a 'normal' flat, smooth surface. In this presentation, we shall describe the radiative regimes of typical scarps and troughs on icy surfaces of Mars, and suggest how these features originate and evolve through time. The basis of our analysis is the radiation balance model presented by Pfeffer and Bretherton. Their model considers the visible band radiation regime of a V-shaped groove on a terrestrial ice surface, and shows that absorbed energy can be enhanced by up to 50 percent for grooves with small opening angles and with typical polar values of the solar zenith angle. Our work extends this model by considering: (a) departures from V-shaped geometry, (b) both englacial and surficial dust and debris, and (c) the infrared spectrum. We apply the extended model to various features on the Martian surface, including the spiral-like scarps on the Northern and Southern ice sheets, the large-scale chasms (e.g., Chasm Borealis), and groove-like lineations on valley floors thought to be filled with mixtures of dust and icy substances. In conjunction with study of valley-closure experiments, we suggest that spiral-like scarps and chasms are stable features of the Martian climate regime. We also suggest that further study of scarps and chasms may shed light on the composition (i.e., relative proportions of water ice, carbon-dioxide ice and dust) of the Martian ice sheets and valley fills.

  11. The Other Chemistry of the Jovian Icy Satellites - Low Energy and Sulfurous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra of Jupiter's icy satellites reveal surfaces dominated by H2O-ice with minor amounts of SO2 and other materials. The co-existence of H2O and SO2 in surfaces exposed to jovian magnetospheric radiation suggests that sulfuric acid (H2SO4) also could be present. This was noted by Carlson et al. (1999), who supported this suggestion with assignments of near-IR bands in Europa spectra to hydrated H2SO4. Laboratory experiments since have demonstrated radiolytically-driven syntheses in S- and SO2-containing H2O-Ices (Carlson et al., 2002; Moore et al., 2006). In the Cosmic Ice Laboratory, we recently have investigated the thermal chemistry of SO2 trapped in H2O-ice. IR spectra of H2O + SO2 mixtures recorded at 10 to 230 K were used to follow low-temperature reactions in the absence of radiation effects. No SO2 reactions were found at 10 K, but warming to more-relevant Europa temperatures produced both HSO3(-) and S2O5(2-). Added NH3 shifted the product composition toward SO3(2-) and away from the other ions. We find that H2O and SO2 react to produce sulfur oxyanions, such as bisulfite, that as much as 30% of the SO2 can be consumed through this reaction, and that the products remain in the ice when the temperature is lowered, indicating that these reactions are irreversible. Our results suggest that thermally-induced reactions can alter the chemistry at and below the surfaces of the icy satellites in the jovian system.

  12. Olivine and Carbonate Globules in ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analog, and Implications for Water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2005-03-01

    Low-temperature carbonate globules in ALH84001 are found near olivine grains that equilibrated at T>800° C. Terrestrial analogs from Spitsbergen (Norway) suggest an explanation of this association; the carbonate globules may have been deposited in cavities where olivine had been dissolved out.

  13. 279 - Xanes Studies on UV-Irradiated Interstellar Ice Analogs: A Comparison to STARDUST Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Cody, George D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; DeGregorio, Bradley T.

    2010-01-01

    We present C-, N-, and O-XANES (X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy) results of organic residues produced in the laboratory from the UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs containing H20, CO, CH30H, NH31 in order to mimic processes that may occur in cold icy bodies of the outer Solar System, particularly in comets, Such analyses showed that laboratory-formed organic residues mainly consist of a solid phase and an oily phase. C-XANES analysis of the solid phase suggests a rich distribution of organic functionalities, among which carbonyl groups, C=C bonds, and alcohols are present. Results from N-XANES indicate the possible presence of amide, amine, and nitrile groups, The O-XANES spectra confirmed the a-bearing groups, These results are compared with the XANES spectra obtained from STARDUST cometary samples,

  14. Film grain synthesis and its application to re-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallauer, Peter; Mörzinger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Digital film restoration and special effects compositing require more and more automatic procedures for movie regraining. Missing or inhomogeneous grain decreases perceived quality. For the purpose of grain synthesis an existing texture synthesis algorithm has been evaluated and optimized. We show that this algorithm can produce synthetic grain which is perceptually similar to a given grain template, which has high spatial and temporal variation and which can be applied to multi-spectral images. Furthermore a re-grain application framework is proposed, which synthesises based on an input grain template artificial grain and composites this together with the original image content. Due to its modular approach this framework supports manual as well as automatic re-graining applications. Two example applications are presented, one for re-graining an entire movie and one for fully automatic re-graining of image regions produced by restoration algorithms. Low computational cost of the proposed algorithms allows application in industrial grade software.

  15. Analogies and "Modeling Analogies" in Teaching: Some Examples in Basic Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, J. J.; Johsua, S.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the effect of modeling analogy on learning of the concepts of electricity in grade 6, 8, and 10. Describes 2 analogies (train analogy and thermal analogy) with diagrams and examples. Discusses the accessibility, transferability, and difficulty of each analogy. Reports treatment effect and some further implications. (YP)

  16. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  17. Mathematical Analogy and Metaphorical Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Jan

    2010-01-01

    How are we to understand the power of certain literary metaphors? The author argues that the apprehension of good metaphors is importantly similar to the apprehension of fruitful mathematical analogies: both involve a structural realignment of vision. The author then explores consequences of this claim, drawing conceptually significant parallels…

  18. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bichard, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body.

  19. Analog Simulation of a Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Presents an analog simulation of laser properties (finding time evolution of the intensity of a ruby laser pulse) which serves as the basis of a three-four hour laboratory experiment. Includes programs for solution to rate equations of a three-level laser and production of a giant pulse in a ruby laser. (Author/SK)

  20. Understanding & Teaching Genetics Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Scott; Himelblau, Ed

    2013-01-01

    We present a collection of analogies that are intended to help students better understand the foreign and often nuanced vocabulary of the genetics curriculum. Why is it called the "wild type"? What is the difference between a locus, a gene, and an allele? What is the functional (versus a rule-based) distinction between dominant and…

  1. Algicidal Activity of Stilbene Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our continuing search for natural product and natural product-based compounds for the control of off-flavor in catfish, a total of twenty nine stilbene analogs were synthesized and evaluated for algicidal activity against the 2-methylisoborneol (MIB)-producing cyanobacterium Oscillatoria ...

  2. Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Chen, Dawn; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    How can humans acquire relational representations that enable analogical inference and other forms of high-level reasoning? Using comparative relations as a model domain, we explore the possibility that bottom-up learning mechanisms applied to objects coded as feature vectors can yield representations of relations sufficient to solve analogy…

  3. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  4. Analogy of the Cell Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this project, students compare the makeup of a cell to an everyday working unit or system. They create a three-dimensional object that represents their analogy. For example, students could create a car motor or manufacturing plant. (Of course, this is totally hand-created by them, so it can be a homemade re-creation of a system, not an actual…

  5. Multichannel analog temperature sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, R.

    1985-08-01

    A multichannel system that protects the numerous and costly water-cooled magnet coils on the translation section of the FRX-C/T magnetic fusion experiment is described. The system comprises a thermistor for each coil, a constant current circuit for each thermistor, and a multichannel analog-to-digital converter interfaced to the computer.

  6. Geometrical Analogies in Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    A typical form of thinking to approach problem solutions humanly is thinking in analogous structures. Therefore school, especially mathematical lessons should help to form and to develop corresponding heuristic abilities of the pupils. In the contribution, a summary of possibilities of mathematics lessons regarding this shall particularly be…

  7. Simulation Experiments with Cometary Analogous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Hermann W.; Huebner, Walter F.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1998-12-01

    Comet simulation experiments are discussed, in the context of physical models and the results in cometary physics, gathered especially from the GIOTTO space mission to comet P'Halley. The “status of the today knowledge” about comets, the experiments could start from, is briefly reviewed. The setup of the KOSI (German = Kometen Simulation) - experiments and the techniques to produce cometary analogous material, on the basis of that knowledge are described in general, as for the different KOSI experiments. The limitations of the simulation of physical processes at the surface of real comets in an earth-bound laboratory are discussed, and the possibilities to receive common insights in cometary physics are shown. Methods and procedures are described, and the major results reviewed. As with attempting to reproduce any natural phenomenon in the laboratory, there are short-comings to these experiments, but there are possibly major new insights to be gained. Physical laws only have the same consequences under same experimental or environmental conditions. A number of small-scale comet simulation experiments have been performed, since the early 60ties in many laboratories, but the largest and most ambitious series of comet simulation experiments to date were performed between 1987 and 1993 using the German space agency's (DLR) space hardware testing facilities in Cologne. These experiments were triggered by the scientific community after the comet P'Halley's recurrence in 1986 and the many data gathered by the space missions in this year. Simulation experiments have proved valuable in developing methods for making cometary analogues, and for exploring specific properties of such materials in detail. These experiments provided new insights into the morphology and physical behavior of aggregates formed out of silicate- /water-ice -grains likely to exist in comets. The formation of a dust mantle on the surface, and a system of ice layers below the mantle from the

  8. Temperature controlled icy dust reservoir of sodium: A possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shican; Tang, Yihuan; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-06-01

    Using seven years, from 2006 to 2013, sodium lidar observations over Hefei, China (31.80°N, 117.3°E), we attempt to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers (SSLs or NaS). We analyze the relationship between low temperature (<150 K) and SSL occurrence and detect a statistically significant link that the low temperature (<150 K) occur in three days before an SSL with an occurrence rate of 93.4% (57/61). The sharp decrease of water vapor concentration nearby before an SSL and the recover after the SSL are also detected frequently. Based upon these evidences and some case studies, we propose an icy dust reservoir in the formation of an SSL. The icy dust could form in the extremely cold mesopause region where the temperature falls below 150 K and it will absorb sodium atoms to form a solid sodium metal film as a sodium reservoir. The icy dust will then sublimate rapidly when meeting with warm air (e.g., 150 K < T < 190 K) and leave behind the solid metal atom film. The remanent sodium film might release vapor sodium atoms finally by some means through high temperature (e.g., >190 K and sometimes even >230 K) and form a sporadic sodium layer. Although not conclusive and highly uncertain, the icy dust reservoir model not only provides a good explanation for the observed characteristics of SSLs; it is also in good agreement with many other observations, such as the simultaneous sporadic sodium and iron layers, the behavior of SSLs on small time scale, the deviation of the sodium density profile of SSLs from the normal one, and the sharply decreased scale height above the peak of the sodium layer. These results further suggest that the icy dust might be a viable option of sodium reservoir for the formation of SSLs.

  9. Laboratory Spectra of CO2 Vibrational Modes in Planetary Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Douglas; Mastrapa, Rachel M.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory spectra have shown that CO2 is a powerful diagnostic tool for analyzing infrared data from remote observations, as it has been detected on icy moons in the outer Solar System as well as dust grain surfaces in the interstellar medium (ISM). IR absorption band profiles of CO2 within ice mixtures containing H2O and CH3OH change with respect to temperature and mixture ratios. In this particular study, the CO2 asymmetric stretching mode near 4.3 m (2350 cm (exp-1)), overtone mode near 1.97 m (5080 cm (exp-1)), and the combination bands near 2.7 m (3700 cm (exp-1)), 2.8 m (3600 cm (exp-1)), and 2.02 m (4960 cm (exp -1)), are systematically observed in different mixtures with H2O and CH3OH in temperature ranges from 15K to 150 K. Additionally, some high-temperature deposits (T greater than 50 K) of H2O, CH3OH, and CO2 ice mixtures were performed. These data may then be used to interpret infrared observational data obtained from icy surfaces in the outer Solar System and beyond.

  10. Bayesian analogy with relational transformations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Chen, Dawn; Holyoak, Keith J

    2012-07-01

    How can humans acquire relational representations that enable analogical inference and other forms of high-level reasoning? Using comparative relations as a model domain, we explore the possibility that bottom-up learning mechanisms applied to objects coded as feature vectors can yield representations of relations sufficient to solve analogy problems. We introduce Bayesian analogy with relational transformations (BART) and apply the model to the task of learning first-order comparative relations (e.g., larger, smaller, fiercer, meeker) from a set of animal pairs. Inputs are coded by vectors of continuous-valued features, based either on human magnitude ratings, normed feature ratings (De Deyne et al., 2008), or outputs of the topics model (Griffiths, Steyvers, & Tenenbaum, 2007). Bootstrapping from empirical priors, the model is able to induce first-order relations represented as probabilistic weight distributions, even when given positive examples only. These learned representations allow classification of novel instantiations of the relations and yield a symbolic distance effect of the sort obtained with both humans and other primates. BART then transforms its learned weight distributions by importance-guided mapping, thereby placing distinct dimensions into correspondence. These transformed representations allow BART to reliably solve 4-term analogies (e.g., larger:smaller::fiercer:meeker), a type of reasoning that is arguably specific to humans. Our results provide a proof-of-concept that structured analogies can be solved with representations induced from unstructured feature vectors by mechanisms that operate in a largely bottom-up fashion. We discuss potential implications for algorithmic and neural models of relational thinking, as well as for the evolution of abstract thought. PMID:22775500

  11. Impact of Self-Explanation and Analogical Comparison Support on Learning Processes, Motivation, Metacognition, and Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. Elizabeth

    Research examining analogical comparison and self-explanation has produced a robust set of findings about learning and transfer supported by each instructional technique. However, it is unclear how the types of knowledge generated through each technique differ, which has important implications for cognitive theory as well as instructional practice. I conducted a pair of experiments to directly compare the effects of instructional prompts supporting self-explanation, analogical comparison, and the study of instructional explanations across a number of fine-grained learning process, motivation, metacognition, and transfer measures. Experiment 1 explored these questions using sequence extrapolation problems, and results showed no differences between self-explanation and analogical comparison support conditions on any measure. Experiment 2 explored the same questions in a science domain. I evaluated condition effects on transfer outcomes; self-reported self-explanation, analogical comparison, and metacognitive processes; and achievement goals. I also examined relations between transfer and self-reported processes and goals. Receiving materials with analogical comparison support and reporting greater levels of analogical comparison were both associated with worse transfer performance, while reporting greater levels of self-explanation was associated with better performance. Learners' self-reports of self-explanation and analogical comparison were not related to condition assignment, suggesting that the questionnaires did not measure the same processes promoted by the intervention, or that individual differences in processing are robust even when learners are instructed to engage in self-explanation or analogical comparison.

  12. Grain quality inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, C. A., Jr.; Singletow, D. P.; James, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A review of grain quality indicators and measurement methods was conducted in order to assess the feasibility of using remote sensing technology to develop a continuous monitoring system for use during grain transfer operations. Most detection methods were found to be too slow or too expensive to be incorporated into the normal inspection procedure of a grain elevator on a continuous basis. Two indicators, moisture content and broken corn and foreign material, show potential for automation and are of an economic value. A microprocessor based system which utilizes commercially available electronic moisture meter was developed and tested. A method for automating BCFM measurement is described. A complete system description is presented along with performance test results.

  13. Grain optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha

    1988-01-01

    The optical properties of small grains provide the link between the infrared observations presented in Chapter 1 and the dust composition described in Chapter 3. In this session, the optical properties were discussed from the viewpoint of modeling the emission from the dust coma and the scattering in order to draw inference about the dust size distribution and composition. The optical properties are applied to the analysis of the infrared data in several ways, and these different uses should be kept in mind when judging the validity of the methods for applying optical constants to real grains.

  14. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  15. Coarse-grained distributions and superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2006-01-01

    We show an interesting connection between non-standard (non-Boltzmannian) distribution functions arising in the theory of violent relaxation for collisionless stellar systems [D. Lynden-Bell, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 136 (1967) 101.] and the notion of superstatistics recently introduced by [Beck and Cohen Physica A 322 (2003) 267]. The common link between these two theories is the emergence of coarse-grained distributions arising out of fine-grained distributions. The coarse-grained distribution functions are written as a superposition of Boltzmann factors weighted by a non-universal function. Even more general distributions can arise in case of incomplete violent relaxation (non-ergodicity). They are stable stationary solutions of the Vlasov equation. We also discuss analogies and differences between the statistical equilibrium state of a multi-components self-gravitating system and the metaequilibrium (or quasi-equilibrium) states of a collisionless stellar system. Finally, we stress the important distinction between entropies, generalized entropies, relative entropies and H-functions. We discuss applications of these ideas in two-dimensional turbulence and for other systems with long-range interactions.

  16. Grain-damage hysteresis and plate tectonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2016-04-01

    Shear localization in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The theoretical model for grain-damage and pinning in two-phase polycrystalline rocks provides a frame-work for understanding lithospheric shear weakening and plate-generation, and is consistent with laboratory and field observations of mylonites. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, and damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between crystalline phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary positive self-weakening feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. However, the suppression of interface damage at low interface curvature (wherein inter-grain mixing is inefficient and other energy sinks of deformational work are potentially more facile) causes a hysteresis effect, in which three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress coexist: (1) a stable, large-grain, weakly-deforming state, (2) a stable, small-grain, rapidly-deforming state analogous to ultramylonites, and (3) an unstable, intermediate grain-size state perhaps comparable to protomylonites. A comparison of the model to field data suggests that shear-localized zones of small-grain mylonites and ultra-mylonites exist at a lower stress than the co-existing large-grain porphyroclasts, rather than, as predicted by paleopiezometers or paleowattmeters, at a much higher stress; this interpretation of field data thus allows localization to relieve instead of accumulate stress. The model also predicts that a lithosphere that

  17. Grain boundary curvature and grain growth kinetics with particle pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahandeh, Sina; Militzer, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Second-phase particles are used extensively in design of polycrystalline materials to control the grain size. According to Zener's theory, a distribution of particles creates a pinning pressure on a moving grain boundary. As a result, a limiting grain size is observed, but the effect of pinning on the detail of grain growth kinetics is less known. The influence of the particles on the microstructure occurs in multiple length scales, established by particle radius and the grain size. In this article, we use a meso-scale phase-field model that simulates grain growth in the presence of a uniform pinning pressure. The curvature of the grain boundary network is measured to determine the driving pressure of grain growth in 2D and 3D systems. It was observed that the grain growth continues, even under conditions where the average driving pressure is smaller than the pinning pressure. The limiting grain size is reached when the maximum of driving pressure distribution in the structure is equal to the pinning pressure. This results in a limiting grain size, larger than the one predicted by conventional models, and further analysis shows consistency with experimental observations. A physical model is proposed for the kinetics of grain growth using parameters based on the curvature analysis of the grain boundaries. This model can describe the simulated grain growth kinetics.

  18. On Organic Material in E Ring Ice Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Khawaja, N.; Reviol, R.; Nölle, L.; Klenner, F.; Hsu, H. W.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Pure water ice dominates the composition of the micron and sub-micron sized dust particles in Saturn's E-ring, a ring constantly replenished by active ice jets of the moon Enceladus [1]. Details about the composition of this tenuous, optically thin ring can only be constrained by in situ measurements. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard Cassini investigates the composition of these grains by cationic time-of-flight mass spectra of individual ice grains hitting the instruments target surface. From these spectra three compositional types of E ring ice grains have been identified previously [2,3]: Type-1: Almost pure water, Type-2: Enriched in organics, and Type-3: Enriched in salt. Unlike Type-1 and 3, organic-enriched Type-2 spectra have not yet been investigated in depth. Here we report the first detailed compositional analysis of this type. The spectra analysis is supported by a large-scale laboratory ground campaign yielding a library of analogue spectra for organic material embedded in a water ice matrix. In contrast to Type 1 and 3, Type-2 spectra display a great compositional diversity, which indicates varying contributions of several organic species. So far we have identified characteristic fragment patterns of at least three classes of organic compounds: aromatic species, amines, and carbonyl group species. Work is in progress to quantify concentrations of the identified species and to assign yet un-specified organic mass lines in Type 2 spectra. Due to the dynamical evolution of the orbital elements of E ring grains a large fraction collides with the icy moons embedded in the E ring. Therefore, the organic components identified by CDA can accumulate on the surfaces of these bodies over time. Ref: :[1]Kempf et al., Icarus-206, 2010. [2]Postberg et al., Nature-459, 2009. [3]Postberg et al., Icarus-193, 2008.

  19. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties. PMID:17716003

  20. Battery hydrometer with analog output

    SciTech Connect

    Patis, B.L.

    1982-09-21

    There is disclosed a battery hydrometer for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude related to the specific gravity of a battery electrolyte. The hydrometer includes a source of radiation for providing a detectable beam of radiation and a piston member arranged to be submerged within the electrolyte and to intercept and modulate the beam of radiation in response to the specific gravity of the electrolyte. The piston member is suspended within the electrolyte by a spring which exerts a compressive force upon the piston member against which the electrolyte must act. The hydrometer further includes a radiation detector aligned with the radiation source for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude responsive to the modulated beam of radiation.

  1. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  2. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  3. Edible grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible grain legumes including dry bean, dry pea, chickpeas, and lentils, have served as important sources of protein for human diets for thousands of years. In the US, these crops are predominately produced for export markets. The objective of this study was to examine yield gains in these crops ov...

  4. Interstellar Grain Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Chemistry on grain surfaces plays an Important role in the formation of interstellar Ices, It can also influence the composition of the gas phase through outgassing near luminous, newly formed stars. This paper reviews the chemical processes taking place on Interstellar grain surfaces with the emphasis on those transforming CO into other hydrocarbons. At low, molecular cloud temperatures (approximately equal to 10K), physisorption processes dominate interstellar grain surface chemistry and GO is largely hydrogenated through reactions with atomic H and oxidized through reactions with atomic O. The former will lead to the formation of H2CO and CH3OH ices, while the latter results in CO2 ice. The observational evidence for these ices in molecular clouds will be discussed. Very close to protostars, the gas and grain temperatures are much higher (approximately equal to 500K) and chemisorption processes, including catalytic surface reactions, becomes important. This will be illustrated based upon our studies of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of CH4 from CO on metallic surfaces. Likely, this process has played an important role in the early solar nebula. Observational consequences will be pointed out.

  5. Organic synthesis via irradiation and warming of ice grains in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Fred J; Sandford, Scott A

    2012-04-27

    Complex organic compounds, including many important to life on Earth, are commonly found in meteoritic and cometary samples, though their origins remain a mystery. We examined whether such molecules could be produced within the solar nebula by tracking the dynamical evolution of ice grains in the nebula and recording the environments to which they were exposed. We found that icy grains originating in the outer disk, where temperatures were less than 30 kelvin, experienced ultraviolet irradiation exposures and thermal warming similar to that which has been shown to produce complex organics in laboratory experiments. These results imply that organic compounds are natural by-products of protoplanetary disk evolution and should be important ingredients in the formation of all planetary systems, including our own. PMID:22461502

  6. Organic Synthesis via Irradiation and Warming of Ice Grains in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, Fred J.; Sanford, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Complex organic compounds, including many important to life on Earth, are commonly found in meteoritic and cometary samples, though their origins remain a mystery. We examined whether such molecules could be produced within the solar nebula by tracking the dynamical evolution of ice grains in the nebula and recording the environments they were exposed to. We found that icy grains originating in the outer disk, where temperatures were less than 30 K, experienced UV irradiation exposures and thermal warming similar to that which has been shown to produce complex organics in laboratory experiments. These results imply that organic compounds are natural byproducts of protoplanetary disk evolution and should be important ingredients in the formation of all planetary systems, including our own.

  7. THz time-domain spectroscopy of mixed CO2-CH3OH interstellar ice analogs.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brett A; Ioppolo, Sergio; Allodi, Marco A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2016-07-27

    The icy mantles of interstellar dust grains are the birthplaces of the primordial prebiotic molecular inventory that may eventually seed nascent solar systems and the planets and planetesimals that form therein. Here, we present a study of two of the most abundant species in these ices after water: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methanol (CH3OH), using TeraHertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy and mid-infrared spectroscopy. We study pure and mixed-ices of these species, and demonstrate the power of the THz region of the spectrum to elucidate the long-range structure (i.e. crystalline versus amorphous) of the ice, the degree of segregation of these species within the ice, and the thermal history of the species within the ice. Finally, we comment on the utility of the THz transitions arising from these ices for use in astronomical observations of interstellar ices. PMID:27306081

  8. Tectonics of Icy Moons: A Tale of Oceans and Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Icy moons of the outer solar system commonly experience eccentric orbits that impart daily tidal stresses to the outer ice layer. Depending on the orbital dynamics and configuration of the moons and their host planets, these stresses may or may not be sufficiently large to deform the ice layer. Although the stresses are typically very small, many icy moons exhibit pervasively tectonized surfaces, replete with fractures, faults, and significant topography (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus, Dione, Titan, Miranda, Ariel, Titania, Triton). Deformation may be driven by various means (e.g., orbital recession, polar wander, ice shell thickening), but tidal deformation is particularly important and is enhanced if an outer ice layer is decoupled from an underlying liquid ocean. The tidal response of the ocean creates tidal bulges in the ice layer that oscillate longitudinally and in amplitude during the orbital period. The resultant diurnal tidal stress field (perhaps 10s of kPa) rotates throughout the orbit. Any fractures growing in this time frame should thus be curved (e.g., Europa's cycloidal cracks, which have been cited as the smoking gun for a subsurface ocean). Long lineaments should accumulate strike-slip offsets in such a stress field, as occurs on Europa and perhaps Enceladus. The progressive development of ice ridges to either side of central cracks may result from this shearing process. A decoupled ice layer also permits faster than synchronous rotation of the ice layer, which may allow several MPa of stress to accrue, perhaps explaining long lineaments on Europa. It is unclear if Europa continues to be tectonically active, especially given apparent ice shell thickening that would have muted the tidal response through time. Nonetheless, subtle troughs across Europa's surface crosscut all other features and may indicate some degree of ongoing activity. In contrast, active tectonics on Enceladus is implied by ongoing geyser-like eruptions of water-ice from

  9. Methods of Estimating Initial Crater Depths on Icy Satellites using Stereo Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, D. M.; Phillips, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Stereo topography, combined with models of viscous relaxation of impact craters, allows for the study of the rheology and thermal history of icy satellites. An important step in calculating relaxation of craters is determining the initial depths of craters before viscous relaxation. Two methods for estimating initial crater depths on the icy satellites of Saturn have been previously discussed. White and Schenk (2013) present the craters of Iapetus as relatively unrelaxed in modeling the relaxation of craters of Rhea. Phillips et al. (2013) assume that Herschel crater on Saturn's satellite Mimas is unrelaxed in relaxation calculations and models of Rhea and Dione. In the second method, the depth of Herschel crater is scaled based on the different crater diameters and the difference in surface gravity on the large moons to predict the initial crater depths for Rhea and Dione. In the first method, since Iapetus is of similar size to Dione and Rhea, no gravity scaling is necessary; craters of similar size on Iapetus were chosen and their depths measured to determine the appropriate initial crater depths for Rhea. We test these methods by first extracting topographic profiles of impact craters on Iapetus from digital elevation models (DEMs) constructed from stereo images from the Cassini ISS instrument. We determined depths from these profiles and used them to calculate initial crater depths and relaxation percentages for Rhea and Dione craters using the methods described above. We first assumed that craters on Iapetus were relaxed, and compared the results to previously calculated relaxation percentages for Rhea and Dione relative to Herschel crater (with appropriate scaling for gravity and crater diameter). We then tested the assumption that craters on Iapetus were unrelaxed and used our new measurements of crater depth to determine relaxation percentages for Dione and Rhea. We will present results and conclusions from both methods and discuss their efficacy for

  10. Theoretical studies of the radar properties of the icy Galilean moons of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1993-01-01

    The icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter - Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto - have unusual radar scattering properties compared with those of the terrestrial planets or Earth's Moon. There are three main features of the data that distinguish these targets: (1) the radar cross-section normalized by the geometrical cross-section is an order of magnitude larger than that of any terrestrial planet; (2) the reflected power is almost evenly distributed between two orthogonal polarizations with more power being returned in the same circular polarization as was transmitted whereas virtually all of the power returned from the terrestrial planets is contained in the opposite circular polarization to the one that was transmitted; and (3) the echo power spectra have a broad shape indicating a nearly uniformly radar-bright surface in contrast to the spectra from the terrestrial planets that contain a strong quasi-specular component from the vicinity of the sub-radar point and very little reflected power from the rest of the surface. The normalized radar cross-sections decrease as the areal water ice coverage decreases from Europa to Ganymede to Callisto. Recently, radar echoes from the polar caps of Mars and Mercury, and from Saturn's satellite Titan imply similarly strong cross-sections and have classically unexpected polarization properties and it is also thought that this is due to the presence of ice on the surface. A model called the radar glory model is analyzed and it is shown that the main features of the radar echoes calculated from this model agree well with the observations from all three icy Galilean satellites. This model involves long radar paths in the ice below the surface and special structures in which the refractive index decreases abruptly at a hemispherical boundary. It is not known whether such structures exist or how they could be created, but possible scenarios can be imagined such as the formation of an impact crater followed by deposition of a frost layer

  11. New Cassini RADAR Results for Iapetus and Saturn's Other Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S.; West, R.; Wye, L.; Janssen, M.; Paillou, P.; Stiles, B.; Kelleher, K.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W.; Veeramachaneni, C.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2007-12-01

    During the past two years, radar tracks on the icy satellites have more than doubled the number of observations reported by Ostro et al. (2006, Icarus 183, 479-490). Our scatterometry has now yielded estimates of the 2.2-cm- wavelength radar albedo in the same linear (SL) polarization as transmitted for Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Phoebe. Our tracks have sampled widely separated subradar locations on most of the satellites, in some cases using beams comparable to or larger than the target's disc and in others using beams significantly smaller than the disc. Hence we can begin to assess the dispersion in these objects' distributions of radar reflectivity. The 2.2-cm SL radar albedo varies by at least several tens of percent on at least Dione, Rhea, Enceladus, and Iapetus. For Enceladus, a scatterometric observation centered on (29 S, 243 W) with a beamwidth of 1.2 Enceladus diameters gives the largest disc-integrated SL radar albedo obtained at any wavelength for any solar system object (including Europa), probably because of the extreme purity of at least the uppermost few decimeters of the water-ice regolith on much of the hemisphere facing the radar. For Iapetus, multi-beam, disc-resolved measurements disclose that the disparity in the 2.2-cm SL radar albedos between the optically bright and dark terrains is greater than that inferred by Ostro et al. (2006). During the Iapetus 49 flyby shortly after this meeting's abstract deadline, radar observations will include SAR imaging with 2-to-12-km surface resolution covering much of the visible disc, using beam sizes of about 120 km (less than one tenth of an Iapetus diameter), plus a short altimetric measurement with 35-m range resolution. The radar imaging will be mostly of the optically dark terrain and will include tracks across the equatorial ridge and the largest impact structures in Cassini Regio. The Iapetus SAR images will be the first of an icy satellite for which high

  12. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa and Similar Scales on Earth (Providence, RI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The top image is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa, showing an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs. The bottom image is an aerial photograph of downtown Providence, Rhode Island at the same scale. The bright white circular feature in the top center of the Providence image is an indoor hockey rink, and one can find many craters in the Europa image about the same size. Blocks of debris which have fallen from the cliffs on the Europa image are about the same size as houses seen in the Providence image, and the largest blocks are almost as large as the Rhode Island state capitol building (large white building in upper left of Providence image). A fracture that runs horizontally across the center of the Europa image is about the same width as the freeway which runs along the bottom of the Providence image.

    North is to the top right of the Europa image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The Europa image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The images each cover an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. The Europa image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by the solid state imaging system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  13. Basic Electricity--a Novel Analogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Uses the analogy of water flow to introduce concepts in basic electricity. Presents a demonstration that uses this analogy to help students grasp the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance. (JRH)

  14. Thermal analog device reduces machining errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal analog devices predict thermal expansion and contraction of machine structures subjected to various heat inputs. Analog devices correct positioning of machine tools to compensate for distortion of machine frame.

  15. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  16. Hegel, Analogy, and Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joseph T.

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel rejected the possibility of life outside of the Earth, according to several scholars of extraterrestrial life. Their position is that the solar system and specifically the planet Earth is the unique place in the cosmos where life, intelligence, and rationality can be. The present study offers a very different interpretation of Hegel's statements about the place of life on Earth by suggesting that, although Hegel did not believe that there were other solar systems where rationality is present, he did in fact suggest that planets in general, not the Earth exclusively, have life and possibly also intelligent inhabitants. Analogical syllogisms are superficial, according to Hegel, insofar as they try to conclude that there is life on the Moon even though there is no evidence of water or air on that body. Similar analogical arguments for life on the Sun made by Johann Elert Bode and William Herschel were considered by Hegel to be equally superficial. Analogical arguments were also used by astronomers and philosophers to suggest that life could be found on other planets in our solar system. Hegel offers no critique of analogical arguments for life on other planets, and in fact Hegel believed that life would be found on other planets. Planets, after all, have meteorological processes and therefore are "living" according to his philosophical account, unlike the Moon, Sun, and comets. Whereas William Herschel was already finding great similarities between the Sun and the stars and had extended these similarities to the property of having planets or being themselves inhabitable worlds, Hegel rejected this analogy. The Sun and stars have some properties in common, but for Hegel one cannot conclude from these similarities to the necessity that stars have planets. Hegel's arguments against the presence of life in the solar system were not directed against other planets, but rather against the Sun and Moon, both of which he said have a different

  17. Why Is It Important to Eat Grains, Especially Whole Grains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate), and minerals ( iron , magnesium , and selenium). Dietary fiber from whole grains or other foods, ... diets. Whole grains are sources of magnesium and selenium. Magnesium is a mineral used in building bones ...

  18. Dust grain charging in a wake of other grains

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Block, D.

    2012-12-15

    The charging of dust grain in the wake of another grains in sonic and supersonic collisionless plasma flows is studied by numerical simulations. We consider two grains aligned with the flow, as well as dust chains and multiple grain arrangements. It is found that the dust charge depends significantly on the flow speed, distance between the grains, and the grain arrangement. For two and three grains aligned, the charges on downstream grains depend linearly on the flow velocity and intergrain distance. The simulations are carried out with DiP3D, a three dimensional particle-in-cell code with both electrons and ions represented as numerical particles [W. J. Miloch et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 103703 (2010)].

  19. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-01-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to…

  20. Reasoning by Analogy in Constructing Mathematical Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    A powerful way of understanding something new is by analogy with something already known. An analogy is defined as a mapping from one structure, which is already known (the base or source), to another structure that is to be inferred or discovered (the target). The research community has given considerable attention to analogical reasoning in the…

  1. A common origin for ridge-and-trough terrain on icy satellites by sluggish lid convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Hammond, Noah P.

    2015-12-01

    Ridge-and-trough terrain is a common landform on outer Solar System icy satellites. Examples include Ganymede's grooved terrain, Europa's gray bands, Miranda's coronae, and several terrains on Enceladus. The conditions associated with the formation of each of these terrains are similar: heat flows of order tens to a hundred milliwatts per meter squared, and deformation rates of order 10-16-10-12 s-1. Our prior work shows that the conditions associated with the formation of these terrains on Ganymede and the south pole of Enceladus are consistent with vigorous solid-state ice convection in a shell with a weak surface. We show that sluggish lid convection, an intermediate regime between the isoviscous and stagnant lid regimes, can create the heat flow and deformation rates appropriate for ridge and trough formation on a number of satellites, regardless of the ice shell thickness. For convection to deform their surfaces, the ice shells must have yield stresses similar in magnitude to the daily tidal stresses. Tidal and convective stresses deform the surface, and the spatial pattern of tidal cracking controls the locations of ridge-and-trough terrain.

  2. The response of subsurface oceans in icy satellites to tidally driven forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E. M.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft suggest that subsurface global water oceans are likely present on multiple icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. However, the dynamics of these oceans, under the influence of a time-varying tidal potential and buoyancy and coriolis forces, have not been investigated in detail. We have investigated the large scale ocean flow in two ways. First, we simulate the 3-D global circulation of the subsurface oceans on Europa and Titan driven primarily by a time-varying tidal potential and secondarily by heating at the base of the ocean. Second, we analyze the behavior of tidally-forced subsurface oceans in two-dimensions using quasi-nonlinear shallow water theory. These approaches allow us to predict potentially observable effects, in particular non-synchronous rotation of the ice shell driven by ocean torques and spatial variations in the heat flow supplied to the base of the ice shell, and magnetic induction effects due to the ocean circulation. Time-series analyses suggest that the ocean responds primarily at the tidal frequency; however, there are responses at lower frequencies as well. Preliminary results of full 3-D simulations will be presented, and comparisons will be made to the forced shallow water model.

  3. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Newman, S.F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Griffith, C.A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 ??m. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 ??m and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (???0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma turbulence and coherent structures in the polar cap observed by the ICI-2 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicher, A.; Miloch, W. J.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Moen, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    The electron density data from the ICI-2 sounding rocket experiment in the high-latitude F region ionosphere are analyzed using the higher-order spectra and higher-order statistics. Two regions of enhanced fluctuations are chosen for detailed analysis: the trailing edge of a polar cap patch and an electron density enhancement associated with particle precipitation. While these two regions exhibit similar power spectra, our analysis reveals that their internal structures are significantly different. The structures on the edge of the polar cap patch are likely due to nonlinear wave interactions since this region is characterized by intermittency and significant coherent mode coupling. The plasma enhancement subjected to precipitation, however, exhibits stronger random characteristics with uncorrelated phases of density fluctuations. These results suggest that particle precipitation plays a fundamental role in ionospheric plasma structuring creating turbulent-like structures. We discuss the physical mechanisms that cause plasma structuring as well as the possible processes for the low-frequency part of the spectrum in terms of plasma instabilities.

  5. Radar-Sounding of Icy Mantles and Comets Using Natural Radio Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Sahr, J. D.

    2011-10-01

    Radar-sounding of ice sheets on Earth yields crucial information on ice history and dynamics, including discoveries of subglacial lakes beneath 3-4 km of ice [1]. Mars Express and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have now demonstrated the corresponding power of orbital radar sounding for planetary exploration, in particular by imaging structures within and beneath kilometers of Martian water ice [2-4]. Based on this experience, a sophisticated orbital radar sounder is planned for a flagship mission to Europa, with the aim of imaging stratigraphy, faults, diapirs and other geological structure in the upper few kilometers of the water-ice mantle there, and possibly even detecting the upper surface of the (likely) underlying ocean [5]. Recent modeling of the formation and evolution of volatilerich bodies suggests that oceans or lakes of liquid water occur beneath water-ice mantles in a surprising variety of places, including Ceres in the outer asteroid belt [6], 3 of the 4 Galilean moons of Jupiter as well as Enceladus and Titan in the Saturnian system [7], and possibly even Pluto [8]. Thus there is now a wide scope for low-cost missions to bodies of exceptional interest, and for radar sounding of icy mantles to image near-surface structural geology related to underlying water (whether past or present).

  6. Feasibility Study of Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Permanent Magnet Alternator Start Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Tokars, Roger P.

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission was a proposed, (recently cancelled) long duration science mission to study three moons of Jupiter: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. One design of the JIMO spacecraft used a nuclear heat source in conjunction with a Brayton rotating machine to generate electrical power for the electric thrusters and the spacecraft bus. The basic operation of the closed cycle Brayton system was as follows. The working fluid, a heliumxenon gas mixture, first entered a compressor, then went through a recuperator and hot-side heat exchanger, then expanded across a turbine that drove an alternator, then entered the cold-side of the recuperator and heat exchanger and finally returned to the compressor. The spacecraft was to be launched with the Brayton system off-line and the nuclear reactor shut down. Once the system was started, the helium-xenon gas would be circulated into the heat exchangers as the nuclear reactors were activated. Initially, the alternator unit would operate as a motor so as to drive the turbine and compressor to get the cycle started. This report investigated the feasibility of the start up sequence of a permanent magnet (PM) machine, similar in operation to the alternator unit, without any position or speed feedback sensors ("sensorless") and with a variable load torque. It is found that the permanent magnet machine can start with sensorless control and a load torque of up to 30 percent of the rated value.

  7. High-resolution CASSINI-VIMS mosaics of Titan and the icy Saturnian satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Cerroni, P.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Soderbloom, L.A.; Griffith, C.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, Th.; Scholten, F.; Porco, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the CASSINI spacecraft obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn after its arrival at Saturn in June 2004. VIMS operates in a spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m, generating image cubes in which each pixel represents a spectrum consisting of 352 contiguous wavebands. As an imaging spectrometer VIMS combines the characteristics of both a spectrometer and an imaging instrument. This makes it possible to analyze the spectrum of each pixel separately and to map the spectral characteristics spatially, which is important to study the relationships between spectral information and geological and geomorphologic surface features. The spatial analysis of the spectral data requires the determination of the exact geographic position of each pixel on the specific surface and that all 352 spectral elements of each pixel show the same region of the target. We developed a method to reproject each pixel geometrically and to convert the spectral data into map projected image cubes. This method can also be applied to mosaic different VIMS observations. Based on these mosaics, maps of the spectral properties for each Saturnian satellite can be derived and attributed to geographic positions as well as to geological and geomorphologic surface features. These map-projected mosaics are the basis for all further investigations. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Fresh Icy Surfaces of Pluto-sized Trans-Neptunian Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, B. E.; Tourtellotte, S. W.

    2006-09-01

    We have been monitoring Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) with the SMARTS 1.3m telescope at Cerro Tololo to determine colors, solar phase curves, and rotation periods[1]. To date we have observed the phase curves of over 30 distant bodies, including 20 TNOs, 7 Centaurs, and Nereid. Here we present observations showing that the new Pluto-sized bodies (2003 UB313, 2005 FY9, and 2003 EL61), like Pluto, all have flat phase phase curves and neutral visible colors compared with smaller TNOs. Since these large bodies, including Pluto, are known to have high albedos and reflectance spectra dominated by the presence of methane or water ice, we suggest that the flat phase curves and neutral visible colors we observe are the result of recent resurfacing. This could be caused by surface sublimation at perihelion followed by freeze out at aphelion. Smaller TNOs with similar orbits would not retain an icy covering owing to a surface gravity to weak to retain the sublimated volatiles. It follows that there is a threshold size below which TNOs will have lower albedos and redder colors owing to long-term surface weathering. [1] D. Rabinowitz, B. Schaefer, and S. Tourtellote, 2006, submitted to AJ. This work as supported by the NASA.

  9. Considerations for a Radar System to Detect an Ocean Underneath the Icy Shell of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, Prasad; Green, James; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Taylor, William; Benson, Robert; Reinisch, Bodo; Song, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The detection of an ocean underneath Europa is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. An orbiting surface penetrating radar has the potential of providing that measurement thus yielding information regarding the possibility of life support on Europa. Radars in the MHz range have successfully monitored the kilometer-deep ice shelves of Greenland and Antarctica, including the detection of Lake Vostok (and others) below an ice sheet thickness of about 4 km. The performance of a radar system orbiting Europa will be subject to several potential complications and unknowns. Besides ionospheric dispersion and the actual depth of the ocean, which is estimated between 2 and 30 km, major unknowns affecting radar performance are the temperature profile, the amount of salt and other impurities within the ice crust as well as the surface roughness. These impurities can in part be produced at the highly irradiated surface by magnetospheric interactions and transported downward into the ice crust by geologic processes. The ionospheric interference must also be modeled from effects of these interactions on production of the thin neutral atmosphere and subsequent ionization of the neutrals. We investigated these uncertainties through radar simulations using different surface and ice characteristics over a frequency range from 10 to 50 MHz. The talk will present results from these simulations discussing potential limitations.

  10. Implications for Bidirectional Signaling Between Afferent Nerves and Urothelial Cells—ICI-RS 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Anthony; Fry, Christopher; Ikeda, Youko; Kullmann, Florenta Aura; Parsons, Brian; Birder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present a synopsis of the presentations and discussions from Think Tank I, “Implications for afferent–urothelial bidirectional communication” of the 2014 International Consultation on Incontinence-Research Society (ICI-RS) meeting in Bristol, UK. Methods The participants presented what is new, currently understood or still unknown on afferent–urothelial signaling mechanisms. New avenues of research and experimental methodologies that are or could be employed were presented and discussed. Results It is clear that afferent–urothelial interactions are integral to the regulation of normal bladder function and that its disruption can have detrimental consequences. The urothelium is capable of releasing numerous signaling factors that can affect sensory neurons innervating the suburothelium. However, the understanding of how factors released from urothelial cells and afferent nerve terminals regulate one another is incomplete. Utilization of techniques such as viruses that genetically encode Ca2+ sensors, based on calmodulin and green fluorescent protein, has helped to address the cellular mechanisms involved. Additionally, the epithelial–neuronal interactions in the urethra may also play a significant role in lower urinary tract regulation and merit further investigation. Conclusion The signaling capabilities of the urothelium and afferent nerves are well documented, yet how these signals are integrated to regulate bladder function is unclear. There is unquestionably a need for expanded methodologies to further our understanding of lower urinary tract sensory mechanisms and their contribution to various pathologies. PMID:26872567

  11. Production of O2 on icy satellites by electronic excitation of low-temperature water ice.

    PubMed

    Sieger, M T; Simpson, W C; Orlando, T M

    1998-08-01

    The signature of condensed molecular oxygen has been reported in recent optical-reflectance measurements of the jovian moon Ganymede, and a tenuous oxygen atmosphere has been observed on Europa. The surfaces of these moons contain large amounts of water ice, and it is thought that O2 is formed by the sputtering of ice by energetic particles from the jovian magnetosphere. Understanding how O2 might be formed from low-temperature ice is crucial for theoretical and experimental simulations of the surfaces and atmospheres of icy bodies in the Solar System. Here we report laboratory measurements of the threshold energy, cross-section and temperature dependence of O2 production by electronic excitation of ice in vacuum, following electron-beam irradiation. Molecular oxygen is formed by direct excitation and dissociation of a stable precursor molecule, rather than (as has been previously thought) by diffusion and chemical recombination of precursor fragments. The large cross-section for O2 production suggests that electronic excitation plays an important part in the formation of O2 on Ganymede and Europa. PMID:9707116

  12. Tírez lake as a terrestrial analog of Europa.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Kessler, Carola González; Amils, Ricardo; Remolar, David Fernández

    2003-01-01

    Tírez Lake (La Mancha, central Spain) is proposed as a terrestrial analogue of Europa's ocean. The proposal is based on the comparison of the hydrogeochemistry of Tírez Lake with the geochemical features of the alteration mineralogy of meteoritic precursors and with Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer data on Europa's surface. To validate the astrobiological potential of Tírez Lake as an analog of Europa, different hydrogeochemical, mineral, and microbial analyses were performed. Experimental and theoretical modeling helped to understand the crystallization pathways that may occur in Europa's crust. Calculations about the oxidation state of the hypothetical Europan ocean were estimated to support the sulfate-rich neutral liquid model as the origin of Europa's observed hydrated minerals and to facilitate their comparison with Tírez's hydrogeochemistry. Hydrogeochemical and mineralogical analyses showed that Tírez waters corresponded to Mg-Na-SO(4)-Cl brines with epsomite, hexahydrite, and halite as end members. A preliminary microbial ecology characterization identified two different microbial domains: a photosynthetically sustained community represented by planktonic/benthonic forms and microbial mat communities, and a subsurficial anaerobic realm in which chemolithotrophy predominates. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has been used to characterize the prokaryotic diversity of the system. The subsurficial community seemed to be dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens. Frozen Tírez brines were analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared techniques providing spectra similar to those reported previously using pure components and to the Galileo spectral data. Calorimetric measurements of Tírez brines showed pathways and phase metastability for magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride crystallization that may aid in understanding the processes involved in the formation of Europa's icy crust. The use of fluorescence hybridization techniques for

  13. Thermally-Induced Chemistry and the Jovian Icy Satellites: A Laboratory Study of the Formation of Sulfur Oxyanions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that magnetospheric radiation in the Jovian system drives reaction chemistry in ices at temperatures relevant to Europa and other icy satellites. Here we present new results on thermally-induced reactions at 50-100 K in solid H2O-SO2 mixtures, reactions that take place without the need for a high-radiation environment. We find that H2O and SO2 react to produce sulfur Oxyanions, such as bisulfite, that as much as 30% of the SO2 can be consumed through this reaction, and that the products remain in the ice when the temperature is lowered, indicating that these reactions are irreversible. Our results suggest that thermally-induced reactions can alter the chemistry at temperatures relevant to the icy satellites in the Jovian system.

  14. COMMINGLING EFFECTS AND RESIDUAL GRAIN DURING GRAIN RECEIVING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern about the possible effects of genetically modified crops has increased the demand for segregating grains during handling and processing operations. Research on the amount of commingling of different grains in an elevator is limited. This study evaluated the level of commingling at a grain ...

  15. Grain rotation mediated by grain boundary dislocations in nanocrystalline platinum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Teng, Jiao; Liu, Pan; Hirata, Akihiko; Ma, En; Zhang, Ze; Chen, Mingwei; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Grain rotation is a well-known phenomenon during high (homologous) temperature deformation and recrystallization of polycrystalline materials. In recent years, grain rotation has also been proposed as a plasticity mechanism at low temperatures (for example, room temperature for metals), especially for nanocrystalline grains with diameter d less than ~15 nm. Here, in tensile-loaded Pt thin films under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, we show that the plasticity mechanism transitions from cross-grain dislocation glide in larger grains (d>6 nm) to a mode of coordinated rotation of multiple grains for grains with d<6 nm. The mechanism underlying the grain rotation is dislocation climb at the grain boundary, rather than grain boundary sliding or diffusional creep. Our atomic-scale images demonstrate directly that the evolution of the misorientation angle between neighbouring grains can be quantitatively accounted for by the change of the Frank–Bilby dislocation content in the grain boundary. PMID:25030380

  16. Non-water-ice constituents in the surface material of the icy Galilean satellites from the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Martin, P.D.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Fanale, F.P.; Granahan, J.C.; Segura, M.; Matson, D.L.; Johnson, T.V.; Carlson, R.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Danielson, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    We present evidence for several non-ice constituents in the surface material of the icy Galilean satellites, using the reflectance spectra returned by the Galileo near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) experiment. Five new absorption features are described at 3.4, 3.88, 4.05, 4.25, and 4.57 ??m for Callisto and Ganymede, and some seem to exist for Europa as well. The four absorption bands strong enough to be mapped on Callisto and Ganymede are each spatially distributed in different ways, indicating different materials are responsible for each absorption. The spatial distributions are correlated at the local level in complex ways with surface features and in some cases show global patterns. Suggested candidate spectrally active groups, perhaps within larger molecules, producing the five absorptions include C-H, S-H, SO2, CO2, and C???N. Organic material like tholins are candidates for the 4.57- and 3.4-??m features. We suggest, based on spectroscopic evidence, that CO2 is present as a form which does not allow rotational modes and that SO2 is present neither as a frost nor a free gas. The CO2, SO2, and perhaps cyanogen (4.57 ??m) may be present as very small collections of molecules within the crystal structure, perhaps following models for radiation damage and/or for comet and interstellar grain formation at low temperatures. Some of the dark material on these surfaces may be created by radiation damage of the CO2 and other carbon-bearing species and the formation of graphite. These spectra suggest a complex chemistry within the surface materials and an important role for non-ice materials in the evolution of the satellite surfaces. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Sublimation of icy aggregates in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko detected with the OSIRIS cameras onboard Rosetta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Sierks, H.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Besse, S.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; Debei, S.; Deller, J.; De Cecco, M.; Frattin, E.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Gutiérrez-Marquez, P.; Güttler, C.; Höfner, S.; Hofmann, M.; Hu, X.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Moreno, J. J. Lopez; Lowry, S.; Marzari, F.; Masoumzadeh, N.; Massironi, M.; Moreno, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Pommerol, A.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Toth, I.; Tubiana, C.

    2016-08-01

    Beginning in March 2014, the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) cameras began capturing images of the nucleus and coma (gas and dust) of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using both the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The many observations taken since July of 2014 have been used to study the morphology, location, and temporal variation of the comet's dust jets. We analyzed the dust monitoring observations shortly after the southern vernal equinox on May 30 and 31, 2015 with the WAC at the heliocentric distance R_h = 1.53 AU, where it is possible to observe that the jet rotates with the nucleus. We found that the decline of brightness as a function of the distance of the jet is much steeper than the background coma, which is a first indication of sublimation. We adapted a model of sublimation of icy aggregates and studied the effect as a function of the physical properties of the aggregates (composition and size). The major finding of this article was that through the sublimation of the aggregates of dirty grains (radius a between 5μm and 50μm) we were able to completely reproduce the radial brightness profile of a jet beyond 4 km from the nucleus. To reproduce the data we needed to inject a number of aggregates between 8.5 × 1013 and 8.5 × 1010 for a = 5μm and 50μm respectively, or an initial mass of H_2O ice around 22kg.

  18. History of Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Papers on the History of Presolar Grains. This has been a very productive period in which much of the laboratory work conducted in the previous year and during this funding cycle were brought to completion. In the last year we have published or submitted for peer review 4 research papers, 4 review papers, and 11 abstracts in research areas supported under this grant. Brief synopses of the results of the research papers are presented, followed by short summaries of the topics discussed in the review papers. Several areas of research are of course being actively pursued, and the appended list of abstracts gives citations to this ongoing work. In a paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, the results of an investigation into the physical conditions in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars that are required for the formation of micron-sized presolar graphite grains, with and without previously formed internal crystals of titanium carbide (TIC) are reported.

  19. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  20. Icy moon exospheres: the interface between Jovian environment and satellite surfaces as a key scientific target for JUICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Milillo, Anna; Grassi, Davide; Mura, Alessandro; Massetti, Stefano; Orsini, Stefano; Mangano, Valeria; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Rispoli, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    The exospheres of Jupiter's icy satellites -often referred to as tenuous atmospheres- represent the actual interface between the surfaces of these moons and the giant planet's environment. In this perspective, their characterization is of key importance to achieve a fully understanding of the alteration processes induced on the icy surfaces by the radiation environment. Therefore, a full interpretation of the surface data and a thorough understanding of the surface evolution history, have as a necessary prerequisite the accurate determination of the role of the exospheres in the interactions between the icy moons and the Jupiter's magnetospheric environment. Moreover, in order to understand the mass and energy exchange between satellites and Jovian environment, the detailed characterization of the exosphere as a boundary region between the moon and the giant planet's magnetosphere, is fundamental. In this paper, we show that the achievement of the science objectives of the JUICE mission related to the icy satellites exospheres will be feasible only through an interdisciplinary approach characterized by coordinated observation scenarios and joint campaigns in payload operations. It is evidenced that it is of key importance to measure - in the larger possible extent - the following quantities: density of neutral species; density of ionosphere and charged particles fluxes; efficiency of interactions of the exosphere with particle and photon radiation fields. Through the planning of potential synergies between different datasets to be obtained during different mission phases, the current paper aims to contribute to the achievement of both of the JUICE mission's Key Science Goals, i.e. 1) the characterization of Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats and 2) the exploration of the Jupiter system as an archetype for gas giants. The suggested planning for joint observations by different JUICE payload instruments could be extended later in

  1. Firn densification in a Late Noachian “icy highlands” Mars: Implications for ice sheet evolution and thermal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent modeling of a thicker early CO2 martian atmosphere and Late Noachian climate predicts that for pressures beyond a fraction of a bar, atmosphere-surface thermal coupling occurs, resulting in adiabatic cooling of high areas across Mars. This promotes the transport of water ice from relatively warmer low-lying areas to the highlands, where deposition and accumulation of water ice result in an "icy highlands" Late Noachian Mars. Deposits will remain stable in the highlands under nominal Late Noachian conditions, but the potential exists for punctuated heating by both top-down (e.g. impacts, volcanism) and bottom-up (e.g. elevated geothermal heat flux) processes. Important in understanding melt generation from these processes is the state of the accumulated snow and ice. Through modeling of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" framework we assess: (1) the nature of snow accumulation and the physical growth and evolution of the predicted ice deposits, and (2) the implications for the thermal properties of the ice sheets and the response to heating events. Analysis of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" context indicates that: (1) the upper layers of the ice sheet will be more vulnerable to melting from top-down heating processes because they are comprised of the least dense and least thermally conductive ice, and (2) even with a low thermal conductivity firn layer, basal melting is only likely to occur through a combination of top-down and bottom-up heating. This is because at the nominal mean annual surface temperatures and estimated effective thermal conductivities, the predicted ice sheet thicknesses do not produce enough basal warming to initiate melting for plausible geothermal heat fluxes. Variations in spin-axis/orbital parameters alone are not predicted to cause widespread ablation (melting and sublimation) of the icy highlands ice sheets.

  2. Oxalate in grain amaranth.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Bruce; Seguin, Philippe

    2007-06-13

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus spp.) is a widely adaptable C4 pseudo-cereal crop that has interesting nutritional characteristics including high protein and calcium concentrations and a lack of gluten. To date, no antinutrient has been found at problematic levels in grain amaranth; however, oxalate has not been thoroughly studied. Dietary oxalate is a potential risk factor for kidney stone development, and its presence in food lowers calcium and magnesium availability. Oxalate concentration and forms and calcium and magnesium concentrations were determined in 30 field-grown grain amaranth genotypes from the species A. cruentus, A. hybrid, and A. hypochondriacus. The effects of seeding date and fertilization with calcium ammonium nitrate were evaluated in field experiments conducted in multiple environments; the effects of cooking were also evaluated. Mean total oxalate concentration in the 30 genotypes analyzed was 229 mg/100 g, with values ranging between 178 and 278 mg/100 g, the greatest proportion being insoluble (average of 80%). Calcium concentration averaged 186 mg/100 g and ranged between 134 and 370 mg/100 g, whereas magnesium averaged 280 mg/100 g and ranged between 230 and 387 mg/100 g. Fertilization only marginally increased total oxalate concentration and had no effects on other variables. Seeding date had no effects on any of the variables studied. Boiling increased the proportion of soluble oxalate but did not affect total oxalate concentration. Grain amaranth can be considered a high oxalate source, however, as most is in insoluble form, and due to its high calcium and magnesium concentrations, oxalate absorbability could be low. This should be confirmed by bioavailability studies. PMID:17511467

  3. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  4. Solving the Schrodinger equation for helium atom and its isoelectronic ions with the free iterative complement interaction (ICI) method.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2007-12-14

    The Schrodinger equation was solved very accurately for helium atom and its isoelectronic ions (Z=1-10) with the free iterative complement interaction (ICI) method followed by the variational principle. We obtained highly accurate wave functions and energies of helium atom and its isoelectronic ions. For helium, the calculated energy was -2.903,724,377,034,119,598,311,159,245,194,404,446,696,905,37 a.u., correct over 40 digit accuracy, and for H(-), it was -0.527,751,016,544,377,196,590,814,566,747,511,383,045,02 a.u. These results prove numerically that with the free ICI method, we can calculate the solutions of the Schrodinger equation as accurately as one desires. We examined several types of scaling function g and initial function psi(0) of the free ICI method. The performance was good when logarithm functions were used in the initial function because the logarithm function is physically essential for three-particle collision area. The best performance was obtained when we introduce a new logarithm function containing not only r(1) and r(2) but also r(12) in the same logarithm function. PMID:18081387

  5. RAPID COAGULATION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES OUTSIDE THE SNOW LINE: A PATHWAY TO SUCCESSFUL ICY PLANETESIMAL FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Wada, Koji

    2012-06-20

    Rapid orbital drift of macroscopic dust particles is one of the major obstacles to planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks. We re-examine this problem by considering the porosity evolution of dust aggregates. We apply a porosity model based on recent N-body simulations of aggregate collisions, which allows us to study the porosity change upon collision for a wide range of impact energies. As a first step, we neglect collisional fragmentation and instead focus on dust evolution outside the snow line, where the fragmentation has been suggested to be less significant than inside the snow line because of the high sticking efficiency of icy particles. We show that dust particles can evolve into highly porous aggregates (with internal densities of much less than 0.1 g cm{sup -3}) even if collisional compression is taken into account. We also show that the high porosity triggers significant acceleration in collisional growth. This acceleration is a natural consequence of the particles' aerodynamical properties at low Knudsen numbers, i.e., at particle radii larger than the mean free path of the gas molecules. Thanks to this rapid growth, the highly porous aggregates are found to overcome the radial drift barrier at orbital radii less than 10 AU (assuming the minimum-mass solar nebula model). This suggests that, if collisional fragmentation is truly insignificant, formation of icy planetesimals is possible via direct collisional growth of submicron-sized icy particles.

  6. Electrical Evolution of a Dust Plume from a Low Energy Lunar Impact: A Model Analog to LCROSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Jackson, T. L.; Colaprete, A.; Heldmann, J. L.; Schultz, P. H.; Killen, R. M.; Delory, G. T.; Halekas, J. S.; Marshall, J. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Collier, M. R.; Vondrak, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    A Monte Carlo test particle model was developed that simulates the charge evolution of micron and sub-micron sized dust grains ejected upon low-energy impact of a moderate-size object onto a lunar polar crater floor. Our analog is the LCROSS impact into Cabeus crater. Our primary objective is to model grain discharging as the plume propagates upwards from shadowed crater into sunlight.

  7. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  9. Comet Grains: Their IR Emission and Their Relation to ISM Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    deduced abundance of crystalline silicates in comet dust. An insufficient source of ISM Mg-rich crystals leads to the inference that most Mg-rich crystals in comets are primitive grains processed in the early solar nebula prior to their incorporation into comets. Mg-rich crystals may condense in the hot (approx. 1450 K), inner zones of the early solar nebula and then travel large radial distances out to the comet-forming zone. On the other hand, Mg-rich silicate crystals may be ISM amorphous silicates annealed at approx. 1000 K and radially distributed out to the comet-forming zone or annealed in nebular shocks at approx. 5 - 10 AU. Determining the relative abundance of amorphous and crystalline silicates in comets probes the relative contributions of ISM grains and primitive grains to small, icy bodies in the solar system. The life cycle of dust from its stardust origins through the ISM to its incorporation into comets is discussed.

  10. Identification of Organics in Ice Grains from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Reviol, R.; Nölle, L.; Klenner, F.; Srama, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft performs in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of icy dust grains impinging onto the target surface. The instrument recorded cationic Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass spectra of organic-bearing ice grains emitted from Enceladus at different impact velocities causing different molecular fragmentation patterns [1,2]. Here we present a detailed analysis of these spectra (Type-2) to identify the composition of organic material embedded in Enceladus ice grains. The organic compounds display a great compositional diversity, which indicates varying contributions of several organic species. The spectra analysis is supported by a large-scale laboratory ground campaign yielding a library of analogue spectra for organic material embedded in a water ice matrix. To mimic the identified pattern of cationic fragments in organic enriched spectra we use a laboratory setup: Infrared Free Liquid MALDI ToF Mass Spectrometer (IR-FL-MALDI-ToF-MS). An infrared laser is used to disperse a liquid micro-beam of a water-solution to get cationic fragments. The laser energy is adjusted to simulate different impact velocities of ice particles on CDA [3]. So far we have identified characteristic fragment patterns of at least three classes of organic molecules: (i) aromatic species, (ii) amines, and (iii) carbonyl group species. (i) ice grains containing aromatic species are identified by a series of characteristic aromatic fragment cations (ii) ice grains containing amines are identified by a pronounced ammonium cation and (iii) ice grains containing carbonyl compounds are specified by a characteristic acylium cation in conjunction with certain others mass lines. Besides aromatic, amine and carbonyl species, Type-2 spectra also show contributions from other, yet un-specified, organic species. Typically, fragment cations of aromatic compounds are stable at impact velocities up-to 15km/s whereas cations of amines and carbonyl species

  11. Treatment with the pure antiestrogen faslodex (ICI 182780) induces tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smolnikar, K; Löffek, S; Schulz, T; Michna, H; Diel, P

    2000-10-01

    Apoptosis induction by the pure antiestrogen faslodex, also known as ICI 182780 (ICI), is associated with an effective down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Recent observations point out that beside members of the Bcl-2 family also the TNFR1 signaling pathway may be involved in apoptosis induction by antiestrogens. In this report we have analyzed the expression of members of the TNFR1 signaling pathway during the apoptotic process induced by the pure antiestrogen faslodex and by tamoxifen (Tam) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 10(-7) M ICI or 10(-7) M Tam leads to a time dependent increase of TNFR1 and TRADD steady-state mRNA levels in MCF-7 cells. In contrast, Bcl-2 expression was strongly decreased following administration of ICI but only weakly after administration of Tam. Western blot analysis and studies by the use of fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed a time dependent induction of TNFR1 protein and cell surface expression in MCF-7 cells in response to treatment with ICI. To investigate if TNFR1 is functionally involved in apoptosis induction by antiestrogens, we tested whether TNFR1 blocking antibodies can counteract the growth inhibitory action of Tam and ICI. Coincubation of MCF-7 cells with antiestrogens (ICI or Tam) and blocking TNFR1 antibodies lead to an increase in cell viability. Our results provide evidence for a cross talk between the TNFR1 signaling pathway and antiestrogens during the process of apoptosis induction in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The superiority of the pure antiestrogen ICI to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells may result from its capability to modulate the induction of apoptosis via Bcl-2 as well as TNF-associated signal transduction pathways. PMID:11110059

  12. Grain-grain interaction in stationary dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lampe, Martin; Joyce, Glenn

    2015-02-15

    We present a particle-in-cell simulation study of the steady-state interaction between two stationary dust grains in uniform stationary plasma. Both the electrostatic force and the shadowing force on the grains are calculated explicitly. The electrostatic force is always repulsive. For two grains of the same size, the electrostatic force is very nearly equal to the shielded electric field due to a single isolated grain, acting on the charge of the other grain. For two grains of unequal size, the electrostatic force on the smaller grain is smaller than the isolated-grain field, and the force on the larger grain is larger than the isolated-grain field. In all cases, the attractive shadowing force exceeds the repulsive electrostatic force when the grain separation d is greater than an equilibrium separation d{sub 0}. d{sub 0} is found to be between 6λ{sub D} and 9λ{sub D} in all cases. The binding energy is estimated to be between 19 eV and 900 eV for various cases.

  13. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Sadanov, E. V.; Starchenko, I. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains.

  14. Special Grain Boundaries in Ultrafine-Grained Tungsten.

    PubMed

    Dudka, O V; Ksenofontov, V A; Sadanov, E V; Starchenko, I V; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M

    2016-12-01

    Field ion microscopy and computer simulation were used for the study of an atomic structure high-angle grain boundary in hard-drawn ultrafine-grained tungsten wire. These boundaries with special misorientations are beyond the scope of the coincident site lattice model. It was demonstrated that the special non-coincident grain boundaries are the plane-matching boundaries, and rigid-body displacements of adjacent nanograins are normal to the <110> misorientation axis. The vectors of rigid-body translations of grains are described by broad asymmetric statistical distribution. Mathematical modeling showed that special incommensurate boundaries with one grain oriented along the {211} plane have comparatively high cohesive energies. The grain-boundary dislocations ½<110> were revealed and studied at the line of local mismatch of {110} atomic planes of adjacent grains. PMID:27416905

  15. Destruction of nanograins by grain-grain collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Bringa, Eduardo; Remington, Bruce; Gilmer, George; Minich, Roger; Yamaguchi, Yasutaka; Tielens, Alexander

    2008-04-01

    Atomistic simulations of grain-grain collisions have been carried out for spherical grains of 1.4 and 4 nm radii with relative velocities of 3.6--6.1 km/s and a number of random impact parameters. Since the initial grains are crystallites without any pre-existing defects, grain shattering due to nucleation of cracks was not observed in our simulations. We find grain fusion in some events, but generally melting occurs due to the small size of grain. The melting leads to nucleation, growth and linkage of voids in the melt, and finally small clusters are produced through a web-like structure. The size distribution does not obey a single power law and can be considered as four different regimes in the cluster size.

  16. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  17. Analog computation with dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegelmann, Hava T.; Fishman, Shmuel

    1998-09-01

    Physical systems exhibit various levels of complexity: their long term dynamics may converge to fixed points or exhibit complex chaotic behavior. This paper presents a theory that enables to interpret natural processes as special purpose analog computers. Since physical systems are naturally described in continuous time, a definition of computational complexity for continuous time systems is required. In analogy with the classical discrete theory we develop fundamentals of computational complexity for dynamical systems, discrete or continuous in time, on the basis of an intrinsic time scale of the system. Dissipative dynamical systems are classified into the computational complexity classes P d, Co-RP d, NP d and EXP d, corresponding to their standard counterparts, according to the complexity of their long term behavior. The complexity of chaotic attractors relative to regular ones leads to the conjecture P d ≠ NP d. Continuous time flows have been proven useful in solving various practical problems. Our theory provides the tools for an algorithmic analysis of such flows. As an example we analyze the continuous Hopfield network.

  18. Chemical Production by Pulse-Laser Irradiation on Ices: Simulation of Impact Shock-Induced Chemistry on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna-Mvondo, Delphine; Khare, B. N.; Ishihara, T.; McKay, C. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer planets show a variety of impact cratering features. The effect of impact by extraterrestrial objects into the surface is commonly related to physical changes. Most of the research applied to impacts on ices has been developed to study and understand the cratering formation process and their physical, geophysical characteristics. Chemical changes and synthesis occurring on icy planetary surfaces are generally explained by the influence of UV photons and high-energy charged particles on ices. Nonetheless, impact process onto ices could be a source of local or global endogenic process and could be especially advantageous as an efficient energy source for driving interesting chemistry. Upon impact on icy surface, the kinetic energy of the impacting body is transferred to the ground liberating a great deal of stress energy which could initiate in situ aqueous melts of the ice, hydrolysis and other chemical reactions in the fracture zone beneath the crater. Here we present a novel experimental method to study the chemistry in planetary ices induced by impact shocks. Impact shocks were simulated in laboratory using a powerful pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, 1064 nm). We have irradiated at 77K icy mixtures of H2O / CO2, H2O / Na2CO3, H2O / CH3OH and finally H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4. GC-MS and FTIR analyses show that hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and methanol are formed in irradiated H2O / CO2 ices. Ice containing sodium carbonate generates under simulated impact CO and CO2 which are also produced in impacted H2O / CH3OH and H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 ices. But, in both latter icy mixtures, methane and more complex molecules are also formed. We have detected acetone, methyl formate and dimethyl formal. Adding ammonium sulfate to ice containing methanol induces the production of N2O, HCN and CH3CN.

  19. The proposed icy mineralogy package (XRD/XRF) for TandEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Andrew Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Fewster, Paul F.; Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    Introduction: Understanding the geology of Titan's crust, and its interaction with the atmosphere, requires determination of the chemistry and mineralogy of surface materials which can only be achieved unambiguously using a combination of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Here we describe an icy mineralogy package (IMP) consisting of a miniaturised XRD/XRF instrument designed primarily with Titan (and the TandEM ESA Cosmic Vision proposal [1]) in mind; however, the instrument is not predicated upon an a priori knowledge of surface mineralogy and consequently is applicable with little modification to any solar system body (rocky or icy). The proposed instrument is well suited to integration with other analytical tools, such as IR and UV Raman spectrometers. Instrument design: Two design concepts are currently under study, which differ in the complexity of the sample handling system, and the range of Bragg angles which may be observed. Both are focusing cameras, one (IMP senior) working in transmission, and the other (IMP junior) working in back-reflection. IMP jnr is intended for deployment on a static surface probe with no sample acquisition capability, collecting a single diffraction pattern through a window in the probe's underside. IMP snr is intended for deployment on a balloon with a sample collection arm able to deliver scoops of surface material to a rotating specimen stage. The latter may therefore be used to analyse many samples at geographically dispersed points. In each case we will use X-rays generated by high specific-activity radioisotope sources, 55 Fe and 241 Am. Our paper will present the results of the following activities: (a) compilation of a crystallographic database of materials expected on Titan's surface; (b) simulation of single-phase and polyphase diffraction data to illustrate the ease with which substances may be distinguished (even in complex mixtures); (c) blind tests of peak-matching software against

  20. Planetary Protection for the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) Mission Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erd, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The JUICE mission is being studied by ESA in the framework of its Cosmic Vision programme, addressing the topical questions ``What are the conditions for planet formation and emergence of life?'' and ``How does the Solar System work?''. Jupiter can be seen as a paradigm of planetary systems forming a mini-solar system on its own. By investigating its diverse satellites, the understanding of the formation and evolution such of systems would be advanced. The question of whether possible habitats of life are provided underneath the surfaces of the icy satellites Callisto, Ganymede and Europa would be addressed by remote sensing and in situ observations of their surfaces, their compositions and their interiors, including the characterizations of subsurface liquid water oceans, including targeting of recently active regions on Europa for inferring the minimal thickness of the icy crust. JUICE would furthermore provide observations of Jupiter's atmosphere addressing open questions on the circulation at mid-latitudes, and also including coverage of the polar region from a distance of about 29~R_J (see also L. Fletcher et al. in meeting C3.1 "Planetary Atmospheres"). JUICE would study the properties of the magnetosphere and would provide extensive monitoring of Jupiter's plasma environment at distances ranging from more than 100 to 8.5~R_J, which is the distance of Europa. The unique magnetic and plasma interactions between the Jupiter environment and Ganymede would be target to focused investigations, from orbit around Ganymede (see also A. Coates et al in session C3.2 ``Planetary Upper Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres''). The magnetic field and its potential habitability of Ganymede makes it a unique target for specific investigation. The presentation will briefly describe the science objectives of the JUICE mission (see also C.~Erd et al. in session B0.3 ``Active Natural Satellites in the Solar System''), and will then discuss the baseline mission profile