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Sample records for ideal quantum gas

  1. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799–1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi–Dirac or Bose–Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  2. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799-1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  3. Thermodynamics of ideal quantum gas with fractional statistics in D dimensions.

    PubMed

    Potter, Geoffrey G; Müller, Gerhard; Karbach, Michael

    2007-06-01

    We present exact and explicit results for the thermodynamic properties (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions, velocity of sound) of a quantum gas in dimensions D > or = 1 and with fractional exclusion statistics 0 < or = g < or =1 connecting bosons (g=0) and fermions (g=1) . In D=1 the results are equivalent to those of the Calogero-Sutherland model. Emphasis is given to the crossover between bosonlike and fermionlike features, caused by aspects of the statistical interaction that mimic long-range attraction and short-range repulsion. A phase transition along the isobar occurs at a nonzero temperature in all dimensions. The T dependence of the velocity of sound is in simple relation to isochores and isobars. The effects of soft container walls are accounted for rigorously for the case of a pure power-law potential. PMID:17677233

  4. A proof of the Biswas-Mitra-Bhattacharyya conjecture for the ideal quantum gas trapped under the generic power law potential U=\\sum\

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Muktadir Rahman, Md

    2016-03-01

    The well known relation for ideal classical gas $\\Delta \\epsilon^2=kT^2 C_V$ which does not remain valid for quantum system is revisited. A new connection is established between energy fluctuation and specific heat for quantum gases, valid in the classical limit and the degenerate quantum regime as well. Most importantly the proposed Biswas-Mitra-Bhattacharyya (BMB) conjecture (Biswas $et.$ $al.$, J. Stat. Mech. P03013, 2015.) relating hump in energy fluctuation and discontinuity of specific heat is proved and precised in this manuscript.

  5. Quantum-mechanical engines working with an ideal gas with a finite number of particles confined in a power-law trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Ma, Yongli; He, Jizhou

    2015-07-01

    Based on quantum thermodynamic processes, we make a quantum-mechanical (QM) extension of the typical heat engine cycles, such as the Carnot, Brayton, Otto, Diesel cycles, etc., with no introduction of the concept of temperature. When these QM engine cycles are implemented by an ideal gas confined in an arbitrary power-law trap, a relation between the quantum adiabatic exponent and trap exponent is found. The differences and similarities between the efficiency of a given QM engine cycle and its classical counterpart are revealed and discussed.

  6. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are…

  7. Chemical Potential for the Interacting Classical Gas and the Ideal Quantum Gas Obeying a Generalized Exclusion Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, F. J.; Olivares-Quiroz, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we address the concept of the chemical potential [mu] in classical and quantum gases towards the calculation of the equation of state [mu] = [mu](n, T) where n is the particle density and "T" the absolute temperature using the methods of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two cases seldom discussed in elementary textbooks are

  8. Quantum cryptography with an ideal local relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedalieri, Gaetana; Ottaviani, Carlo; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    We consider two remote parties connected to a relay by two quantum channels. To generate a secret key, they transmit coherent states to the relay, where the states are subject to a continuous-variable (CV) Bell detection. We study the ideal case where Alice's channel is lossless, i.e., the relay is locally in her lab and the Bell detection is perfomed with unit efficiency. This configuration allows us to explore the optimal performances achievable by CV measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. This corresponds to the limit of a trusted local relay, where the detection loss can be re-scaled. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed by an experimental simulation where 10-4 secret bits per use can potentially be distributed at 170km assuming ideal reconciliation.

  9. Ideal Gas Laws: Experiments for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments designed to verify the various relationships implicit in the ideal gas equation and shows that the success of the Graham's law effusion experiments can be explained by elementary hydrodynamics. (GS)

  10. Derivation of the Ideal Gas Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laugier, Alexander; Garai, Jozsef

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate and graduate physics and chemistry books usually state that combining the gas laws results in the ideal gas law. Leaving the derivation to the students implies that this should be a simple task, most likely a substitution. Boyle's law, Charles's law, and the Avogadro's principle are given under certain conditions; therefore, direct…

  11. Derivation of the Ideal Gas Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laugier, Alexander; Garai, Jozsef

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate and graduate physics and chemistry books usually state that combining the gas laws results in the ideal gas law. Leaving the derivation to the students implies that this should be a simple task, most likely a substitution. Boyle's law, Charles's law, and the Avogadro's principle are given under certain conditions; therefore, direct

  12. How Is the Ideal Gas Law Explanatory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Andrea I.

    2013-01-01

    Using the ideal gas law as a comparative example, this essay reviews contemporary research in philosophy of science concerning scientific explanation. It outlines the inferential, causal, unification, and erotetic conceptions of explanation and discusses an alternative project, the functional perspective. In each case, the aim is to highlight…

  13. How Is the Ideal Gas Law Explanatory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Andrea I.

    2013-01-01

    Using the ideal gas law as a comparative example, this essay reviews contemporary research in philosophy of science concerning scientific explanation. It outlines the inferential, causal, unification, and erotetic conceptions of explanation and discusses an alternative project, the functional perspective. In each case, the aim is to highlight

  14. Ideal gas matching for thermal Galilean holography

    SciTech Connect

    Barbon, Jose L. F.; Fuertes, Carlos A.

    2009-07-15

    We exhibit a nonrelativistic ideal gas with a Kaluza-Klein tower of species, featuring a singular behavior of thermodynamic functions at zero chemical potential. In this way, we provide a qualitative match to the thermodynamics of recently found black holes in backgrounds with asymptotic nonrelativistic conformal symmetry.

  15. Thermodynamics of an ideal generalized gas: I. Thermodynamic laws.

    PubMed

    Lavenda, B H

    2005-11-01

    The equations of state for an ideal relativistic, or generalized, gas, like an ideal quantum gas, are expressed in terms of power laws of the temperature. In contrast to an ideal classical gas, the internal energy is a function of volume at constant temperature, implying that the ideal generalized gas will show either attractive or repulsive interactions. This is a necessary condition in order that the third law be obeyed and for matter to have an electromagnetic origin. The transition from an ideal generalized to a classical gas occurs when the two independent solutions of the subsidiary equation to Lagrange's equation coalesce. The equation of state relating the pressure to the internal energy encompasses the full range of cosmological scenarios, from the radiation to the matter dominated universes and finally to the vacuum energy, enabling the coefficient of proportionality, analogous to the Grüeisen ratio, to be interpreted in terms of the degrees of freedom related to the temperature exponents of the internal energy and the absolute temperature expressed in terms of a power of the empirical temperature. The limit where these exponents merge is shown to be the ideal classical gas limit. A corollary to Carnot's theorem is proved, asserting that the ratio of the work done over a cycle to the heat absorbed to increase the temperature at constant volume is the same for all bodies at the same volume. As power means, the energy and entropy are incomparable, and a new adiabatic potential is introduced by showing that the volume raised to a characteristic exponent is also the integrating factor for the quantity of heat so that the second law can be based on the property that power means are monotonically increasing functions of their order. The vanishing of the chemical potential in extensive systems implies that energy cannot be transported without matter and is equivalent to the condition that Clapeyron's equation be satisfied. PMID:16231132

  16. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state. PMID:26764644

  17. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.240405]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  18. PHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: The distribution function and fluctuations of the number of particles in an ideal Bose gas confined by a trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Vladimir A.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution function ω0(n0) of the number n0 of particles in the condensate of an ideal Bose gas confined by a trap is found. It is shown that at the temperature above the critical one (T > Tc) this function has the usual form ω0(n0) =(1 — eμ)eμno, where μ is the chemical potential in the temperature units. For T < Tc, this distribution changes almost in a jump to a Gaussian distribution, which depends on the trap potential only parametrically. The centre of this function shifts to larger values of n0 with decreasing temperature and its width tends to zero, which corresponds to the suppression of fluctuations.

  19. How is the Ideal Gas Law Explanatory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, Andrea I.

    2013-07-01

    Using the ideal gas law as a comparative example, this essay reviews contemporary research in philosophy of science concerning scientific explanation. It outlines the inferential, causal, unification, and erotetic conceptions of explanation and discusses an alternative project, the functional perspective. In each case, the aim is to highlight insights from these investigations that are salient for pedagogical concerns. Perhaps most importantly, this essay argues that science teachers should be mindful of the normative and prescriptive components of explanatory discourse both in the classroom and in science more generally. Giving attention to this dimension of explanation not only will do justice to the nature of explanatory activity in science but also will support the development of robust reasoning skills in science students while helping them understand an important respect in which science is more than a straightforward collection of empirical facts, and consequently, science education involves more than simply learning them.

  20. Quantum afterburner: improving the efficiency of an ideal heat engine.

    PubMed

    Scully, Marlan O

    2002-02-01

    By using a laser and maser in tandem, it is possible to obtain laser action in the hot exhaust gases of a heat engine. Such a "quantum afterburner" involves the internal quantum states of the working molecules as well as the techniques of cavity quantum electrodynamics and is therefore in the domain of quantum thermodynamics. It is shown that Otto cycle engine performance can be improved beyond that of the "ideal" Otto heat engine. Furthermore, the present work demonstrates a new kind of lasing without initial inversion. PMID:11863710

  1. Quantum Afterburner: Improving the Efficiency of an Ideal Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan O.

    2002-02-01

    By using a laser and maser in tandem, it is possible to obtain laser action in the hot exhaust gases of a heat engine. Such a ``quantum afterburner'' involves the internal quantum states of the working molecules as well as the techniques of cavity quantum electrodynamics and is therefore in the domain of quantum thermodynamics. It is shown that Otto cycle engine performance can be improved beyond that of the ``ideal'' Otto heat engine. Furthermore, the present work demonstrates a new kind of lasing without initial inversion.

  2. Ideal gas behavior of a strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma.

    PubMed

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Griffith, Elias J; Durniak, Céline; Ralph, Jason F; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    In a laboratory, a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma consists of a low-density ionized gas containing a confined suspension of Yukawa-coupled plastic microspheres. For an initial crystal-like form, we report ideal gas behavior in this strongly coupled system during shock-wave experiments. This evidence supports the use of the ideal gas law as the equation of state for soft crystals such as those formed by dusty plasmas. PMID:23863006

  3. Gas lift systems make ideal offshore workers

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    With a low initial installation cost and small footprint, gas lift systems are well suited for offshore installations where compressed gas is usually already available. These systems are used on multiple and slimhole completions and handle sandy conditions well. They are also used to kick off wells that will flow naturally once the heavier completion fluids leave the production string. Gas lift itself is a mature workaday technology. Measurement and control of gas flow is an area of intense development in gas lift technology. One new control method involves production of multiple completions through a single wellbore. Typically, gas lift valves are opened and closed through tubing pressure. But downhole measurement technology does not yet yield information good enough for stable gas lift control of multiple completions. Gas lift is proving to be a useful AL technique in conjunction with electric submersible pumps (ESP). Located above the ESP pump, the gas lift can reduce the head and allow greater flow. This is helpful when small casing restricts the size of the downhole ESP pump. Wells can usually be produced by the gas lift alone in case of ESP failure, or by replacing the ESP where schedules, high repair costs or low prices rule out repair.

  4. Lorentz covariant statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of the relativistic ideal gas and preferred frame

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, K.; Rembielinski, J.; Smolinski, K. A.

    2007-08-15

    The Lorentz covariant classical and quantum statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of an ideal relativistic gas of bradyons (particles slower than light), luxons (particles moving with the speed of light), and tachyons (hypothetical particles faster than light) is discussed. The Lorentz covariant formulation is based on the preferred frame approach which among others enables a consistent, free of paradoxes description of tachyons. The thermodynamic functions within the covariant approach are obtained both in the classical and quantum case.

  5. Experimental Verification of Boyle's Law and the Ideal Gas Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov

    2007-01-01

    Two new experiments are offered concerning the experimental verification of Boyle's law and the ideal gas law. To carry out the experiments, glass tubes, water, a syringe and a metal manometer are used. The pressure of the saturated water vapour is taken into consideration. For educational purposes, the experiments are characterized by their…

  6. A Demonstration of Ideal Gas Principles Using a Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bare, William D.; Andrews, Lester

    1999-01-01

    Uses a true-to-life story of accusations made against a college football team to illustrate ideal gas laws. Students are asked to decide whether helium-filled footballs would increase punt distances and how to determine whether a football contained air or helium. (WRM)

  7. Shock wave structure in an ideal dissociating gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    Composition changes within the shock layer due to chemical reactions are considered. The Lighthill ideal dissociating gas model was used in an effort to describe the oxygen type molecule. First, the two limiting cases, when the chemical reaction rates are very slow and very fast in comparison to local convective rates, are investigated. Then, the problem is solved for arbitrary chemical reaction rates.

  8. From Free Expansion to Abrupt Compression of an Ideal Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mario G.

    2009-01-01

    Using macroscopic thermodynamics, the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas was studied. It was shown that the process reversibility is characterized by the adiabatic reversibility coefficient r, in the range 0 [less than or equal] r [less than or equal] 1 for expansions and r [greater than or equal] 1 for compressions.…

  9. From Free Expansion to Abrupt Compression of an Ideal Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mario G.

    2009-01-01

    Using macroscopic thermodynamics, the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas was studied. It was shown that the process reversibility is characterized by the adiabatic reversibility coefficient r, in the range 0 [less than or equal] r [less than or equal] 1 for expansions and r [greater than or equal] 1 for compressions.

  10. Experimental Verification of Boyle's Law and the Ideal Gas Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov

    2007-01-01

    Two new experiments are offered concerning the experimental verification of Boyle's law and the ideal gas law. To carry out the experiments, glass tubes, water, a syringe and a metal manometer are used. The pressure of the saturated water vapour is taken into consideration. For educational purposes, the experiments are characterized by their

  11. Molecular structure, conformation, potential to internal rotation, and ideal gas thermodynamic properties of 3-fluoroanisole and 3,5-difluoroanisole as studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeeva, Olga V.; Vishnevskiy, Yuriy V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Karasev, Nikolai M.; Moiseeva, Natalia F.; Vilkov, Lev V.; Oberhammer, Heinz

    2006-05-01

    3-Fluoroanisole (3-FA) and 3,5-difluoroanisole (3,5-DFA) have been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction, ab initio (HF and MP2), and density functional theory (B3LYP) calculations. Both molecules have a planar heavy atom skeleton. 3,5-DFA exists as a single conformer of Cs symmetry, whereas 3-FA exists as a mixture of two planar conformers of Cs symmetry with the syn form (the O-CH 3 bond is oriented toward the fluorine atom) being 0.1-0.2 kcal/mol lower in energy than the anti form (the O-CH 3 bond is oriented away from the fluorine atom). From the experimental scattering intensities the following geometric parameters ( ra distances and ∠ α angles with 3σ uncertainties) were derived for 3,5-DFA: r(C-C) av=1.391(2) Å, r(C Ph-O)=1.359(13) Å, r(C Me-O)=1.427(19) Å, r(C-F) av=1.350(6) Å, ∠C-C-C=116.0-123.6°, ∠C-O-C=118.7(12)°, ∠C2-C1-O=114.9(10)°, ∠C6-C1-O=124.9(10)°, ∠(C-C-F) av=118.4(17)°, and for 3-FA, syn conformer: r(C-C) av=1.393(3) Å, r(C Ph-O)=1.364(13) Å, r(C Me-O)=1.423(14) Å, r(C-F)=1.348(9) Å, ∠C-C-C=117.7-123.1°, ∠C-O-C=118.4(11)°, ∠C2-C1-O=124.7(17)°, ∠C6-C1-O=115.1(17)°, ∠C2-C3-F=118.0(24)°. The mole fractions of the syn and anti conformers were found to be 0.55(17) and 0.45, respectively, in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Ideal gas thermodynamic functions, S°( T), Cp°(T), H°( T)- H°(0), for anisole, 3-FA, and 3,5-DFA were obtained on the basis of B3LYP calculations. Enthalpies of formations, Δ fH298°, were calculated using a Gaussian-3X (G3X) method and the method of isodesmic reactions. Calculated values of Cp°(T) and Δ fH298° for anisole are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. How many is different? Answer from ideal Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2014-03-01

    How many H2O molecules are needed to form water? While the precise answer is not known, it is clear that the answer should be a finite number rather than infinity. We revisit with care the ideal Bose gas confined in a cubic box which is discussed in most statistical physics textbooks. We show that the isobar of the ideal gas zigzags on the temperature-volume plane featuring a boiling-like discrete phase transition, provided the number of particles is equal to or greater than a particular value: 7616. This demonstrates for the first time how a finite system can feature a mathematical singularity and realize the notion of 'Emergence', without resorting to the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Relativistic ideal Fermi gas at zero temperature and preferred frame

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, K.; Rembielinski, J.; Smolinski, K. A.

    2007-12-15

    We discuss the limit T{yields}0 of the relativistic ideal Fermi gas of luxons (particles moving with the speed of light) and tachyons (hypothetical particles faster than light) based on observations of our recent paper: K. Kowalski, J. Rembielinski, and K. A. Smolinski, Phys. Rev. D 76, 045018 (2007). For bradyons this limit is in fact the nonrelativistic one and therefore it is not studied herein.

  14. Measurement of optical Feshbach resonances in an ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Blatt, S; Nicholson, T L; Bloom, B J; Williams, J R; Thomsen, J W; Julienne, P S; Ye, J

    2011-08-12

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic (88)Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:21902391

  15. Gravitational Thermodynamics for Interstellar Gas and Weakly Degenerate Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ding Yu; Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-03-01

    The temperature distribution of an ideal gas in gravitational fields has been identified as a longstanding problem in thermodynamics and statistical physics. According to the principle of entropy increase (i.e., the principle of maximum entropy), we apply a variational principle to the thermodynamical entropy functional of an ideal gas and establish a relationship between temperature gradient and gravitational field strength. As an illustrative example, the temperature and density distributions of an ideal gas in two simple but typical gravitational fields (i.e., a uniform gravitational field and an inverse-square gravitational field) are considered on the basis of entropic and hydrostatic equilibrium conditions. The effect of temperature inhomogeneity in gravitational fields is also addressed for a weakly degenerate quantum gas (e.g., Fermi and Bose gas). The present gravitational thermodynamics of a gas would have potential applications in quantum fluids, e.g., Bose-Einstein condensates in Earth’s gravitational field and the temperature fluctuation spectrum in cosmic microwave background radiation.

  16. Quantum arrival and dwell times via idealized clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Yearsley, J. M.; Downs, D. A.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hashagen, A. K.

    2011-08-15

    A number of approaches to the problem of defining arrival- and dwell-time probabilities in quantum theory makes use of idealized models of clocks. An interesting question is the extent to which the probabilities obtained in this way are related to standard semiclassical results. In this paper, we explore this question using a reasonably general clock model, solved using path-integral methods. We find that, in the weak-coupling regime, where the energy of the clock is much less than the energy of the particle it is measuring, the probability for the clock pointer can be expressed in terms of the probability current in the case of arrival times, and the dwell-time operator in the case of dwell times, the expected semiclassical results. In the regime of strong system-clock coupling, we find that the arrival-time probability is proportional to the kinetic-energy density, consistent with an earlier model involving a complex potential. We argue that, properly normalized, this may be the generically expected result in this regime. We show that these conclusions are largely independent of the form of the clock Hamiltonian.

  17. Microeconomics of the ideal gas like market models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2009-10-01

    We develop a framework based on microeconomic theory from which the ideal gas like market models can be addressed. A kinetic exchange model based on that framework is proposed and its distributional features have been studied by considering its moments. Next, we derive the moments of the CC model (Eur. Phys. J. B 17 (2000) 167) as well. Some precise solutions are obtained which conform with the solutions obtained earlier. Finally, an output market is introduced with global price determination in the model with some necessary modifications.

  18. Correlation of the ideal gas properties of five aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Laesecke, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The ideal gas thermodynamic properties of isobaric heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy have been correlated for benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, and p-xylene by a uniform, semiempirical function of temperature. The correlation is based on literature values calculated from statistical mechanics for temperature up to 1,500K for benzene and up to 3,000K for the other molecules. The temperature function chosen is more accurate than that used for previous correlations, and can be used in a wider temperature range.

  19. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J.; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-il; Huang Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  20. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  1. An ideal gas approach to classify countries using financial indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mattos Neto, Paulo S. G.; Cavalcanti, George D. C.; Madeiro, Francisco; Ferreira, Tiago A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, countries’ development is classified based on several features that can be related to economic and social factors. However, this classification task is costly due to the difficulty of obtaining those features. We propose a method to classify countries based on financial indices using an ideal gas model. The probability density function (pdf) of the return series of the financial indices is used to characterize the fluctuation of a market. Based on the pdf, the volatility and the B coefficient, which describe the behavior of world markets, are estimated. The evaluation procedure uses 34 indices from developed and developing countries. The results show that the proposed method is an accurate, fast and low-cost computational alternative to the classifications provided by traditional organizations.

  2. A cryogenic quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naides, Matthew; Turner, Richard; Lai, Ruby; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Atom chip trapping of quantum gases will enable single-shot, large area imaging of transport through strongly correlated and topologically non-trivial materials via detection of magnetic flux at the 10-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology we have recently demonstrated [1] will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques, while allowing sample temperatures spanning <10 K to room temperature. We report on experimental progress toward developing this novel quantum gas scanning magnetic microscope [1] and describe our recent proposal [2] to image topologically protected transport through a non-ideal topological insulator in a relatively model-independent fashion. U.S. DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under award #DE-SC0001823.

  3. Performance of a multilevel quantum heat engine of an ideal N-particle Fermi system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jianhui; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the quantum heat engine (QHE) model which was first proposed by Bender et al. [J. Phys. A 33, 4427 (2000)] to the case in which an ideal Fermi gas with an arbitrary number N of particles in a box trap is used as the working substance. Besides two quantum adiabatic processes, the engine model contains two isoenergetic processes, during which the particles are coupled to energy baths at a high constant energy E(h) and a low constant energy E(c), respectively. Directly employing the finite-time thermodynamics, we find that the power output is enhanced by increasing particle number N (or decreasing minimum trap size L(A)) for given L(A) (or N), without reduction in the efficiency. By use of global optimization, the efficiency at possible maximum power output (EPMP) is found to be universal and independent of any parameter contained in the engine model. For an engine model with any particle-number N, the efficiency at maximum power output (EMP) can be determined under the condition that it should be closest to the EPMP. Moreover, we extend the heat engine to a more general multilevel engine model with an arbitrary 1D power-law potential. Comparison between our engine model and the Carnot cycle shows that, under the same conditions, the efficiency η = 1 - E(c)/E(h) of the engine cycle is bounded from above the Carnot value η(c) =1 - T(c)/T(h). PMID:23005748

  4. Ideal quantum glass transitions: Many-body localization without quenched disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Schiulaz, M.; Müller, M.

    2014-08-20

    We explore the possibility for translationally invariant quantum many-body systems to undergo a dynamical glass transition, at which ergodicity and translational invariance break down spontaneously, driven entirely by quantum effects. In contrast to analogous classical systems, where the existence of such an ideal glass transition remains a controversial issue, a genuine phase transition is predicted in the quantum regime. This ideal quantum glass transition can be regarded as a many-body localization transition due to self-generated disorder. Despite their lack of thermalization, these disorder-free quantum glasses do not possess an extensive set of local conserved operators, unlike what is conjectured for many-body localized systems with strong quenched disorder.

  5. High School Forum. The Solution: "Derivation of the Ideal Gas Law."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents responses to an earlier report concerning a procedure for the derivation of the Ideal Gas Law from Charles', Boyle's, and other gas laws. Logic errors and solutions that work are discussed. (CS)

  6. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amount of water in an ideal gas. 1065.645 Section 1065.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.645 Amount of water in an ideal gas. This section describes how...

  7. Ideal gas thermodynamic properties for the phenyl, phenoxy, and o-biphenyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcat, A.; Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Ideal gas thermodynamic properties of the phenyl and o-biphenyl radicals, their deuterated analogs and the phenoxy radical were calculated to 5000 K using estimated vibrational frequencies and structures. The ideal gas thermodynamic properties of benzene, biphenyl, their deuterated analogs and phenyl were also calculated.

  8. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amount of water in an ideal gas. 1065.645 Section 1065.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.645 Amount of water in an ideal gas. This section describes how...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amount of water in an ideal gas. 1065.645 Section 1065.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.645 Amount of water in an ideal gas. This section describes how...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... humidity. If you measure humidity as a relative humidity, RH%, determine the amount of water in an ideal gas, x H2O, as follows: ER30AP10.035 Where: x H20 = amount of water in an ideal gas. RH% = relative... measurement. Example: RH% = 50.77% p abs = 99.980 kPa T sat = T amb = 20 °C Using Eq. 1065.645-1, p H20 =...

  11. Student understanding of the ideal gas law, Part II: A microscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Christian H.; Heron, Paula R. L.; Shaffer, Peter S.; McDermott, Lillian C.

    2005-11-01

    Evidence from research indicates that many undergraduate science and engineering majors have seriously flawed microscopic models for the pressure and temperature in an ideal gas. In the investigation described in this paper, some common mistaken ideas about microscopic processes were identified. Examples illustrate the use of this information in the design of instruction that helped improve student understanding of the ideal gas law, especially its substance independence. Some broader implications of this study for the teaching of thermal physics are noted.

  12. Anomalous heat conduction in a one-dimensional ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Casati, Giulio; Prosen, Tomaz

    2003-01-01

    We provide firm convincing evidence that the energy transport in a one-dimensional gas of elastically colliding free particles of unequal masses is anomalous, i.e., the Fourier law does not hold. Our conclusions are confirmed by a theoretical and numerical analysis based on a Green-Kubo-type approach specialized to momentum-conserving lattices. PMID:12636549

  13. Ultracold strongly coupled gas: A near-ideal liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2005-10-01

    Feshbach resonances of trapped ultracold alkali-metal atoms allow to vary the atomic scattering length a . At very large values of a the system enters an universal strongly coupled regime in which its properties—the ground-state energy, pressure, etc.—become independent of a . We discuss the transport properties of such systems. In particular, the universality arguments imply that the shear viscosity of ultracold Fermi atoms at the Feschbach resonance is proportional to the particle number density n and the Plank constant ℏ : η=ℏnαη , where αη is a universal constant. Using Heisenberg uncertainty principle and Einstein’s relation between diffusion and viscosity we argue that the viscosity has the lower bound given by αη⩽(6π)-1 . We relate the damping of low-frequency density oscillations of ultracold optically trapped Li6 atoms to viscosity and find that the value of the coefficient αη is about 0.3. We also show that such a small viscosity cannot be explained by kinetic theory based on binary scattering. We conclude that the system of ultracold atoms near the Feshbach resonance is a near-ideal liquid.

  14. Redundant imprinting of information in non-ideal environments: Quantum Darwinism via a noisy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Quan, Haitao; Zurek, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism provides an information-theoretic framework for the emergence of the classical world from the quantum substrate. It recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the ``systems of interest'' indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Objectivity, a key property of the classical world, arises via the proliferation of redundant information into the environment where many observers can then intercept it and independently determine the state of the system. While causing a system to decohere, environments that remain nearly invariant under the Hamiltonian dynamics, such as very mixed states, have a diminished ability to transmit information about the system, yet can still acquire redundant information about the system [1,2]. Our results show that Quantum Darwinism is robust with respect to non-ideal initial states of the environment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  15. Real-gas effects 1: Simulation of ideal gas flow by cryogenic nitrogen and other selected gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas do not thermodynamically approximate an ideal, diatomic gas at cryogenic temperatures. Choice of a suitable equation of state to model its behavior is discussed and the equation of Beattie and Bridgeman is selected as best meeting the needs for cryogenic wind tunnel use. The real gas behavior of nitrogen gas is compared to an ideal, diatomic gas for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion; normal shocks; boundary layers; and shock wave boundary layer interactions. The only differences in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas that may limit the minimum operating temperatures of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels seem to occur at total pressures approaching 9atmospheres and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature, where the differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Several alternative cryogenic test gases - air, helium, and hydrogen - are also analyzed. Differences in air from an ideal, diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those of nitrogen. Differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. Helium and hydrogen do not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal, diatomic gas.

  16. A Unified Theory of Non-Ideal Gas Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi

    1998-01-01

    A non-ideal gas lattice Boltzmann model is directly derived, in an a priori fashion, from the Enskog equation for dense gases. The model is rigorously obtained by a systematic procedure to discretize the Enskog equation (in the presence of an external force) in both phase space and time. The lattice Boltzmann model derived here is thermodynamically consistent and is free of the defects which exist in previous lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases. The existing lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases are analyzed and compared with the model derived here.

  17. Two Approaches to Fractional Statistics in the Quantum Hall Effect: Idealizations and the Curious Case of the Anyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shech, Elay

    2015-09-01

    This paper looks at the nature of idealizations and representational structures appealed to in the context of the fractional quantum Hall effect, specifically, with respect to the emergence of anyons and fractional statistics. Drawing on an analogy with the Aharonov-Bohm effect, it is suggested that the standard approach to the effects—(what we may call) the topological approach to fractional statistics—relies essentially on problematic idealizations that need to be revised in order for the theory to be explanatory. An alternative geometric approach is outlined and endorsed. Roles for idealizations in science, as well as consequences for the debate revolving around so-called essential idealizations, are discussed.

  18. On an ideal gas related to the law of corresponding states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2010-06-01

    By an “ideal gas” we mean a gas which formally does not depend on the form of the interaction between the particles. We construct the thermodynamics (the equation of state) of such a gas, and this thermodynamics depends on three parameters corresponding to the Zeno-line and to the value of the compressibility factor Z at the critical point (a three-parameter family of three-dimensional Lagrangian manifolds).

  19. Kinetic Models for Adiabatic Reversible Expansion of a Monatomic Ideal Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, On-Kok

    1983-01-01

    A fixed amount of an ideal gas is confined in an adiabatic cylinder and piston device. The relation between temperature and volume in initial/final phases can be derived from the first law of thermodynamics. However, the relation can also be derived based on kinetic models. Several of these models are discussed. (JN)

  20. How Incorrect Is the Classical Partition Function for the Ideal Gas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroemer, Herbert

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the classical partition function for the ideal gas and how it differs from the exact value for bosons or fermions in the classical regime. The differences in the two values are negligible hence the classical treatment leads in the end to correct answers for all observables. (Author/DS)

  1. Cooking under Pressure: Applying the Ideal Gas Law in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ling; Anderson, Jennifer Y.; Wang, Diane R.

    2010-01-01

    This case study uses a daily cooking scenario to demonstrate how the boiling point of water is directly related to the external pressures in order to reinforce the concepts of boiling and boiling point, apply ideal gas law, and relate chemical reaction rates with temperatures. It also extends its teaching to autoclaves used to destroy…

  2. Cooking under Pressure: Applying the Ideal Gas Law in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ling; Anderson, Jennifer Y.; Wang, Diane R.

    2010-01-01

    This case study uses a daily cooking scenario to demonstrate how the boiling point of water is directly related to the external pressures in order to reinforce the concepts of boiling and boiling point, apply ideal gas law, and relate chemical reaction rates with temperatures. It also extends its teaching to autoclaves used to destroy

  3. Fluctuation theorem for entropy production during effusion of a relativistic ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Cleuren, B; Willaert, K; Engel, A; Van den Broeck, C

    2008-02-01

    The probability distribution of the entropy production for the effusion of a relativistic ideal gas is calculated explicitly. This result is then extended to include particle and antiparticle pair production and annihilation. In both cases, the fluctuation theorem is verified. PMID:18352067

  4. Ideal gas law, enthalpy, heat capacity, heats of solution and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a self-study module designed to be used in independent study, continuing education courses, and traditional classes. Contents: Introduction. Methods of Analysis and Measurement. Guidelines for Solving Material and Energy Balance Problems. Ideal Gas Laws for One Component. Enthalpy - Computation, Applications, Tables and Charts. Enthalpy for Phase Change.

  5. Thermal and Electrical Conductivities of a Three-Dimensional Ideal Anyon Gas with Fractional Exclusion Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fang; Wen, Wen; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    The thermal and electrical transport properties of an ideal anyon gas within fractional exclusion statistics are studied. By solving the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation-time approximation, the analytical expressions for the thermal and electrical conductivities of a three-dimensional ideal anyon gas are given. The low-temperature expressions for the two conductivities are obtained by using the Sommerfeld expansion. It is found that the Wiedemann—Franz law should be modified by the higher-order temperature terms, which depend on the statistical parameter g for a charged anyon gas. Neglecting the higher-order terms of temperature, the Wiedemann—Franz law is respected, which gives the Lorenz number. The Lorenz number is a function of the statistical parameter g.

  6. Using Rubber-Elastic Material-Ideal Gas Analogies To Teach Introductory Thermodynamics. Part I: Equations of State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Describes equations of state as a supplement to an introductory thermodynamics undergraduate course. Uses rubber-elastic materials (REM) which have strong analogies to the concept of an ideal gas and explains the molar basis of REM. Provides examples of the analogies between ideal gas and REM and mathematical analogies. (Contains 22 references.)…

  7. Using Rubber-Elastic Material-Ideal Gas Analogies To Teach Introductory Thermodynamics. Part II: The Laws of Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Describes the laws of thermodynamics as a supplement to an introductory thermodynamics undergraduate course. Uses rubber-elastic materials (REM) which have strong analogies to the concept of ideal gas. Provides examples of the analogies between ideal gas and REM and mathematical analogies. (YDS)

  8. Advantages and challenges in coupling an ideal gas to atomistic models in adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, K.; Fogarty, A. C.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2015-09-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations, molecular fluids are modeled employing different levels of resolution in different subregions of the system. When traveling from one region to the other, particles change their resolution on the fly. One of the main advantages of such approaches is the computational efficiency gained in the coarse-grained region. In this respect the best coarse-grained system to employ in the low resolution region would be the ideal gas, making intermolecular force calculations in the coarse-grained subdomain redundant. In this case, however, a smooth coupling is challenging due to the high energetic imbalance between typical liquids and a system of non-interacting particles. In the present work, we investigate this approach, using as a test case the most biologically relevant fluid, water. We demonstrate that a successful coupling of water to the ideal gas can be achieved with current adaptive resolution methods, and discuss the issues that remain to be addressed.

  9. Critical behavior of the ideal-gas Bose-Einstein condensation in the Apollonian network.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, I N; dos Santos, T B; de Moura, F A B F; Lyra, M L; Serva, M

    2013-08-01

    We show that the ideal Boson gas displays a finite-temperature Bose-Einstein condensation transition in the complex Apollonian network exhibiting scale-free, small-world, and hierarchical properties. The single-particle tight-binding Hamiltonian with properly rescaled hopping amplitudes has a fractal-like energy spectrum. The energy spectrum is analytically demonstrated to be generated by a nonlinear mapping transformation. A finite-size scaling analysis over several orders of magnitudes of network sizes is shown to provide precise estimates for the exponents characterizing the condensed fraction, correlation size, and specific heat. The critical exponents, as well as the power-law behavior of the density of states at the bottom of the band, are similar to those of the ideal Boson gas in lattices with spectral dimension d(s)=2ln(3)/ln(9/5)~/=3.74. PMID:24032807

  10. Casimir effect of an ideal Bose gas trapped in a generic power-law potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tongling; Su, Guozhen; Wang, Qiuping A.; Chen, Jincan

    2012-05-01

    The Casimir effect of an ideal Bose gas trapped in a generic power-law potential and confined between two slabs with Dirichlet, Neumann, and periodic boundary conditions is investigated systematically, based on the grand potential of the ideal Bose gas, the Casimir potential and force are calculated. The scaling function is obtained and discussed. The special cases of free and harmonic potentials are also discussed. It is found that when T<=Tc (where Tc is the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation), the Casimir force is a power-law decay function; when T>Tc, the Casimir force is an exponential decay function; and when TGtTc, the Casimir force vanishes.

  11. Quantum learning for a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-03-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. In low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  12. Quantum learning in a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-04-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. At low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  13. Thermodynamics of a one-dimensional ideal gas with fractional exclusion statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, M.V.N.; Shankar, R. )

    1994-12-19

    We show that the particles in the Calogero-Sutherland model obey fractional exclusion statistics as defined by Haldane. We construct anyon number densities and derive the energy distribution function. We show that the partition function factorizes in the form characteristic of an ideal gas. The virial expansion is exactly computable and interestingly it is only the second virial coefficient that encodes the statistics information.

  14. Equation of state of an ideal gas with nonergodic behavior in two connected vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naplekov, D. M.; Semynozhenko, V. P.; Yanovsky, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional collisionless ideal gas in the two vessels connected through a small hole. One of them is a well-behaved chaotic billiard, another one is known to be nonergodic. A significant part of the second vessel's phase space is occupied by an island of stability. In the works of Zaslavsky and coauthors, distribution of Poincaré recurrence times in similar systems was considered. We study the gas pressure in the vessels; it is uniform in the first vessel and not uniform in second one. An equation of the gas state in the first vessel is obtained. Despite the very different phase-space structure, behavior of the second vessel is found to be very close to the behavior of a good ergodic billiard but of different volume. The equation of state differs from the ordinary equation of ideal gas state by an amendment to the vessel's volume. Correlation of this amendment with a share of the phase space under remaining intact islands of stability is shown.

  15. Equation of state of an ideal gas with nonergodic behavior in two connected vessels.

    PubMed

    Naplekov, D M; Semynozhenko, V P; Yanovsky, V V

    2014-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional collisionless ideal gas in the two vessels connected through a small hole. One of them is a well-behaved chaotic billiard, another one is known to be nonergodic. A significant part of the second vessel's phase space is occupied by an island of stability. In the works of Zaslavsky and coauthors, distribution of Poincaré recurrence times in similar systems was considered. We study the gas pressure in the vessels; it is uniform in the first vessel and not uniform in second one. An equation of the gas state in the first vessel is obtained. Despite the very different phase-space structure, behavior of the second vessel is found to be very close to the behavior of a good ergodic billiard but of different volume. The equation of state differs from the ordinary equation of ideal gas state by an amendment to the vessel's volume. Correlation of this amendment with a share of the phase space under remaining intact islands of stability is shown. PMID:24580310

  16. Dynamics of the electric current in an ideal electron gas: A sound mode inside the quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Polonyi, Janos

    2015-09-01

    We study the equation of motion for the Noether current in an electron gas within the framework of the Schwinger-Keldysh closed-time-path formalism. The equation is shown to be highly nonlinear and irreversible even for a noninteracting, ideal gas of electrons at nonzero density. We truncate the linearized equation of motion, written as the Laurent series in Fourier space, so that the resulting expressions are local in time, both at zero and at small finite temperatures. Furthermore, we show that the one-loop Coulomb interactions only alter the physical picture quantitatively, while preserving the characteristics of the dynamics that the electric current exhibits in the absence of interactions. As a result of the composite nature of the Noether current, composite sound waves are found to be the dominant IR collective excitations at length scales between the inverse Fermi momentum and the mean free path that would exist in an interacting electron gas. We also discuss the difference and the transition between the hydrodynamical regime of an ideal gas, defined in this work, and the hydrodynamical regime in phenomenological hydrodynamics, which is normally used for the description of interacting gases.

  17. Thermodynamics of Ideal Bose Gas Under Generic Power Law Potential in d-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruk, M. M.

    Thermodynamic properties of ideal Bose gas trapped in an external generic power law potential are investigated systematically from the grand thermodynamic potential in $d$ dimensional space. The most general conditions for Bose-Einstein condensate and the discontinuous conditions of heat capacity at the critical temperature in presence of generic power law potential are presented in this manuscript. The dependence of the physical quantities on external potential, particle characteristics and space dimensionality are discussed. The more general results obtained in this paper presents an unified illustration of Bose-Einstein condensation of ideal Bose systems as they reduces to the expressions and conclusions available in the literature with appropiate choice of power law exponent.

  18. Spinons in the Haldane Shastry model: An ideal gas of half-fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuricht, Dirk; Greiter, Martin

    2005-04-01

    The dynamics of spinons in the Haldane-Shastry model, a paradigm for antiferromagnetic spin systems, has been subject to intense recent interest. Bernevig, Giuliano and Laughlin have presented arguments for the existence of a short-ranged, attractive interaction between the spinon excitations in this model. We re-examine their analysis and conclude that their interpretation is not correct; the spinon excitations in the Haldane-Shastry model do not interact. The spinons rather represent an ideal gas of half-fermions.

  19. A complete theory for the magnetism of an ideal gas of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan; Sen, Swati

    2013-05-15

    We have explored Pauli paramagnetism, Landau diamagnetism, and de Haas-van Alphen effect in a single framework, and unified these three effects for all temperatures as well as for all strengths of magnetic field. Our result goes beyond Pauli-Landau result on the magnetism of the 3-D ideal gas of electrons, and is able to describe crossover of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillation to the saturation of magnetization. We also have obtained a novel asymptotic series expansion for the low temperature properties of the system.

  20. Thermodynamics of Ideal Fermi Gas Under Generic Power Law Potential in d-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruk, M. M.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    Thermodynamics of ideal Fermi gas trapped in an external generic power law potential $U=\\sum_{i=1} ^d c_i |\\frac{x_i}{a_i}|^{n_i}$ are investigated systematically from the grand thermodynamic potential in $d$ dimensional space. These properties are explored deeply in the degenerate limit ($\\mu>> K_BT$), where the thermodynamic properties are greatly dominated by Pauli exclusion principle. Pressure and energy along with the isothermal compressibilty is non zero at $T=0K$, denoting trapped Fermi system is quite live even at absolute zero temperature. The nonzero value of compressibilty denotes zero point pressure is not just a constant but depends on volume.

  1. Probability theory for 3-layer remote sensing in ideal gas law environment.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E

    2013-08-26

    We extend the probability model for 3-layer radiative transfer [Opt. Express 20, 10004 (2012)] to ideal gas conditions where a correlation exists between transmission and temperature of each of the 3 layers. The effect on the probability density function for the at-sensor radiances is surprisingly small, and thus the added complexity of addressing the correlation can be avoided. The small overall effect is due to (a) small perturbations by the correlation on variance population parameters and (b) cancellation of perturbation terms that appear with opposite signs in the model moment expressions. PMID:24105525

  2. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Asif; Meyer, David A.; Love, Peter J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  3. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Shakeel, Asif E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu Love, Peter J. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu; Meyer, David A. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu

    2014-12-15

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  4. Gas-Kinetic Theory Based Flux Splitting Method for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    A gas-kinetic solver is developed for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The new scheme is based on the direct splitting of the flux function of the MHD equations with the inclusion of "particle" collisions in the transport process. Consequently, the artificial dissipation in the new scheme is much reduced in comparison with the MHD Flux Vector Splitting Scheme. At the same time, the new scheme is compared with the well-developed Roe-type MHD solver. It is concluded that the kinetic MHD scheme is more robust and efficient than the Roe- type method, and the accuracy is competitive. In this paper the general principle of splitting the macroscopic flux function based on the gas-kinetic theory is presented. The flux construction strategy may shed some light on the possible modification of AUSM- and CUSP-type schemes for the compressible Euler equations, as well as to the development of new schemes for a non-strictly hyperbolic system.

  5. Collision of BEC dark matter structures and comparison with the collision of ideal gas structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    2010-12-07

    In this work we present an important feature of the Bose Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter model, that is, the head-on collision of BEC dark matter virialized structures. This model of dark matter is assumed to be ruled by the Schroedinger-Poisson system of equations, which is interpreted as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a gravitational potential sourced by the density of probability. It has been shown recently that during the collision of two structures a pattern formation in the density of probability appears. We explore the pattern formation for various initial dynamical conditions during the collision. In order to know whether or not the pattern formation is a particular property of the BEC dark matter, we compare with the collision of two structures of virialized ideal gas under similar dynamical initial conditions, which is a model more consistent with usual models of dark matter. In order to do so, we also solve Euler's equations using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics approach. We found that the collision of the ideal gas structures does not show interference patterns, which in turn implies that the pattern formation is a property of the BEC dark matter.

  6. The Ideal and Real Gas Heat Capacity of Potassium Atoms at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biolsi, Louis; Biolsi, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The ideal gas heat capacity, Cp, of potassium atoms is calculated to high temperatures using statistical mechanics. Since there are a large number of electronic energy levels in the partition function (Boltzmann sum) below the first ionization potential, the partition function and Cp will become very large as the temperature increases unless the number of energy levels contributing to the partition function is constrained. Two primary categories of arguments are used to do this. First, at high temperatures, the increased size of the atoms constrains the sum (Bethe method). Second, an argument based on the existence of interacting charged species at higher temperatures is used to constrain the sum (ionization potential lowering method). When potassium atoms are assumed to constitute a real gas that obeys the virial equation of state, the lowest non-ideal contribution to Cp depends on the second derivative of the second virial coefficient, B( T), which depends on the interaction potential energy curves between two potassium atoms. When two ground-state (2{S}) atoms interact, they can follow either of the two potential energy curves. When a 2{S} atom interacts with an atom in the first electronically excited (2{P}) state, they can follow any of the eight potential energy curves. The values of B( T) for the ten states are determined, then averaged, and used to calculate the nonideal contribution to Cp.

  7. [Development and application of quantum cascade laser based gas sensing system].

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhi-yu; Wang, Ling-fang; Chen, Gang

    2010-08-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is an ideal mid-infrared source for gas sensing in the wavelength range from 2.5 to 25 microm, due to its fast response, high sensitivity and selectivity for gas detecting. Prototypes of gas sensing system based on QCL have been developed by worldwide research groups. They have great potential in many applications, such as environment monitoring, space exploration, anti-terrorism and so on. The present paper gives a broad review of QCL gas sensing system, including the basic working principle, existing systems, and its application and future development. PMID:20939303

  8. Universal Behavior of the BEC Critical Temperature for a Multi-slab Ideal Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    For an ideal Bose gas within a multi-slab periodic structure, we discuss the effect of the spatial distribution of the gas on its Bose-Einstein condensation critical temperature T_c, as well as on the origin of its dimensional crossover observed in the specific heat. The multi-slabs structure is generated by applying a Kronig-Penney potential to the gas in the perpendicular direction to the slabs of width b and separated by a distance a, and allowing the particles to move freely in the other two directions. We found that T_c decreases continuously as the potential barrier height increases, becoming inversely proportional to the square root of the barrier height when it is large enough. This behavior is universal as it is independent of the width and spacing of the barriers. The specific heat at constant volume shows a crossover from 3D to 2D when the height of the potential or the barrier width increases, in addition to the well-known peak related to the Bose-Einstein condensation. These features are due to the trapping of the bosons by the potential barriers and can be characterized by the energy difference between the energy bands below the potential height.

  9. Universal Behavior of the BEC Critical Temperature for a Multi-slab Ideal Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    For an ideal Bose gas within a multi-slab periodic structure, we discuss the effect of the spatial distribution of the gas on its Bose-Einstein condensation critical temperature T_c , as well as on the origin of its dimensional crossover observed in the specific heat. The multi-slabs structure is generated by applying a Kronig-Penney potential to the gas in the perpendicular direction to the slabs of width b and separated by a distance a, and allowing the particles to move freely in the other two directions. We found that T_c decreases continuously as the potential barrier height increases, becoming inversely proportional to the square root of the barrier height when it is large enough. This behavior is universal as it is independent of the width and spacing of the barriers. The specific heat at constant volume shows a crossover from 3D to 2D when the height of the potential or the barrier width increases, in addition to the well-known peak related to the Bose-Einstein condensation. These features are due to the trapping of the bosons by the potential barriers and can be characterized by the energy difference between the energy bands below the potential height.

  10. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave.

    PubMed

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions. PMID:20866940

  11. Generic features of the wealth distribution in ideal-gas-like markets.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P K

    2006-07-01

    We provide an exact solution to the ideal-gas-like models studied in econophysics to understand the microscopic origin of Pareto law. In these classes of models the key ingredient necessary for having a self-organized scale-free steady-state distribution is the trading or collision rule where agents or particles save a definite fraction of their wealth or energy and invest the rest for trading. Using a Gibbs ensemble approach we could obtain the exact distribution of wealth in this model. Moreover we show that in this model (a) good savers are always rich and (b) every agent poor or rich invests the same amount for trading. Nonlinear trading rules could alter the generic scenario observed here. PMID:16907070

  12. Smoothed MHD equations for numerical simulations of ideal quasi-neutral gas dynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Mikhail V.; Elizarova, Tatiana G.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a mathematical model and related numerical method for numerical modeling of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) gas flows as an extension of previously known quasi-gasdynamic (QGD) equations. This approach is based on smoothing, or averaging of the original MHD equation system over a small time interval that leads to a new equation system, named quasi-MHD, or QMHD system. The QMHD equations are closely related to the original MHD system except for additional strongly non-linear dissipative τ-terms with a small parameter τ as a factor. The τ-terms depend on the solution itself and decrease in regions with the small space gradients of the solution. In this sense the QMHD system could be regarded as an approach with adaptive artificial dissipation. The QMHD is a generalization of regularized (or quasi-) gas dynamic equation system suggested in last three decades. In the QMHD numerical method the evolution of all physical variables is presented in a non-split divergence form. Divergence-free evolution of the magnetic field provides by using a constrained transport method based on Faraday's law of induction. Accuracy and convergence of the QMHD method is verified on a wide set of standard MHD tests including the 3D Orszag-Tang vortex flow.

  13. Teleportation of a general two-mode coherent-state superposition via attenuated quantum channels with ideal and/or threshold detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Nguyen Ba

    2009-04-01

    Three novel probabilistic yet conclusive schemes are proposed to teleport a general two-mode coherent-state superposition via attenuated quantum channels with ideal and/or threshold detectors. The calculated total success probability is highest (lowest) when only ideal (threshold) detectors are used.

  14. PHD TUTORIAL: Heteronuclear quantum gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospelkaus, C.; Ospelkaus, S.

    2008-10-01

    In this PhD tutorial, we present experiments with quantum degenerate mixtures of fermionic and bosonic atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices. This heteronuclear quantum gas mixture offers a wide range of possibilities for quantum simulation, implementation of condensed matter Hamiltonians, quantum chemistry and ultimately dense and quantum degenerate dipolar molecular samples. We show how quantum degenerate mixtures of 40K and 87Rb are created in the experiment. We analyse stages of evaporative cooling and show how a dynamic mean-field collapse occurs during the final stage of the evaporation (Ospelkaus et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 020401) as a result of attractive interactions. The particle numbers observed in our experiment have only been limited by this mean-field collapse, resulting in an excellent starting point for our experiments. We explore magnetic-field-induced Feshbach resonances and demonstrate tuning of interactions (Ospelkaus et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 120403) between 40K and 87Rb by means of heteronuclear Feshbach resonances. We observe both stable attractively and repulsively interacting mixtures. We analyse the mean-field energy of the condensate and find qualitative agreement with a simple model. By making the interaction strong and attractive, we induce a mean-field collapse of the mixture. For strong and repulsive interactions, we observe phase separation of the mixture. When loaded into a 3D optical lattice, a whole zoo of novel quantum phases has been predicted for Fermi-Bose mixtures. We present the first realization of Fermi-Bose mixtures in 3D optical lattices as a novel quantum many-body system (Ospelkaus et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 180403). We study the phase coherence of the bosonic cloud in the 3D optical lattice as a function of the amount of fermionic atoms simultaneously trapped in the lattice. We observe a loss of phase coherence at much lower lattice depth than for a pure bosonic cloud and discuss possible theoretical scenarios including adiabatic processes, mean-field Fermi-Bose-Hubbard scenarios and disorder-enhanced localization scenarios. After considering this many-body limit of mixtures in lattices, we show how fermionic heteronuclear Feshbach molecules can be created in the optical lattice (Ospelkaus et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 120402) as a crucial step towards all ground-state dense dipolar molecular samples. We develop rf association as a novel molecule association technique, measure the binding energy, lifetime and association efficiency of the molecules. We develop a simple theoretical single-channel model of the molecules trapped in the lattice (Deuretzbacher et al 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 032726) which gives an excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds:

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Nguyen, A.; Hossenlopp, I.A.; Smith, N.K.

    1991-10-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic and organosilicon substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of ({plus minus})-butan-2-ol, tetradecan-1-ol, hexan-1,6-diol, methacrylamide, benzoyl formic acid, naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester, and tetraethylsilane are reported. A crystalline-phase enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K was determined for naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, which decomposed at 695 K before melting. The combustion calorimetry of tetraethylsilane used the proven fluorine-additivity methodology. Critical temperature and critical density were determined for tetraethylsilane with differential scanning calorimeter and the critical pressure was derived. Group-additivity parameters useful in the application of group- contribution correlations are derived. 112 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. University Students Explaining Adiabatic Compression of an Ideal Gas--A New Phenomenon in Introductory Thermal Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on second-year university students' explanations and reasoning related to adiabatic compression of an ideal gas. The phenomenon was new to the students, but it was one which they should have been capable of explaining using their previous upper secondary school knowledge. The students' explanations and reasoning were…

  17. University Students Explaining Adiabatic Compression of an Ideal Gas--A New Phenomenon in Introductory Thermal Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on second-year university students' explanations and reasoning related to adiabatic compression of an ideal gas. The phenomenon was new to the students, but it was one which they should have been capable of explaining using their previous upper secondary school knowledge. The students' explanations and reasoning were

  18. Physical model for the generation of ideal resources in multipartite quantum networking

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarello, F.; Zarcone, M.; Paternostro, M.; Bose, S.; Browne, D. E.; Palma, G. M.

    2010-09-15

    We propose a physical model for generating multipartite entangled states of spin-s particles that have important applications in distributed quantum information processing. Our protocol is based on a process where mobile spins induce the interaction among remote scattering centers. As such, a major advantage lies in the management of stationary and well-separated spins. Among the generable states, there is a class of N-qubit singlets allowing for optimal quantum telecloning in a scalable and controllable way. We also show how to prepare Aharonov, W, and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states.

  19. Quantum noise of non-ideal Sagnac speed meter interferometer with asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, S. L.; Gräf, C.; Leavey, S. S.; Hennig, J.; Houston, E. A.; Pascucci, D.; Steinlechner, S.; Wright, J.; Hild, S.

    2015-04-01

    The speed meter concept has been identified as a technique that can potentially provide laser-interferometric measurements at a sensitivity level which surpasses the standard quantum limit (SQL) over a broad frequency range. As with other sub-SQL measurement techniques, losses play a central role in speed meter interferometers and they ultimately determine the quantum noise limited sensitivity that can be achieved. So far in the literature, the quantum noise limited sensitivity has only been derived for lossless or lossy cases using certain approximations (for instance that the arm cavity round trip loss is small compared to the arm cavity mirror transmission). In this article we present a generalized, analytical treatment of losses in speed meters that allows accurate calculation of the quantum noise limited sensitivity of Sagnac speed meters with arm cavities. In addition, our analysis allows us to take into account potential imperfections in the interferometer such as an asymmetric beam splitter or differences of the reflectivities of the two arm cavity input mirrors. Finally, we use the examples of the proof-of-concept Sagnac speed meter currently under construction in Glasgow and a potential implementation of a Sagnac speed meter in the Einstein Telescope to illustrate how our findings affect Sagnac speed meters with metre- and kilometre-long baselines.

  20. Quantum-Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheuk, Lawrence W.; Nichols, Matthew A.; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Bakr, Waseem S.; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2015-05-01

    We realize a quantum-gas microscope for fermionic 40K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single-atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single-lattice-site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site-resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time-resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement.

  1. Quantum-gas microscope for fermionic atoms.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Nichols, Matthew A; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V; Bakr, Waseem S; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2015-05-15

    We realize a quantum-gas microscope for fermionic ^{40}K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single-atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single-lattice-site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site-resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time-resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement. PMID:26024169

  2. Approaching the ideal quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Hui; Luo, Sun-Long; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-08-01

    We present a scheme for the practical decoy-state quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon source. In this scheme, only two-intensity decoy states are employed. However, its performance can approach the asymptotic case of using infinite decoy states. We compare it with the standard three-intensity decoy-state method, and through numerical simulations, we demonstrate its significant improvement over the three-intensity method in both the final key rate and the secure transmission distance. Furthermore, when taking statistical fluctuations into account, a very high key generation rate can still be obtained even at a long transmission distance.

  3. A new method for the measurement of meteorite bulk volume via ideal gas pycnometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shijie; Wang, Shijie; Li, Xiongyao; Li, Yang; Liu, Shen; Coulson, Ian M.

    2012-10-01

    To date, of the many techniques used to measure the bulk volume of meteorites, only three methods (Archimedean bead method, 3-D laser imaging and X-ray microtomography) can be considered as nondestructive or noncontaminating. The bead method can show large, random errors for sample sizes of smaller than 5 cm3. In contrast, 3-D laser imaging is a high-accuracy method even when measuring the bulk volumes of small meteorites. This method is both costly and time consuming, however, and meteorites of a certain shape may lead to some uncertainties in the analysis. The method of X-ray microtomography suffers from the same problems as 3-D laser imaging. This study outlines a new method of high-accuracy, nondestructive and noncontaminating measurement of the bulk volume of meteorite samples. In order to measure the bulk volume of a meteorite, one must measure the total volume of the balloon vacuum packaged meteorite and the volume of balloon that had been used to enclose the meteorite using ideal gas pycnometry. The difference between the two determined volumes is the bulk volume of the meteorite. Through the measurement of zero porosity metal spheres and tempered glass fragments, our results indicate that for a sample which has a volume of between 0.5 and 2 cm3, the relative error of the measurement is less than ±0.6%. Furthermore, this error will be even smaller (less than ±0.1%) if the determined sample size is larger than 2 cm3. The precision of this method shows some volume dependence. For samples smaller than 1 cm3, the standard deviations are less than ±0.328%, and these values will fall to less than ±0.052% for samples larger than 2 cm3. The porosities of nine fragments of Jilin, GaoGuenie, Zaoyang and Zhaodong meteorites have been measured using our vacuum packaging-pycnometry method, with determined average porosities of Jilin, GaoGuenie, Zaoyang and Zhaodong of 9.0307%, 2.9277%, 17.5437% and 5.9748%, respectively. These values agree well with the porosities of fragments of which have been measured using the Archimedean bead method and 3-D laser imaging. This method also may be applied to the study of rare samples in other fields (e.g., archeology and geology).

  4. Jack Polynomials as Fractional Quantum Hall States and the Betti Numbers of the ( k + 1)-Equals Ideal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamaere, Christine Berkesch; Griffeth, Stephen; Sam, Steven V.

    2014-08-01

    We show that for Jack parameter α = -( k + 1)/( r - 1), certain Jack polynomials studied by Feigin-Jimbo-Miwa-Mukhin vanish to order r when k + 1 of the coordinates coincide. This result was conjectured by Bernevig and Haldane, who proposed that these Jack polynomials are model wavefunctions for fractional quantum Hall states. Special cases of these Jack polynomials include the wavefunctions of Laughlin and Read-Rezayi. In fact, along these lines we prove several vanishing theorems known as clustering properties for Jack polynomials in the mathematical physics literature, special cases of which had previously been conjectured by Bernevig and Haldane. Motivated by the method of proof, which in the case r = 2 identifies the span of the relevant Jack polynomials with the S n -invariant part of a unitary representation of the rational Cherednik algebra, we conjecture that unitary representations of the type A Cherednik algebra have graded minimal free resolutions of Bernstein-Gelfand-Gelfand type; we prove this for the ideal of the ( k + 1)-equals arrangement in the case when the number of coordinates n is at most 2 k + 1. In general, our conjecture predicts the graded S n -equivariant Betti numbers of the ideal of the ( k + 1)-equals arrangement with no restriction on the number of ambient dimensions.

  5. Quantum Phase Transition and Protected Ideal Transport in a Kondo Chain.

    PubMed

    Tsvelik, A M; Yevtushenko, O M

    2015-11-20

    We study the low energy physics of a Kondo chain where electrons from a one-dimensional band interact with magnetic moments via an anisotropic exchange interaction. It is demonstrated that the anisotropy gives rise to two different phases which are separated by a quantum phase transition. In the phase with easy plane anisotropy, Z_{2} symmetry between sectors with different helicity of the electrons is broken. As a result, localization effects are suppressed and the dc transport acquires (partial) symmetry protection. This effect is similar to the protection of the edge transport in time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The phase with easy axis anisotropy corresponds to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with a pronounced spin-charge separation. The slow charge density wave modes have no protection against localization. PMID:26636861

  6. Quantum phase transition and protected ideal transport in a Kondo chain

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvelik, A. M.; Yevtushenko, O. M.

    2015-11-30

    We study the low energy physics of a Kondo chain where electrons from a one-dimensional band interact with magnetic moments via an anisotropic exchange interaction. It is demonstrated that the anisotropy gives rise to two different phases which are separated by a quantum phase transition. In the phase with easy plane anisotropy, Z2 symmetry between sectors with different helicity of the electrons is broken. As a result, localization effects are suppressed and the dc transport acquires (partial) symmetry protection. This effect is similar to the protection of the edge transport in time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The phase with easy axis anisotropy corresponds to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with a pronounced spin-charge separation. The slow charge density wave modes have no protection against localizatioin.

  7. Quantum phase transition and protected ideal transport in a Kondo chain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsvelik, A. M.; Yevtushenko, O. M.

    2015-11-30

    We study the low energy physics of a Kondo chain where electrons from a one-dimensional band interact with magnetic moments via an anisotropic exchange interaction. It is demonstrated that the anisotropy gives rise to two different phases which are separated by a quantum phase transition. In the phase with easy plane anisotropy, Z2 symmetry between sectors with different helicity of the electrons is broken. As a result, localization effects are suppressed and the dc transport acquires (partial) symmetry protection. This effect is similar to the protection of the edge transport in time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The phase with easy axismore » anisotropy corresponds to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with a pronounced spin-charge separation. The slow charge density wave modes have no protection against localizatioin.« less

  8. Quantum gas microscopy of ytterbium: cool me twice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-03-01

    The site-resolved detection of ultracold atoms in optical lattice potentials is a powerful technique to study lattice models of correlated quantum matter. In their recent paper, Yamamoto et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 023016) demonstrate a quantum gas microscope for ultracold ytterbium atoms. By simultaneously cooling these atoms on two optical transitions, they show that fluorescent images of the lattice gas can be obtained while keeping the atoms pinned to their lattice sites even for a lattice spacing as small as 266 nm. This promises to be a powerful enabling tool for studies of metrology and quantum magnetism with quantum degenerate gases of ytterbium.

  9. Validation of the Jarzynski relation for a system with strong thermal coupling: an isothermal ideal gas model.

    PubMed

    Baule, A; Evans, R M L; Olmsted, P D

    2006-12-01

    We revisit the paradigm of an ideal gas under isothermal conditions. A moving piston performs work on an ideal gas in a container that is strongly coupled to a heat reservoir. The thermal coupling is modeled by stochastic scattering at the boundaries. In contrast to recent studies of an adiabatic ideal gas with a piston [R.C. Lua and A.Y. Grosberg, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 6805 (2005); I. Bena, Europhys. Lett. 71, 879 (2005)], the container and piston stay in contact with the heat bath during the work process. Under this condition the heat reservoir as well as the system depend on the work parameter lambda and microscopic reversibility is broken for a moving piston. Our model is thus not included in the class of systems for which the nonequilibrium work theorem has been derived rigorously either by Hamiltonian [C. Jarzynski, J. Stat. Mech. (2004) P09005] or stochastic methods [G.E. Crooks, J. Stat. Phys. 90, 1481 (1998)]. Nevertheless the validity of the nonequilibrium work theorem is confirmed both numerically for a wide range of parameter values and analytically in the limit of a very fast moving piston, i.e., in the far nonequilibrium regime. PMID:17280048

  10. Accurate treatments of electronic correlation: Phase transitions in an idealized one-dimensional ferroelectric and modelling experimental quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkens, Timothy James

    2001-12-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is one of the most powerful methods for solving many-body problems in Physics and Chemistry. MC sampling allows one to measure physical properties systems with very complicated wave functions that incorporate correlation between the electrons. Additionally, QMC has O(N3) scaling verses exponential scaling for methods such as Configuration Interaction and "exact diagonalization", and its perfect parallelism allows one to speed up computation with little effort on large parallel computers. Our work has focussed on two systems. The first is a 1D ionic Hubbard model with a complex phase diagram that we find to exhibit a ferroeletric "bond ordered" phase. A new many-body berry's phase formulation of the electronic polarization and localization is used in conjunction with QMC to analyze whether a bond order phase exists between the customary band and Mott insulating phases. The bond order and bond order correlation functions are measured to illustrate the stability of this intermediate state, and phase swapping between two degenerate states of bond order (+/-B) is observed. We propose that the Mott state it is unstable to bond ordering for any degree of ionicity. The second system we have studied is a set of idealized (harmonic) and realistic quantum dots. Two idealized dots, spherical and squashed, quasi-2D structures, are analyzed. In the first QMC is contrasted with a large set of commonly used electronic structure methods including MSFT, KLI, LSDA, and CCSD, and in the second we scrutinize whether SDW states truly exist as predicted by LSDA. In conjunction with the Computational Electronics Group at the Beckman Institute, we have performed QMC calculations on realistically modelled quantum dots in the effective mass approximation. The potentials of these dots are determined using the FEM method to solve Poisson's equation and the effective mass is allowed to spatially vary in our QMC simulations. We find that in arrays of QD's, LSDA may be insufficiently accurate to determine the proper spin states of the electrons. Additionally, we illustrate that QMC has a bright future ahead of it in modelling such devices using arbitrary functions represented on grids using splines.

  11. The Heat Capacity of Ideal Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of an ideal gas has been shown to be calculable directly by statistical mechanics if the energies of the quantum states are known. However, unless one makes careful calculations, it is not easy for a student to understand the qualitative results. Why there are maxima (and occasionally minima) in heat capacity-temperature curves…

  12. The Heat Capacity of Ideal Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of an ideal gas has been shown to be calculable directly by statistical mechanics if the energies of the quantum states are known. However, unless one makes careful calculations, it is not easy for a student to understand the qualitative results. Why there are maxima (and occasionally minima) in heat capacity-temperature curves

  13. On the Equipartition of Kinetic Energy in an Ideal Gas Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peliti, L.

    2007-01-01

    A refinement of an argument due to Maxwell for the equipartition of translational kinetic energy in a mixture of ideal gases with different masses is proposed. The argument is elementary, yet it may work as an illustration of the role of symmetry and independence postulates in kinetic theory. (Contains 1 figure.)

  14. The Role of Multiple Representations in the Understanding of Ideal Gas Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Sean P.; Jones, Loretta L.; Rahm, Jrene

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the representational competence of students as they solved problems dealing with the temperature-pressure relationship for ideal gases. Seven students enrolled in a first-semester general chemistry course and two advanced undergraduate science majors participated in the study. The written work and transcripts from videotaped

  15. The Role of Multiple Representations in the Understanding of Ideal Gas Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Sean P.; Jones, Loretta L.; Rahm, Jrene

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the representational competence of students as they solved problems dealing with the temperature-pressure relationship for ideal gases. Seven students enrolled in a first-semester general chemistry course and two advanced undergraduate science majors participated in the study. The written work and transcripts from videotaped…

  16. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir Mehedi, Faruk; Md. Sazzad, Hossain; Md. Muktadir, Rahman

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  17. Interferograms, Schlieren, and Shadowgraphs Constructed from Real- and Ideal-Gas, Two- and Three-Dimensional Computed Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from computed flowfield solutions permits one-to-one comparisons of computed and experimental results. A method for constructing these images from both ideal- and real-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flowfields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. Constructed images are shown for several types of computed flows including nozzle, wake, and reacting flows; comparisons to experimental images are also shown. In addition, the sensitivity of these images to errors in the flowfield solution is demonstrated, and the constructed images can be used to identify problem areas in the computations.

  18. Interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs constructed from real- and ideal-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1993-01-01

    The construction of interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from computed flowfield solutions permits one-to-one comparisons of computed and experimental results. A method of constructing these images from both ideal- and real-gas, two and three-dimensional computed flowfields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. Constructed images are shown for several types of computed flows including nozzle, wake, and reacting flows; comparisons to experimental images are also shown. In addition, th sensitivity of these images to errors in the flowfield solution is demonstrated, and the constructed images can be used to identify problem areas in the computations.

  19. Towards enhancing two-dimensional electron gas quantum confinement effects in perovskite oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kesong; Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar

    2015-03-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 perovskite-oxide heterostructure has attracted much attention because of its potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. A 2DEG has two landmark characters: strong charge confinement in the third dimension and high electron conductivity in two dimensions. In an ideal 2DEG system, electrons can move freely along the interface but are tightly confined in the c-axis that is perpendicular to the interface. Nevertheless, the actual electron gas in the SrTiO3-based perovskite heterostructures is extended a few nanometers along the c-axis into the SrTiO3 substrate, and thus they are also called as quasi-2DEG. Actually, it is a problem of both fundamental and practical interest to achieve an ideal 2DEG via enhancing the lateral quantum confinement effects. By using first-principles electronic structure calculations, herein we proposed two possible approaches to enhance the quantum charge confinement effects by confining the electron gas within one single atomic layer in the perovskite oxide heterostructure. This work is supported by start-up funds at the University of California, San Diego.

  20. Quantum Joule-Thomson effect in a saturated homogeneous Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidutz, Tobias F; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L; Smith, Robert P; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-31

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>10(9)  K/bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases. PMID:24580421

  1. Ideal-Modified Bosonic Gas Trapped in AN Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Power-Law Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Lämmerzahl, C.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the effects caused by an anomalous single-particle dispersion relation suggested in several quantum-gravity models, upon the thermodynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a generic three-dimensional power-law potential. We prove that the shift in the condensation temperature, caused by a deformed dispersion relation, described as a non-trivial function of the number of particles and the shape associated to the corresponding trap, could provide bounds for the parameters associated to such deformation. In addition, we calculate the fluctuations in the number of particles as a criterium of thermodynamic stability for these systems. We show that the apparent instability caused by the anomalous fluctuations in the thermodynamic limit can be suppressed considering the lowest energy associated to the system in question.

  2. Simulation of ideal-gas flow by nitrogen and other selected gases at cryogenic temperatures. [transonic flow in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The real gas behavior of nitrogen, the gas normally used in transonic cryogenic tunnels, is reported for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion, normal shocks, boundary layers, and interactions between shock waves and boundary layers. The only difference in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas which may limit the minimum operating temperature of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels occur at total pressures approaching 9 atm and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature. These pressure differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Alternative cryogenic test gases were also analyzed. Differences between air and an ideal diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those for nitrogen and should present no difficulty. However, differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. It is concluded that helium and cryogenic hydrogen would not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal diatomic gas.

  3. Idealized gas turbine combustor for performance research and validation of large eddy simulations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy C; Schefer, Robert W; Oefelein, Joseph C; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2007-03-01

    This paper details the design of a premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor that was designed and built for the express purpose of obtaining validation-quality data for the development of large eddy simulations (LES) of gas turbine combustors. The combustor features nonambiguous boundary conditions, a geometrically simple design that retains the essential fluid dynamics and thermochemical processes that occur in actual gas turbine combustors, and unrestrictive access for laser and optical diagnostic measurements. After discussing the design detail, a preliminary investigation of the performance and operating envelope of the combustor is presented. With the combustor operating on premixed methane/air, both the equivalence ratio and the inlet velocity were systematically varied and the flame structure was recorded via digital photography. Interesting lean flame blowout and resonance characteristics were observed. In addition, the combustor exhibited a large region of stable, acoustically clean combustion that is suitable for preliminary validation of LES models. PMID:17411224

  4. Idealized gas turbine combustor for performance research and validation of large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Timothy C.; Schefer, Robert W.; Oefelein, Joseph C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper details the design of a premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor that was designed and built for the express purpose of obtaining validation-quality data for the development of large eddy simulations (LES) of gas turbine combustors. The combustor features nonambiguous boundary conditions, a geometrically simple design that retains the essential fluid dynamics and thermochemical processes that occur in actual gas turbine combustors, and unrestrictive access for laser and optical diagnostic measurements. After discussing the design detail, a preliminary investigation of the performance and operating envelope of the combustor is presented. With the combustor operating on premixed methane/air, both the equivalence ratio and the inlet velocity were systematically varied and the flame structure was recorded via digital photography. Interesting lean flame blowout and resonance characteristics were observed. In addition, the combustor exhibited a large region of stable, acoustically clean combustion that is suitable for preliminary validation of LES models.

  5. Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardehali, Hossein; Pedram, Pouria

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we study the Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology. Using Schutz formalism and Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition, we obtain the corresponding Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We obtain exact classical and quantum mechanical solutions and construct wave packets to study the time evolution of the expectation value of the scale factor for two cases. We show that unlike classical solutions and upon choosing appropriate initial conditions, the expectation value of the scale factor never tends to the singular point which exhibits the singularity-free behavior of the solutions in the quantum domain.

  6. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V.

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V ˙ ≡ d V / d t , x ˙ , and T ˙ . The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for T ˙ is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal.

  7. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V̇≡dV/dt, ẋ, and Ṫ. The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for Ṫ is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal. PMID:26254656

  8. Monopole Excitations of a Harmonically Trapped One-Dimensional Bose Gas from the Ideal Gas to the Tonks-Girardeau Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Dunjko, V.; Zhang, Z. D.; Olshanii, M.

    2015-09-01

    Using a time-dependent modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MNLSE)—where the conventional chemical potential proportional to the density is replaced by the one inferred from Lieb-Liniger's exact solution—we study frequencies of the collective monopole excitations of a one-dimensional Bose gas. We find that our method accurately reproduces the results of a recent experimental study [E. Haller et al., Science 325, 1224 (2009)] in the full spectrum of interaction regimes from the ideal gas, through the mean-field regime, through the mean-field Thomas-Fermi regime, all the way to the Tonks-Giradeau gas. While the former two are accessible by the standard time-dependent NLSE and inaccessible by the time-dependent local density approximation, the situation reverses in the latter case. However, the MNLSE is shown to treat all these regimes within a single numerical method.

  9. Monopole excitations of a harmonically trapped one-dimensional Bose gas from the ideal gas to the Tonks-Girardeau regime.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Dunjko, V; Zhang, Z D; Olshanii, M

    2015-09-11

    Using a time-dependent modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MNLSE)-where the conventional chemical potential proportional to the density is replaced by the one inferred from Lieb-Liniger's exact solution-we study frequencies of the collective monopole excitations of a one-dimensional Bose gas. We find that our method accurately reproduces the results of a recent experimental study [E. Haller et al., Science 325, 1224 (2009)] in the full spectrum of interaction regimes from the ideal gas, through the mean-field regime, through the mean-field Thomas-Fermi regime, all the way to the Tonks-Giradeau gas. While the former two are accessible by the standard time-dependent NLSE and inaccessible by the time-dependent local density approximation, the situation reverses in the latter case. However, the MNLSE is shown to treat all these regimes within a single numerical method. PMID:26406838

  10. Ideal gas solubilities and solubility selectivities in a binary mixture of room-temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Finotello Alexia; Bara Jason E.; Narayan Suguna; Campder Dean; Noble Richard D.

    2008-07-01

    This study focuses on the solubility behaviors of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} gases in binary mixtures of imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) using l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ((C{sub 2}mim)(Tf{sub 2}N)) and l-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ((C{sub 2}mim)(BF{sub 4})) at 40{sup o}C and low pressures (about 1 atm). The mixtures tested were 0, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, and 100 mol % (C{sub 2}mim)(BF{sub 4}) in (C{sub 2}-mim)(Tf2{sub N}). Results show that regular solution theory (RST) can be used to describe the gas solubility and selectivity behaviors in RTIL mixtures using an average mixture solubility parameter or an average measured mixture molar volume. Interestingly, the solubility selectivity, defined as the ratio of gas mole fractions in the RTIL mixture, of CO{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4} in pure (C{sub 2}mim)(BF4) can be enhanced by adding 5 mol% (C{sub 2}-mim)(Tf{sub 2}N).

  11. Quantum Control of Molecular Gas Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedpour, S.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that strong impulsive gas heating or heating suppression at standard temperature and pressure can occur from coherent rotational excitation or deexcitation of molecular gases using a sequence of nonionizing laser pulses. For the case of excitation, subsequent collisional decoherence of the ensemble leads to gas heating significantly exceeding that from plasma absorption under the same laser focusing conditions. In both cases, the macroscopic hydrodynamics of the gas can be finely controlled with ˜40 fs temporal sensitivity.

  12. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  13. Ideal-Gas Heat Capacity for 2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf) Determined from Speed-of-Sound Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Yuya; Kayukawa, Yohei; Fujii, Kenichi; Sato, Haruki

    2010-12-01

    The isobaric ideal-gas heat capacity for HFO-1234yf, which is expected to be one of the best alternative refrigerants for HFC-134a, was determined on the basis of speed-of-sound measurements in the gaseous phase. The speed of sound was measured by means of the acoustic resonance method using a spherical cavity. The resonance frequency in the spherical cavity containing the sample gas was measured to determine the speed of sound. After correcting for some effects such as the thermal boundary layer and deformation of the cavity on the resonance frequency, the speed of sound was obtained with a relative uncertainty of 0.01 %. Using the measured speed-of-sound data, the acoustic-virial equation was formulated and the isobaric ideal-gas heat capacity was determined with a relative uncertainty of 0.1 %. A temperature correlation function of the isobaric ideal-gas heat capacity for HFO-1234yf was also developed.

  14. Quantum hydrodynamics and expansion of a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. Y.; Zhou, L.; Ma, Y. L.

    2009-11-01

    We generalize the quantum hydrodynamical equations and study the dynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas trapped in an anisotropic harmonic trap. By using this simple theory to simulate the expansion of the Fermi gas observed experimentally by O'Hara et al., Science, 298 (2002) 2179, we find that the density profiles of the system are well described by the Fetter-like form in the dynamical process in all spatial directions. We also discuss the anisotropic dependence on the expansion.

  15. Notes on the unsteady rectilinear motion of a perfect gas. 10: On the influence of gravity upon the expansion of an ideal gas with gamma = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steketee, J. A.

    1990-08-01

    A vertical column of an ideal homentropic gas is at rest in a gravitational field, with constant acceleration of gravity g. At the upper end the column is bounded by a piston, while downwards it extends indefinitely. The gas pressure p at the piston has the value p sub 0, while above the piston there is vacuum extended to infinity. At time t = 0 the piston is suddenly removed, permitting the gas to expand and to move into the vacuum. The motion of the gas for t is greater than 0 is studied. Burgers considered this problem for gamma equals 5/3 and found that the gas starts to move upwards, but after some time, due to the action of the gravity the velocity changes direction and the gas begins to fall back. In this phase of the motion the solution shows some singularities, which indicate that physically a shock wave, moving in downwards direction, makes its appearance. The flow beyond the shock wave can only be analyzed tentatively and the analysis retains a preliminary character. Also a final state of rest is only approximately obtained for large t. Burgers' problem is considered once more for a fictitious gas with gamma = 3. This assumption simplifies the analysis and the singularities found for gamma equals 5/3 are drastically reduced. Also since the answers are simpler it is possible to a large extent to invert the solutions. Distinct from the case with gamma = 5/3 there is no overshoot, followed by a falling back, accompanied by a shock wave. For gamma = 3 the gas begins at t = 0 to move upwards but slows down and reaches a maximum height with speed zero, and density zero.

  16. Bernoulli's formula and Poisson's equations for a confined quantum gas: Effects due to a moving piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Katsuhiro; Sobirov, Zarifboy A.; Matrasulov, Davron U.; Avazbaev, Sanat K.

    2012-12-01

    We study a nonequilibrium equation of states of an ideal quantum gas confined in the cavity under a moving piston with a small but finite velocity in the case in which the cavity wall suddenly begins to move at the time origin. Confining ourselves to the thermally isolated process, the quantum nonadiabatic (QNA) contribution to Poisson's adiabatic equations and to Bernoulli's formula which bridges the pressure and internal energy is elucidated. We carry out a statistical mean of the nonadiabatic (time-reversal-symmetric) force operator found in our preceding paper [Nakamura , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.041133 83, 041133 (2011)] in both the low-temperature quantum-mechanical and high-temperature quasiclassical regimes. The QNA contribution, which is proportional to the square of the piston's velocity and to the inverse of the longitudinal size of the cavity, has a coefficient that is dependent on the temperature, gas density, and dimensionality of the cavity. The investigation is done for a unidirectionally expanding three-dimensional (3D) rectangular parallelepiped cavity as well as its 1D version. Its relevance in a realistic nanoscale heat engine is discussed.

  17. Bernoulli's formula and Poisson's equations for a confined quantum gas: effects due to a moving piston.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuhiro; Sobirov, Zarifboy A; Matrasulov, Davron U; Avazbaev, Sanat K

    2012-12-01

    We study a nonequilibrium equation of states of an ideal quantum gas confined in the cavity under a moving piston with a small but finite velocity in the case in which the cavity wall suddenly begins to move at the time origin. Confining ourselves to the thermally isolated process, the quantum nonadiabatic (QNA) contribution to Poisson's adiabatic equations and to Bernoulli's formula which bridges the pressure and internal energy is elucidated. We carry out a statistical mean of the nonadiabatic (time-reversal-symmetric) force operator found in our preceding paper [Nakamura et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 041133 (2011)] in both the low-temperature quantum-mechanical and high-temperature quasiclassical regimes. The QNA contribution, which is proportional to the square of the piston's velocity and to the inverse of the longitudinal size of the cavity, has a coefficient that is dependent on the temperature, gas density, and dimensionality of the cavity. The investigation is done for a unidirectionally expanding three-dimensional (3D) rectangular parallelepiped cavity as well as its 1D version. Its relevance in a realistic nanoscale heat engine is discussed. PMID:23367914

  18. Speed-of-sound measurements and ideal-gas heat capacity for 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Hozumi, T.; Sato, H.; Watanabe, K.

    1996-09-01

    The speed of sound in gaseous 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a, CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F) and difluoromethane (R-32, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}) has been measured by using a spherical resonator. The measurements for R-134a have been carried out along two isotherms at 323 K and 343 K and at pressures up to 400 kPa for a total of 26 values. For R-32 the measurements were made at 308 K, 323 K, 333 K, and 343 K and at pressures up to 500 kPa for a total of 44 measurements. The experimental uncertainties for R-134a in temperature, pressure, and speed of sound are estimated to be not greater than {+-}6 mK, {+-}0.2 kPa, and {+-}0.0061%, respectively. The experimental uncertainties for R-32 in temperature, pressure, and speed of sound are estimated to be not greater than {+-}8 mK, {+-}0.2 kPa, and {+-}0.0061%, respectively. The purities of the R-134a and R-32 samples were better than 99.95% and 99.99% of area percent of the gas chromatography, respectively. The authors have determined the ideal-gas heat capacities and the second acoustic virial coefficients from the speed-of-sound measurements.

  19. FRW quantum cosmology with a generalized Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Moniz, Paulo Vargas

    2005-03-15

    Cosmologies with a Chaplygin gas have recently been explored with the objective of explaining the transition from a dust dominated epoch towards an accelerating expansion stage. In this context, we consider the hypothesis that this transition involves a quantum mechanical process. Our analysis is entirely analytical, with the objective of finding explicit mathematical expressions for the different quantum mechanical states and their cosmological implications. We employ a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) minisuperspace model, characterized by two Lorentzian sectors, separated by a classically forbidden region. This is the configuration associated with the evolution of a generalized Chaplygin gas in a FRW universe. The Hartle-Hawking and Vilenkin wave functions are then computed, together with the transition amplitudes towards the accelerating epoch. Furthermore, for specific initial conditions we found that the generalized Chaplygin gas parameters become related through an expression involving an integer n. We also introduce a phenomenological association between some brane-world scenarios and a FRW minisuperspace cosmology with a generalized Chaplygin gas. The aim is to promote a discussion and subsequent research on the quantum creation of brane cosmologies from such a perspective. Additional results in this paper suggest that the brane tension would become related with the generalized Chaplygin gas parameters through another expression involving an integer.

  20. Stability of a trapped dipolar quantum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, D.; Bisset, R. N.; Blakie, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the stability diagram for a trapped normal Fermi or Bose gas with dipole-dipole interactions. Our study characterizes the roles of trap geometry and temperature on the stability using Hartree-Fock theory. We find that exchange appreciably reduces stability and that, for bosons, the double instability feature in oblate trapping geometries predicted previously is still predicted by the Hartree-Fock theory. Our results are relevant to current experiments with polar molecules and will be useful in developing strategies to obtain a polar molecule Bose-Einstein condensate or degenerate Fermi gas.

  1. Rigorous investigation of the reduced density matrix for the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps by a loop-gas-like approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beau, Mathieu; Savoie, Baptiste

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we rigorously investigate the reduced density matrix (RDM) associated to the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps. We present a method based on a sum-decomposition of the RDM allowing to treat not only the isotropic trap, but also general anisotropic traps. When focusing on the isotropic trap, the method is analogous to the loop-gas approach developed by Mullin ["The loop-gas approach to Bose-Einstein condensation for trapped particles," Am. J. Phys. 68(2), 120 (2000)]. Turning to the case of anisotropic traps, we examine the RDM for some anisotropic trap models corresponding to some quasi-1D and quasi-2D regimes. For such models, we bring out an additional contribution in the local density of particles which arises from the mesoscopic loops. The close connection with the occurrence of generalized-Bose-Einstein condensation is discussed. Our loop-gas-like approach provides relevant information which can help guide numerical investigations on highly anisotropic systems based on the Path Integral Monte Carlo method.

  2. Rigorous investigation of the reduced density matrix for the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps by a loop-gas-like approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beau, Mathieu; Savoie, Baptiste

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we rigorously investigate the reduced density matrix (RDM) associated to the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps. We present a method based on a sum-decomposition of the RDM allowing to treat not only the isotropic trap, but also general anisotropic traps. When focusing on the isotropic trap, the method is analogous to the loop-gas approach developed by Mullin [“The loop-gas approach to Bose-Einstein condensation for trapped particles,” Am. J. Phys. 68(2), 120 (2000)]. Turning to the case of anisotropic traps, we examine the RDM for some anisotropic trap models corresponding to some quasi-1D and quasi-2D regimes. For such models, we bring out an additional contribution in the local density of particles which arises from the mesoscopic loops. The close connection with the occurrence of generalized-Bose-Einstein condensation is discussed. Our loop-gas-like approach provides relevant information which can help guide numerical investigations on highly anisotropic systems based on the Path Integral Monte Carlo method.

  3. Quantum hydrodynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The peculiar dynamics of superfluids are a fascinating research topic. Since the first generation of a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995, quantum degenerate atomic gases have taken the investigation of quantum hydrodynamics to a new level. The atomic physics toolbox has grown tremendously and now provides unique and powerful ways to explore nonlinear quantum systems. As an example, pioneering results have recently revealed that the counterflow between two superfluids can be used as a well controlled tool to access the rich dynamics of vector systems. New structures, such as beating dark-dark solitons which only exist in multicomponent systems and have never been observed before, can now be realized in the lab for the first time. Furthermore, the field of nonlinear quantum hydrodynamics is entering new regimes by exploiting Raman dressing as a tool to directly modify the dispersion relation. This leads to the generation of spin-orbit coupled BECs, artificial gauge fields, etc. that are currently receiving tremendous interest due to their parallels to complex condensed-matter systems. Studies of quantum hydrodynamics help to develop a profound understanding of nonlinear quantum dynamics, which is not only of fundamental interest but also of eminent importance for future technological applications, e.g. in telecommunication applications using optical solitons in fibers. This talk will showcase some ``classic'' hallmark results and highlight recent advances from the forefront of the field.

  4. DIPPER project 871 determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds, The 1991 project results

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.; Tasker, I.R.

    1993-09-01

    Results of a study aimed at improving group-contribution methodology for estimating thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, n-octylamine, di-n-octylamine, tri-n-octylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine are reported. Two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined for phthalan, isoxazole, the three octylamines, and phenyl isocyanate. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for phthalan and isoxazole at 298 to 425 K. The critical temperature and critical density of n-octylamine were determined from d.s.c. results and critical pressure derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, pressures, and densities for cyclohexene (pressure and density only), phthalan, isoxazole, di-n-octylamine, and phenyl isocyanate. Group-additivity parameters or ring-correction terms are derived.

  5. Shortcut to Adiabaticity for an Anisotropic Gas Containing Quantum Defects.

    PubMed

    Papoular, D J; Stringari, S

    2015-07-10

    We present a shortcut to adiabaticity (STA) protocol applicable to 3D unitary Fermi gases and 2D weakly interacting Bose gases containing defects such as vortices or solitons. Our protocol relies on a new class of exact scaling solutions in the presence of anisotropic time-dependent harmonic traps. It connects stationary states in initial and final traps having the same frequency ratios. The resulting scaling laws exhibit a universal form and also apply to the classical Boltzmann gas. The duration of the STA can be made very short so as to realize a quantum quench from one stationary state to another. When applied to an anisotropically trapped superfluid gas, the STA conserves the shape of the quantum defects hosted by the cloud, thereby acting like a perfect microscope, which sharply contrasts with their strong distortion occurring during the free expansion of the cloud. PMID:26207476

  6. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This

  7. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  8. Dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser for trace gas spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jágerská, J.; Tuzson, B.; Mangold, M.; Emmenegger, L.; Jouy, P.; Hugi, A.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.; Looser, H.

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a sequentially operating dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser with electrically separated laser sections, emitting single-mode at 5.25 and 6.25 μm. Based on a single waveguide ridge, this laser represents a considerable asset to optical sensing and trace gas spectroscopy, as it allows probing multiple gas species with spectrally distant absorption features using conventional optical setups without any beam combining optics. The laser capability was demonstrated in simultaneous NO and NO{sub 2} detection, reaching sub-ppb detection limits and selectivity comparable to conventional high-end spectroscopic systems.

  9. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Reyes, A; Hou, Z; van Mastrigt, E; Horsten, R C; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W; Urbach, H P; Bhattacharya, N

    2014-07-28

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm(-1). Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present in a complex gas mixture without any pre-treatment in two minutes. We demonstrate that we can detect sub-ppmv concentration of acetone in presence of 2% of water at the same wavenumber region. PMID:25089450

  10. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Angela; Di Franco, Cinzia; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2006-01-01

    Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, non invasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selective detection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb) and sub-ppb range. The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) has given a new aspect to infrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLs are attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrow linewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these laser sources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity, compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reports recent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensor employing a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb of ozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacoustic sensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring and medical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  11. Self-energy of an impurity in an ideal Fermi gas to second order in the interaction strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefzger, Christian; Castin, Yvan

    2014-09-01

    We study in three dimensions the problem of a spatially homogeneous zero-temperature ideal Fermi gas of spin-polarized particles of mass m perturbed by the presence of a single distinguishable impurity of mass M. The interaction between the impurity and the fermions involves only the partial s wave through the scattering length a and has negligible range b compared to the inverse Fermi wave number 1/kF of the gas. Through the interactions with the Fermi gas the impurity gives birth to a quasiparticle, which will be here a Fermi polaron (or more precisely a monomeron). We consider the general case of an impurity moving with wave vector K ≠0: Then the quasiparticle acquires a finite lifetime in its initial momentum channel because it can radiate particle-hole pairs in the Fermi sea. A description of the system using a variational approach, based on a finite number of particle-hole excitations of the Fermi sea, then becomes inappropriate around K =0. We rely thus upon perturbation theory, where the small and negative parameter kFa→0- excludes any branches other than the monomeronic one in the ground state (as, e.g., the dimeronic one), and allows us a systematic study of the system. We calculate the impurity self-energy Σ(2)(K,ω) up to second order included in a. Remarkably, we obtain an analytical explicit expression for Σ(2)(K,ω), allowing us to study its derivatives in the plane (K,ω). These present interesting singularities, which in general appear in the third-order derivatives ∂3Σ(2)(K,ω). In the special case of equal masses, M =m, singularities appear already in the physically more accessible second-order derivatives ∂2Σ(2)(K,ω); using a self-consistent heuristic approach based on Σ(2) we then regularize the divergence of the second-order derivative ∂K2ΔE(K) of the complex energy of the quasiparticle found in Trefzger and Castin [Europhys. Lett. 104, 50005 (2013), 10.1209/0295-5075/104/50005] at K =kF, and we predict an interesting scaling law in the neighborhood of K =kF. As a by product of our theory we have access to all moments of the momentum of the particle-hole pair emitted by the impurity while damping its motion in the Fermi sea at the level of Fermi's golden rule.

  12. Control of hot-carrier relaxation for realizing ideal quantum-dot intermediate-band solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tex, David M; Kamiya, Itaru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    For intermediate-band solar cells, the broad absorption spectrum of quantum dots (QDs) offers a favorable conversion efficiency, and photocurrent generation via efficient two-step two-photon-absorption (TS-TPA) in QDs is essential for realizing high-performance solar cells. In the last decade, many works were dedicated to improve the TS-TPA efficiency by modifying the QD itself, however, the obtained results are far from the requirements for practical applications. To reveal the mechanisms behind the low TS-TPA efficiency in QDs, we report here on two- and three-beam photocurrent measurements of InAs quantum structures embedded in AlGaAs. Comparison of two- and three-beam photocurrent spectra obtained by subbandgap excitation reveals that the QD TS-TPA efficiency is improved significantly by suppressing the relaxation of hot TS-TPA carriers to unoccupied shallow InAs quantum structure states. PMID:24535195

  13. When is a quantum cellular automaton (QCA) a quantum lattice gas automaton (QLGA)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Asif; Love, Peter J.

    2013-09-01

    Quantum cellular automata (QCA) are models of quantum computation of particular interest from the point of view of quantum simulation. Quantum lattice gas automata (QLGA - equivalently partitioned quantum cellular automata) represent an interesting subclass of QCA. QLGA have been more deeply analyzed than QCA, whereas general QCA are likely to capture a wider range of quantum behavior. Discriminating between QLGA and QCA is therefore an important question. In spite of much prior work, classifying which QCA are QLGA has remained an open problem. In the present paper we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for unbounded, finite QCA (finitely many active cells in a quiescent background) to be QLGA. We define a local condition that classifies those QCA that are QLGA, and we show that there are QCA that are not QLGA. We use a number of tools from functional analysis of separable Hilbert spaces and representation theory of associative algebras that enable us to treat QCA on finite but unbounded configurations in full detail.

  14. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock front.

  15. Ideal square quantum wells achieved in AlGaN/GaN superlattices using ultrathin blocking-compensation pair

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaohong; Xu, Hongmei; Xu, Fuchun; Chen, Hangyang; Kang, Junyong E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn; Lin, Na; Cai, Duanjun E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-03-16

    A technique for achieving square-shape quantum wells (QWs) against the intrinsic polar discontinuity and interfacial diffusion through self-compensated pair interlayers is reported. Ultrathin low-and-high % pair interlayers that have diffusion-blocking and self-compensation capacities is proposed to resist the elemental diffusion at nanointerfaces and to grow the theoretically described abrupt rectangular AlGaN/GaN superlattices by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Light emission efficiency in such nanostructures is effectively enhanced and the quantum-confined Stark effect could be partially suppressed. This concept could effectively improve the quality of ultrathin QWs in functional nanostructures with other semiconductors or through other growth methods.

  16. Quintessence and (anti-)Chaplygin gas in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Lamon, Raphael; Woehr, Andreas J.

    2010-01-15

    The concordance model of cosmology contains several unknown components such as dark matter and dark energy. Many proposals have been made to describe them by choosing an appropriate potential for a scalar field. We study four models in the realm of loop quantum cosmology: the Chaplygin gas, an inflationary and radiationlike potential, quintessence and an anti-Chaplygin gas. For the latter we show that all trajectories start and end with a type II singularity and, depending on the initial value, may go through a bounce. On the other hand the evolution under the influence of the first three scalar fields behaves classically at times far away from the big bang singularity and bounces as the energy density approaches the critical density.

  17. The Instability of Terahertz Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Gated and Ungated Quantum Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping

    2016-04-01

    The instability of terahertz (THz) plasma waves in two-dimensional (2D) quantum electron gas in a nanometer field effect transistor (FET) with asymmetrical boundary conditions has been investigated. We analyze THz plasma waves of two parts of the 2D quantum electron gas: gated and ungated regions. The results show that the radiation frequency and the increment (radiation power) in 2D ungated quantum electron gas are much higher than that in 2D gated quantum electron gas. The quantum effects always enhance the radiation power and enlarge the region of instability in both cases. This allows us to conclude that 2D quantum electron gas in the transistor channel is important for the emission and detection process and both gated and ungated parts take part in that process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10975114)

  18. Equation of state and ideal-gas heat capacity of a gaseous mixture of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, pentafluoroethane, and difluoromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Hurly, J.J.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gillis, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present the gas-phase equation of state and ideal-gas heat capacity of a ternary mixture of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (35%), pentafluoroethane (30%), and difluoromethane (35%) for temperatures between 260 and 453 K and pressures between 0.05 and 7.7 MPa. These results were based on two very different measurement techniques. The first technique measured the gas density of the mixture in a Burnett apparatus from 313 to 453 K and from 0.2 to 7.7 MPa. The second technique deduced the gas density and ideal-gas heat capacity from high-accuracy speed-of-sound measurements in the mixture at temperatures between 260 and 400 K and at pressures between 0.05 and 1.0 MPa. The data from the two techniques were analyzed together to obtain an equation of state that reproduced the densities from the Burnett technique with a fractional RMS deviation of 0.038%, and it also reproduced the sound speeds with a fractional RMS deviation of 0.003%. Finally, the results are compared to a predictive model based on the properties of the pure fluids.

  19. Gas-Solid Transition of Quantum Particles Interacting with Inverse-Power-Law Repulsive Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Kwon, Yongkyung; Koike, Yukio; Hirashima, Dai S.

    2014-04-01

    We study the gas-solid phase diagram of quantum particles interacting with the inverse-power-law repulsive interaction. It is found that the solid phase is promoted by the quantum effect in the intermediate region where the quantum effect is not yet dominant but is nonnegligible. We further find that a weak minimum in the coexistence pressure curve appears at low temperatures.

  20. External cavity tunable quantum cascade lasers and their applications to trace gas monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Since the first quantum cascade laser (QCL) was demonstrated approximately 16 years ago, we have witnessed an explosion of interesting developments in QCL technology and QCL-based trace gas sensors. QCLs operate in the mid-IR region (3-24??m) and can directly access the rotational vibrational bands of most molecular species and, therefore, are ideally suited for trace gas detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These sensors have applications in a wide range of fields, including environmental monitoring, atmospheric chemistry, medical diagnostics, homeland security, detection of explosive compounds, and industrial process control, to name a few. Tunable external cavity (EC)-QCLs in particular offer narrow linewidths, wide ranges of tunability, and stable power outputs, which open up new possibilities for sensor development. These features allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple species and the study of large molecules, free radicals, ions, and reaction kinetics. In this article, we review the current status of EC-QCLs and sensor developments based on them and speculate on possible future developments. PMID:21283214

  1. Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey P.

    2014-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The ideal MHD model; 3. General properties of ideal MHD; 5. Equilibrium: one-dimensional configurations; 6. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations; 7. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations; 8. Stability: general considerations; 9. Alternate MHD models; 10. MHD stability comparison theorems; 11. Stability: one-dimensional configurations; 12. Stability: multi-dimensional configurations; Appendix A. Heuristic derivation of the kinetic equation; Appendix B. The Braginskii transport coefficients; Appendix C. Time derivatives in moving plasmas; Appendix D. The curvature vector; Appendix E. Overlap limit of the high b and Greene-Johnson stellarator models; Appendix F. General form for q(y); Appendix G. Natural boundary conditions; Appendix H. Upper and lower bounds on dQKIN.

  2. Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-05-26

    The advent of bottom-up atomic manipulation heralded a new horizon for attainable information density, as it allowed a bit of information to be represented by a single atom. The discrete spacing between atoms in condensed matter has thus set a rigid limit on the maximum possible information density. While modern technologies are still far from this scale, all theoretical downscaling of devices terminates at this spatial limit. Here, however, we break this barrier with electronic quantum encoding scaled to subatomic densities. We use atomic manipulation to first construct open nanostructures - 'molecular holograms' - which in turn concentrate information into a medium free of lattice constraints: the quantum states of a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The information embedded in the holograms is transcoded at even smaller length scales into an atomically uniform area of a copper surface, where it is densely projected into both two spatial degrees of freedom and a third holographic dimension mapped to energy. In analogy to optical volume holography, this requires precise amplitude and phase engineering of electron wavefunctions to assemble pages of information volumetrically. This data is read out by mapping the energy-resolved electron density of states with a scanning tunnelling microscope. As the projection and readout are both extremely near-field, and because we use native quantum states rather than an external beam, we are not limited by lensing or collimation and can create electronically projected objects with features as small as {approx}0.3 nm. These techniques reach unprecedented densities exceeding 20 bits/nm{sup 2} and place tens of bits into a single fermionic state.

  3. Quantum-electrodynamical parametric instability in the incoherent photon gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2013-02-01

    We present a theory for the quantum-electrodynamical (QED) parametric scattering instability of an intense photon pulse in an incoherent radiation background. The pump electromagnetic (EM) wave can decay into a scattered daughter EM wave and an acousticlike wave due to the QED vacuum polarization nonlinearity. By a linear instability analysis we obtain a nonlinear dispersion relation for the growth rate of the scattering instability. The nonlinear QED scattering instability can give rise to the exchange of orbital angular momentum between intense Laguerre-Gaussian mode photon pulses and the two daughter waves, which may be a useful method to detect the highly energetic photon gases existing in the vicinity of rotating dense bodies in the Universe, such as pulsars and magnetars. The observation of the scattered waves may reveal information about the twisted acoustic waves in the incoherent photon gas. PMID:23496629

  4. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity. PMID:26465581

  5. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under a gravitational field due to heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche Model). The unsteady model of Roche consists of a dusty gas distributed with spherical symmetry around a nucleus having large mass It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the heavy nucleus. The density of the ambient medium is taken to be constant. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effect surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable difference can be found in the distribution of flow variables. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the gravitational parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is increased with an increase in the value of gravitational parameter. Further, it is investigated that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under a gravitational field can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, star formation in shocks, shocks in supernova explosions and shocks in stellar explosion, rupture of a pressurized vessels and explosion in the ionosphere etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating medium.

  6. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates. PMID:26150069

  7. Ideal CO2/Light Gas Separation Performance of Poly(vinylimidazolium) Membranes and Poly(vinylimidazolium)-Ionic Liquid Composite Films

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, TK; Wiesenauer, EF; Nicodemus, GD; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2013-01-23

    Six vinyl-based, imidazolium room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) monomers were synthesized and photopolymerized to form dense poly(RTIL) membranes. The effect of polymer backbone (i.e., poly(ethylene), poly(styrene), and poly(acrylate)) and functional cationic substituent (e.g., alkyl, fluoroalkyl, oligo(ethylene glycol), and disiloxane) on ideal CO2/N-2 and CO2/CH4 membrane separation performance was investigated. The vinyl-based poly(RTIL)s were found to be generally less CO2-selective compared to analogous styrene- and acrylate-based poly(RTIL)s. The CO2 permeability of n-hexyl-(69 barrers) and disiloxane- (130 barrers) substituted vinyl-based poly(RTIL)s were found to be exceptionally larger than that of previously studied styrene and acrylate poly(RTIL)s. The CO2 selectivity of oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized vinyl poly(RTIL)s was enhanced, and the CO2 permeability was reduced when compared to the n-hexyl-substituted vinyl-based poly(RTIL). Nominal improvement in CO2/CH4 selectivity was observed upon fluorination of the n-hexyl vinyl-based poly(RTIL), with no observed change in CO2 permeability. However, rather dramatic improvements in both CO2 permeability and selectivity were observed upon blending 20 mol % RTIL (emim Tf2N) into the n-hexyl- and disiloxane-functionalized vinyl poly(RTIL)s to form solid liquid composite films.

  8. Optimizing quantum gas production by an evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, T.; Hohmann, M.; Kindermann, F.; Mayer, D.; Schmidt, F.; Widera, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the application of an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to enhance performance of an ultra-cold quantum gas experiment. The production of a ^{87}rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can be divided into fundamental cooling steps, specifically magneto-optical trapping of cold atoms, loading of atoms to a far-detuned crossed dipole trap, and finally the process of evaporative cooling. The EA is applied separately for each of these steps with a particular definition for the feedback, the so-called fitness. We discuss the principles of an EA and implement an enhancement called differential evolution. Analyzing the reasons for the EA to improve, e.g., the atomic loading rates and increase the BEC phase-space density, yields an optimal parameter set for the BEC production and enables us to reduce the BEC production time significantly. Furthermore, we focus on how additional information about the experiment and optimization possibilities can be extracted and how the correlations revealed allow for further improvement. Our results illustrate that EAs are powerful optimization tools for complex experiments and exemplify that the application yields useful information on the dependence of these experiments on the optimized parameters.

  9. A quantum chemistry study of natural gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Atilhan, Mert; Pala, Nezih; Aparicio, Santiago

    2014-04-01

    The structure and properties of natural gas hydrates containing hydrocarbons, CO₂, and N₂ molecules were studied by using computational quantum chemistry methods via the density functional theory approach. All host cages involved in I, II, and H types structures where filled with hydrocarbons up to pentanes, CO₂ and N₂ molecules, depending on their size, and the structures of these host-guest systems optimized. Structural properties, vibrational spectra, and density of states were analyzed together with results from atoms-in-a-molecule and natural bond orbitals methods. The inclusion of dispersion terms in the used functional plays a vital role for obtaining reliable information, and thus, B97D functional was shown to be useful for these systems. Results showed remarkable interaction energies, not strongly affected by the type of host cage, with molecules tending to be placed at the center of the cavities when host cages and guest molecules cavities are of similar size, but with molecules approaching hexagonal faces for larger cages. Vibrational properties show remarkable features in certain regions, with shiftings rising from host-guest interactions, and useful patterns in the terahertz region rising from water surface vibrations strongly coupled with guest molecules. Likewise, calculations on crystal systems for the I and H types were carried out using a pseudopotential approach combined with Grimme's method to take account of dispersion. PMID:24633777

  10. Sex Education and Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.; Spiecker, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that sex education should include sexual ideals. Sexual ideals are divided into sexual ideals in the strict sense and sexual ideals in the broad sense. It is argued that ideals that refer to the context that is deemed to be most ideal for the gratification of sexual ideals in the strict sense are rightfully called sexual…

  11. Highly efficient counter-propagation-beams narrow-band ultraviolet frequency conversion in a quantum gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L; Hagley, E W

    2013-05-15

    We show that highly efficient ultraviolet frequency up conversion can be established in a single-component quantum gas in the counter-propagating weak pump beam geometry where no frequency up conversion can occur in a normal gas. We also show that all light-wave mixing and scattering processes in quantum gases originating from elementary excitations characterized by efficient collective atomic recoil motion are stimulated Raman/hyper-Raman in nature. PMID:23938922

  12. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low cost and compactness. In this dissertation we investigate the performance of the SG-DBR laser for its feasibility to monitor the atmospheric gases and possible other applications. For this purpose, we first reported continuous mode-hope free tuning and detected three consecutive N2O features by controlling all three sections of laser namely: front DBR, back DBR and the phase. Subsequently, we demonstrated a novel mechanism to tuning the laser wavelength by just controlling the current of front and back DBR sections. From this tuning methodology we achieved continuous tuning over a wide range ~ 10 cm-1. Applying the tuning method in a direct absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrated the viability of SG-DBR QCLs in multi-species gas sensing by detecting and retrieving the concentration of N2O, CO and H2O in ambient air. SG-DBR QCLs capability of high resolution spectroscopy has also been demonstrated at reduced pressure. We also performed Time Resolved Spectroscopy (TRS) to determine the tuning speed response when the DBR sections undergo current steps.

  13. Orbital Excitation Blockade and Algorithmic Cooling of Strongly Correlated Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Ming; Bakr, Waseem; Preiss, Philipp; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide a rich experimental toolbox for simulating the physics of condensed matter systems. Here we present a new blockade effect that employs the orbital dependence of the interaction between bosons in optical lattices to manipulate the onsite occupation in a strongly interacting quantum gas. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth and observe interaction-induced energy shifts in the modulation resonances. By sweeping the modulation frequency across several resonances we can deterministically remove atoms on individual sites based upon initial occupation. Using this number filtering approach, we have demonstrated algorithmic entropy removal from a high-temperature gas to the point that it Bose-condenses. This algorithmic cooling can be used to bring quantum gases to the pico-Kelvin regime required for observing strong correlations. Further applications of these methods include preparation of high fidelity quantum registers, imaging strongly-correlated quantum gases, and generation of entangled orbital states.

  14. A Fock space representation for the quantum Lorentz gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, H.; Tip, A.

    1995-02-01

    A Fock space representation is given for the quantum Lorentz gas, i.e., for random Schrödinger operators of the form H(ω)=p2+Vω=p2+∑ φ(x-xj(ω)), acting in H=L2(Rd), with Poisson distributed xjs. An operator H is defined in K=H⊗P=H⊗L2(Ω,P(dω))=L2(Ω,P(dω);H) by the action of H(ω) on its fibers in a direct integral decomposition. The stationarity of the Poisson process allows a unitarily equivalent description in terms of a new family {H(k)||k∈Rd}, where each H(k) acts in P [A. Tip, J. Math. Phys. 35, 113 (1994)]. The space P is then unitarily mapped upon the symmetric Fock space over L2(Rd,ρdx), with ρ the intensity of the Poisson process (the average number of points xj per unit volume; the scatterer density), and the equivalent of H(k) is determined. Averages now become vacuum expectation values and a further unitary transformation (removing ρ in ρdx) is made which leaves the former invariant. The resulting operator HF(k) has an interesting structure: On the nth Fock layer we encounter a single particle moving in the field of n scatterers and the randomness now appears in the coefficient √ρ in a coupling term connecting neighboring Fock layers. We also give a simple direct self-adjointness proof for HF(k), based upon Nelson's commutator theorem. Restriction to a finite number of layers (a kind of low scatterer density approximation) still gives nontrivial results, as is demonstrated by considering an example.

  15. Van der Waals and ideal gas models for compressibility by means of pressure in pneumatic pipes from 1 to 100 Lpm.

    PubMed

    Mugruza Vassallo, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The general aim is to develop a Venturi flow sensor for the inspiration line to be used in mechanical ventilation. This work is an advance for the development and construction of this sensor and to explain some of its characteristics in mechanical ventilation. The Mach number in this sensor grows with the pipe diameter, but it is less than 0.3 to diameters higher than 3mm, and according to the traditional bibliography it can be used as incompressible fluid for the design. For this reason the simulations were done between 2:1 and 6:1 to simulation pressures from 15 to 16.5 Psi (mechanical ventilation range). The results of these simulations are: it needs to consider the gas compressibility levels for Mach numbers smaller than 0.3 because the error of flow measure can be between 5 and 15% for the pattern of ideal gas and enter 7.5 to 20% for the Van Der Waals model above the incompressibility pattern, and these results were used for the construction of the small reduction the Venturi's pipe from 3 to 78 Lpm, taken from absolute pressure to complete the norm ISO9360. PMID:17272118

  16. A note on the Fermi energy of an ideal Fermi gas trapped under a generic power law potential in d-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir

    2015-09-01

    The average energy per fermion in the case of a Fermi gas with any kinematic characteristic, trapped under the most general power law potential in d-dimension has been calculated at zero temperature. In a previous paper (Acharyya M 2010 Eur. J Phys. 31 L89) it was shown, in the case of a free ideal Fermi gas, as the dimension increases the average energy approaches the Fermi energy and in infinite dimension the average energy becomes equal to the Fermi energy at T = 0. In this letter it is shown that, for a trapped system at finite dimension the average energy depends on a power law exponent, but as the dimension tends to infinity the average energy coincides with the Fermi energy for any power law exponent. The result obtained in this manuscript is more general, as we can describe the free system as well as any trapped system with an appropriate choice of power law exponent, and is true for any kinematic parameter.

  17. Single-atom imaging of fermions in a quantum-gas microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Elmar; Hudson, James; Kelly, Andrew; Cotta, Dylan A.; Peaudecerf, Bruno; Bruce, Graham D.; Kuhr, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Single-atom-resolved detection in optical lattices using quantum-gas microscopes has enabled a new generation of experiments in the field of quantum simulation. Although such devices have been realized with bosonic species, a fermionic quantum-gas microscope has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate single-site- and single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of fermionic potassium-40 atoms in a quantum-gas microscope set-up, using electromagnetically-induced-transparency cooling. We detected on average 1,000 fluorescence photons from a single atom within 1.5 s, while keeping it close to the vibrational ground state of the optical lattice. A quantum simulator for fermions with single-particle access will be an excellent test bed to investigate phenomena and properties of strongly correlated fermionic quantum systems, allowing direct measurement of ordered quantum phases and out-of-equilibrium dynamics, with access to quantities ranging from spin-spin correlation functions to many-particle entanglement.

  18. Physically flexible, rapid-response gas sensor based on colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Min; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Hu, Long; Fu, Qiuyun; Zhou, Dongxiang; Xia, Zhe; Sargent, Edward H; Tang, Jiang

    2014-05-01

    A gas sensor based on PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is constructed on a paper substrate, yielding flexible, rapid-response NO₂ gas sensors, fabricated from the solution phase. The devices are highly sensitive and fully recoverable at room temperature, which is attributed to the excellent access of gas molecules to the CQD surface, realized by surface ligand removal, combined with the desirable binding energy of NO₂ with the PbS CQDs. PMID:24452852

  19. Quantum-cascade laser photoacoustic detection of methane emitted from natural gas powered engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, M. V.; Sthel, M. S.; Silva, M. G.; Paiva, L. B.; Pinheiro, F. W.; Miklòs, A.; Vargas, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we present a laser photoacoustic arrangement for the detection of the important greenhouse gas methane. A quantum-cascade laser and a differential photoacoustic cell were employed. A detection limit of 45 ppbv in nitrogen was achieved as well as a great selectivity. The same methodology was also tested in the detection of methane issued from natural gas powered vehicles (VNG) in Brazil, which demonstrates the excellent potential of this arrangement for greenhouse gas detection emitted from real sources.

  20. Energy Fluctuation of Ideal Fermi Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential U=\\sum_{i=1}^{d} c_i\\vert x_{i}/a_{i}\\vert^{n_{i} } in d Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir Mehedi, Faruk; Md. Muktadir, Rahman; Dwaipayan, Debnath; Md. Sakhawat Hossain, Himel

    2016-04-01

    Energy fluctuation of ideal Fermi gas trapped under generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1d ci \\vertxi/ai \\vert n_i has been calculated in arbitrary dimensions. Energy fluctuation is scrutinized further in the degenerate limit μ ≫ KBT with the help of Sommerfeld expansion. The dependence of energy fluctuation on dimensionality and power law potential is studied in detail. Most importantly our general result can not only exactly reproduce the recently published result regarding free and harmonically trapped ideal Fermi gas in d = 3 but also can describe the outcome for any power law potential in arbitrary dimension.

  1. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms. PMID:19890326

  2. Ideal clocksa convenient fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorek, Krzysztof; Louko, Jorma; Dragan, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    We show that no device built according to the rules of quantum field theory can measure proper time along its path. Highly accelerated quantum clocks experience the Unruh effect, which inevitably influences their time rate. This contradicts the concept of an ideal clock, whose rate should only depend on the instantaneous velocity.

  3. Impurity transport through a strongly interacting bosonic quantum gas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. H.; Clark, S. R.; Bruderer, M.; Jaksch, D.

    2011-08-15

    Using near-exact numerical simulations, we study the propagation of an impurity through a one-dimensional Bose lattice gas for varying bosonic interaction strengths and filling factors at zero temperature. The impurity is coupled to the Bose gas and confined to a separate tilted lattice. The precise nature of the transport of the impurity is specific to the excitation spectrum of the Bose gas, which allows one to measure properties of the Bose gas nondestructively, in principle, by observing the impurity; here we focus on the spatial and momentum distributions of the impurity as well as its reduced density matrix. For instance, we show it is possible to determine whether the Bose gas is commensurately filled as well as the bandwidth and gap in its excitation spectrum. Moreover, we show that the impurity acts as a witness to the crossover of its environment from the weakly to the strongly interacting regime, i.e., from a superfluid to a Mott insulator or Tonks-Girardeau lattice gas, and the effects on the impurity in both of these strongly interacting regimes are clearly distinguishable. Finally, we find that the spatial coherence of the impurity is related to its propagation through the Bose gas.

  4. Mesoscopic Rydberg Impurity in an Atomic Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Richard; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Demler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Giant impurity excitations are powerful probes for exploring new regimes of far out of equilibrium dynamics in few- and many-body quantum systems, and in situ observations of correlations. Motivated by recent experimental progress in spectroscopic studies of Rydberg excitations in ultracold atoms, we develop a new theoretical approach for describing multiscale dynamics of Rydberg excitations in quantum Bose gases. We find that the crossover from few- to many-body dynamics manifests in a dramatic change in spectral profile from resolved molecular lines to broad Gaussian distributions representing a superpolaronic state in which many atoms bind to the Rydberg impurity. We discuss signatures of this crossover in the temperature and density dependence of the spectra.

  5. Negative Differential Conductivity in an Interacting Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Wimberger, Sandro; Ott, Herwig

    2015-07-01

    We report on the observation of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in a quantum transport device for neutral atoms employing a multimode tunneling junction. The system is realized with a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded in a one-dimensional optical lattice with high site occupancy. We induce an initial difference in chemical potential at one site by local atom removal. The ensuing transport dynamics are governed by the interplay between the tunneling coupling, the interaction energy, and intrinsic collisions, which turn the coherent coupling into a hopping process. The resulting current-voltage characteristics exhibit NDC, for which we identify atom number-dependent tunneling as a new microscopic mechanism. Our study opens new ways for the future implementation and control of complex neutral atom quantum circuits.

  6. Mesoscopic Rydberg Impurity in an Atomic Quantum Gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Richard; Sadeghpour, H R; Demler, E

    2016-03-11

    Giant impurity excitations are powerful probes for exploring new regimes of far out of equilibrium dynamics in few- and many-body quantum systems, and in situ observations of correlations. Motivated by recent experimental progress in spectroscopic studies of Rydberg excitations in ultracold atoms, we develop a new theoretical approach for describing multiscale dynamics of Rydberg excitations in quantum Bose gases. We find that the crossover from few- to many-body dynamics manifests in a dramatic change in spectral profile from resolved molecular lines to broad Gaussian distributions representing a superpolaronic state in which many atoms bind to the Rydberg impurity. We discuss signatures of this crossover in the temperature and density dependence of the spectra. PMID:27015490

  7. High-harmonic generation in a quantum electron gas trapped in a nonparabolic and anisotropic well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Jérôme; Lévêque-Simon, Kévin; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine; Manfredi, Giovanni; Haas, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    An effective self-consistent model is derived and used to study the dynamics of an electron gas confined in a nonparabolic and anisotropic quantum well. This approach is based on the equations of quantum hydrodynamics, which incorporate quantum and nonlinear effects in an approximate fashion. The effective model consists of a set of six coupled differential equations (dynamical system) for the electric dipole and the size of the electron gas. Using this model we show that: (i) high harmonic generation is related to the appearance of chaos in the phase space, as attested to by related Poincaré sections; (ii) higher order harmonics can be excited efficiently and with relatively weak driving fields by making use of chirped electromagnetic waves.

  8. Creation of a low-entropy quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Steven A; Covey, Jacob P; Miecnikowski, Matthew T; Yan, Bo; Gadway, Bryce; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah S

    2015-11-01

    Ultracold polar molecules, with their long-range electric dipolar interactions, offer a unique platform for studying correlated quantum many-body phenomena. However, realizing a highly degenerate quantum gas of molecules with a low entropy per particle is challenging. We report the synthesis of a low-entropy quantum gas of potassium-rubidium molecules (KRb) in a three-dimensional optical lattice. We simultaneously load into the optical lattice a Mott insulator of bosonic Rb atoms and a single-band insulator of fermionic K atoms. Then, using magnetoassociation and optical state transfer, we efficiently produce ground-state molecules in the lattice at those sites that contain one Rb and one K atom. The achieved filling fraction of 25% should enable future studies of transport and entanglement propagation in a many-body system with long-range dipolar interactions. PMID:26542566

  9. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for Proving the Application of Quantum Symmetry Restrictions in Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosiere, M.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which gas chromatography is used to prove the application of quantum symmetry restrictions in homonuclear diatomic molecules. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical computed values show good agreement, within one to two…

  10. The Hidden Symmetries of Spin-1 Ising Lattice Gas for Usual Quantum Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payandeh, Farrin

    2016-02-01

    In this letter, the most common quantum Hamiltonian is exploited in order to compare the definite equivalences, corresponding to possible spin values in a lattice gas model, to those in a spin-1 Ising model. Our approach also requires interpolating both results in a p-state clock model, in order to find the hidden symmetries of both under consideration models.

  11. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for Proving the Application of Quantum Symmetry Restrictions in Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosiere, M.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which gas chromatography is used to prove the application of quantum symmetry restrictions in homonuclear diatomic molecules. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical computed values show good agreement, within one to two

  12. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  13. Underbarrier nucleation kinetics in a metastable quantum liquid near the liquid-gas spinodal line

    SciTech Connect

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.; Okuda, Y.

    2005-02-01

    We develop a theory that incorporates the relaxation properties of a condensed medium into the quantum decay of a metastable liquid near the liquid-gas spinodal line at low temperatures. We find that both the regime and the rate of quantum nucleation strongly depend on the relaxation time and its temperature behavior. The quantum nucleation rate slows down with decreasing relaxation time. We also discuss the low-temperature experiments on cavitation in normal {sup 3}He and superfluid {sup 4}He at negative pressures. It is the drastic distinctions in the properties of the high-frequency sound mode and in the temperature behavior of the relaxation time that make the quantum cavitation kinetics in {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He completely different.

  14. Creating a quantum degenerate gas of stable molecules via weak photoassociation

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Matt; Phou, Pierre

    2010-07-15

    Quantum degenerate molecules represent a new paradigm for fundamental studies and practical applications. Association of already quantum degenerate atoms into molecules provides a crucial shortcut around the difficulty of cooling molecules to ultracold temperatures. Whereas association can be induced with either laser or magnetic fields, photoassociation requires impractical laser intensity to overcome poor overlap between the atom pair and molecular wave functions, and experiments are currently restricted to magnetoassociation. Here we model realistic production of a quantum degenerate gas of stable molecules via two-photon photoassociation of Bose-condensed atoms. An adiabatic change of the laser frequency converts the initial atomic condensate almost entirely into stable molecular condensate, even for low-intensity lasers. Results for dipolar LiNa provide an upper bound on the necessary photoassociation laser intensity for alkali-metal atoms {approx}30 W/cm{sup 2}, indicating a feasible path to quantum degenerate molecules beyond magnetoassociation.

  15. Buoyancy-Driven Heat Transfer During Application of a Thermal Gradient for the Study of Vapor Deposition at Low Pressure Using and Ideal Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Hung, R. J.; Paley, M. S.; Penn, B. G.; Long, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to determine heat transfer during vapor deposition of source materials under a variety of orientations relative to gravitational accelerations. The model demonstrates that convection can occur at total pressures as low as 10-2 mm Hg. Through numerical computation, using physical material parameters of air, a series of time steps demonstrates the development of flow and temperature profiles during the course of vapor deposition. These computations show that in unit gravity vapor deposition occurs by transport through a fairly complicated circulating flow pattern when applying heat to the bottom of the vessel with parallel orientation with respect to the gravity vector. The model material parameters for air predict the effect of kinematic viscosity to be of the same order as thermal diffusivity, which is the case for Prandtl number approx. 1 fluids. Qualitative agreement between experiment and the model indicates that 6-(2-methyl-4-nitroanilino)-2,4-hexadiyn-l-ol (DAMNA) at these pressures indeed approximates an ideal gas at the experiment temperatures, and may validate the use of air physical constants. It is apparent that complicated nonuniform temperature distribution in the vapor could dramatically affect the homogeneity, orientation, and quality of deposited films. The experimental test i's a qualitative comparison of film thickness using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy on films generated in appropriately oriented vapor deposition cells. In the case where heating of the reaction vessel occurs from the top, deposition of vapor does not normally occur by convection due to a stable stratified medium. When vapor deposition occurs in vessels heated at the bottom, but oriented relative to the gravity vector between these two extremes, horizontal thermal gradients induce a complex flow pattern. In the plane parallel to the tilt axis, the flow pattern is symmetrical and opposite in direction from that where the vessel is positioned vertically. The ground-based experiments are sufficient preliminary tests of theory and should be of significant interest regarding vapor deposited films in microgravity.

  16. Chemiresistive gas sensors employing solution-processed metal oxide quantum dot films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huan Xu, Songman; Li, Min; Shao, Gang; Zhang, Wenkai; Wei, Wendian; He, Mingze; Song, Huaibing; Gao, Liang; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-10-20

    We report low-temperature chemiresistive gas sensors based on tin oxide colloidal quantum dots (CQDs), in which the benefits of CQDs such as extremely small crystal size, solution-processability, and tunable surface activity are exploited to enhance the gas-sensing effect. The sensor fabrication is simply employing spin-coating followed by a solid-state ligand exchange treatment at room temperature in air ambient. The optimal gas sensor exhibited rapid and significant decrease in resistance upon H{sub 2}S gas exposure when operated at 70 °C, and it was fully recoverable upon gas release. We observed a power law correlation between the sensor response and H{sub 2}S gas concentration, and the sensing mechanism was discussed using the completely depletion model with a flat band diagram.

  17. Chemiresistive gas sensors employing solution-processed metal oxide quantum dot films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Songman; Li, Min; Shao, Gang; Song, Huaibing; Zhang, Wenkai; Wei, Wendian; He, Mingze; Gao, Liang; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-10-01

    We report low-temperature chemiresistive gas sensors based on tin oxide colloidal quantum dots (CQDs), in which the benefits of CQDs such as extremely small crystal size, solution-processability, and tunable surface activity are exploited to enhance the gas-sensing effect. The sensor fabrication is simply employing spin-coating followed by a solid-state ligand exchange treatment at room temperature in air ambient. The optimal gas sensor exhibited rapid and significant decrease in resistance upon H2S gas exposure when operated at 70 °C, and it was fully recoverable upon gas release. We observed a power law correlation between the sensor response and H2S gas concentration, and the sensing mechanism was discussed using the completely depletion model with a flat band diagram.

  18. Negative Differential Conductivity in an Interacting Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Labouvie, Ralf; Heun, Simon; Wimberger, Sandro; Ott, Herwig

    2015-05-01

    Negative differential conductivity (NDC) is a widely exploited mechanism in many areas of research dealing with particle and energy transport. We experimentally realize such a many body quantum transport system based on ultracold atoms in a periodic potential. We prepare our system by loading Bose condensed rubidium atoms in a 1D optical lattice with high atom occupancy per lattice site. Subsequently, we remove all the atoms from a central lattice site. While the atoms from neighboring sites tunnel into the empty site, we observe NDC in the resulting current voltage characteristics and investigate the microscopic mechanism behind it.

  19. Satyendranath Bose: Co-Founder of Quantum Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanpied, William A.

    1972-01-01

    Satyendranath Bose was first to prove Planck's Law by using ideal quantum gas. Einstein credited Bose for this first step in the development of quantum statistical mechanics. Bose did not realize the importance of his work, perhaps because of peculiar academic settings in India under British rule. (PS)

  20. Quantum enhancement of spin drag in a Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, S. B.; Groot, A.; Bons, P. C.; Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H. T. C.; van der Straten, P.

    2015-11-01

    In spintronics the active control and manipulation of spin currents is studied in solid-state systems. Opposed to charge currents, spin currents are strongly damped due to collisions between different spin carriers in addition to relaxation due to impurities and lattice vibrations. The phenomenon of relaxation of spin currents is called spin drag. Here we study spin drag in ultra-cold bosonic atoms deep in the hydrodynamic regime and show that spin drag is the dominant damping mechanism for spin currents in this system. By increasing the phase space density we find that spin drag is enhanced in the quantum regime by more than a factor of two due to Bose stimulation, which is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions and, surprisingly, already occurs considerably above the phase transition.

  1. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  2. Observation of Scaling in the Dynamics of a Strongly Quenched Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklas, E.; Karl, M.; Höfer, M.; Johnson, A.; Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Tomkovič, J.; Gasenzer, T.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the experimental observation of scaling in the time evolution following a sudden quench into the vicinity of a quantum critical point. The experimental system, a two-component Bose gas with coherent exchange between the constituents, allows for the necessary high level of control of parameters as well as the access to time-resolved spatial correlation functions. The theoretical analysis reveals that when quenching the system close to the critical point, the energy introduced by the quench leads to a short-time evolution exhibiting crossover reminiscent of the finite-temperature critical properties in the system's universality class. Observing the time evolution after a quench represents a paradigm shift in accessing and probing experimentally universal properties close to a quantum critical point and allows in a new way benchmarking of quantum many-body theory with experiments.

  3. Observation of Scaling in the Dynamics of a Strongly Quenched Quantum Gas.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, E; Karl, M; Höfer, M; Johnson, A; Muessel, W; Strobel, H; Tomkovič, J; Gasenzer, T; Oberthaler, M K

    2015-12-11

    We report on the experimental observation of scaling in the time evolution following a sudden quench into the vicinity of a quantum critical point. The experimental system, a two-component Bose gas with coherent exchange between the constituents, allows for the necessary high level of control of parameters as well as the access to time-resolved spatial correlation functions. The theoretical analysis reveals that when quenching the system close to the critical point, the energy introduced by the quench leads to a short-time evolution exhibiting crossover reminiscent of the finite-temperature critical properties in the system's universality class. Observing the time evolution after a quench represents a paradigm shift in accessing and probing experimentally universal properties close to a quantum critical point and allows in a new way benchmarking of quantum many-body theory with experiments. PMID:26705638

  4. Quantum gas microscopy with spin, atom-number, and multilayer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Atom- and site-resolved experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a powerful platform for the simulation of strongly correlated materials. In this Rapid Communication, we present a toolbox for the preparation, control, and site-resolved detection of a tunnel-coupled bilayer degenerate quantum gas. Using a collisional blockade, we engineer occupation-dependent interplane transport which enables us to circumvent light-assisted pair loss during imaging and count n =0 to n =3 atoms per site. We obtain the first number- and site-resolved images of the Mott insulator "wedding cake" structure and observe the emergence of antiferromagnetic ordering across a magnetic quantum phase transition. We are further able to employ the bilayer system for spin-resolved readout of a mixture of two hyperfine states. This work opens the door to direct detection of entanglement and Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phase dynamics, as well as studies of coupled planar quantum materials.

  5. Probing the Quantum State of a 1D Bose Gas Using Off-Resonant Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, A. G.; Ballagh, R. J.

    2011-12-30

    We present a theoretical treatment of coherent light scattering from an interacting 1D Bose gas at finite temperatures. We show how this can provide a nondestructive measurement of the atomic system states. The equilibrium states are determined by the temperature and interaction strength, and are characterized by the spatial density-density correlation function. We show how this correlation function is encoded in the angular distribution of the fluctuations of the scattered light intensity, thus providing a sensitive, quantitative probe of the density-density correlation function and therefore the quantum state of the gas.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pilati, S.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Giorgini, S.

    2005-02-01

    The equation of state of a homogeneous two-dimensional Bose gas is calculated using quantum Monte Carlo methods. The low-density universal behavior is investigated using different interatomic model potentials, both finite ranged and strictly repulsive and zero ranged, supporting a bound state. The condensate fraction and the pair distribution function are calculated as a function of the gas parameter, ranging from the dilute to the strongly correlated regime. In the case of the zero-range pseudopotential we discuss the stability of the gaslike state for large values of the two-dimensional scattering length, and we calculate the critical density where the system becomes unstable against cluster formation.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing Application of GRAPHENE/Y2O3 Quantum Dots Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemade, K. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    Graphene/Y2O3 quantum dots (QDs) composite was investigated towards the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas at room temperature. Graphene synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite. The composite prepared by mixing 20-wt% graphene into the 1 g Y2O3 in organic medium (acetone). The chemiresistor of composite prepared by screen-printing on glass substrate. The optimum value of sensing response (1.08) was showed by 20-wt% graphene/Y2O3 QDs composite. The excellent stability with optimum sensing response evidenced for the composite. The gas sensing mechanism discussed on the basis of electron transfer reaction.

  8. A simple probabilistic model of ideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossinsky, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a discrete 3D model of ideal gas based on the idea that, on the microscopic level, the particles move randomly (as in ASEP models), instead of obeying Newton's laws as prescribed by Boltzmann.

  9. Solution-Processed Gas Sensors Employing SnO2 Quantum Dot/MWCNT Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Wenkai; Yu, Haoxiong; Gao, Liang; Song, Zhilong; Xu, Songman; Li, Min; Wang, Yang; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2016-01-13

    Solution-processed SnO2 colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged as an important new class of gas-sensing materials due to their potential for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. Here we employed the design strategy based on the synergetic effect from highly sensitive SnO2 CQDs and excellent conductive properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to overcome the transport barrier in CQD gas sensors. The attachment and coverage of SnO2 CQDs on the MWCNT surfaces were achieved by simply mixing the presynthesized SnO2 CQDs and MWCNTs at room temperature. Compared to the pristine SnO2 CQDs, the sensor based on SnO2 quantum dot/MWCNT nanocomposites exhibited a higher response upon exposure to H2S, and the response toward 50 ppm of H2S at 70 °C was 108 with the response and recovery time being 23 and 44 s. Because of the favorable energy band alignment, the MWCNTs can serve as the acceptor of the electrons that are injected from H2S into SnO2 quantum dots in addition to the charge transport highway to direct the electron flow to the electrode, thereby enhancing the sensor response. Our research results open an easy pathway for developing highly sensitive and low-cost gas sensors. PMID:26652646

  10. Gas Permeability and Ideal Selectivity of Poly[bis-(phenoxy)phosphazene], Poly[bis-(4-tert-butylphenoxy)phosphazene], and Poly[bis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenoxy)1.2(chloro)0.8phosphazene

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Frederick F. Stewart

    2004-07-01

    Described in this paper is the synthesis and gas permeability characterization of poly[bis-(4-tert-butylphenoxy)phosphazene], and poly[bis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenoxy)1.2(chloro)0.8phosphazene]. In general, linear chloro-containing polyphosphazenes are hydrolytically unstable. However, in this work, a novel polymer, poly[bis-(3,5-di-tert-butylphenoxy)1.2(chloro)0.8phosphazene], was observed to have an unusually high degree of hydrolytic stability and excellent membrane formation characteristics. Data derived from these polymers were compared to that of the more common poly[(bis-phenoxy)phosphazene]. These comparisons showed higher gas permeabilities and ideal separation factors for both of the alkyl-substituted phenoxy-phosphazenes, thus validating the concept that adding sterically bulky pendant groups to phosphazenes can affect membrane performance through disruption of orderly chain packing. Chemical characterization of these polymers was conducted using NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, helium pycnometry, elemental analysis, and multi-angle laser light scattering. Membranes were formed by solution casting and were characterized for their pure gas permeability using the following gases: H2, Ar, N2, O2, CH4, CO2, and H2S. Additionally, ideal selectivities of the significant O2/N2 and CO2/CH4 gas pairs are discussed.

  11. Ideals and category typicality.

    PubMed

    Kim, ShinWoo; Murphy, Gregory L

    2011-09-01

    Barsalou (1985) argued that exemplars that serve category goals become more typical category members. Although this claim has received support, we investigated (a) whether categories have a single ideal, as negatively valenced categories (e.g., cigarette) often have conflicting goals, and (b) whether ideal items are in fact typical, as they often have unusual attributes. Because past studies on ideals were largely correlational and often used categories not strongly associated to goals (e.g., tree, bird, fish), we took an experimental approach, using categories with obvious goals. Our results indicated that exemplars having goal-fulfilling characteristics are generally judged as less typical than exemplars with average features. Also, although subjects had a general consensus on the ideals of neutral and positive categories, they held opposing opinions on the ideals of the negatively valenced categories. We found that this bimodality in idealness perception was due to differing perspectives taken on the categories; however, perspectives that changed idealness of category exemplars did not influence their typicality. In short, ideal exemplars that best serve category goals are not necessarily perceived as typical. We contrast the goal-fulfilling aspect of ideals with the structural notion of extreme values (e.g., very tall trees), which may influence typicality through other mechanisms. PMID:21767059

  12. Suppression of quantum collapse in an anisotropic gas of dipolar bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-09-15

    In recent work [Sakaguchi and Malomed, Phys. Rev. A 83, 013607 (2011)], a solution to the problem of the quantum collapse (fall onto the center) in the three-dimensional space with the attractive potential -(U{sub 0}/2)r{sup -2} was proposed, based on the replacement of the linear Schroedinger equation by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation with the repulsive cubic term. The model applies to a quantum gas of molecules carrying permanent electric dipole moments, with the attraction center representing a fixed electric charge. It was demonstrated that the repulsive nonlinearity suppresses the quantum collapse and creates the corresponding spherically symmetric ground state (GS), which was missing in the case of the linear Schroedinger equation. Here, we aim to extend the analysis to the cylindrical geometry and to eigenstates carrying angular momentum. The cylindrical anisotropy is imposed by a uniform dc field, which fixes the orientation of the dipole moments, thus altering the potential of the attraction to the center. First, we analyze the modification of the condition for the onset of the quantum collapse in the framework of the linear Schroedinger equation with the cylindrically symmetric potential for the states with azimuthal quantum numbers m=0 (the GS) and m=1, 2. The corresponding critical values of the strength of the attractive potential (U{sub 0}){sub cr}(m) are found. Next, a numerical solution of the nonlinear GP equation is developed, which demonstrates the replacement of the quantum collapse by the originally missing eigenstates with m=0,1,2. Their dynamical stability is verified by means of numerical simulations of the perturbed evolution. For m=0, the Thomas-Fermi approximation is presented too, in an analytical form. Crucially important for the solution is the proper choice of the boundary conditions at r{yields}0.

  13. Influence of Ambient Gas on the Performance of Quantum-Dot Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingli; Chen, Fei; Wang, Hongzhe; Shen, Huaibin; Wang, Aqiang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fengjuan; Guo, Fang; Li, Lin Song

    2016-05-11

    Here, we report the influence of the ambient gas on the performance of quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs). The blue QD-LED devices with the maximum external quantum efficiency of 8.1% and the turn-on voltage of 2.7 V could be obtained in air. The efficiency decreases by 12% and turn-on voltage increases by 0.3 V relative to the control devices fabricated in a N2-filled glovebox. The histogram of maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) shows average peak EQE of 8.08% and a low standard deviation of 3.63%, suggesting high reproducibility. Correspondingly, the operational lifetime of 376 h is obtained, which is on par with 408 h of devices fabricated in N2. For the devices fabricated in air, relatively high efficiency could be maintained only at low voltages, because of the near balanced injection of carriers under low bias. The measurements of contact potential difference, chemical composition, and surface roughness are used to verify the variation of energy level and surface morphology of films influenced by different ambient gas. These results would offer reasonable guidance for the application of QD-LEDs in actual large-scale production. PMID:27086660

  14. Strongly interacting one-dimensional quantum gas mixtures with weak p -wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiping; Pan, Lei; Chen, Shu

    2016-03-01

    We study one-dimensional strongly interacting quantum gas mixtures, including both the Bose-Fermi and spin-1 /2 Fermi-Fermi mixtures, with weak p -wave interaction between intracomponent fermions, and demonstrate that the weak p -wave interaction cannot be omitted in the strong interaction region where the strength of p -wave interaction is comparable with the inverse of the strength of strongly repulsive s -wave interaction. While the total density distribution is not sensitive to the weak p -wave interaction, we find that the p -wave interaction plays an important role in determining the species-dependent (or spin-dependent) density distributions and produces significant physical effects on the low-energy spin dynamics. We also derive effective spin-exchange models for strongly interacting quantum gas mixtures with weak p -wave interaction, which indicate that a quantum phase transition from an antiferromagnetic state to a ferromagnetic state can be induced by tuning the relative strengths of intracomponent and intercomponent interactions.

  15. Ideals and Category Typicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, ShinWoo; Murphy, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    Barsalou (1985) argued that exemplars that serve category goals become more typical category members. Although this claim has received support, we investigated (a) whether categories have a single ideal, as negatively valenced categories (e.g., cigarette) often have conflicting goals, and (b) whether ideal items are in fact typical, as they often…

  16. Ideals and Category Typicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, ShinWoo; Murphy, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    Barsalou (1985) argued that exemplars that serve category goals become more typical category members. Although this claim has received support, we investigated (a) whether categories have a single ideal, as negatively valenced categories (e.g., cigarette) often have conflicting goals, and (b) whether ideal items are in fact typical, as they often

  17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with many-body states of a two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Stephan; Wuester, Wolf; Haupt, Florian; Faelt, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Imamoglu, Ataç

    2014-10-17

    Light-matter interaction has played a central role in understanding as well as engineering new states of matter. Reversible coupling of excitons and photons enabled groundbreaking results in condensation and superfluidity of nonequilibrium quasiparticles with a photonic component. We investigated such cavity-polaritons in the presence of a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas, exhibiting strongly correlated phases. When the cavity was on resonance with the Fermi level, we observed previously unknown many-body physics associated with a dynamical hole-scattering potential. In finite magnetic fields, polaritons show distinct signatures of integer and fractional quantum Hall ground states. Our results lay the groundwork for probing nonequilibrium dynamics of quantum Hall states and exploiting the electron density dependence of polariton splitting so as to obtain ultrastrong optical nonlinearities. PMID:25278508

  18. Cyclotron resonance of an interacting polaron gas in a quantum well in a tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. N.; Devreese, J. T.

    2004-03-01

    Cyclotron-resonance spectra of a gas of interacting polarons confined to a GaAs/AlAs quantum well in the presence of a tilted magnetic field are theoretically investigated taking into account the magnetoplasmon-phonon mixing. In a tilted magnetic field, the intersubband magnetoplasmon-phonon modes can participate in the CR optical absorption. It is confirmed theoretically, that the resonant magneto-polaron coupling in a high-density GaAs/AlAs quantum well occurs near the GaAs TO-phonon frequency rather than near the GaAs LO-phonon frequency. Calculated CR spectra are in agreement with recent experimental data. This work has been supported by the GOA BOF UA 2000, IUAP, FWO-V projects G.0274.01N, G.0435.03, the WOG WO.025.99 (Belgium) and the European Commission GROWTH Programme, NANOMAT project, contract No. G5RD-CT-2001-00545.

  19. NMR dynamics of quantum discord for spin-carrying gas molecules in a closed nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Yurishchev, M. A.

    2014-11-15

    A local orthogonal transformation that transforms any centrosymmetric density matrix of a two-qubit system to the X form has been found. A piecewise-analytic-numerical formula Q = min(Q{sub π/2}, Q{sub θ}, Q{sub 0}), where Q{sub π/2} and Q{sub 0} are analytical expressions and the branch Q{sub 0θ} can be obtained only by numerically searching for the optimal measurement angle θ ∈ (0, π/2), is proposed to calculate the quantum discord Q of a general X state. The developed approaches have been applied for a quantitative description of the recently predicted flickering (periodic disappearance and reappearance) of the quantum-information pair correlation between nuclear 1/2 spins of atoms or molecules of a gas (for example, {sup 129}Xe) in a bounded volume in the presence of a strong magnetic field.

  20. Fractional Quantum Hall Effects in a Two-Dimensional Atomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Jacome, Louis; Gemelke, Nathan

    2014-03-01

    Fractional Hall effects in two-dimensional electron gases have dramatically altered the way we look at ordering in quantum many body systems. Despite heroic advances since their discovery, many predictions regarding unique behavior have yet to be observed. We describe new efforts to produce similar effects in cold atomic Bose gases. Previous experiments have observed strong correlation in large ensembles of rapidly rotating few body samples consistent with a description using bosonic analogues of fractional hall states. We describe extensions of these experiments to observe individual systems in a quantum gas micropscope, introduce strong interactions through Feshbach resonance, and extend effects to larger numbers of atoms. The use of impurity atoms to probe fractional hall droplets will also be discussed, as will the extension of these effects to higher spin samples by using multiple internal states of Rubidium-87.

  1. Tunnel-field-effect-transistor based gas-sensor: Introducing gas detection with a quantum-mechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Gossner, Harald; Hansch, Walter; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    A gas-sensor based on tunnel-field-effect-transistor (TFET) is proposed that leverages the unique current injection mechanism in the form of quantum-mechanical band-to-band tunneling to achieve substantially improved performance compared to conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) for detection of gas species under ambient conditions. While nonlocal phonon-assisted tunneling model is used for detailed device simulations, in order to provide better physical insights, analytical formula for sensitivity is derived for both metal as well as organic conducting polymer based sensing elements. Analytical derivations are also presented for capturing the effects of temperature on sensor performance. Combining the developed analytical and numerical models, intricate properties of the sensor such as gate bias dependence of sensitivity, relationship between the required work-function modulation and subthreshold swing, counter-intuitive increase in threshold voltage for MOSFETs and reduction in tunneling probability for TFETs with temperature are explained. It is shown that TFET gas-sensors can not only lead to more than 10 000× increase in sensitivity but also provide design flexibility and immunity against screening of work-function modulation through non-specific gases as well as ensure stable operation under temperature variations.

  2. Trace-gas sensing using the compliance voltage of an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-06-04

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are increasingly being used to detect, identify, and measure levels of trace gases in the air. External cavity QCLs (ECQCLs) provide a broadly-tunable infrared source to measure absorption spectra of chemicals and provide high detection sensitivity and identification confidence. Applications include detecting chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, monitoring building air quality, measuring greenhouse gases for atmospheric research, monitoring and controlling industrial processes, analyzing chemicals in exhaled breath for medical diagnostics, and many more. Compact, portable trace gas sensors enable in-field operation in a wide range of platforms, including handheld units for use by first responders, fixed installations for monitoring air quality, and lightweight sensors for deployment in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present experimental demonstration of a new chemical sensing technique based on intracavity absorption in an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). This new technique eliminates the need for an infrared photodetector and gas cell by detecting the intracavity absorption spectrum in the compliance voltage of the laser device itself. To demonstrate and characterize the technique, we measure infrared absorption spectra of chemicals including water vapor and Freon-134a. Sub-ppm detection limits in one second are achieved, with the potential for increased sensitivity after further optimization. The technique enables development of handheld, high-sensitivity, and high-accuracy trace gas sensors for in-field use.

  3. Weakly Relativistic Quantum Effects in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas: Dispersion of Langmuir Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, P. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A weakly-relativistic quantum-hydrodynamic model for charged spinless particles applied to low-dimensional systems is described in detail. The equations are constructed in the self-consistent field approximation. The Darwin term, the current-current interaction, and the weakly relativistic correction to the kinetic energy, all described by the Breit Hamiltonian, are considered together with the Coulomb interaction. The contributions of the described effects and also of relativistic-temperature effects to the dispersion of the Langmuir waves in a two-dimensional electron gas are calculated. A comparison with the corresponding formula for a three-dimensional system of particles is presented.

  4. Exciton gas compression and metallic condensation in a single semiconductor quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Alén, B; Fuster, D; Muñoz-Matutano, G; Martínez-Pastor, J; González, Y; Canet-Ferrer, J; González, L

    2008-08-01

    We study the metal-insulator transition in individual self-assembled quantum wires and report optical evidence of metallic liquid condensation at low temperatures. First, we observe that the temperature and power dependence of the single nanowire photoluminescence follow the evolution expected for an electron-hole liquid in one dimension. Second, we find novel spectral features that suggest that in this situation the expanding liquid condensate compresses the exciton gas in real space. Finally, we estimate the critical density and critical temperature of the phase transition diagram at n{c} approximately 1 x 10;{5} cm;{-1} and T{c} approximately 35 K, respectively. PMID:18764504

  5. Idealized mixing impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.A.

    1999-12-08

    The dispersion of tetraphenylborate in continuous stirred tank reactors plays a significant role in the utility achieved from the tetraphenylborate. Investigating idealized mixing of the materials can illuminate how this dispersion occurs.

  6. Quantum anomaly, universal relations, and breathing mode of a two-dimensional Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we show that the classical SO(2,1) symmetry of a harmonically trapped Fermi gas in two dimensions is broken by quantum effects. The anomalous correction to the symmetry algebra is given by a two-body operator that is well known as the contact. Taking into account this modification, we are able to derive the virial theorem for the system and a universal relation for the pressure of a homogeneous gas. The existence of an undamped breathing mode is associated with the classical symmetry. We provide an estimate for the anomalous frequency shift of this oscillation at zero temperature and compare the result with a recent experiment by [E. Vogt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 070404 (2012)]. Discrepancies are attributed to finite temperature effects. PMID:22681087

  7. FK-DLR properties of a quantum multi-type Bose-gas with a repulsive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2014-08-01

    The paper extends earlier results from Suhov and Kelbert ["FK-DLR states of a quantum Bose-gas with a hardcore interaction," arXiv:1304.0782] and Suhov et al. ["Shift-invariance for FK-DLR states of a 2D quantum Bose-gas," arXiv:1304.4177] about infinite-volume quantum bosonic states (FK-DLR states) to the case of multi-type particles with non-negative interactions. (An example is a quantum Widom-Rowlinson model.) Following the strategy from Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al., we establish that, for the values of fugacity z ∈ (0, 1) and inverse temperature β > 0, finite-volume Gibbs states form a compact family in the thermodynamic limit. Next, in dimension two we show that any limit-point state (an FK-DLR state in the terminology adopted in Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al.) is translation-invariant.

  8. Idealization and empirical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Michael John

    It has been argued that the presence of idealizations in physical theories implies that scientific realism is false. Furthermore, it has also been argued that because physical theories incorporate idealizations scientific theories must be accepted a priori, because the objects, processes, etc. quantified over in such expressions cannot be observed in the actual world. I argue against the former view by showing that scientific realism is compatible with the fact that all theoretical claims depend on idealizing assumptions, at least when such claims are properly regimented as a special kind of counterfactual conditional. To this end a logic incorporating such conditionals, VCP, is constructed and given a semantic basis. Given VCP, the latter problem is considered in light of extant theories of confirmation, and all are found to be incapable of dealing with the acceptance of theoretical claims that depend on idealizing assumptions. In addressing this problem it is also shown that a new problem arises for subjective Bayesians concerning prior probabilities of theoretical claims that depend on idealizing assumptions. Insofar as I claim that all theoretical claims depend on idealizing assumptions, this problem for Bayesian confirmation theory appears to be quite serious. I conclude that only inference to the best explanation, when understood in terms of VCP, can provide a rational basis for the empirical acceptance of such theoretical claims.

  9. Buried-heterostructure quantum-cascade laser overgrown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashnikova, M.; Monastyrskyi, G.; Aleksandrova, A.; Klinkmüller, M.; Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2012-05-01

    We describe the realization of buried-heterostructure quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy both for the growth of the active region as well as for the regrowth of InP:Fe. The regrowth of the semi-insulating InP:Fe layer was carried out at 470 °C, which is more than 100 °C below the standard growth temperature during metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy, the standard method for laser overgrowth. The electrical resistivity of the InP:Fe insulation layer, measured in test samples grown on (001) InP, is as large as 2×108Ωcm. High-resistivity InP:Fe is overgrown non-selectively over the etched laser ridge, followed by the top contact alloyed through it to the active region. The processed quantum-cascade lasers show no evidence of parallel leakage current and exhibit lower threshold current density than lasers using SiO2 as an insulator. The ability to fabricate buried heterostructure lasers without exceeding 600 °C is important for strain-compensated AlAs-InGaAs quantum cascade lasers with large internal strain because these devices do not typically withstand temperatures used to grow InP:Fe using vapor-phase epitaxy.

  10. An ytterbium quantum gas microscope with narrow-line laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kobayashi, Jun; Kuno, Takuma; Kato, Kohei; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate site-resolved imaging of individual bosonic {}174{Yb} atoms in a Hubbard-regime two-dimensional optical lattice with a short lattice constant of 266 nm. To suppress the heating by probe light with the 1S0-1P1 transition of the wavelength λ = 399 nm for high-resolution imaging and preserve atoms at the same lattice sites during the fluorescence imaging, we simultaneously cool atoms by additionally applying narrow-line optical molasses with the 1S0-3P1 transition of the wavelength λ = 556 nm. We achieve a low temperature of T=7.4(13) μ {{K}}, corresponding to a mean oscillation quantum number along the horizontal axes of 0.22(4) during the imaging process. We detect, on average, 200 fluorescence photons from a single atom within a 400 ms exposure time, and estimate a detection fidelity of 87(2)%. The realization of a quantum gas microscope with enough fidelity for Yb atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice opens up the possibilities for studying various kinds of quantum many-body systems such as Bose and Fermi gases, and their mixtures, and also long-range-interacting systems such as Rydberg states.

  11. High-power and single-frequency quantum cascade lasers for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Stephane; Bonetti, Yargo; Hvozdara, Lubos; Muller, Antoine; Giovannini, Marcella; Hoyler, Nicolas; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    The quantum cascade laser is an unipolar semiconductor laser source emitting in the mid-infrared range between 3.5 and 25 μm. During the past ten years after their invention, this technology has reached the level of maturity required for commercialization, and QC lasers have thus become very attractive for a large number of applications, including gas sensing, pollution detection, atmospheric chemistry, detection of compounds, non-invasive medical diagnostics, free-space optical data transmission or even LIDAR. Most common requirements are single-mode operation on thermoelectric cooler, high power and/or continuous-wave. Nowadays several high-power single-mode QC lasers are available at Alpes Lasers in the range from 4.3 to 16.5 μm, with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 30 dB. We present here a specific high-average power Fabry-Perot quantum cascade laser and a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating near 8 μm.

  12. Life cycle of superfluid vortices and quantum turbulence in the unitary Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlaz?owski, Gabriel; Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Roche, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    The unitary Fermi gas (UFG) offers a unique opportunity to study quantum turbulence both experimentally and theoretically in a strongly interacting fermionic superfluid with the highest vortex line density of any known superfluid. It yields to accurate and controlled experiments and admits the only dynamical microscopic description via time-dependent density-functional theory, apart from dilute bosonic gases, of the crossing and reconnection of superfluid vortex lines conjectured by Feynman [R. P. Feynman, Prog. Low Temp. Phys. 1, 17 (1955), 10.1016/S0079-6417(08)60077-3] to be at the origin of quantum turbulence in superfluids at zero temperature. We demonstrate how various vortex configurations can be generated by using well-established experimental techniques: laser stirring and phase imprinting. New imaging techniques demonstrated by Ku et al. [M. J. H. Ku et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 065301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.065301] should be able to directly visualize these crossings and reconnections in greater detail than performed so far in liquid helium. We demonstrate the critical role played by the geometry of the trap in the formation and dynamics of a vortex in the UFG and how laser stirring and phase imprint can be used to create vortex tangles with clear signatures of the onset of quantum turbulence.

  13. Measuring the dynamic structure factor of a quantum gas undergoing a structural phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Landig, Renate; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic structure factor is a central quantity describing the physics of quantum many-body systems, capturing structure and collective excitations of a material. In condensed matter, it can be measured via inelastic neutron scattering, which is an energy-resolving probe for the density fluctuations. In ultracold atoms, a similar approach could so far not be applied because of the diluteness of the system. Here we report on a direct, real-time and nondestructive measurement of the dynamic structure factor of a quantum gas exhibiting cavity-mediated long-range interactions. The technique relies on inelastic scattering of photons, stimulated by the enhanced vacuum field inside a high finesse optical cavity. We extract the density fluctuations, their energy and lifetime while the system undergoes a structural phase transition. We observe an occupation of the relevant quasi-particle mode on the level of a few excitations, and provide a theoretical description of this dissipative quantum many-body system. PMID:25944151

  14. Exchange Interaction in a Degenerate Electron Gas: Contribution of Electrons with Opposite Spins, Found in One Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    The contribution of the Coulomb exchange interaction between pairs of electrons found in one quantum state is calculated. For this case it is shown that in an unpolarized, degenerate, weakly nonideal electron gas the frequency of a Langmuir wave with zero wave vector is √{3/2} times greater than the Langmuir frequency. With increase of the spin polarization (with decrease of the number of pairs of electrons in one quantum state) the frequency shift decreases monotonically to zero.

  15. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0–70% for propane and 0–90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration. PMID:26887891

  16. Multi-quantum excitation in optically pumped alkali atom: rare gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Rawlins, W. T.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-03-01

    Diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) technology offers a means of achieving high-energy gas laser output through optical pumping of the D-lines of Cs, Rb, and K. The exciplex effect, based on weak attractive forces between alkali atoms and polarizable rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), provides an alternative approach via broadband excitation of exciplex precursors (XPAL). In XPAL configurations, we have observed multi-quantum excitation within the alkali manifolds which result in infrared emission lines between 1 and 4 μm. The observed excited states include the 42FJ states of both Cs and Rb, which are well above the two-photon energy of the excitation laser in each case. We have observed fluorescence from multi-quantum states for excitation wavelengths throughout the exciplex absorption bands of Cs-Ar, Cs-Kr, and Cs-Xe. The intensity scaling is roughly first-order or less in both pump power and alkali concentration, suggesting a collisional energy pooling excitation mechanism. Collisional up-pumping appears to present a parasitic loss term for optically pumped atomic systems at high intensities, however there may also be excitation of other lasing transitions at infrared wavelengths.

  17. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0-70% for propane and 0-90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration. PMID:26887891

  18. Mid-infrared surface transmitting and detecting quantum cascade device for gas-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, Andreas; Szedlak, Rolf; Schwarz, Benedikt; Moser, Harald; Zederbauer, Tobias; Macfarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Lendl, Bernhard; Strasser, Gottfried

    2016-02-01

    We present a bi-functional surface emitting and surface detecting mid-infrared device applicable for gas-sensing. A distributed feedback ring quantum cascade laser is monolithically integrated with a detector structured from a bi-functional material for same frequency lasing and detection. The emitted single mode radiation is collimated, back reflected by a flat mirror and detected by the detector element of the sensor. The surface operation mode combined with the low divergence emission of the ring quantum cascade laser enables for long analyte interaction regions spatially separated from the sample surface. The device enables for sensing of gaseous analytes which requires a relatively long interaction region. Our design is suitable for 2D array integration with multiple emission and detection frequencies. Proof of principle measurements with isobutane (2-methylpropane) and propane as gaseous analytes were conducted. Detectable concentration values of 0-70% for propane and 0-90% for isobutane were reached at a laser operation wavelength of 6.5 μm utilizing a 10 cm gas cell in double pass configuration.

  19. High-power, micro-integrated diode laser modules at 767 and 780 nm for portable quantum gas experiments.

    PubMed

    Schiemangk, Max; Lampmann, Kai; Dinkelaker, Aline; Kohfeldt, Anja; Krutzik, Markus; Kürbis, Christian; Sahm, Alexander; Spießberger, Stefan; Wicht, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Peters, Achim

    2015-06-10

    We present micro-integrated diode laser modules operating at wavelengths of 767 and 780 nm for cold quantum gas experiments on potassium and rubidium. The master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept provides both narrow linewidth emission and high optical output power. With a linewidth (10 μs) below 1 MHz and an output power of up to 3 W, these modules are specifically suited for quantum optics experiments and feature the robustness required for operation at a drop tower or on-board a sounding rocket. This technology development hence paves the way toward precision quantum optics experiments in space. PMID:26192832

  20. Transport studies of reentrant integer quantum Hall states forming in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nianpei

    The two dimensional electron gas subjected to a magnetic field has been a model system in contemporary condensed matter physics which generated many beautiful experiments as well as novel fundamental concepts. These novel concepts are of broad interests and have benefited other fields of research. For example, the observations of conventional odd-denominator fractional quantum Hall states have enriched many-body physics with important concepts such as fractional statistics and composite fermions. The subsequent discovery of the enigmatic even-denominator nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state has led to more interesting concepts such as non-Abelian statistics and pairing of composite fermions which can be intimately connected to the electron pairing in superconductivity. Moreover, the observations of stripe phases and reentrant integer quantum Hall states have stimulated research on exotic electron solids which have more intricate structures than the Wigner Crystal. In contrast to fractional quantum Hall states and stripes phases, the reentrant integer quantum Hall states are very little studied and their ground states are the least understood. There is a lack of basic information such as exact filling factors, temperature dependence and energy scales for the reentrant integer quantum Hall states. A critical experimental condition in acquiring this information is a stable ultra-low temperature environment. In the first part of this dissertation, I will discuss our unique setup of 3He immersion cell in a state-of-art dilution refrigerator which achieves the required stability of ultra-low temperature. With this experimental setup, we are able to observe for the first time very sharp magnetotransport features of reentrant integer quantum Hall states across many Landau levels for the first time. I will firstly present our results in the second Landau level. The temperature dependence measurements reveal a surprisingly sharp peak signature that is unique to the reentrant integer quantum Hall states. Such a peak signature allows us to define the energy scale of reentrant integer quantum Hall state. An analysis of the energy scales indicate the collective nature of electron solid states. In the following I will present our results in the third Landau level and higher Landau levels which are used in testing the bubble theory predictions for the reentrant integer quantum Hall states. Currently there is no direct experimental probe of the microscopic structures of the reentrant integer quantum Hall states. Instead, by contrasting their energy scales, we find that certain predictions of the bubble theory are at odds with experimental data in the low Landau level limit. Furthermore, an orbital dependent energy scale from the second Landau level to the fifth Landau level is found which will provide useful insights in determining the bubble structures of these reentrant integer quantum Hall states. It must be appreciated that the reentrant integer quantum Hall states have only been observed in the cleanest GaAs/AlGaAs samples. While the highest electron mobility has been achieved in this system by Molecular Beam Epitaxy technique, further improvements are still necessary to facilitate the study of fragile many-body ground states. However, it is little understood that how different disorder which limits the electron mobility affects the strength of the many-body ground states. In the second part of this dissertation, I will present our work on the impact of alloy disorder on the nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state. This work is conducted in a series of specially engineered GaAs/AlGaAs samples with controllable alloy disorder. We are able to quantitatively measure the suppression of the nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state by alloy disorder scattering. Surprisingly, the nu=5/2 state is found to develop at significantly reduced mobility compared with the empirical mobility threshold according to prior experiments. An analysis of the results indicates that the short-range alloy disorder and the long-range Coulomb disorder play different roles in the formation of the nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state.

  1. Multiparticle states and the factors that complicate an experimental observation of the quantum coherence in the exciton gas of SiGe/Si quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, V. S.; Davletov, E. T.; Krivobok, V. S. Nikolaev, S. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Onishchenko, E. E.; Pruchkina, A. A.; Skorikov, M. L.

    2015-12-15

    The measured stationary and time-resolved photoluminescence is used to study the properties of the exciton gas in a second-order 5-nm-thick Si{sub 0.905}Ge{sub 0.095}/Si quantum well. It is shown that, despite the presence of an electron barrier in the Si{sub 0.905}Ge{sub 0.095} layer, a spatially indirect biexciton is the most favorable energy state of the electron–hole system at low temperatures. This biexciton is characterized by a lifetime of 1100 ns and a binding energy of 2.0–2.5 meV and consists of two holes localized in the SiGe layer and two electrons mainly localized in silicon. The formation of biexcitons is shown to cause low-temperature (5 K) luminescence spectra over a wide excitation density range and to suppress the formation of an exciton gas, in which quantum statistics effects are significant. The Bose statistics can only be experimentally observed for a biexciton gas at a temperature of 1 K or below because of the high degree of degeneracy of biexciton states (28) and a comparatively large effective mass (about 1.3m{sub e}). The heat energy at such temperatures is much lower than the measured energy of localization at potential fluctuations (about 1 meV). This feature leads to biexciton localization and fundamentally limits the possibility of observation of quantum coherence in the biexciton gas.

  2. The Ideal Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jervis, Jane L.

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the faculty appointment system at Evergreen State College (Washington), which does not have tenure, academic departments, or academic ranks, in light of an ideal system that might have a core of long-term faculty supplemented by short-term faculty. It considers the need to balance institutional flexibility with faculty…

  3. The Ideal Promotion Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Edward L.

    The ideal promotional effort for an educational television (ETV) station is dependent on a professional approach to the problem. This means that each ETV station should employ a public relations manager and should keep him informed about all major station decisions. The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) has a campaign of its own to bring attention…

  4. The Ideal Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This profile of the ideal teacher was compiled by the Commissioner's Student Advisory Committee which is made up of 17 secondary school students representing their respective geographic regions across New York State. Part 1 outlines positive personal characteristics, good teaching methods, and elements of sound teacher-student relationships. Brief…

  5. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  6. Renormalization Theory of a Two Dimensional Bose Gas: Quantum Critical Point and Quasi-Condensed State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenatiempo, S.; Giuliani, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a renormalization group construction of a weakly interacting Bose gas at zero temperature in the two-dimensional continuum, both in the quantum critical regime and in the presence of a condensate fraction. The construction is performed within a rigorous renormalization group scheme, borrowed from the methods of constructive field theory, which allows us to derive explicit bounds on all the orders of renormalized perturbation theory. Our scheme allows us to construct the theory of the quantum critical point completely, both in the ultraviolet and in the infrared regimes, thus extending previous heuristic approaches to this phase. For the condensate phase, we solve completely the ultraviolet problem and we investigate in detail the infrared region, up to length scales of the order (λ ^3ρ _0)^{-1/2} (here λ is the interaction strength and ρ _0 the condensate density), which is the largest length scale at which the problem is perturbative in nature. We exhibit violations to the formal Ward Identities, due to the momentum cutoff used to regularize the theory, which suggest that previous proposals about the existence of a non-perturbative non-trivial fixed point for the infrared flow should be reconsidered.

  7. Spin-orbit coupling in the strongly interacting Fermi gas: an exact quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Peter; Shi, Hao; Chiesa, Simone; Zhang, Shiwei

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) plays an essential role in a variety of intriguing condensed matter phenomena, including the quantum Hall effect, and topological insulators and superconductors. The recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupled Fermi gases provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of SOC in a tunable, disorder-free system. Motivated by this experimental progress, we present here the first exact numerical results on the two-dimensional, unpolarized, uniform Fermi gas with attractive interactions and Rashba SOC. Using auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo and incorporating recent algorithmic advances, we carry out exact calculations on sufficiently large system sizes to provide accurate results systematically as a function of experimental parameters. We obtain the equation of state, study the spin behavior and momentum distribution, and examine the interplay of SOC and pairing in real and momentum space. Our results help illuminate the rich pairing structure induced by SOC, and provide important guidance to future experimental efforts. Supported by DOE SciDAC and NSF.

  8. Multi-species trace gas analysis with dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jágerská, Jana; Tuzson, Béla; Looser, Herbert; Jouy, Pierre; Hugi, Andreas; Mangold, Markus; Soltic, Patrik; Faist, Jérôme; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple gas species using mid-IR laser spectroscopy is highly appealing for a large variety of applications ranging from air quality monitoring, medical breath analysis to industrial process control. However, state-of-the-art distributed-feedback (DFB) mid-IR lasers are usually tunable only within a narrow spectral range, which generally leads to one-laser-one-compound measurement strategy. Thus, multi-species detection involves several lasers and elaborate beam combining solutions [1]. This makes them bulky, costly, and highly sensitive to optical alignment, which limits their field deployment. In this paper, we explore an alternative measurement concept based on a dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser (DW-QCL) [2]. Such a laser can emit at two spectrally distinct wavelengths using a succession of two DFB gratings with different periodicities and a common waveguide to produce one output beam. The laser design was optimized for NOx measurements and correspondingly emits single-mode at 5.26 and 6.25 μm. Electrical separation of the respective laser sections makes it possible to address each wavelength independently. Thereby, it is possible to detect NO and NO2 species with one laser using the same optical path, without any beam combining optics, i.e. in a compact and cost-efficient single-path optical setup. Operated in a time-division multiplexed mode, the spectrometer reaches detection limits at 100 s averaging of 0.5 and 1.5 ppb for NO2 and NO, respectively. The performance of the system was validated against the well-established chemiluminescence detection while measuring the NOx emissions on an automotive test-bench, as well as monitoring the pollution at a suburban site. [1] B. Tuzson, K. Zeyer, M. Steinbacher, J. B. McManus, D. D. Nelson, M. S. Zahniser, and L. Emmenegger, 'Selective measurements of NO, NO2 and NOy in the free troposphere using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy,' Atmospheric Measurement Techniques 6, 927-936 (2013). [2] J. Jágerská, P. Jouy, A. Hugi, B. Tuzson, H. Looser, M. Mangold, M. Beck, L. Emmenegger, and J. Faist, 'Dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser for trace gas spectroscopy,' Applied Physics Letters 105, 161109-161109-4 (2014).

  9. Ideal Integrating Bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; DiPirro, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new "ideal integrator" bolometer as a prototype for a new generation of sensitive, flexible far-IR detectors suitable for use in large arrays. The combination of a non-dissipative sensor coupled with a fast heat switch provides breakthrough capabilities in both sensitivity and operation. The bolometer temperature varies linearly with the integrated infrared power incident on the detector, and may be sampled intermittently without loss of information between samples. The sample speed and consequent dynamic range depend only on the heat switch reset cycle and can be selected in software. Between samples, the device acts as an ideal integrator with noise significantly lower than resistive bolometers. Since there is no loss of information between samples, the device is well-suited for large arrays. A single SQUID readout could process an entire column of detectors, greatly reducing the complexity, power requirements, and cost of readout electronics for large pixel arrays.

  10. Applications of quantum chemistry to gas and solid phase reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senosiain, Juan Pablo

    Chemical kinetics has nourished from the achievements of computational quantum chemistry as perhaps no other field. This thesis illustrates the application of first-principles calculations to elucidate complex reaction mechanisms, and to quantitatively simulate reaction rates. The work embodied in this dissertation encompasses several projects with very diverse applications. In some cases, quantum chemistry calculations have been used for predicting reaction rates, while in others they are used in a semi-qualitative manner to elucidate complex reaction mechanisms. The first two chapters of this dissertation explain some key theoretical concepts of quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics. They are not intended to be exhaustive or detailed, but rather to illustrate general principles that are applied in the subsequent chapters. Chapter three reviews the disperse literature on the statistical treatment of internal rotors and provides a comparison of commonly used approximations. Chapters four through six cover three areas of special interest to gas-phase kinetics: bond dissociation energies, transition state theory and unimolecular reactions, with particular emphasis on combustion and atmospheric chemistry applications. A critical assessment of reaction barriers and bond dissociation energies calculated with several ab initio methods in common use is provided in chapters four and five, respectively. Chapters seven and eight illustrate how quantum chemistry can be used to decipher complex reaction mechanisms, with applications to current and future problems in semiconductor processing. The former studies the mechanisms of boron diffusion through thin gate oxide layers in metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs). The latter investigates the details of atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions on germanium and silicon-germanium alloys. Both of these studies are motivated by the miniaturization trend in gate oxide layers in MOSFET devices. As the device feature size is scaled down, a lower operating voltage must be applied to maintain a constant electrical field, thereby requiring a larger capacitance. The capacitance can be increased by reducing the oxide thickness (as has been happening so far) or by substituting silica in transistor gates with a new material with a higher dielectric constant.

  11. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a gravitational field can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, star formation in shocks and shocks in stellar explosion, rupture of a pressurized vessels and explosion in the ionosphere etc. Also, the solution obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by spacecraft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's surface.

  12. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Bisson, Rgis; Beck, Rainer D.

    2013-05-01

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S(?). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  13. Cavity-Enhanced Quantum-Cascade Laser-Based Instrument for Trace gas Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, R.; Gupta, M.; Owano, T.; Baer, D.; Ricci, K.; O'Keefe, A.

    2005-12-01

    An autonomous instrument based on Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy has been successfully deployed for measurements of CO in the troposphere and tropopause onboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft. The instrument consists of a measurement cell comprised of two high reflectivity mirrors, a continuous-wave quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data acquisition electronics, and data analysis software. The instrument reports CO mixing ratio at a 1-Hz rate based on measured absorption, gas temperature and pressure using Beer's Law. During several flights in May-June 2004 and January 2005 that reached altitudes of 41000 ft, the instrument recorded CO values with a precision of 0.2 ppbv (1-s averaging time). Despite moderate turbulence and measurements of particulate-laden airflows, the instrument operated consistently and did not require any maintenance, mirror cleaning, or optical realignment during the flights. We will also present recent development efforts to extend the instrument's capabilities for the measurements of CH4, N2O and CO in real time.

  14. Kelvin's ideal foam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaire, Denis

    2009-04-01

    Among his many extraordinary accomplishments, Kelvin was a pioneer of crystallography, elasticity and materials science. These interests came together to inspire his speculation on the nature of the ether in 1887. He conceived it to be an ordered liquid foam, of minimal surface area. Kelvin's ideal structure of foam has been realised in the laboratory only recently. In the meantime it was surpassed (in terms of surface area minimisation) by the Weaire-Phelan foam, which is the basis for one of the main buildings of the Beijing Olympics.

  15. Steric, quantum, and electrostatic effects on S(N)2 reaction barriers in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shubin; Hu, Hao; Pedersen, Lee G

    2010-05-13

    Biomolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions, S(N)2, are fundamental and commonplace in chemistry. It is the well-documented experimental finding in the literature that vicinal substitution with bulkier groups near the reaction center significantly slows the reaction due to steric hindrance, but theoretical understanding in the quantitative manner about factors dictating the S(N)2 reaction barrier height is still controversial. In this work, employing the new quantification approach that we recently proposed for the steric effect from the density functional theory framework, we investigate the relative contribution of three independent effects-steric, electrostatic, and quantum-to the S(N)2 barrier heights in gas phase for substituted methyl halide systems, R(1)R(2)R(3)CX, reacting with the fluorine anion, where R(1), R(2), and R(3) denote substituting groups and X = F or Cl. We found that in accordance with the experimental finding, for these systems, the steric effect dominates the transition state barrier, contributing positively to barrier heights, but this contribution is largely compensated by the negative, stabilizing contribution from the quantum effect due to the exchange-correlation interactions. Moreover, we find that it is the component from the electrostatic effect that is linearly correlated with the S(N)2 barrier height for the systems investigated in the present study. In addition, we compared our approach with the conventional method of energy decomposition in density functional theory as well as examined the steric effect from the wave function theory for these systems via natural bond orbital analysis. PMID:20377265

  16. Classical field records of a quantum system: Their internal consistency and accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietraszewicz, Joanna; Deuar, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    We determine the regime where the widespread classical field description for quantum Bose gases is quantitatively accurate in one dimension (1D), 2D, and 3D by a careful study of the ideal gas limit. Numerical benchmarking in 1D shows that the ideal gas results carry over unchanged into the weakly interacting gas. The optimum high-energy cutoff is in general shown to depend strongly on the observable in question (e.g., energy, density fluctuations, phase coherence length, condensate fraction). This explains the wide range of past results. A consistent classical field representation with less than 10% deviation in all typical observables can be given for systems at temperatures below 0.0064 degeneracy temperature in 1D, and 0.49 critical temperature in 3D. Surprisingly, this is not possible for the two-dimensional ideal gas even at zero temperature because mean density, density fluctuations, and energy cannot be simultaneously matched to the quantum results.

  17. A quantum chemistry study for ionic liquids applied to gas capture and separation.

    PubMed

    Damas, Giane B; Dias, Amina B A; Costa, Luciano T

    2014-07-31

    In recent years, the global climate change is in evidence and it is almost a consensus that it is caused by the greenhouse gases emissions. An alternative to reduce these emissions is carbon capture and storage (CCS), which employs solvents based on amine compounds. In this scene, ionic liquids (IL) have been investigated to a greater extent for this application. In this work, we make an evaluation of interactions between gases (CO2, SO2, and H2S) and anion/cation from IL, as well as cation-anion interactions. For this, quantum calculations under vacuum were performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory and using the M06-2X functional, where dispersion effects are considered. Among the well-studied systems based on imidazolium cations and fluorinated anions, we also studied the tetraalkylammonium, tetraalkylphosphonium, ether-functionalized imidazolium based systems, and tetrahexylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [THA][Tf2N], as a potential prototype. The ion pairs evaluated include [Tf2N](-)-based IL, with alkyl chain varying from [C1mim](+) to [C8mim](+) and [C1mim](+)-based IL. We found that the anion becomes more available to interact with gas with the weakening of the cation-anion interaction. [THA][Tf2N] has a binding energy of -274.89 kJ/mol at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory, which is considered energetically interesting to gas capture applications. PMID:24988534

  18. Characterization of Pb24Te76 quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, Manal A.; Mahdy, Iman A.; El Zawawi, I. K.

    2015-01-01

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10-3 Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5 h at 473 K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473 K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473 K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473 K for 5 h.

  19. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms. PMID:24670766

  20. Characterization of Pb₂₄Te₇₆ quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Manal A; Mahdy, Iman A; El Zawawi, I K

    2015-01-01

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10(-3)Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5h at 473K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473K for 5 h. PMID:25022502

  1. Size-controlled synthesis of SnO2 quantum dots and their gas-sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jianping; Zhao, Ruihua; Xie, Yajuan; Li, Jinping

    2015-08-01

    Tin dioxide quantum dots (TQDs) with controllable size were synthesized by changing the amount of alkaline reagent in the hydrothermal process. The gas-sensing properties were investigated by operating chemoresistor type sensor. The morphology and structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis and Raman spectrometry. The as-synthesized SnO2 shows the characteristics of quantum dots and the narrowest size distribution is about 2-3 nm. The gas-sensing results indicate that the responses are strongly dependent on the size of quantum dots. TQDs with different sizes exhibit different sensitivities and selectivities to volatile toxic chemicals such as aldehyde, acetone, methanol, ethanol and amine. Especially, when the sensors are exposed to 100 ppm triethylamine (TEA), the sensing response value of TQDs with small size is two times higher than that of the large-size TQDs. The maximum response values of TQDs to 1 ppm and 100 ppm TEA are 15 and 153, respectively. The response time is 1 s and the recovery time is 47 s upon exposure to 1 ppm TEA. The results suggest that it is an effective method by regulating the size of SnO2 quantum dots to detect low-concentration hazardous volatile compounds.

  2. FK-DLR properties of a quantum multi-type Bose-gas with a repulsive interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2014-08-01

    The paper extends earlier results from Suhov and Kelbert [“FK-DLR states of a quantum Bose-gas with a hardcore interaction,” http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.0782 ] and Suhov et al. [“Shift-invariance for FK-DLR states of a 2D quantum Bose-gas,” http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.4177 ] about infinite-volume quantum bosonic states (FK-DLR states) to the case of multi-type particles with non-negative interactions. (An example is a quantum Widom–Rowlinson model.) Following the strategy from Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al., we establish that, for the values of fugacity zϵ(0, 1) and inverse temperature β > 0, finite-volume Gibbs states form a compact family in the thermodynamic limit. Next, in dimension two we show that any limit-point state (an FK-DLR state in the terminology adopted in Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al.) is translation-invariant.

  3. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Cesium-Containing Species by Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Šulková, Katarína; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of cesium species reactions have been studied by using high-level quantum chemical tools. A systematic theoretical study has been done to find suitable methodology for calculation of reliable thermodynamic properties, allowing us to determine bimolecular rate constants with appropriate kinetic theories of gas-phase reactions. Four different reactions have been studied in this work: CsO + H2 = CsOH + H (R1), Cs + HI = CsI + H (R2), CsI + H2O = CsOH + HI (R3), and CsI + OH = CsOH + I (R4). All reactions involve steam, hydrogen, and iodine in addition of cesium. Most of the reactions are fast and (R3) and (R4) proceed even without energetic barrier. In terms of chemical reactivity in the reactor coolant system (RCS) in the case of severe accident, it can be expected that there will be no kinetic limitations for main cesium species (CsOH and CsI) transported along the RCS. Cs chemical speciation inside the RCS should be governed by the thermodynamics. PMID:26237575

  4. Depletion of pair correlations by photoassociation of a ^7Li quantum degenerate gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Marin; Prodan, Ionut; Junker, Mark; Hulet, Randall G.

    2002-05-01

    Depletion of pair correlations, a non-mean-field effect, is responsible for damping of coherent oscillations of a resonantly coupled atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. This effect limits the rate at which atoms can be converted to molecules(M. Koš)trun et al. PRA, 62, 063616 (2000); M. Holland et al. PRL, 86, 1915 (2001)., since cold atoms cannot travel sufficient distances fast enough in order to find one another and form molecules. We investigate this effect by measuring the one-photon photoassociation rate in a quantum degenerate ^7Li gas. The rate to the high-lying v'=83 vibrational level of the 1^3Σ_g^+ state of ^7Li2 is measured as a function of laser intensity. At low intensities, the photoassociation rate increases linearly with intensity. At sufficiently high intensities, however, we observe the onset of saturation. This result is relevant to the understanding of the dynamics of molecule formation by photoassociation, as well as by magnetically-tuned Feshbach resonances.

  5. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  6. Molecular simulation of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes and idealized carbon slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyu; Johnson, J. Karl

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen gas into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and idealized carbon slit pores is studied by computer simulation. Hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are modeled with the Silvera-Goldman potential. The Crowell-Brown potential is used to model the hydrogen-carbon interactions. Calculations include adsorption inside the tubes, in the interstitial regions of tube arrays, and on the outside surface of isolated tubes. Quantum effects are included through implementation of the path integral formalism. Comparison with classical simulations gives an indication of the importance of quantum effects for hydrogen adsorption. Quantum effects are important even at 298 K for adsorption in tube interstices. We compare our simulations with experimental data for SWNTs, graphitic nanofibers, and activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms from simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data for activated carbon, but do not confirm the large uptake reported for SWNTs and nanofibers. Although the adsorption potential for hydrogen in SWNTs is enhanced relative to slit pores of the same size, our calculations show that the storage capacity of an array of tubes is less than that for idealized slit pore geometries, except at very low pressures. Ambient temperature isotherms indicate that an array of nanotubes is not a suitable sorbent material for achieving DOE targets for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  7. Thermodynamic properties and ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, octylamine, dioctylamine, trioctylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.; Smith, N.K.; Tasker, I.R.

    1996-11-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of the group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (dsc) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, octylamine, dioctylamine, trioctylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine are reported. Two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined for phthalan, isoxazole, the three octylamines, and phenyl isocyanate. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for phthalan and isoxazole in the temperature range 298 K to 425 K. The critical temperature and critical density of octylamine were determined from the dsc results and a critical pressure derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, critical pressures, and critical densities for cyclohexene (pressure and density only), phthalan, isoxazole, dioctylamine, and phenyl isocyanate. Group-additivity parameters or ring-correction terms useful in the application of the Benson group-contribution correlations are derived.

  8. Traces, ideals, and arithmetic means

    PubMed Central

    Kaftal, Victor; Weiss, Gary

    2002-01-01

    This article grew out of recent work of Dykema, Figiel, Weiss, and Wodzicki (Commutator structure of operator ideals) which inter alia characterizes commutator ideals in terms of arithmetic means. In this paper we study ideals that are arithmetically mean (am) stable, am-closed, am-open, soft-edged and soft-complemented. We show that many of the ideals in the literature possess such properties. We apply these notions to prove that for all the ideals considered, the linear codimension of their commutator space (the “number of traces on the ideal”) is either 0, 1, or ∞. We identify the largest ideal which supports a unique nonsingular trace as the intersection of certain Lorentz ideals. An application to elementary operators is given. We study properties of arithmetic mean operations on ideals, e.g., we prove that the am-closure of a sum of ideals is the sum of their am-closures. We obtain cancellation properties for arithmetic means: for principal ideals, a necessary and sufficient condition for first order cancellations is the regularity of the generator; for second order cancellations, sufficient conditions are that the generator satisfies the exponential Δ2-condition or is regular. We construct an example where second order cancellation fails, thus settling an open question. We also consider cancellation properties for inclusions. And we find and use lattice properties of ideals associated with the existence of “gaps.” PMID:12032287

  9. The ideal physician entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Bottles, K

    2000-01-01

    How does the sometimes elusive and high-stakes world of venture capital really work? How can physician executives with innovative ideas or new technologies approach venture capitalists to help them raise capital to form a start-up company? These important questions are explored in this new column on the physician as entrepreneur. The ideal physician executive is described as: (1) an expert in an area that Wall Street perceives as hot; (2) a public speaker who can enthusiastically communicate scientific and business plans to a variety of audiences; (3) a team leader who is willing to share equity in the company with other employees; (4) a recruiter and a motivator; (5) an implementer who can achieve milestones quickly that allow the company to go public as soon as possible; and (6) a realist who does not resent the terms of the typical deal. The lucrative world of the venture capitalists is foreign territory for physician executives and requires a great idea, charisma, risk-taking, connections, patience, and perseverance to navigate it successfully. PMID:11187408

  10. 19F single-quantum and 19F-33S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence NMR of SF6 in thermotropic nematogens and in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Henri; Saunavaara, Jani; Ingman, L Petri; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-08-24

    (19)F single-quantum (SQC) and (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) NMR spectroscopy of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) dissolved in thermotropic liquid crystals (TLCs) were used to investigate the properties of TLCs. On one hand, environmental effects on the NMR parameters of SF(6), (19)F nuclear shielding, (19)F-(33)S spin-spin coupling, secondary isotope effects of sulfur on (19)F shielding, and the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction of the external magnetic field were studied as well. The temperature dependence of the (19)F shielding of SF(6) in TLCs was modeled with a function that takes into account the properties of both TLC and SF(6). It appears that the TLC environment deforms the electronic system of SF(6) so that the (19)F shielding tensor becomes slightly anisotropic, with the anisotropy being from -0.5 to -1.4 ppm, depending upon the TLC solvent. On the contrary, no sign of residual dipolar coupling between (19)F and (33)S was found, meaning that the so-called deformational effects, which arise from the interaction between vibrational and reorientational motions of the molecule, on the geometry of the molecule are insignificant. Diffusion activation energies, E(a), were determined from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients. In each TLC, E(a) increases when moving from an isotropic phase to a nematic phase. The spin-spin coupling constant, J((19)F,(33)S), increases by ca. 10 Hz when moving from the gas phase to TLC solutions. The secondary isotope shifts of (19)F shielding are practically independent of TLC solvent and temperature. For the first time, (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum NMR spectra were recorded for SF(6) in the gas phase and in a liquid-crystalline solution. PMID:16913748

  11. Space Sciences and Idealism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.

    Erwin Schrodinger suggested that " Scientific knowledge forms part of the idealistic background of human life", which exalted man from a nude and savage state to true humanity [Science and Humanism, Cambridge, 1961, p9]. Modern space sciences an space exploration are a brilliant demonstration of the validity of Schrodinger's thesis on Idealism. Moreover, Schrodingers thesis could be considered also as a basic principle for the New Educational Space Philosophical Project "TIMAEUS"."TIMAEUS" is not only an attempt to to start a new dialogue between Science, the Humanities and Religion; but also it is an origin of the cultural innovations of our so strange of globilisation. TIMAEUS, thus, can reveal Idealism as something more fundamental , more refined, more developed than is now accepted by the scientific community and the piblic. TIMAEUS has a significant cultural agenda, connected with the high orbital performance of the synthetic arts, combining a knowledge of the truly spiritual as well as the universal. In particular, classical ballet as a synthetic art can be a new and powerful perfector and re-creator of the real human, real idealistic, real complex culture in orbit. As is well known, Carlo Blasis, the most important dance theorist of the 19t h .century, made probably the first attempts to use the scientific ideas of Leonardo da Vinci and Isaac Newton for the understanding of the gravitational nature of balance and allegro in ballet. In particular Blasis's idea of the limited use of the legs in classical dance realised by the gifted pupils of Enrico Cecchetti - M.Fokine, A.Pavlova and V.Nijinsky, with thinkable purity and elegance of style. V.Nijinsky in his remarkable animation of the dance of two dimensional creatures of a Euclidean flat world (L'Apres Midi d'un Faune,1912) discovered that true classical dance has some gravitational limits. For example, Nijinsky's Faunes and Nymphs mut use running on the heels (In accordance with "Partitura" 1916); they cannot use a turn-out or epaulement for their pas-de-bra. In other words Nijinsky's dancers must live in weightlessness in order to perform what his "Partitura" (L'Apres Midi d'un Faune, version of 1916) describes. Diaghilev and Benois, platonised theorists of the Ballet Russe, suggested that the true idealised classical dance must be performed in Tiepolo's weightlessnessful manner of later Baroque. Anna Pavlova by her idiosyncrasy of parallel motion opened the New World of Aesthetics and brought it to its utmost perfection. Hence, it is natural to think that some findings of choreographers could be developed and tested in space environment. Moreover, we believe that classical ballet itself could be brought to perfection in space fter Diaghilev's reform. Correspondingly, we may await that such innovations can initiate a development of the New Grand Style in Arts, Music and Choreography free from contemporary religious and national prejudices.

  12. Trace gas measurements using optically resonant cavities and quantum cascade lasers operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Lombardi, G.; Davies, P. B.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.; Röpcke, J.

    2008-11-01

    Achieving the high sensitivity necessary for trace gas detection in the midinfrared molecular fingerprint region generally requires long absorption path lengths. In addition, for wider application, especially for field measurements, compact and cryogen free spectrometers are definitely preferable. An alternative approach to conventional linear absorption spectroscopy employing multiple pass cells for achieving high sensitivity is to combine a high finesse cavity with thermoelectrically (TE) cooled quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and detectors. We have investigated the sensitivity limits of an entirely TE cooled system equipped with an ˜0.5 m long cavity having a small sample volume of 0.3 l. With this spectrometer cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy employing a continuous wave QCL emitting at 7.66 μm yielded path lengths of 1080 m and a noise equivalent absorption of 2×10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2. The molecular concentration detection limit with a 20 s integration time was found to be 6×108 molecules/cm3 for N2O and 2×109 molecules/cm3 for CH4, which is good enough for the selective measurement of trace atmospheric constituents at 2.2 mbar. The main limiting factor for achieving even higher sensitivity, such as that found for larger volume multi pass cell spectrometers, is the residual mode noise of the cavity. On the other hand the application of TE cooled pulsed QCLs for integrated cavity output spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) was found to be limited by the intrinsic frequency chirp of the laser. Consequently the accuracy and advantage of an absolute internal absorption calibration, in theory inherent for CRDS experiments, are not achievable.

  13. Lorentz ratio of quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khalfaoui, A.; Bennaceur, D. )

    1994-06-01

    A quantum collective approach is developed to investigate linear transport properties of a system of highly degenerate weakly coupled electrons and strongly coupled semiclassical ions. The basic formalism rests upon suitable extention of the Boltzmann--Bloch quantum transport equation. The model considers electron--ion (e--i) and electron--electron (e--e) collisions in a unified scheme of both long- and short-range Coulomb interactions. The e--e collisions contribute to the thermal conductivity calculation in the low coupling regime. Even though they can be insignificant for strongly coupled systems, the extensively used Lorentz gas approximation cannot be justified for plasmas of astrophysical interests. It is shown that the Lorentz ratio of high-density plasma may exhibit substantial negative deviation from the ideal Sommerfeld value, due to some nonidealities, such as e--e interaction and quantum effects. Results are presented under analytical and compact forms allowing numerical applications, as well as comparisons with existing theories.

  14. Beyond the Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Mehmani, Bahar; Špička, Václav; Aghdami, Maryam J.; Khrennikov, Andrei Yu

    2007-09-01

    pt. A. Introductions. The mathematical basis for deterministic quantum mechanics / G.'t Hooft. What did we learn from quantum gravity? / A. Ashtekar. Bose-Einstein condensates and EPR quantum non-locality / F. Laloe. The quantum measurement process: lessons from an exactly solvable model / A.E. Allahverdyan, R. Balian and Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen -- pt. B. Quantum mechanics and quantum information. POVMs: a small but important step beyond standard quantum mechanics / W. M. de Muynck. State reduction by measurements with a null result / G. Nienhuis. Solving open questions in the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal gas via a hybrid mixture of laser and statistical physics / M. Kim, A. Svidzinsky and M.O. Scully. Twin-Photon light scattering and causality / G. Puentes, A. Aiello and J. P. Woerdman. Simultaneous measurement of non-commuting observables / G. Aquino and B. Mehmani. Quantum decoherence and gravitational waves / M.T. Jaekel ... [et al.]. Role of various entropies in the black hole information loss problem / Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen and I.V. Volovich. Quantum and super-quantum correlations / G.S. Jaeger -- pt. C. Long distance correlations and bell inequalities. Understanding long-distance quantum correlations / L. Marchildon. Connection of probability models to EPR experiments: probability spaces and Bell's theorem / K. Hess and W. Philipp. Fair sampling vs no-signalling principle in EPR experiments / G. Adenier and A. Yu. Khrennikov -- pt. D. Mathematical foundations. Where the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics comes from / G.M. D'Ariano. Phase space description of quantum mechanics and non-commutative geometry: Wigner-Moyal and Bohm in a wider context / B.J. Hiley. Quantum mechanics as simple algorithm for approximation of classical integrals / A. Yu. Khrennikov. Noncommutative quantum mechanics viewed from Feynman Formalism / J. Lages ... [et al.]. Beyond the quantum in Snyder space / J.F.S. van Huele and M. K. Transtrum -- pt. E. Stochastic electrodynamics. Some quantum experiments from the point of view of Stochastic electrodynamics / V. Spicka ... [et al.]. On the ergodic behaviour of atomic systems under the action of the zero-point radiation field / L. De La Peña and A. M. Cetto. Inertia and the vacuum-view on the emergence of the inertia reaction force / A. Rueda and H. Sunahata -- pt. F. Models for the electron. Rotating Hopf-Kinks: oscillators in the sense of de Broglie / U. Enz. Kerr-Newman particles: symmetries and other properties / H.I. Arcos and J.G. Pereira. Kerr geometry beyond the quantum theory / Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen -- pt. G. Philosophical considerations. Probability in non-collapse interpretations of a quantum mechanics / D. Dieks. The Schrödinger-Park paradox about the concept of "State" in quantum statistical mechanics and quantum information theory is still open: one more reason to go beyond? / G.P. Beretta. The conjecture that local realism is possible / E. Santos -- pt. H. The round table. Round table discussion / A.M. Cetto ... [et al.].

  15. Uncountably Generated Ideals of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sury, B.

    2011-01-01

    Maximal ideals in the ring of continuous functions on the closed interval [0, 1] are not finitely generated. This is well-known. What is not as well-known, but perhaps should be, is the fact that these ideals are not countably generated although the proof is not harder! We prove this here and use the result to produce some non-prime ideals in the…

  16. Liquid-Gated High Mobility and Quantum Oscillation of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at an Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shengwei; Lü, Weiming; Huang, Zhen; Liu, Zhiqi; Han, Kun; Gopinadhan, Kalon; Li, Changjian; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Wenxiong; Ma, Haijiao Harsan; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Ariando

    2016-04-26

    Electric field effect in electronic double layer transistor (EDLT) configuration with ionic liquids as the dielectric materials is a powerful means of exploring various properties in different materials. Here, we demonstrate the modulation of electrical transport properties and extremely high mobility of two-dimensional electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface through ionic liquid-assisted electric field effect. With a change of the gate voltages, the depletion of charge carrier and the resultant enhancement of electron mobility up to 19 380 cm(2)/(V s) are realized, leading to quantum oscillations of the conductivity at the LAO/STO interface. The present results suggest that high-mobility oxide interfaces, which exhibit quantum phenomena, could be obtained by ionic liquid-assisted field effect. PMID:26974812

  17. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam; Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Pepper, Michael

    2013-12-04

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background.

  18. Ideal thermodynamic processes of oscillatory-flow regenerative engines will go to ideal stirling cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ercang

    2012-06-01

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic cycle of oscillating-flow regenerative machines. Unlike the classical analysis of thermodynamic textbooks, the assumptions for pistons' movement limitations are not needed and only ideal flowing and heat transfer should be maintained in our present analysis. Under such simple assumptions, the meso-scale thermodynamic cycles of each gas parcel in typical locations of a regenerator are analyzed. It is observed that the gas parcels in the regenerator undergo Lorentz cycle in different temperature levels, whereas the locus of all gas parcels inside the regenerator is the Ericson-like thermodynamic cycle. Based on this new finding, the author argued that ideal oscillating-flow machines without heat transfer and flowing losses is not the Stirling cycle. However, this new thermodynamic cycle can still achieve the same efficiency of the Carnot heat engine and can be considered a new reversible thermodynamic cycle under two constant-temperature heat sinks.

  19. Ultra-high mobility two-dimensional electron gas in a SiGe/Si/SiGe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, M. Yu. Shashkin, A. A.; Dolgopolov, V. T.; Huang, S.-H.; Liu, C. W.; Kravchenko, S. V.

    2015-03-02

    We report the observation of an electron gas in a SiGe/Si/SiGe quantum well with maximum mobility up to 240 m{sup 2}/Vs, which is noticeably higher than previously reported results in silicon-based structures. Using SiO, rather than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as an insulator, we obtain strongly reduced threshold voltages close to zero. In addition to the predominantly small-angle scattering well known in the high-mobility heterostructures, the observed linear temperature dependence of the conductivity reveals the presence of a short-range random potential.

  20. Analysis of Trace Gas Mixtures Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    We measure and analyze mixtures of trace gases at ppb-ppm levels using an external cavity quantum cascade laser sensor with a 1-second response time. Accurate spectral fits are obtained in the presence of overlapping spectra.

  1. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Wang, G. T.; Dimakis, E. E-mail: e.dimakis@hzdr.de; Moustakas, T. D.; Tsui, D. C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in a superlattice structure of 40 InN quantum wells consisting of one monolayer of InN embedded between 10 nm GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} (or 1.25 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} per InN quantum well, assuming all the quantum wells are connected by diffused indium contacts) and 420 cm{sup 2}/Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  2. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 μm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The sensor was designed for operation in multiple modes, including gas sensing within a multi-pass Heriott cell and intracavity absorption sensing using the ECQCL compliance voltage. In addition, the ECQCL compliance voltage was used to reduce effects of long-term drifts in the ECQCL output power. The sensor was characterized for noise, drift, and detection of chemicals including ammonia, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, Freon- 134a, Freon-152a, and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP). We also present use of the sensor for mobile detection of ammonia downwind of cattle facilities, in which concentrations were recorded at 1-s intervals.

  3. Controllable manipulation and detection of local densities and bipartite entanglement in a quantum gas by a dissipative defect

    SciTech Connect

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2011-10-15

    We study the complex dynamics of a one-dimensional Bose gas subjected to a dissipative local defect which induces one-body atom losses. In experiments these atom losses occur, for example, when a focused electron or light beam or a single trapped ion is brought into contact with a quantum gas. We discuss how within such setups one can measure or manipulate densities locally and specify the excitations that are induced by the defect. In certain situations the defect can be used to generate entanglement in a controlled way despite its dissipative nature. The careful examination of the interplay between hole excitations and the collapse of the wave function due to nondetection of loss is crucial for the understanding of the dynamics we observe.

  4. Be Ye Perfect? Religious Ideals in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of "religious ideals" and their possible role in education. "Religious ideals" are defined as ideals that acquire meaning due to a belief in transcendence or a divine being. Two kinds of religious ideals are being distinguished, namely ideals that are constituted by a belief in a transcendent being and ideals that…

  5. The Place of Ideals in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David T.

    This paper examines whether ideals and idealism have a role to play in teaching, identifying some ambiguities and problems associated with ideals and arguing that ideals figure importantly in teaching, but they are ideals of character or personhood as much as they are ideals of educational purpose. The first section focuses on the promise and…

  6. Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo and Diffusion Monte Carlo: A Comparative Study of the 3D Homogeneous Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; López Ríos, Pablo; Needs, Richard J.; Drummond, Neil D.; Mohr, Jennifer A.-F.; Booth, George H.; Grüneis, Andreas; Kresse, Georg; Alavi, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo1 (FCIQMC) and its initiator adaptation2 allow for exact solutions to the Schrödinger equation to be obtained within a finite-basis wavefunction ansatz. In this talk, we explore an application of FCIQMC to the homogeneous electron gas (HEG). In particular we use these exact finite-basis energies to compare with approximate quantum chemical calculations from the VASP code3. After removing the basis set incompleteness error by extrapolation4,5, we compare our energies with state-of-the-art diffusion Monte Carlo calculations from the CASINO package6. Using a combined approach of the two quantum Monte Carlo methods, we present the highest-accuracy thermodynamic (infinite-particle) limit energies for the HEG achieved to date. 1 G. H. Booth, A. Thom, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 054106 (2009). 2 D. Cleland, G. H. Booth, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 041103 (2010). 3 www.vasp.at (2012). 4 J. J. Shepherd, A. Grüneis, G. H. Booth, G. Kresse, and A. Alavi, Phys. Rev. B. 86, 035111 (2012). 5 J. J. Shepherd, G. H. Booth, and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 244101 (2012). 6 R. Needs, M. Towler, N. Drummond, and P. L. Ríos, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 22, 023201 (2010).

  7. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  8. Vortex Quantum Creation and Winding Number Scaling in a Quenched Spinor Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlmann, Michael; Schuetzhold, Ralf; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2007-09-21

    Motivated by a recent experiment, we study nonequilibrium quantum phenomena taking place in the quench of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate through the zero-temperature phase transition separating the polar paramagnetic and planar ferromagnetic phases. We derive the typical spin domain structure (correlations of the effective magnetization) created by the quench arising due to spin-mode quantum fluctuations, and we establish a sample-size scaling law for the creation of spin vortices, which are topological defects in the transverse magnetization.

  9. Quantum-relativistic hydrodynamic model for a spin-polarized electron gas interacting with light.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Omar; Zamanian, Jens; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine

    2014-07-01

    We develop a semirelativistic quantum fluid theory based on the expansion of the Dirac Hamiltonian to second order in 1/c. By making use of the Madelung representation of the wave function, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations that comprises a continuity equation, an Euler equation for the mean velocity, and an evolution equation for the electron spin density. This hydrodynamic model is then applied to study the dynamics of a dense and weakly relativistic electron plasma. In particular, we investigate the impact of the quantum-relativistic spin effects on the Faraday rotation in a one-dimensional plasma slab irradiated by an x-ray laser source. PMID:25122397

  10. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  11. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  12. Quantum-relativistic hydrodynamic model for a spin-polarized electron gas interacting with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Omar; Zamanian, Jens; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine

    2014-07-01

    We develop a semirelativistic quantum fluid theory based on the expansion of the Dirac Hamiltonian to second order in 1/c. By making use of the Madelung representation of the wave function, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations that comprises a continuity equation, an Euler equation for the mean velocity, and an evolution equation for the electron spin density. This hydrodynamic model is then applied to study the dynamics of a dense and weakly relativistic electron plasma. In particular, we investigate the impact of the quantum-relativistic spin effects on the Faraday rotation in a one-dimensional plasma slab irradiated by an x-ray laser source.

  13. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The quest for higher efficiency, better fidelity, broader bandwidth, multimode capacity and longer storage lifetime is pursued in all those approaches, as shown in this special issue. The improvement of quantum memory operation specifically requires in-depth study and control of numerous physical processes leading to atomic decoherence. The present issue reflects the development of rare earth ion doped matrices offering long lifetime superposition states, either as bulk crystals or as optical waveguides. The need for quantum sources and high efficiency detectors at the single photon level is also illustrated. Several papers address the networking of quantum memories either in long-haul cryptography or in the prospect of quantum processing. In this context, much attention has been paid recently to interfacing quantum light with superconducting qubits and with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Finally, the quantum interfacing of light with matter raises questions on entanglement. The last two papers are devoted to the generation of entanglement by dissipative processes. It is shown that long lifetime entanglement may be built in this way. We hope this special issue will help readers to become familiar with the exciting field of ensemble-based quantum memories and will stimulate them to bring deeper insights and new ideas to this area.

  14. The Quantum Field Theory of the Ensemble Operator

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Richard N.

    2009-03-09

    Quantum field theory (QFT) provides a systematic investigative tool for ensembles of molecules. The grand-canonical ensemble operator (GCEO) for an ideal gas is presented in terms of the Fock creation and annihilation operators. The ideal GCEO can be shown to obey a simple equation which facilitates calculation of quantum-statistical properties of bosonic and fermionic molecules. Examples are linked-cluster QFT derivations of the grand-canonical partition function and the Poisson distribution for non-interacting molecules. The Boltzmann limit is achieved by omitting exchange diagrams. Summations of Feynman diagrams for long- and short-range interactions to infinite order lead to a useful model of the pair-correlation function and a new avenue for the study of dynamics near the critical point for gas-liquid phase transitions.

  15. The Geometry of Non-Ideal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    Arnold showed that the Euler equations of an ideal fluid describe geodesies on the Lie algebra of incompressible vector fields. We generalize this to fluids with dissipation and Gaussian random forcing. The dynamics is determined by the structure constants of a Lie algebra, along with inner products defining kinetic energy, Ohmic dissipation and the covariance of the forces. This allows us to construct tractable toy models for fluid mechanics with a finite number of degrees of freedom. We solve one of them to show how symmetries can be broken spontaneously.In another direction, we derive a deterministic equation that describes the most likely path connecting two points in the phase space of a randomly forced system: this is a WKB approximation to the Fokker-Plank-Kramer equation, analogous to the instantons of quantum theory. Applied to hydrodynamics, we derive a PDE system for Navier-Stokes instantons.

  16. Potential interstellar noble gas molecules: ArOH+ and NeOH+ rovibrational analysis from quantum chemical quartic force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Riley A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has shown that noble gas chemistry may be of more chemical significance than previously believed. The present work extends the known chemistry of small noble gas molecules to NeOH+ and ArOH+. Besides their respective neonium and argonium diatomic cation cousins, these hydroxyl cation molecules are the most stable small noble gas molecules analyzed of late. ArOH+ is once again more stable than the neon cation, but both are well-behaved enough for a complete quartic force field analysis of their rovibrational properties. The Ar-O bond in ArOH+ , for instance, is roughly three-quarters of the strength of the Ar-H bond in ArH+ highlighting the rigidity of this system. The rotational constants, geometries, and vibrational frequencies for both molecules and their various isotopologues are computed from ab initio quantum chemical theory at high-level, and it is shown that these cations may form in regions where peroxy or weakly-bound alcohols may be present. The resulting data should be of significant assistance for the laboratory or observational analysis of these potential interstellar molecules.

  17. Density Fluctuations in Uniform Quantum Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2011-12-12

    Analytical expressions are given for the static structure factor S(k) and the pair correlation function g(r) for uniform ideal Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac gases for all temperatures. In the vicinity of Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) temperature, g(r) becomes long ranged and remains so in the condensed phase. In the dilute gas limit, g(r) of bosons and fermions do not coincide with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas but exhibit bunching and anti-bunching effect respectively. The width of these functions depends on the temperature and is scaled as {radical}(inverse atomic mass). Our numerical results provide the precise quantitative values of suppression/increase (antibunching and bunching) of the density fluctuations at small distances in ideal quantum gases in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation for almost non-trapped dilute gases.

  18. Quantum oscillations in a two-dimensional electron gas in black phosphorus thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Likai; Ye, Guo Jun; Tran, Vy; Fei, Ruixiang; Chen, Guorui; Wang, Huichao; Wang, Jian; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yang, Li; Chen, Xian Hui; Zhang, Yuanbo

    2015-07-01

    For decades, two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) have allowed important experimental discoveries and conceptual developments in condensed-matter physics. When combined with the unique electronic properties of two-dimensional crystals, they allow rich physical phenomena to be probed at the quantum level. Here, we create a 2DEG in black phosphorus—a recently added member of the two-dimensional atomic crystal family—using a gate electric field. The black phosphorus film hosting the 2DEG is placed on a hexagonal boron nitride substrate. The resulting high carrier mobility in the 2DEG allows the observation of quantum oscillations. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of these oscillations yields crucial information about the system, such as cyclotron mass and lifetime of its charge carriers. Our results, coupled with the fact that black phosphorus possesses anisotropic energy bands with a tunable, direct bandgap, distinguish black phosphorus 2DEG as a system with unique electronic and optoelectronic properties.

  19. Idealism and materialism in perception.

    PubMed

    Rose, David; Brown, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Koenderink (2014, Perception, 43, 1-6) has said most Perception readers are deluded, because they believe an 'All Seeing Eye' observes an objective reality. We trace the source of Koenderink's assertion to his metaphysical idealism, and point to two major weaknesses in his position-namely, its dualism and foundationalism. We counter with arguments from modern philosophy of science for the existence of an objective material reality, contrast Koenderink's enactivism to his idealism, and point to ways in which phenomenology and cognitive science are complementary and not mutually exclusive. PMID:26492727

  20. Microscopic description of quantum Lorentz gas and extension of the Boltzmann equation to entire space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kanki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Petrosky, T.

    2016-02-01

    Irreversible processes of weakly coupled one-dimensional quantum perfect Lorentz gas are studied on the basis of the fundamental laws of physics in terms of the complex spectral analysis associated with the resonance state of the Liouville-von Neumann operator. Without any phenomenological operations, such as a coarse-graining of space-time, or a truncation of the higher order correlation, we obtained irreversible processes in a purely dynamical basis in all space and time scale including the microscopic atomic interaction range that is much smaller than the mean-free length. Based on this solution, a limitation of the usual phenomenological Boltzmann equation, as well as an extension of the Boltzmann equation to entire space-time scale, is discussed.

  1. Quantum chemical study on substituent effect of gas-phase reactions in III-V nitride semiconductor crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Takanobu; Doi, Kentaro; Nakamura, Koichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out ab initio quantum chemical calculations to discuss the substituent effect of the metal source on the coordination interaction and the reactivity in the gas-phase parasitic reactions in M(t-C4H9)3/H2/NH3 (M = Al, Ga) systems following the elimination of isobutane. We found that t-butyl groups play two important roles: high ability for electron donation leading to large M-N interaction and high bulkiness leading to large steric repulsion. It is expected that the extension of chain adducts obstructing the growth of AlGaN would be suppressed by the steric hindrance due to bulky substituents lifting up the activation energies in the parasitic reactions.

  2. Quantum-tunneling dynamics of a spin-polarized Fermi gas in a double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Mazzarella, G.; Toigo, F.; Salerno, M.

    2010-02-15

    We study the exact dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-polarized gas of fermions in a double-well potential at zero and finite temperature. Despite the system being made of noninteracting fermions, its dynamics can be quite complex, showing strongly aperiodic spatio-temporal patterns during the tunneling. The extension of these results to the case of mixtures of spin-polarized fermions interacting with self-trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at zero temperature is considered as well. In this case we show that the fermionic dynamics remains qualitatively similar to that observed in the absence of BEC but with the Rabi frequencies of fermionic excited states explicitly depending on the number of bosons and on the boson-fermion interaction strength. From this, the possibility of controlling quantum fermionic dynamics by means of Feshbach resonances is suggested.

  3. Sensitive trace gas detection with cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Lang, N.; Macherius, U.; Zimmermann, H.; Röpcke, J.

    2013-09-01

    Trace gas sensing in the mid-infrared using quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) promises high specificity and sensitivity. We report on the performance of a simple cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) sensor using a continuous wave external-cavity QCL at 7.4 μm. A noise-equivalent absorption coefficient αmin of 2.6 × 10-8 cm-1 in 625 s was achieved, which corresponds to a detection limit of 6 ± 1 ppb of CH4 in 15 millibars air for the R(3) transition at 1327.074 cm-1. This is the highest value of noise-equivalent absorption and among the longest effective path length (1780 m) reported to date with QCL-based CEAS.

  4. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  5. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ("Found Chem" 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all "ceteris paribus" laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are…

  6. [Harmony--idea and ideal].

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, C

    1996-03-01

    The concept of the whole as an ideal of gestalt and value is sketched. In the concrete situation of healer and patient a multiperspective approach rather than a realization of wholeness has to be enough, taking into account somatic, physiological, intraindividual-psychological, interpersonal-social and transpersonal aspects of personalities in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:8900879

  7. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ("Found Chem" 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all "ceteris paribus" laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are

  8. Collider performance with ideal collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-06-01

    Performance is estimated for head-on bunch collisions. The luminosity is written as a distribution in time and length along the collision path, using a Gaussian distribution in all space dimensions. Computations are made for the Tevatron. Sources of luminosity reduction are listed in the case of non-ideal conditions.

  9. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  10. Ionic conductivity in a quantum lattice gas model with three-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. H.; Muttalib, K. A.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-12-01

    A system of mesoscopic ions with dominant three-particle interactions is modeled by a quantum lattice liquid on the planar kagomé lattice. The two-parameter Hamiltonian contains localized attractive triplet interactions as potential energy and nearest neighbor hopping-type terms as kinetic energy. The dynamic ionic conductivity σ(ω) is theoretically investigated for ‘weak hopping’ via a quantum many-body perturbation expansion of the thermal (Matsubara) Green function (current-current correlation). A simple analytic continuation and mapping of the thermal Green function provide the temporal Fourier transform of the physical retarded Green function in the Kubo formula. Substituting pertinent exact solutions for static multi-particle correlations known from previous work, Arrhenius relations are revealed in zeroth-order approximation for the dc ionic conductivity σdc along special trajectories in density-temperature space. The Arrhenius plots directly yield static activation energies along the latter loci. Experimental possibilities relating to σdc are discussed in the presence of equilibrium aggregation. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  11. Modified Coulomb gas construction of quantum Hall states from nonunitary conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, M. V.; Jolicoeur, Th.; Vidanović, I.

    2009-10-01

    Some fractional quantum Hall states observed in experiments may be described by first-quantized wavefunctions with special clustering properties such as the Moore-Read Pfaffian for filling factor ν=5/2 . This wavefunction has been constructed by constructing correlation functions of a two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) involving a free boson and a Majorana fermion. By considering other CFTs many other clustered states have been proposed as candidate fractional quantum Hall states under appropriate circumstances. It is believed that the underlying CFT should be unitary if one wants to describe an incompressible, i.e., gapped liquid state. We show that by changing the way one derives the wavefunction from its parent CFT it is possible to obtain an incompressible candidate state when starting from a nonunitary parent. The construction mimics a global change in parameters in the phase space of the electron system. We explicit our construction in the case of the so-called Gaffnian state (a state for filling factor 2/5) and also for the Haldane-Rezayi state (a spin-singlet state at filling 1/2). We note that there are obstructions along this path in the case of the permanent spin-singlet state of Read and Rezayi which can be characterized as a robust gapless state.

  12. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. I. Formal developments

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.; Baranov, M.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a quantum field theoretical framework to analytically study the three-body constrained Bose-Hubbard model beyond mean field and noninteracting spin wave approximations. It is based on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory with two coupled bosonic degrees of freedom with polynomial interactions, which have a natural interpretation as single particles and two-particle states. The procedure can be seen as a proper quantization of the Gutzwiller mean field theory. The theory is conveniently evaluated in the framework of the quantum effective action, for which the usual symmetry principles are now supplemented with a ''constraint principle'' operative on short distances. We test the theory via investigation of scattering properties of few particles in the limit of vanishing density, and we address the complementary problem in the limit of maximum filling, where the low-lying excitations are holes and diholes on top of the constraint-induced insulator. This is the first of a sequence of two papers. The application of the formalism to the many-body problem, which can be realized with atoms in optical lattices with strong three-body loss, is performed in a related work [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064510 (2010)].

  13. Visualizing edge states with an atomic Bose gas in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhl, B. K.; Lu, H.-I.; Aycock, L. M.; Genkina, D.; Spielman, I. B.

    2015-09-01

    Bringing ultracold atomic gases into the quantum Hall regime is challenging. We engineered an effective magnetic field in a two-dimensional lattice with an elongated-strip geometry, consisting of the sites of an optical lattice in the long direction and of three internal atomic spin states in the short direction. We imaged the localized states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip; via excitation dynamics, we further observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down the system’s edges, analogous to edge magnetoplasmons in two-dimensional electron systems, and a dynamical Hall effect for bulk excitations. Our technique involves minimal heating, which will be important for spectroscopic measurements of the Hofstadter butterfly and realizations of Laughlin’s charge pump.

  14. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Angela; Di Franco, Cinzia; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 μm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm−1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters. PMID:22574040

  15. Equation of state for a trapped quantum gas: remnant of zero-point energy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilho, P. C. M.; Poveda-Cuevas, F. J.; Seman, J. A.; Shiozaki, R. F.; Roati, G.; Muniz, S. R.; Magalhães, D. V.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2016-02-01

    The study of the thermodynamic properties of trapped gases has attracted great attention during the last few years and can be used as a tool to characterize such clouds in the presence of other phenomena. Here, we obtain an equation of state for a harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate taking the limit of T\\to 0 by means of global themodynamic variables. These variables allow us to explore limits in which the standard thermodynamics are not defined. Our results are taken in the high density limit, and the extrapolation for N\\to 1 is done later. Even in this situation, we qualitatively observe the well known existence of a zero-point energy for harmonic potentials in which the determination of conjugated variables is limited by the quantum nature of the system.

  16. Plasmon response of a quantum-confined electron gas probed by core-level photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, Mustafa M; Moon, Eun Ju; Eguiluz, Adolfo G; Weitering, Harm H

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of quantized 'bulk' plasmons in ultrathin magnesium films on Si(111) by analyzing plasmon-loss satellites in core-level photoemission spectra, recorded as a function of the film thickness d. Remarkably, the plasmon energy is shown to vary as 1/d{sup 2} all the way down to three atomic layers. The loss spectra are dominated by the n=1 and n=2 normal modes, consistent with the excitation of plasmons involving quantized electronic subbands. With decreasing film thickness, spectral weight is gradually transferred from the plasmon modes to the low-energy single-particle excitations. These results represent striking manifestations of the role of quantum confinement on plasmon resonances in precisely controlled nanostructures.

  17. Bose-Einstein statistics of an excitonic gas in two dimensions: Excitons and biexcitons in a GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.C.; Wolfe, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    Intense photoexcitation of a GaAs quantum well produces a dense gas of free excitons that can pairwise combine to form biexcitons. At sufficiently high density where interparticle spacing is comparable to the thermal deBroglie wavelength, such a two-component gas confined to two-dimensional motion may exhibit quantum-statistical behavior. In this paper, we theoretically show how quantum statistics modifies the equilibrium-density relationship between excitons and biexcitons from that of a classical square law. We also experimentally examine a gas of excitons and biexcitons in GaAs quantum wells and find the predicted signature of Bose-Einstein statistics: {ital a saturation of the exciton density with a continued growth of the biexciton density, as the pair density is increased.} For a two-dimensional excitonic gas at a temperature of 5 K inside a 100-{Angstrom} GaAs quantum well, the calculated pair density at the onset of excitonic saturation is only about 1{times}10{sup 11}cm{sup {minus}2}, a density readily attained by photoexcitation with 5-ps laser pulses focused to a 3-{mu}m spot. Concurrent with the saturation behavior with increasing density, we observe a gradual broadening and blueshifting of the luminescence peaks, indicating the onset of many-particle effects. Also, the deduced ratio of the total radiative rate of a biexciton to that of an exciton is considerably smaller than what might be expected from simple kinetic arguments. Thus, it seems that a rigorous understanding of the spectral line shapes and luminescence intensities is needed to support our interpretation of Bose-Einstein statistics in this system. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Ideal and incompressible fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneill, M. E.; Chorlton, F.

    An introductory treatment of fluid mechanics theory, emphasizing mathematical methods and techniques, is given. Basic mathematical techniques of flow analysis are outlined in connection with viscous and inviscid flows, compressible and incompressible flows, and ideal flows. Among the specific flow problems addressed are: the kinematics of fluids in motion; equations of motion in boundary layer flows; and the stream functions for two-dimensional flows. Methods for analyzing wave motion in rectangular and cylindrical tanks are also described.

  19. Variational mixed quantum/semiclassical simulation of dihalogen guest and rare-gas solid host dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Cina, Jeffrey A.

    2014-07-21

    A variational mixed quantum-semiclassical theory for the internal nuclear dynamics of a small molecule and the induced small-amplitude coherent motion of a low-temperature host medium is developed, tested, and used to simulate the temporal evolution of nonstationary states of the internal molecular and surrounding medium degrees of freedom. In this theory, termed the Fixed Vibrational Basis/Gaussian Bath (FVB/GB) method, the system is treated fully quantum mechanically while Gaussian wave packets are used for the bath degrees of freedom. An approximate time-dependent wave function of the entire model is obtained instead of just a reduced system density matrix, so the theory enables the analysis of the entangled system and bath dynamics that ensues following initial displacement of the internal-molecular (system) coordinate from its equilibrium position. The norm- and energy-conserving properties of the propagation of our trial wave function are natural consequences of the Dirac-Frenkel-McLachlan variational principle. The variational approach also stabilizes the time evolution in comparison to the same ansatz propagated under a previously employed locally quadratic approximation to the bath potential and system-bath interaction terms in the bath-parameter equations of motion. Dynamics calculations are carried out for molecular iodine in a 2D krypton lattice that reveal both the time-course of vibrational decoherence and the details of host-atom motion accompanying energy dissipation and dephasing. This work sets the stage for the comprehensive simulation of ultrafast time-resolved optical experiments on small molecules in low-temperature solids.

  20. Variational mixed quantum/semiclassical simulation of dihalogen guest and rare-gas solid host dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Cina, Jeffrey A

    2014-07-21

    A variational mixed quantum-semiclassical theory for the internal nuclear dynamics of a small molecule and the induced small-amplitude coherent motion of a low-temperature host medium is developed, tested, and used to simulate the temporal evolution of nonstationary states of the internal molecular and surrounding medium degrees of freedom. In this theory, termed the Fixed Vibrational Basis/Gaussian Bath (FVB/GB) method, the system is treated fully quantum mechanically while Gaussian wave packets are used for the bath degrees of freedom. An approximate time-dependent wave function of the entire model is obtained instead of just a reduced system density matrix, so the theory enables the analysis of the entangled system and bath dynamics that ensues following initial displacement of the internal-molecular (system) coordinate from its equilibrium position. The norm- and energy-conserving properties of the propagation of our trial wave function are natural consequences of the Dirac-Frenkel-McLachlan variational principle. The variational approach also stabilizes the time evolution in comparison to the same ansatz propagated under a previously employed locally quadratic approximation to the bath potential and system-bath interaction terms in the bath-parameter equations of motion. Dynamics calculations are carried out for molecular iodine in a 2D krypton lattice that reveal both the time-course of vibrational decoherence and the details of host-atom motion accompanying energy dissipation and dephasing. This work sets the stage for the comprehensive simulation of ultrafast time-resolved optical experiments on small molecules in low-temperature solids. PMID:25053307

  1. The quantum mechanics of ion-enhanced field emission and how it influences microscale gas breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yingjie; Go, David B.

    2014-09-14

    The presence of a positive gas ion can enhance cold electron field emission by deforming the potential barrier and increasing the tunneling probability of electrons—a process known as ion-enhanced field emission. In microscale gas discharges, ion-enhanced field emission produces additional emission from the cathode and effectively reduces the voltage required to breakdown a gaseous medium at the microscale (<10 μm). In this work, we enhance classic field emission theory by determining the impact of a gaseous ion on electron tunneling and compute the effect of ion-enhanced field emission on the breakdown voltage. We reveal that the current density for ion-enhanced field emission retains the same scaling as vacuum cold field emission and that this leads to deviations from traditional breakdown theory at microscale dimensions.

  2. Phase diagram of a quantum Coulomb wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferr, G.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.

    2015-12-01

    We report the quantum phase diagram of a one-dimensional Coulomb wire obtained using the path-integral Monte Carlo method. The exact knowledge of the nodal points of this system permits us to find the energy in an exact way, solving the sign problem which spoils fermionic calculations in higher dimensions. The results obtained allow for the determination of the stability domain, in terms of density and temperature, of the one-dimensional Wigner crystal. At low temperatures, the quantum wire reaches the quantum-degenerate regime, which is also described by the diffusion Monte Carlo method. Increasing the temperature, the system transforms to a classical Boltzmann gas, which we simulate using classical Monte Carlo. At large enough density, we identify a one-dimensional ideal Fermi gas which remains quantum up to higher temperatures than in two- and three-dimensional electron gases. The obtained phase diagram and the energetic and structural properties of this system are relevant to experiments with electrons in quantum wires and to Coulomb ions in one-dimensional confinement.

  3. Increasing the Efficiency of Ideal Solar Cells by Photon Induced Transitions at Intermediate Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Luque, A.; Marti, A.

    1997-06-01

    Recent attempts have been made to increase the efficiency of solar cells by introducing an impurity level in the semiconductor band gap. We present an analysis of such a structure under ideal conditions. We prove that its efficiency can exceed not only the Shockley and Queisser efficiency for ideal solar cells but also that for ideal two-terminal tandem cells which use two semiconductors, as well as that predicted for ideal cells with quantum efficiency above one but less than two. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations. PMID:26246002

  5. Positron kinetics in an idealized PET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, R. E.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; White, R. D.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic theory of non-relativistic positrons in an idealized positron emission tomography PET environment is developed by solving the Boltzmann equation, allowing for coherent and incoherent elastic, inelastic, ionizing and annihilating collisions through positronium formation. An analytic expression is obtained for the positronium formation rate, as a function of distance from a spherical source, in terms of the solutions of the general kinetic eigenvalue problem. Numerical estimates of the positron range - a fundamental limitation on the accuracy of PET, are given for positrons in a model of liquid water, a surrogate for human tissue. Comparisons are made with the ‘gas-phase’ assumption used in current models in which coherent scattering is suppressed. Our results show that this assumption leads to an error of the order of a factor of approximately 2, emphasizing the need to accurately account for the structure of the medium in PET simulations.

  6. Detonation Failure in Ideal and Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskins, P. J.; Cook, M. D.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we revisit and extend the classic treatment of detonation failure developed by Eyring et. al. [1]. We recently published a development of this theory [2] in which a pressure dependant rate law was substituted for the Arrhenius temperature dependant law originally considered. Here we show that by assuming a 2-component rate law based upon a temperature dependant ignition phase and a pressure dependant growth phase we are able to rationalise the very different failure characteristics (critical diameter and velocity decrement at failure) of ideal and non-ideal explosives. [1] Eyring, H., Powell, R.E., Duffy, G.H., and Parlin, R.B., ``The stability of detonation,'' Chem. Rev. 45, 69-181 (1949). [2] Haskins, P.J., Cook, M.D., and Wood, A.D., ``On the dependence of critical diameter and velocity decrement at failure on the burn law,'' in proceedings of the 33rd International Pyrotechnics Seminar, Fort Collins, Co, USA, 385-391 (2006).

  7. Quantum Phase Transition Between a Luttinger Liquid and a Gas of Cold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Law, K. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2008-08-29

    We consider cold polar molecules confined in a helical optical lattice similar to those used in holographic microfabrication. An external electric field polarizes molecules along the axis of the helix. The large-distance intermolecular dipolar interaction is attractive but the short-scale interaction is repulsive due to geometric constraints and thus prevents collapse. The interaction strength depends on the electric field. We show that a zero-temperature second-order liquid-gas transition occurs at a critical field. It can be observed under experimentally accessible conditions.

  8. C-C stretching Raman spectra and stabilities of hydrocarbon molecules in natural gas hydrates: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Ojamäe, Lars

    2014-12-11

    The presence of specific hydrocarbon gas molecules in various types of water cavities in natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are governed by the relative stabilities of these encapsulated guest molecule-water cavity combinations. Using molecular quantum chemical dispersion-corrected hybrid density functional computations, the interaction (ΔE(host--guest)) and cohesive energies (ΔE(coh)), enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies for the complexes of host water cages and hydrocarbon guest molecules are calculated at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory. The zero-point energy effect of ΔE(host-guest) and ΔE(coh) is found to be quite substantial. The energetically optimal host-guest combinations for seven hydrocarbon gas molecules (CH4, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, i-C4H10, and n-C4H10) and various water cavities (D, ID, T, P, H, and I) in NGHs are found to be CH4@D, C2H6@T, C3H6@T, C3H8@T, C4H8@T/P/H, i-C4H10@H, and n-C4H10@H, as the largest cohesive energy magnitudes will be obtained with these host-guest combinations. The stabilities of various water cavities enclosing hydrocarbon molecules are evaluated from the computed cohesive Gibbs free energies: CH4 prefers to be trapped in a ID cage; C2H6 prefer T cages; C3H6 and C3H8 prefer T and H cages; C4H8 and i-C4H10 prefer H cages; and n-C4H10 prefer I cages. The vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities of the C-C stretching vibrational modes for these seven hydrocarbon molecules enclosed in each water cavity are computed. A blue shift results after the guest molecule is trapped from gas phase into various water cages due to the host-guest interactions between the water cage and hydrocarbon molecule. The frequency shifts to the red as the radius of water cages increases. The model calculations support the view that C-C stretching vibrations of hydrocarbon molecules in the water cavities can be used as a tool to identify the types of crystal phases and guest molecules in NGHs. PMID:25406092

  9. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ( Found Chem 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all ceteris paribus laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally different to the laws of physics, because they involve approximations. Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34-50, 2000) agree that the laws of chemistry are operationally different to the laws of physics, but claim that the distinction between exact and approximate laws is too simplistic to taxonomise them. Approximations in chemistry involve diverse kinds of activity and often what counts as a scientific law in chemistry is dictated by the context of its use in scientific practice. This paper addresses the question of what makes chemical laws distinctive independently of the separate question as to how they are related to the laws of physics. From an analysis of some candidate ceteris paribus laws in chemistry, this paper argues that there are two distinct kinds of ceteris paribus laws in chemistry; idealized and approximate chemical laws. Thus, while Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34--50, 2000) are correct to point out that the candidate generalisations in chemistry are diverse and heterogeneous, a distinction between idealizations and approximations can nevertheless be used to successfully taxonomise them.

  10. Numerical Simulations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wenlong

    An approximate Riemann solver needed in a high -order Godunov-type scheme for ideal MHD is developed in this thesis. The Riemann solver consists of the initial guess, the calculation of the two fast shock speeds and post-shock states, the performance of two possible rotations, the calculation of the two slow shock speeds and post-shock states, and the improvement of the initial guess. The Riemann solver includes all the discontinuities in ideal MHD. The extension of the Piecewise Parabolic Method in ideal MHD is presented based on the Riemann solver. The code starts from a set of normal physical variables. A cubic polynomial is used to interpolate each of Riemann invariants. The values of those physical variables at edges of computational zones are obtained through the interpolated Riemann invariants. The monotonicity constraint is applied to those point values of physical variables. A parabola is used for the internal structure of a zone. The set of time-averaged fluxes is calculated by the Riemann solver. The conserved quantities are updated by adding the net flux advected into each zone. After the dynamical step in a Lagrangian grid, the conserved quantities are mapped onto a fixed Eulerian grid. The two-dimensional scheme is built upon the technique of dimension splitting. The scheme is applied to wave steepening, propagation of shocks, various shock tube problems, the penetration of a solar wind filament, and MHD shock interactions with a cloud. The results of these applications show that the scheme has the principal advantages of a Godunov-type scheme, i.e., the robust operation in the presence of very strong discontinuities, thin shock fronts with little attendant noise generation, and thin contact and tangential discontinuities.

  11. Obese people's perceptions of the thin ideal.

    PubMed

    Couch, Danielle; Thomas, Samantha L; Lewis, Sophie; Blood, R Warwick; Holland, Kate; Komesaroff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The media play a key role in promoting the thin ideal. A qualitative study, in which we used in depth interviews and thematic analysis, was undertaken to explore the attitudes of 142 obese individuals toward media portrayals of the thin ideal. Participants discussed the thin ideal as a social norm that is also supported through the exclusion of positive media portrayals of obese people. They perceived the thin ideal as an 'unhealthy' mode of social control, reflecting on their personal experiences and their concerns for others. Participants' perceptions highlighted the intersections between the thin ideal and gender, grooming and consumerism. Participants' personal responses to the thin ideal were nuanced--some were in support of the thin ideal and some were able to critically reflect and reject the thin ideal. We consider how the thin ideal may act as a form of synoptical social control, working in tandem with wider public health panoptical surveillance of body weight. PMID:26685706

  12. Quantum computing classical physics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers. PMID:16210187

  13. Equation of state of a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas studied at zero temperature by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Kurbakov, I. L.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2009-05-15

    The equation of state of a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas is studied at zero temperature by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods. Going down to as low densities as na{sup 2}{proportional_to}10{sup -100} permits us to obtain agreement on beyond mean-field level between predictions of perturbative methods and direct many-body numerical simulation, thus providing an answer to the fundamental question of the equation of state of a two-dimensional dilute Bose gas in the universal regime (i.e., entirely described by the gas parameter na{sup 2}). We also show that the measure of the frequency of a breathing collective oscillation in a trap at very low densities can be used to test the universal equation of state of a two-dimensional Bose gas.

  14. Quantum gases. Critical dynamics of spontaneous symmetry breaking in a homogeneous Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Navon, Nir; Gaunt, Alexander L; Smith, Robert P; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Kibble-Zurek theory models the dynamics of spontaneous symmetry breaking, which plays an important role in a wide variety of physical contexts, ranging from cosmology to superconductors. We explored these dynamics in a homogeneous system by thermally quenching an atomic gas with short-range interactions through the Bose-Einstein phase transition. Using homodyne matter-wave interferometry to measure first-order correlation functions, we verified the central quantitative prediction of the Kibble-Zurek theory, namely the homogeneous-system power-law scaling of the coherence length with the quench rate. Moreover, we directly confirmed its underlying hypothesis, the freezing of the correlation length near the transition. Our measurements agree with a beyond-mean-field theory and support the expectation that the dynamical critical exponent for this universality class is z = 3/2. PMID:25574021

  15. [A trace gas sensor using mid-infrared quantum cascaded laser at 4.8 microm to detect carbon monoxide].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Biao; Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Jian; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Presented in the present paper is a compact instrument developed for rapid, sensitive and continuous monitoring of trace gases in air, with results shown for carbon monoxide concentration. This instrument takes advantage of recent technology in mid-infrared quantum cascaded laser (QCL) operating at 4.8 microm and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) mid-infrared (MIR) detector, combing MIR multipass herriott cell with 76 m absorption path length to obtain low detection sensitivity down to 50 nmol x mol(-1) level in 4 s acquisition time. Meanwhile, in order to eliminate the instability induced by electrically modulated light source and effectively improve detection limit of the instrument, an optical structure with dual channel path was designed which is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy method. The experimental results show that the instrument integrated with gas concentration inversion algorithm can be applied to in-situ measurements of trace gases without calibration. Additionally, operator could substitute a QCL operating at a different wavelength to measure other gases. PMID:25208424

  16. [A trace methane gas sensor using mid-infrared quantum cascaded laser at 7.5 microm].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Dang, Jing-Min; Huang, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2012-11-01

    Presented is a compact instrument developed for in situ high-stable and sensitive continuous measurement of trace gases in air, with results shown for ambient methane (CH4) concentration accurate, real-time and in-situ. This instrument takes advantage of recent technology in thermoelectrically cooling (TEC) pulsed Fabry-Perot (FP) quantum cascaded laser (QCL) driving in a pulse mode operating at 7.5 microm ambient temperature to cover a fundamental spectral absorption band near v4 of CH4. A high quality Liquid Nitrogen (LN) cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) mid-infrared (MIR) detector is used along with a total reflection coated gold ellipsoid mirror offering 20 cm single pass optical absorption in an open-path cell to achieve stability of 5.2 x 10(-3) under experimental condition of 200 micromol x mol(-1) measured ambient CH4. The instrument integrated software via time discriminating electronics technology to control QCL provides continuous quantitative trace gas measurements without calibration. The results show that the instrument can be applied to field measurements of gases of environmental concern. Additional, operator could substitute a QCL operating at a different wavelength to measure other gases. PMID:23387197

  17. GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, H. P.; Tu, C. W.

    1998-05-01

    GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with different N composition were successfully grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrate by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. A nitrogen radical beam source was used to incorporate N into GaInAs layers. High resolution x-ray rocking curves measurements indicate that the N composition in GaInNAs layer was increased from 0.009 to 0.03 with increasing N2 flow rate. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the PL wavelength red shifts with increasing N composition in GaInNAs layer. For a 7-period Ga0.7In0.3N0.02As0.98/GaAs MQW, a PL peak at 1.3 μm wavelength at room temperature has been successfully obtained. The band offset ΔEc for Ga0.7In0.3NxAs1-x/GaAs enlarges quickly from 0.26 eV to 0.56 eV with increasing N concentration from 0% to 3%.

  18. Equilibrium structure and relative stability of glyceraldehyde conformers: Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum-chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Atavin, Evgenii G.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Popov, Evgenii V.; Vilkov, Lev V.

    2009-11-01

    For the first time, the five dimensional (5-D) analysis of potential energy surface (PES) from quantum-chemical calculations was carried out to predict reliably the various glyceraldehyde (GLA) conformers. 36 conformers with relative stabilities up to 38 kJ/mol were found in the B3LYP approximation. According to results of MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations, the molecule exists at the experimental temperature of 388 K as a mixture of five conformers in the ratio I:II:III:IV:V = 63:18:4:10:5. Contrary to the theoretical conclusion of Lovas et al., the conformer IV is predicted to be more stable than the conformer III. Our result can explain why the conformer IV could be detected in the microwave (MW) spectroscopic experiment by Lovas et al., whereas the conformer III could not. For the first time, thermal-average and equilibrium structural parameters of GLA (main conformer) have been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) data. Vibrational corrections to the experimental bond lengths were determined using quadratic and cubic force constants from high-level ab initio calculations (MP2/cc-pVTZ). It was shown that the experimental intensities are sensitive to the contribution of the second conformer (27(15)%). Rotational constants calculated from MP2/cc-pVQZ geometries were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental rotational constants corrected for anharmonic effects.

  19. A quartz enhanced photo-acoustic gas sensor based on a custom tuning fork and a terahertz quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Sampaolo, Angelo; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Vitiello, Miriam S; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    An innovative quartz enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensing system operating in the THz spectral range and employing a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) is described. The QTF dimensions are 3.3 cm × 0.4 cm × 0.8 cm, with the two prongs spaced by ∼800 μm. To test our sensor we used a quantum cascade laser as the light source and selected a methanol rotational absorption line at 131.054 cm(-1) (∼3.93 THz), with line-strength S = 4.28 × 10(-21) cm mol(-1). The sensor was operated at 10 Torr pressure on the first flexion QTF resonance frequency of 4245 Hz. The corresponding Q-factor was 74 760. Stepwise concentration measurements were performed to verify the linearity of the QEPAS signal as a function of the methanol concentration. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 7 parts per million in 4 seconds, corresponding to a QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2 × 10(-10) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), comparable with the best result of mid-IR QEPAS systems. PMID:24167816

  20. Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2006-12-31

    A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

  1. Quad quantum cascade laser spectrometer with dual gas cells for the simultaneous analysis of mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Baren, Randall E; Parrish, Milton E; Shafer, Kenneth H; Harward, Charles N; Shi, Quan; Nelson, David D; McManus, J Barry; Zahniser, Mark S

    2004-12-01

    A compact, fast response, infrared spectrometer using four pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers has been applied to the analysis of gases in mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke. QC lasers have many advantages over the traditional lead-salt tunable diode lasers, including near room temperature operation with thermoelectric cooling and single mode operation with improved long-term stability. The new instrument uses two 36 m, 0.3 l multiple pass absorption gas cells to obtain a time response of 0.1s for the MS smoke system and 0.4s for the SS smoke system. The concentrations of ammonia, ethylene, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide for three different reference cigarettes were measured simultaneously in MS and SS smoke. A data rate of 20Hz provides sufficient resolution to determine the concentration profiles during each 2s puff in the MS smoke. Concentration profiles before, during and after the puffs also have been observed for these smoke constituents in SS smoke. Also, simultaneous measurements of CO(2) from a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer are obtained for both MS and SS smoke. In addition, during this work, nitrous oxide was detected in both the MS and SS smoke for all reference cigarettes studied. PMID:15561630

  2. Quad quantum cascade laser spectrometer with dual gas cells for the simultaneous analysis of mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baren, Randall E.; Parrish, Milton E.; Shafer, Kenneth H.; Harward, Charles N.; Shi, Quan; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Zahniser, Mark S.

    2004-12-01

    A compact, fast response, infrared spectrometer using four pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers has been applied to the analysis of gases in mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke. QC lasers have many advantages over the traditional lead-salt tunable diode lasers, including near room temperature operation with thermoelectric cooling and single mode operation with improved long-term stability. The new instrument uses two 36 m, 0.3 l multiple pass absorption gas cells to obtain a time response of 0.1 s for the MS smoke system and 0.4 s for the SS smoke system. The concentrations of ammonia, ethylene, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide for three different reference cigarettes were measured simultaneously in MS and SS smoke. A data rate of 20 Hz provides sufficient resolution to determine the concentration profiles during each 2 s puff in the MS smoke. Concentration profiles before, during and after the puffs also have been observed for these smoke constituents in SS smoke. Also, simultaneous measurements of CO 2 from a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer are obtained for both MS and SS smoke. In addition, during this work, nitrous oxide was detected in both the MS and SS smoke for all reference cigarettes studied.

  3. Imagining the ideal dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clarissa S; Hötzel, Maria José; Weary, Daniel M; Robbins, Jesse A; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2016-02-01

    Practices in agriculture can have negative effects on the environment, rural communities, food safety, and animal welfare. Although disagreements are possible about specific issues and potential solutions, it is widely recognized that public input is needed in the development of socially sustainable agriculture systems. The aim of this study was to assess the views of people not affiliated with the dairy industry on what they perceived to be the ideal dairy farm and their associated reasons. Through an online survey, participants were invited to respond to the following open-ended question: "What do you consider to be an ideal dairy farm and why are these characteristics important to you?" Although participants referenced social, economic, and ecological aspects of dairy farming, animal welfare was the primary issue raised. Concern was expressed directly about the quality of life for the animals, and the indirect effect of animal welfare on milk quality. Thus participants appeared to hold an ethic for dairy farming that included concern for the animal, as well as economic, social, and environmental aspects of the dairy system. PMID:26709190

  4. Representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-02-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}(vector sign) Multiplication-Sign B(vector sign)) ensures that {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi}=0 at a resonance, with {psi} labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign {alpha}B(vector sign). These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi} at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in {xi}(vector sign) to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed.

  5. The Cracking of N-Heptane in the Gas Phase State and in the HZSM-5 Zeolite: A Quantum Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zaragoza, I P.; Santamaria, Ruben

    2002-10-10

    Quantum molecular dynamics is used to investigate the cracking of a representative hydrocarbon of the paraffin family (n-heptane), analyzing the effects of temperature in the fragmentation of n-heptane when this compound is in the gas phase and inside a typical industrial catalyst (zeolite HZSM-5). The hydrocarbon structural and electronic features in the two environments are determined and compared. The results substantiate current views and exhibit the basic aspects in the cracking of n-heptane.

  6. Indian students' perceptions of the ideal self, the ideal leader, the ideal teacher, Indira Gandhi and the business executive.

    PubMed

    Merenda, P F; Mohan, J; Shaw, B J

    1975-04-01

    The Activity Vector Analysis (AVA) was administered to three samples drawn from a population of graduate students at an Indian university. Results indicated a high positive relationship among the perceptions of the ideal self, ideal teacher, and ideal leader. Likewise, the consensual profile of Indira Gandhi was found to be quite similar to the ideal self cluster (r = .96). The collective perception of the business executive, however, was only remotely similar to the other two character profiles. PMID:1178333

  7. Computational Methods for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercher, Andrew D.

    Numerical schemes for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are widely used for modeling space weather and astrophysical flows. They are designed to resolve the different waves that propagate through a magnetohydro fluid, namely, the fast, Alfven, slow, and entropy waves. Numerical schemes for ideal magnetohydrodynamics that are based on the standard finite volume (FV) discretization exhibit pseudo-convergence in which non-regular waves no longer exist only after heavy grid refinement. A method is described for obtaining solutions for coplanar and near coplanar cases that consist of only regular waves, independent of grid refinement. The method, referred to as Compound Wave Modification (CWM), involves removing the flux associated with non-regular structures and can be used for simulations in two- and three-dimensions because it does not require explicitly tracking an Alfven wave. For a near coplanar case, and for grids with 213 points or less, we find root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) that are as much as 6 times smaller. For the coplanar case, in which non-regular structures will exist at all levels of grid refinement for standard FV schemes, the RMSE is as much as 25 times smaller. A multidimensional ideal MHD code has been implemented for simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). Performance measurements were conducted for both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and Intel Xeon E5645 processor. The GPU is shown to perform one to two orders of magnitude greater than the CPU when using a single core, and two to three times greater than when run in parallel with OpenMP. Performance comparisons are made for two methods of storing data on the GPU. The first approach stores data as an Array of Structures (AoS), e.g., a point coordinate array of size 3 x n is iterated over. The second approach stores data as a Structure of Arrays (SoA), e.g. three separate arrays of size n are iterated over simultaneously. For an AoS, coalescing does not occur, reducing memory efficiency. All results are given for Cartesian grids, but the algorithms are implemented for a general geometry on a unstructured grids.

  8. Towards enhancing two-dimensional electron gas quantum confinement effects in perovskite oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar; Yang, Kesong

    2015-03-21

    We explore the possibility of achieving highly confined two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) within one single atomic layer through a comprehensive comparison study on three prototypical perovskite heterostructures, LaAlO{sub 3}/ATiO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba), using first-principles electronic structure calculations. We predict that the heterostructure LaAlO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} has a highly confined 2DEG within a single atomic layer of the substrate BaTiO{sub 3}, and exhibits relatively higher interfacial charge carrier density and larger magnetic moments than the well-known LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} system. The long Ti-O bond length in the ab-plane of the LaAlO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} heterostructure is responsible for the superior charge confinement. We propose BaTiO{sub 3} as an exceptional substrate material for 2DEG systems with potentially superior properties.

  9. Gas-phase formation of the prebiotic molecule formamide: insights from new quantum computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, V.; Latouche, C.; Skouteris, D.; Vazart, F.; Balucani, N.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.

    2015-10-01

    New insights into the formation of interstellar formamide, a species of great relevance in prebiotic chemistry, are provided by electronic structure and kinetic calculations for the reaction NH2 + H2CO → NH2CHO + H. Contrarily to what previously suggested, this reaction is essentially barrierless and can, therefore, occur under the low temperature conditions of intestellar objects thus providing a facile formation route of formamide. The rate coefficient parameters for the reaction channel leading to NH2CHO + H have been calculated to be A = 2.6 × 10-12 cm3 s-1, β = -2.1 and γ = 26.9 K in the range of temperatures 10-300 K. Including these new kinetic data in a refined astrochemical model, we show that the proposed mechanism can well reproduce the abundances of formamide observed in two very different interstellar objects: the cold envelope of the Sun-like protostar IRAS16293-2422 and the molecular shock L1157-B2. Therefore, the major conclusion of this Letter is that there is no need to invoke grain-surface chemistry to explain the presence of formamide provided that its precursors, NH2 and H2CO, are available in the gas phase.

  10. Towards enhancing two-dimensional electron gas quantum confinement effects in perovskite oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar; Yang, Kesong

    2015-03-01

    We explore the possibility of achieving highly confined two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) within one single atomic layer through a comprehensive comparison study on three prototypical perovskite heterostructures, LaAlO3/ATiO3 (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba), using first-principles electronic structure calculations. We predict that the heterostructure LaAlO3/BaTiO3 has a highly confined 2DEG within a single atomic layer of the substrate BaTiO3, and exhibits relatively higher interfacial charge carrier density and larger magnetic moments than the well-known LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system. The long Ti-O bond length in the ab-plane of the LaAlO3/BaTiO3 heterostructure is responsible for the superior charge confinement. We propose BaTiO3 as an exceptional substrate material for 2DEG systems with potentially superior properties.

  11. (Fuzzy) Ideals of BN-Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Walendziak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The notions of an ideal and a fuzzy ideal in BN-algebras are introduced. The properties and characterizations of them are investigated. The concepts of normal ideals and normal congruences of a BN-algebra are also studied, the properties of them are displayed, and a one-to-one correspondence between them is presented. Conditions for a fuzzy set to be a fuzzy ideal are given. The relationships between ideals and fuzzy ideals of a BN-algebra are established. The homomorphic properties of fuzzy ideals of a BN-algebra are provided. Finally, characterizations of Noetherian BN-algebras and Artinian BN-algebras via fuzzy ideals are obtained. PMID:26125050

  12. Irreversibility in an ideal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    When a real fluid is expelled quickly from a tube, it forms a jet separated from the surrounding fluid by a thin, turbulent layer. On the other hand, when the same fluid is sucked into the tube, it enters from all directions, forming a sink-like flow. We show that, even for the ideal flow described by the time-reversible Euler equation, an experimenter who only controls the pressure in a pump attached to the tube would see jets form in one direction exclusively. The asymmetry between outflow and inflow therefore does not depend on viscous dissipation, but rather on the experimenter's limited control of initial and boundary conditions. This illustrates, in a rather different context from the usual one of thermal physics, how irreversibility may arise in systems whose microscopic dynamics are fully reversible.

  13. Calorimetry of a Bose–Einstein-condensed photon gas

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  14. Calorimetry of a Bose-Einstein-condensed photon gas.

    PubMed

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  15. Calorimetry of a Bose-Einstein-condensed photon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level.

  16. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the uniform electron gas without fixed nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, S.; Schoof, T.; Dornheim, T.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-02-01

    The uniform electron gas (UEG) at finite temperature is of key relevance for many applications in the warm dense matter regime, e.g., dense plasmas and laser excited solids. Also, the quality of density functional theory calculations crucially relies on the availability of accurate data for the exchange-correlation energy. Recently, results for N =33 spin-polarized electrons at high density, rs=r ¯/aB≲4 , and low temperature have been obtained with the configuration path integral Monte Carlo (CPIMC) method [T. Schoof et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 130402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.130402]. To achieve these results, the original CPIMC algorithm [T. Schoof et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 51, 687 (2011), 10.1002/ctpp.201100012] had to be further optimized to cope with the fermion sign problem (FSP). It is the purpose of this paper to give detailed information on the manifestation of the FSP in CPIMC simulations of the UEG and to demonstrate how it can be turned into a controllable convergence problem. In addition, we present new thermodynamic results for higher temperatures. Finally, to overcome the limitations of CPIMC towards strong coupling, we invoke an independent method—the recently developed permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo approach [T. Dornheim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 204101 (2015), 10.1063/1.4936145]. The combination of both approaches is able to yield ab initio data for the UEG over the entire density range, above a temperature of about one half of the Fermi temperature. Comparison with restricted path integral Monte Carlo data [E. W. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.146405] allows us to quantify the systematic error arising from the free particle nodes.

  17. Recharging Our Sense of Idealism: Concluding Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael; Dollarhide, Colette T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors aim to recharge one's sense of idealism. They argue that idealism is the Vitamin C that sustains one's commitment to implementing humanistic principles and social justice practices in the work of counselors and educators. The idealism that characterizes counselors and educators who are humanistic and social justice…

  18. Recharging Our Sense of Idealism: Concluding Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael; Dollarhide, Colette T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors aim to recharge one's sense of idealism. They argue that idealism is the Vitamin C that sustains one's commitment to implementing humanistic principles and social justice practices in the work of counselors and educators. The idealism that characterizes counselors and educators who are humanistic and social justice

  19. Quantum chemical analysis of the energy of proton transfer from phenol and chlorophenols to H2O in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrmann, Gerrit

    1998-12-01

    Proton transfer energies of phenol and 14 chlorophenols with H2O as a base are analyzed in the gas phase and in solution using quantum chemical methods at the semiempirical and ab initio level of computation. The effect of aqueous solution was accounted for by applying the density functional theory (DFT) implementation of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) as well as semiempirical continuum-solvation models. The results reveal substantial and systematic overestimations of the free energies of proton transfer as derived from experimental solution-phase pKa data. This can be traced back to both deficiencies in the current model parameterization as well as to limitations of the underlying gas-phase quantum chemical models, which is further illustrated by additional complete-basis-set (CBS) calculations for the proton transfer reaction with phenol. In contrast, the relative pKa trend is reflected well by COSMO-DFT calculations with correlation coefficients (adjusted for degrees of freedom) of 0.96. Decomposition of the dissociation energy in aqueous solution into a gas-phase term and a term summarizing the solvation contributions provides new insights into the effect of solvation on proton transfer energies, and yields mechanistic explanations for the observed differences in the gas-phase and solution-phase acidity orders of various subgroups of the compounds.

  20. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Calculations versus Quantum-State-Resolved Experiments on CHD3 + Pt(111): New Insights into a Prototypical Gas-Surface Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nattino, Francesco; Ueta, Hirokazu; Chadwick, Helen; van Reijzen, Maarten E; Beck, Rainer D; Jackson, Bret; van Hemert, Marc C; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2014-04-17

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of fundamental and practical interest, being a rate-limiting step in the steam reforming process. The reaction is best modeled with quantum dynamics calculations, but these are currently not guaranteed to produce accurate results because they rely on potential energy surfaces based on untested density functionals and on untested dynamical approximations. To help overcome these limitations, here we present for the first time statistically accurate reaction probabilities obtained with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) for a polyatomic gas-phase molecule reacting with a metal surface. Using a general purpose density functional, the AIMD reaction probabilities are in semiquantitative agreement with new quantum-state-resolved experiments on CHD3 + Pt(111). The comparison suggests the use of the sudden approximation for treating the rotations even though CHD3 has large rotational constants and yields an estimated reaction barrier of 0.9 eV for CH4 + Pt(111). PMID:26269970

  1. In Pursuit of a More Ideal Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; Thomas, Cliff; Baumann, Ted; Berger, Richard; Biener, Monika; Callahan, Debbie; Celliers, Peter; Elsner, Fred; Felker, Sean; Hamza, Alex; Hinkel, Denise; Huang, Haibo; Jones, Oggie; Landen, Nino; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Rick; Strozzi, David

    2015-11-01

    Current hohlraum designs have a number of issues which are detrimental to achieving ignition; including LPI, CBET, hot electrons, non-ideal spectral emission(gold M-Band) and wall motion leading to implosions with large symmetry swings. We are undertaking a campaign on the NIF to address many of these issues through the use of thin wall liners. We will present a comparison between three experiments, a gold hohlraum, a copper-lined hohlraum and a zinc oxide foam-lined hohlraum and discuss our future experimental plans which will utilize very low density foam liners, ~ 10 mg/cc, and low gas fill densities, <0.6 mg/cc. This combination is predicted in simulations to greatly reduce the expansion of the gold wall leading to reduced symmetry swings, result in large reductions in LPI(SBS, SRS and 2Wpe) and eliminate gold m-band emission. The removal of the gold m-band spectra reduces the ablator-fuel instability growth and allows the use of undoped or less doped capsules which in turn reduces the ablation front growth factors leading to a more stable implosion. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. ``Additive'' cooperativity of hydrogen bonds in complexes of catechol with proton acceptors in the gas phase: FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Klimovitskii, Alexander E.; Abaidullina, Dilyara I.; Madzhidov, Timur I.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2012-06-01

    Experimental study of hydrogen bond cooperativity in hetero-complexes in the gas phase was carried out by IR-spectroscopy method. Stretching vibration frequencies of Osbnd H groups in phenol and catechol molecules as well as of their complexes with nitriles and ethers were determined in the gas phase using a specially designed cell. Osbnd H groups experimental frequency shifts in the complexes of catechol induced by the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds are significantly higher than in the complexes of phenol due to the hydrogen bond cooperativity. It was shown that the cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with nitriles and ethers in the gas phase are approximately the same. Quantum chemical calculations of the studied systems have been performed using density functional theory (DFT) methods. It was shown, that theoretically obtained cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with proton acceptors are in good agreement with experimental values. Cooperative effects lead to a strengthening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol on about 30%, despite the significant difference in the proton acceptor ability of the bases. The analysis within quantum theory of atoms in molecules was carried out for the explanation of this fact.

  3. Improved Classification of Mammograms Following Idealized Training

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Adam N.; Love, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    People often make decisions by stochastically retrieving a small set of relevant memories. This limited retrieval implies that human performance can be improved by training on idealized category distributions (Giguère & Love, 2013). Here, we evaluate whether the benefits of idealized training extend to categorization of real-world stimuli, namely classifying mammograms as normal or tumorous. Participants in the idealized condition were trained exclusively on items that, according to a norming study, were relatively unambiguous. Participants in the actual condition were trained on a representative range of items. Despite being exclusively trained on easy items, idealized-condition participants were more accurate than those in the actual condition when tested on a range of item types. However, idealized participants experienced difficulties when test items were very dissimilar from training cases. The benefits of idealization, attributable to reducing noise arising from cognitive limitations in memory retrieval, suggest ways to improve real-world decision making. PMID:24955325

  4. Quantum simulation of energy transport with embedded Rydberg aggregates.

    PubMed

    Schönleber, D W; Eisfeld, A; Genkin, M; Whitlock, S; Wüster, S

    2015-03-27

    We show that an array of ultracold Rydberg atoms embedded in a laser driven background gas can serve as an aggregate for simulating exciton dynamics and energy transport with a controlled environment. Energetic disorder and decoherence introduced by the interaction with the background gas atoms can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows for an almost ideal realization of a Haken-Reineker-Strobl-type model for energy transport. The transport can be monitored using the same mechanism that provides control over the environment. The degree of decoherence is traced back to information gained on the excitation location through the monitoring, turning the setup into an experimentally accessible model system for studying the effects of quantum measurements on the dynamics of a many-body quantum system. PMID:25860741

  5. Quantum Simulation of Energy Transport with Embedded Rydberg Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönleber, D. W.; Eisfeld, A.; Genkin, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wüster, S.

    2015-03-01

    We show that an array of ultracold Rydberg atoms embedded in a laser driven background gas can serve as an aggregate for simulating exciton dynamics and energy transport with a controlled environment. Energetic disorder and decoherence introduced by the interaction with the background gas atoms can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows for an almost ideal realization of a Haken-Reineker-Strobl-type model for energy transport. The transport can be monitored using the same mechanism that provides control over the environment. The degree of decoherence is traced back to information gained on the excitation location through the monitoring, turning the setup into an experimentally accessible model system for studying the effects of quantum measurements on the dynamics of a many-body quantum system.

  6. Stochastic Quantum Gas Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proukakis, Nick P.; Cockburn, Stuart P.

    2010-03-01

    We study the dynamics of weakly-interacting finite temperature Bose gases via the Stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation (SGPE). As a first step, we demonstrate [jointly with A. Negretti (Ulm, Germany) and C. Henkel (Potsdam, Germany)] that the SGPE provides a significantly better method for generating an equilibrium state than the number-conserving Bogoliubov method (except for low temperatures and small atom numbers). We then study [jointly with H. Nistazakis and D.J. Frantzeskakis (University of Athens, Greece), P.G.Kevrekidis (University of Massachusetts) and T.P. Horikis (University of Ioannina, Greece)] the dynamics of dark solitons in elongated finite temperature condensates. We demonstrate numerical shot-to-shot variations in soliton trajectories (S.P. Cockburn et al., arXiv:0909.1660.), finding individual long-lived trajectories as in experiments. In our simulations, these variations arise from fluctuations in the phase and density of the underlying medium. We provide a detailed statistical analysis, proposing regimes for the controlled experimental demonstration of this effect; we also discuss the extent to which simpler models can be used to mimic the features of ensemble-averaged stochastic trajectories.

  7. Quantum mechanical computations and spectroscopy: from small rigid molecules in the gas phase to large flexible molecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Improta, Roberto; Rega, Nadia

    2008-05-01

    Interpretation of structural properties and dynamic behavior of molecules in solution is of fundamental importance to understand their stability, chemical reactivity, and catalytic action. While information can be gained, in principle, by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, the interpretation of the rich indirect information that can be inferred from the analysis of experimental spectra is seldom straightforward because of the subtle interplay of several different effects, whose specific role is not easy to separate and evaluate. In such a complex scenario, theoretical studies can be very helpful at two different levels: (i) supporting and complementing experimental results to determine the structure of the target molecule starting from its spectral properties; (ii) dissecting and evaluating the role of different effects in determining the observed spectroscopic properties. This is the reason why computational spectroscopy is rapidly evolving from a highly specialized research field into a versatile and widespread tool for the assignment of experimental spectra and their interpretation in terms of chemical physical effects. In such a situation, it becomes important that both computationally and experimentally oriented chemists are aware that new methodological advances and integrated computational strategies are available, providing reliable estimates of fundamental spectral parameters not only for relatively small molecules in the gas phase but also for large and flexible molecules in condensed phases. In this Account, we review the most significant methodological contributions from our research group in this field, and by exploiting some recent results of their application to the computation of IR, UV-vis, NMR, and EPR spectral parameters, we discuss the microscopic mechanisms underlying solvent and vibrational effects on the spectral parameters. After reporting some recent achievements for the study of excited states by first principle quantum mechanical approaches, we focus on the treatment of environmental effects by means of mixed discrete-continuum solvent models and on effective methods for computing vibronic contributions to the spectra. We then discuss some new developments, mainly based on time-dependent approaches, allowing us to go beyond the determination of spectroscopic parameters toward the simulation of line widths and shapes. Although further developments are surely needed to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of several items in the proposed approach, we try to show that the first important steps toward a direct comparison between the results obtained in vitro and those obtained in silico have been made, making easier fruitful crossovers among experiments, computations and theoretical models, which would be decisive for a deeper understanding of the spectral behavior associated with complex systems and processes. PMID:18307319

  8. High power, widely tunable, mode-hop free, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser for multi-species trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, R.; Marchenko, D.; Mandon, J.; Cristescu, S. M.; Wulterkens, G.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a high power, widely tunable, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for infrared vibrational spectroscopy of molecules exhibiting broadband and single line absorption features. The laser source exhibits single mode operation with a tunability up to 303 cm-1 (˜24% of the center wavelength) at 8 μm, with a maximum optical output power of 200 mW. In combination with off-axis integrated output spectroscopy, trace-gas detection of broadband absorption gases such as acetone was performed and a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.7 × 10-8 cm-1 Hz-1/2 was obtained.

  9. Not All Ideals are Equal: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Ideals in Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lindsey M.; Hadden, Benjamin W.; Knee, C. Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The ideal standards model suggests that greater consistency between ideal standards and actual perceptions of one’s relationship predicts positive relationship evaluations; however, no research has evaluated whether this differs across types of ideals. A self-determination theory perspective was derived to test whether satisfaction of intrinsic ideals buffers the importance of extrinsic ideals. Participants (N=195) in committed relationships directly and indirectly reported the extent to which their partner met their ideal on two dimensions: intrinsic (e.g., warm, intimate) and extrinsic (e.g., attractive, successful). Relationship need fulfillment and relationship quality were also assessed. Hypotheses were largely supported, such that satisfaction of intrinsic ideals more strongly predicted relationship functioning, and satisfaction of intrinsic ideals buffered the relevance of extrinsic ideals for outcomes. PMID:25821396

  10. Quantum hairs’ and entropy of the quantum isolated horizon from Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Abhishek; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2014-10-01

    We articulate the fact that the loop quantum gravity (LQG) description of the quantum macrostates of black hole horizons, modeled as quantum isolated horizons (QIHs), is completely characterized in terms of two independent integer-valued ‘quantum hairs’, viz, the coupling constant (k) of the quantum SU(2) Chern-Simons (CS) theory describing QIH dynamics, and the number of punctures (N) produced by the bulk spin network edges piercing the isolated horizon (which act as pointlike sources for the CS fields). We demonstrate that the microcanonical entropy of macroscopic (both parameters assuming very large values) QIHs can be obtained directly from the microstates of this CS theory using standard statistical mechanical methods, without having to additionally postulate the horizon as an ideal gas of punctures, or incorporate any additional classical or semiclassical input from general relativity vis-a-vis the functional dependence of the isolated horizon mass on its area, or indeed, without having to restrict to any special class of spins. Requiring the validity of the Bekenstein-Hawking area law relates these two parameters (as an equilibrium ‘equation of state’), and consequently allows the Barbero-Immirzi parameter to take any real and positive value depending on the value of k/N. The logarithmic correction to the area law obtained a decade ago by R Kaul and one of us (PM), ensues straightforwardly, with precisely the coefficient -3/2, making it a signature of the LQG approach to black hole entropy.

  11. Ideal and Nonideal Reasoning in Educational Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggar, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    The terms "ideal theory" and "nonideal theory" are used in contemporary Anglophone political philosophy to identify alternative methodological approaches for justifying normative claims. Each term is used in multiple ways. In this article Alison M. Jaggar disentangles several versions of ideal and nonideal theory with a view to…

  12. Maintaining ideal body weight counseling sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, S.H.

    1980-10-09

    The purpose of this program is to provide employees with the motivation, knowledge and skills necessary to maintain ideal body weight throughout life. The target audience for this program, which is conducted in an industrial setting, is the employee 40 years of age or younger who is at or near his/her ideal body weight.

  13. Evaluating human enhancements: the importance of ideals.

    PubMed

    Roduit, Johann A R; Baumann, Holger; Heilinger, Jan-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Is it necessary to have an ideal of perfection in mind to identify and evaluate true biotechnological human "enhancements", or can one do without? To answer this question we suggest employing the distinction between ideal and non-ideal theory, found in the debate in political philosophy about theories of justice: the distinctive views about whether one needs an idea of a perfectly just society or not when it comes to assessing the current situation and recommending steps to increase justice. In this paper we argue that evaluating human enhancements from a non-ideal perspective has some serious shortcomings, which can be avoided when endorsing an ideal approach. Our argument starts from a definition of human enhancement as improvement, which can be understood in two ways. The first approach is backward-looking and assesses improvements with regard to a status quo ante. The second, a forward-looking approach, evaluates improvements with regard to their proximity to a goal or according to an ideal. After outlining the limitations of an exclusively backward-looking view (non-ideal theory), we answer possible objections against a forward-looking view (ideal theory). Ultimately, we argue that the human enhancement debate would lack some important moral insights if a forward-looking view of improvement is not taken into consideration. PMID:25743059

  14. Kirkwood-Buff integrals for ideal solutions.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Bentenitis, Nikolaos; Smith, Paul E

    2010-04-28

    The Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions is a rigorous theory of solution mixtures which relates the molecular distributions between the solution components to the thermodynamic properties of the mixture. Ideal solutions represent a useful reference for understanding the properties of real solutions. Here, we derive expressions for the KB integrals, the central components of KB theory, in ideal solutions of any number of components corresponding to the three main concentration scales. The results are illustrated by use of molecular dynamics simulations for two binary solutions mixtures, benzene with toluene, and methanethiol with dimethylsulfide, which closely approach ideal behavior, and a binary mixture of benzene and methanol which is nonideal. Simulations of a quaternary mixture containing benzene, toluene, methanethiol, and dimethylsulfide suggest this system displays ideal behavior and that ideal behavior is not limited to mixtures containing a small number of components. PMID:20441282

  15. Ideals of powers of linear forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jianyun

    This thesis addresses two closely related problems about ideals of powers of linear forms. In the first chapter, we analyze a problem from spline theory, namely to compute the dimension of the vector space of trivariate splines on a special class of tetrahedral complexes, using ideals of powers of linear forms. By Macaulay's inverse system, this class of ideals is closely related to ideals of fat points. In the second chapter, we approach a conjecture of Postnikov and Shapiro concerning the minimal free resolutions of a class of ideals of powers of linear forms in n variables which are constructed from complete graphs on n + 1 vertices. This statement was also conjectured by Schenck in the special case of n = 3. We provide two different approaches to his conjecture. We prove the conjecture of Postnikov and Shapiro under the additional condition that certain modules are free.

  16. Effect of quantum tunneling on single strand breaks in a modeled gas phase cytidine nucleotide induced by low energy electron: A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Renjith; Sarma, Manabendra

    2013-07-01

    Effect of quantum mechanical tunneling on single strand breaks induced by low energy electron (LEE) has been investigated in a modeled gas phase system, 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate (3'-dCMPH). The potential energy curves for the sugar-phosphate C-O (3' C-O) bond cleavage have been generated using second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the 6-31+G(d) accuracy level. Results from the electronic structure theory calculations in conjunction with our time dependent calculations for the 3' C-O bond rupture in 3'-dCMPH using local complex potential based time dependent wave packet approach show significant quantum tunneling of the 3' C-O bond from the bound vibrational states above 1 eV of the anionic potential energy curve. A comparison of the fragmentation profile with that of our earlier gas phase investigations based on Hartree-Fock and density functional theory - Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr methods with 6-31+G(d) basis set is also provided. Further, inspection of the singly occupied molecular orbitals generated at different 3' C-O bond lengths clearly indicates the electron transfer from the low lying base-π* shape resonance state to the phosphate P = O π* orbital of the DNA backbone during the strand breaks. The decisive step during LEE induced strand breaks follows via "charge induced dissociation" (CID) for the metastable anion formed below 1 eV, whereas quantum mechanical tunnel-ing is out-weighted the CID mechanism for the LEE above 1 eV.

  17. Preparing and probing many-body correlated systems in a Quantum Gas Microscope by engineering arbitrary landscape potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, Matthew; Lukin, Alexander; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp; Tai, M. Eric; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a versatile tool box for observing the emergence of strongly correlated physics in quantum systems. Dynamic control of optical potentials on the single-site level allows us to prepare and probe many-body quantum states through local Hamiltonian engineering. We achieve these high precision levels of optical control through spatial light modulation with a DMD (digital micro-mirror device). This allows for both arbitrary beam shaping and aberration compensation in our imaging system to produce high fidelity optical potentials. We use these techniques to control state initialization, Hamiltonian dynamics, and measurement in experiments investigating low-dimensional many-body physics - from one-dimensional correlated quantum walks to characterizing entanglement.

  18. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then slows the shock Mach number growth producing a maximum followed by monotonic reduction towards magnetosonic conditions, even as the shock accelerates toward the axis. A parameter space of initial shock Mach number at a given radius is explored and the implications of the present results for inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  19. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then slows the shock Mach number growth producing a maximum followed by monotonic reduction towards magnetosonic conditions, even as the shock accelerates toward the axis. A parameter space of initial shock Mach number at a given radius is explored and the implications of the present results for inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  20. Bose-Einstein condensation of ideal photons in a one-dimensional barrel cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ze

    2016-02-01

    Our experimental scheme is based on a barrel optical microresonator filled with a dye solution. The barrel mirror provides a confining potential, a chemical potential, and an effective mass for a photon, making the system formally equivalent to a one-dimensional gas of harmonically trapped, number-conserving, and massive bosons. Within the framework of quantum statistical mechanics, we propose an exact analytical solution to the problem of Bose-Einstein condensation in harmonically trapped, one-dimensional, and ideal photons. It is found that the photon number of vapor is characterized by an analytical function, which involves a q -digamma function in mathematics. The numerical calculation of the analytical solution gives many interesting results. In the thermodynamic limit, the analytical expressions of the critical temperature and the condensate fraction are derived. We find that the spectral radiance of a one-dimensional barrel cavity has a sharp peak at the frequency of the cavity cutoff when the photon number exceeds the critical value determined by a temperature.

  1. Dimensional transitions in thermodynamic properties of ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2015-04-01

    An ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas confined in various rectangular nanodomains is considered under quantum size effects. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated from their relations with the partition function, which consists of triple infinite summations over momentum states in each direction. To obtain analytical expressions, summations are converted to integrals for macrosystems by a continuum approximation, which fails at the nanoscale. To avoid both the numerical calculation of summations and the failure of their integral approximations at the nanoscale, a method which gives an analytical expression for a single particle partition function (SPPF) is proposed. It is shown that a dimensional transition in momentum space occurs at a certain magnitude of confinement. Therefore, to represent the SPPF by lower-dimensional analytical expressions becomes possible, rather than numerical calculation of summations. Considering rectangular domains with different aspect ratios, a comparison of the results of derived expressions with those of summation forms of the SPPF is made. It is shown that analytical expressions for the SPPF give very precise results with maximum relative errors of around 1%, 2% and 3% at exactly the transition point for single, double and triple transitions, respectively. Based on dimensional transitions, expressions for free energy, entropy, internal energy, chemical potential, heat capacity and pressure are given analytically valid for any scale.

  2. Predicting film genres with implicit ideals.

    PubMed

    Olney, Andrew McGregor

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach to defining film genre based on implicit ideals. When viewers rate the likability of a film, they indirectly express their ideal of what a film should be. Across six studies we investigate the category structure that emerges from likability ratings and the category structure that emerges from the features of film. We further compare these data-driven category structures with human annotated film genres. We conclude that film genres are structured more around ideals than around features of film. This finding lends experimental support to the notion that film genres are set of shifting, fuzzy, and highly contextualized psychological categories. PMID:23423823

  3. Predicting Film Genres with Implicit Ideals

    PubMed Central

    Olney, Andrew McGregor

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach to defining film genre based on implicit ideals. When viewers rate the likability of a film, they indirectly express their ideal of what a film should be. Across six studies we investigate the category structure that emerges from likability ratings and the category structure that emerges from the features of film. We further compare these data-driven category structures with human annotated film genres. We conclude that film genres are structured more around ideals than around features of film. This finding lends experimental support to the notion that film genres are set of shifting, fuzzy, and highly contextualized psychological categories. PMID:23423823

  4. Quantum computation speedup limits from quantum metrological precision bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał; Markiewicz, Marcin

    2015-06-01

    We propose a scheme for translating metrological precision bounds into lower bounds on query complexity of quantum search algorithms. Within the scheme the link between quadratic performance enhancement in idealized quantum metrological and quantum computing schemes becomes clear. More importantly, we utilize results from the field of quantum metrology on a generic loss of quadratic quantum precision enhancement in the presence of decoherence to infer an analogous generic loss of quadratic speedup in oracle based quantum computing. While most of our reasoning is rigorous, at one of the final steps, we need to make use of an unproven technical conjecture. We hope that we will be able to amend this deficiency in the near future, but we are convinced that even without the conjecture proven our results provide a deep insight into the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum metrology protocols.

  5. Far-infrared collision-induced absorption in rare gas mixtures: Quantum and semi-classical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Buryak, Ilya; Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 Pyzhevsky per., 119017 Moscow ; Frommhold, Lothar; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2014-04-21

    We compare calculations of the translational collision-induced spectra and their integrated intensities of both He–Ar and Ne–Ar collisional complexes, using the quantum mechanical and a semiclassical formalism. Advanced potential energy and induced dipole functions are used for the calculations. The quantum method used is as described previously [L. Frommhold, Collision-induced Absorption in Gases (Cambridge University Press, 1993 and 2006)]. The semiclassical method is based on repeated classical atom-atom scattering calculations to simulate an ensemble average; subsequent Fourier transform then renders the binary absorption coefficient as a function of frequency. The problem of classical calculations is the violation of the principle of detailed balance, which may be introduced only artificially in classical calculations. Nevertheless, it is shown that the use of classical trajectories permits a fairly accurate reproduction of the experimental spectra, comparable to the quantum mechanical results at not too low temperatures and for collisional pairs of not too small reduced mass. Inexpensive classical calculations may thus be promising to compute spectra also of molecular pairs, or even of polyatomic collisional pairs with anisotropic intermolecular interactions, for which the quantum approach is still inefficient or impractical.

  6. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (III): Accurate evaluation of proton hydration energy and standard hydrogen electrode potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-04-01

    Gibbs free energy of hydration of a proton and standard hydrogen electrode potential were evaluated using high-level quantum chemical calculations. The solvent effect was included using the cluster-continuum model, which treated short-range effects by quantum chemical calculations of proton-water complexes, and the long-range effects by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. The harmonic solvation model (HSM) was employed to estimate enthalpy and entropy contributions due to nuclear motions of the clusters by including the cavity-cluster interactions. Compared to the commonly used ideal gas model, HSM treatment significantly improved the contribution of entropy, showing a systematic convergence toward the experimental data.

  7. Mitosis, diffusible crosslinkers, and the ideal gas law.

    PubMed

    Odde, David J

    2015-03-12

    During mitosis, molecular motors hydrolyze ATP to generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubules and form the bipolar mitotic spindle. Lansky et al. now show that the diffusible microtubule crosslinker Ase1p can generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubules, and it does so without ATP hydrolysis. PMID:25768899

  8. Ideals and Realities of the Olympic Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibler, Richard W.

    1976-01-01

    With the growth of professionalism and the emphasis on money in sports, modern society is losing sight of the ideals of style and grace that were of primary importance in the early Olympic games. nJD)

  9. Ideal shrinking and expansion of discrete sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Ideal methods are described for shrinking or expanding a discrete sequence, image, or image sequence. The methods are ideal in the sense that they preserve the frequency spectrum of the input up to the Nyquist limit of the input or output, whichever is smaller. Fast implementations that make use of the discrete Fourier transform or the discrete Hartley transform are described. The techniques lead to a new multiresolution image pyramid.

  10. Sahaja: an Indian ideal of mental health.

    PubMed

    Neki, J S

    1975-02-01

    Sahaja is an Indian ideal of mental and spiritual health that has received special emphasis in the Sikh scriptures--especially, the Adi Granth. Since the concept of sahaja has long been associated with mystical thought and practice, its description has become shrouded in peculiar esoteric terminologies. It is the purpose of this communication to divest sahaja of its esoteric, mystic connotations and to redefine it as a mental health ideal in the context of contemporary conditions. PMID:1114187

  11. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  12. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  13. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  14. Energy partitioning in polyatomic chemical reactions: Quantum state resolved studies of highly exothermic atom abstraction reactions from molecules in the gas phase and at the gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolot, Alexander M.

    This thesis recounts a series of experiments that interrogate the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions using quantum state resolved measurements of gas-phase products. The gas-phase reactions F + HCl → HF + Cl and F + H2O → HF + OH are studied using crossed supersonic jets under single collision conditions. Infrared (IR) laser absorption probes HF product with near shot-noise limited sensitivity and high resolution, capable of resolving rovibrational states and Doppler lineshapes. Both reactions yield inverted vibrational populations. For the HCl reaction, strongly bimodal rotational distributions are observed, suggesting microscopic branching of the reaction mechanism. Alternatively, such structure may result from a quantum-resonance mediated reaction similar to those found in the well-characterized F + HD system. For the H2O reaction, a small, but significant, branching into v = 2 is particularly remarkable because this manifold is accessible only via the additional center of mass collision energy in the crossed jets. Rotationally hyperthermal HF is also observed. Ab initio calculations of the transition state geometry suggest mechanisms for both rotational and vibrational excitation. Exothermic chemical reaction dynamics at the gas-liquid interface have been investigated by colliding a supersonic jet of F atoms with liquid squalane (C30H62), a low vapor pressure hydrocarbon compatible with the high vacuum environment. IR spectroscopy provides absolute HF( v,J) product densities and Doppler resolved velocity component distributions perpendicular to the surface normal. Compared to analogous gas-phase F + hydrocarbon reactions, the liquid surface is a more effective "heat sink," yet vibrationally excited populations reveal incomplete thermal accommodation with the surface. Non-Boltzmann J-state populations and hot Doppler lineshapes that broaden with HF excitation indicate two competing scattering mechanisms: (i) a direct reactive scattering channel, whereby newly formed molecules leave the surface without equilibrating, and (ii) a partially accommodated fraction that shares vibrational, rotational, and translational energy with the liquid surface before returning to the gas phase. Finally, a velocity map ion imaging apparatus has been implemented to investigate reaction dynamics in crossed molecular beams. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) results in rotational, vibrational, and electronic state selectivity. Velocity map imaging measurements provide differential cross sections and information about the internal energy distribution of the undetected collision partner.

  15. Low temperature second virial coefficients of para-H2 gas obtained from quantum mechanical pair correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J.; Köhler, W. E.

    1989-09-01

    The successfully tested interaction potential of H2-H2 obtained from quantum chemical calculations (M 80) has been used again as input in the attempt of determining a fit interaction potential of the H2-H2 system. It does not only give quantitative agreement with measurements as obtained previously, but also reproduces the second virial coefficients at low temperatures, calculated via quantum mechanical pair correlation functions, as measured in several independent experiments. Since the unique determination of this fit is not possible in principle, we have chosen a final version by means of plausible estimates of the limitations of previous ab initio calculations. The new potential is included in this paper in a table. Our isotropic rigid rotor potential term will be discussed in comparisons with experimentally determined potential fits. More tests of our fit potential have already been completed and can be used for a final judgement.

  16. A new model for ideal gases. Decay to the Maxwellian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivanian, Elyas; Lpez-Ruiz, Ricardo

    2012-04-01

    In this work, a new model in kinetic gas theory for deriving the Maxwellian velocity distribution (MVD) is proposed. We construct an operator that governs the discrete time evolution of the velocity distribution. This operator, which conserves the momentum and the energy of the ideal gas, has the MVD as a fixed point. Moreover, for any initial out-of-equilibrium velocity distribution, it is shown that the gas decays to the equilibrium distribution, that is, to the MVD.

  17. Can non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics solve the magnetic braking catastrophe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether or not the low ionization fractions in molecular cloud cores can solve the `magnetic braking catastrophe', where magnetic fields prevent the formation of circumstellar discs around young stars. We perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of the gravitational collapse of one solar mass molecular cloud cores, incorporating the effects of ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic resistivity and the Hall effect alongside a self-consistent calculation of the ionization chemistry assuming 0.1 μm grains. When including only ambipolar diffusion or Ohmic resistivity, discs do not form in the presence of strong magnetic fields, similar to the cases using ideal MHD. With the Hall effect included, disc formation depends on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the rotation vector of the gas cloud. When the vectors are aligned, strong magnetic braking occurs and no disc is formed. When the vectors are anti-aligned, a disc with radius of 13 au can form even in strong magnetic when all three non-ideal terms are present, and a disc of 38 au can form when only the Hall effect is present; in both cases, a counter-rotating envelope forms around the first hydrostatic core. For weaker, anti-aligned fields, the Hall effect produces massive discs comparable to those produced in the absence of magnetic fields, suggesting that planet formation via gravitational instability may depend on the sign of the magnetic field in the precursor molecular cloud core.

  18. Quantum computation: algorithms and implementation in quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King

    In this thesis, we explore several aspects of both the software and hardware of quantum computation. First, we examine the computational power of multi-particle quantum random walks in terms of distinguishing mathematical graphs. We study both interacting and non-interacting multi-particle walks on strongly regular graphs, proving some limitations on distinguishing powers and presenting extensive numerical evidence indicative of interactions providing more distinguishing power. We then study the recently proposed adiabatic quantum algorithm for Google PageRank, and show that it exhibits power-law scaling for realistic WWW-like graphs. Turning to hardware, we next analyze the thermal physics of two nearby 2D electron gas (2DEG), and show that an analogue of the Coulomb drag effect exists for heat transfer. In some distance and temperature, this heat transfer is more significant than phonon dissipation channels. After that, we study the dephasing of two-electron states in a single silicon quantum dot. Specifically, we consider dephasing due to the electron-phonon coupling and charge noise, separately treating orbital and valley excitations. In an ideal system, dephasing due to charge noise is strongly suppressed due to a vanishing dipole moment. However, introduction of disorder or anharmonicity leads to large effective dipole moments, and hence possibly strong dephasing. Building on this work, we next consider more realistic systems, including structural disorder systems. We present experiment and theory, which demonstrate energy levels that vary with quantum dot translation, implying a structurally disordered system. Finally, we turn to the issues of valley mixing and valley-orbit hybridization, which occurs due to atomic-scale disorder at quantum well interfaces. We develop a new theoretical approach to study these effects, which we name the disorder-expansion technique. We demonstrate that this method successfully reproduces atomistic tight-binding techniques, while using a fraction of the computational resources and providing considerably more physical insight. Using this technique, we demonstrate that large dipole moments can exist between valley states in disordered systems, and calculate corrections to intervalley tunnel rates..

  19. Type II quantum wells on GaSb substrate designed for laser-based gas sensing applications in a broad range of mid infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Sęk, G.; Janiak, F.; Misiewicz, J.; Bauer, A.; Höfling, S.; Forchel, A.

    2012-05-01

    Optical properties of InAs/GaInSb/InAs type II quantum wells grown on GaSb substrate have been studied by Fourier transformed photoreflectance and photoluminescence supported by electronic structure calculations. Such a broken gap material system is utilized for the active region of interband cascade lasers and further for laser-based gas sensors operating at room temperature. Based on the measured absorption-like and emission-like spectra in the range from about 2 to above 5 μm, we indicate the potential of such type II structures for detecting such environmentally relevant gasses as HCl, CO2, N2O, and NH3 which have their absorption lines at wavelengths longer than about 3.5 μm, i.e. beyond the already explored range characteristic for hydrocarbons. We investigate the issue of the type II transition oscillator strength versus the InAs well width and temperature for two different quantum well layer structures. Significant enhancement of the type II transition intensities could be predicted for W-like design of the well and increasing with temperature, as a consequence of various thermal energy gap coefficients of the involved materials and weakening of the confinement for electrons. The concept of compensating the electric field effect in the real operational device, affecting the transition probability, by intentionally introducing an asymmetry of the double quantum well structure has been shown to be functional for various emission wavelengths. Reasonable values of the transition oscillator strengths could still be demonstrated at about 5 μm.

  20. Terahertz Dynamics of a Topologically Protected State: Quantum Hall Effect Plateaus near the Cyclotron Resonance of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Stier, A V; Ellis, C T; Kwon, J; Xing, H; Zhang, H; Eason, D; Strasser, G; Morimoto, T; Aoki, H; Zeng, H; McCombe, B D; Cerne, J

    2015-12-11

    We measure the Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas formed at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction in the terahertz regime close to the cyclotron resonance frequency using highly sensitive Faraday rotation measurements. The sample is electrically gated, allowing the electron density to be changed continuously by more than a factor of 3. We observe clear plateaulike and steplike features in the Faraday rotation angle vs electron density and magnetic field (Landau-level filling factor) even at fields or frequencies very close to cyclotron resonance absorption. These features are the high frequency manifestation of quantum Hall plateaus-a signature of topologically protected edge states. We observe both odd and even filling factor plateaus and explore the temperature dependence of these plateaus. Although dynamical scaling theory begins to break down in the frequency region of our measurements, we find good agreement with theory. PMID:26705653

  1. Quantum-state resolved reaction dynamics at the gas-liquid interface: Direct absorption detection of HF(v,J) product from F(2P)+squalane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolot, Alexander M.; Harper, Warren W.; Perkins, Bradford G.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2006-07-01

    Exothermic reactive scattering of F atoms at the gas-liquid interface of a liquid hydrocarbon (squalane) surface has been studied under single collision conditions by shot noise limited high-resolution infrared absorption on the nascent HF (v,J) product. The nascent HF (v,J) vibrational distributions are inverted, indicating insufficient time for complete vibrational energy transfer into the surface liquid. The HF (v=2,J) rotational distributions are well fit with a two temperature Boltzmann analysis, with a near room temperature component (TTD≈290K) and a second much hotter scattering component (THDS≈1040K). These data provide quantum state level support for microscopic branching in the atom abstraction dynamics corresponding to escape of nascent HF from the liquid surface on time scales both slow and fast with respect to rotational relaxation.

  2. The effect of charged quantum dots on the mobility of a two-dimensional electron gas: How important is the Coulomb scattering?

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzmann, A. Beckel, A.; Lorke, A.; Geller, M.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-02-07

    We have investigated the influence of a layer of charged self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) on the mobility of a nearby two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Time-resolved transconductance spectroscopy was used to separate the two contributions of the change in mobility, which are: (i) The electrons in the QDs act as Coulomb scatterers for the electrons in the 2DEG. (ii) The screening ability and, hence, the mobility of the 2DEG decreases when the charge carrier density is reduced by the charged QDs, i.e., the mobility itself depends on the charge carrier concentration. Surprisingly, we find a negligible influence of the Coulomb scattering on the mobility for a 2DEG, separated by a 30 nm tunneling barrier to the layer of QDs. This means that the mobility change is completely caused by depletion, i.e., reduction of the charge carrier density in the 2DEG, which indirectly influences the mobility.

  3. The effect of charged quantum dots on the mobility of a two-dimensional electron gas: How important is the Coulomb scattering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzmann, A.; Beckel, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Lorke, A.; Geller, M.

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the influence of a layer of charged self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) on the mobility of a nearby two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Time-resolved transconductance spectroscopy was used to separate the two contributions of the change in mobility, which are: (i) The electrons in the QDs act as Coulomb scatterers for the electrons in the 2DEG. (ii) The screening ability and, hence, the mobility of the 2DEG decreases when the charge carrier density is reduced by the charged QDs, i.e., the mobility itself depends on the charge carrier concentration. Surprisingly, we find a negligible influence of the Coulomb scattering on the mobility for a 2DEG, separated by a 30 nm tunneling barrier to the layer of QDs. This means that the mobility change is completely caused by depletion, i.e., reduction of the charge carrier density in the 2DEG, which indirectly influences the mobility.

  4. High power, widely tunable, mode-hop free, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser for multi-species trace gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, R.; Marchenko, D.; Mandon, J.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.; Wulterkens, G.

    2014-12-29

    We present a high power, widely tunable, continuous wave external cavity quantum cascade laser designed for infrared vibrational spectroscopy of molecules exhibiting broadband and single line absorption features. The laser source exhibits single mode operation with a tunability up to 303 cm{sup −1} (∼24% of the center wavelength) at 8 μm, with a maximum optical output power of 200 mW. In combination with off-axis integrated output spectroscopy, trace-gas detection of broadband absorption gases such as acetone was performed and a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.7 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1 }Hz{sup −1/2} was obtained.

  5. Voltage-controlled electron tunneling from a single self-assembled quantum dot embedded in a two-dimensional-electron-gas-based photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, J. D.; Xu, X. L.; Baumberg, J. J.; Irvine, A. C.; Stanley, C.; Williams, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    We perform high-resolution photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy to investigate resonantly the neutral exciton ground-state (X0) in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot (QD) embedded in the intrinsic region of an n-i-Schottky photodiode based on a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), which was formed from a Si δ-doped GaAs layer. Using such a device, a single-QD PC spectrum of X0 is measured by sweeping the bias-dependent X0 transition energy through that of a fixed narrow-bandwidth laser via the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE). By repeating such a measurement for a series of laser energies, a precise relationship between the X0 transition energy and bias voltage is then obtained. Taking into account power broadening of the X0 absorption peak, this allows for high-resolution measurements of the X0 homogeneous linewidth and, hence, the electron tunneling rate. The electron tunneling rate is measured as a function of the vertical electric field and described accurately by a theoretical model, yielding information about the electron confinement energy and QD height. We demonstrate that our devices can operate as 2DEG-based QD photovoltaic cells and conclude by proposing two optical spintronic devices that are now feasible.

  6. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Rui Dai, Jiao-Hua; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  7. pyIAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cory M.; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) is a widely-used thermodynamic framework to readily predict mixed-gas adsorption isotherms from a set of pure-component adsorption isotherms. We present an open-source, user-friendly Python package, pyIAST, to perform IAST calculations for an arbitrary number of components. pyIAST supports several common analytical models to characterize the pure-component isotherms from experimental or simulated data. Alternatively, pyIAST can use numerical quadrature to compute the spreading pressure for IAST calculations by interpolating the pure-component isotherm data. pyIAST can also perform reverse IAST calculations, where one seeks the required gas phase composition to yield a desired adsorbed phase composition.

  8. Out-of-equilibrium evolution of kinetically constrained many-body quantum systems under purely dissipative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmos, Beatriz; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2014-10-01

    We explore the relaxation dynamics of quantum many-body systems that undergo purely dissipative dynamics through non-classical jump operators that can establish quantum coherence. Our goal is to shed light on the differences in the relaxation dynamics that arise in comparison to systems evolving via classical rate equations. In particular, we focus on a scenario where both quantum and classical dissipative evolution lead to a stationary state with the same values of diagonal or "classical" observables. As a basis for illustrating our ideas we use spin systems whose dynamics becomes correlated and complex due to dynamical constraints, inspired by kinetically constrained models (KCMs) of classical glasses. We show that in the quantum case the relaxation can be orders of magnitude slower than the classical one due to the presence of quantum coherences. Aspects of these idealized quantum KCMs become manifest in a strongly interacting Rydberg gas under electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions in an appropriate limit. Beyond revealing a link between this Rydberg gas and the rather abstract dissipative KCMs of quantum glassy systems, our study sheds light on the limitations of the use of classical rate equations for capturing the non-equilibrium behavior of this many-body system.

  9. Classical representation of a quantum system at equilibrium: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufty, James; Dutta, Sandipan

    2013-03-01

    A quantum system at equilibrium is represented by a corresponding classical system, chosen to reproduce thermodynamic and structural properties. The motivation is to allow application of classical strong-coupling theories and molecular dynamics simulation to quantum systems at strong coupling. The correspondence is made at the level of the grand-canonical ensembles for the two systems. An effective temperature, local chemical potential, and pair potential are introduced to define the corresponding classical system. These are determined formally by requiring the equivalence of the grand potentials and their functional derivatives. Practical inversions of these formal definitions are indicated via the integral equations for densities and pair correlation functions of classical liquid theory. Application to the ideal Fermi gas is demonstrated, and the weak-coupling form for the pair potential is given. In a companion paper two applications are described: the thermodynamics and structure of uniform jellium over a range of temperatures and densities and the shell structure of harmonically bound charges.

  10. Reality television and the muscular male ideal.

    PubMed

    Dallesasse, Starla L; Kluck, Annette S

    2013-06-01

    Although researchers have examined the negative effects of viewing reality television (RTV) on women's body image, this research has not been extended to men. Exploring the extent to which RTV depicts men who embody the muscular ideal may enhance our understanding of the potential influence of this media genre. We explored the extent to which RTV depicted men who embodied the muscular ideal using a quantitative content analysis. Based on binomial tests, the primary male cast members of programs airing on networks popular among young adult men during the Fall 2009 broadcast season were more muscular, with lower levels of body fat, than average U.S. men. The chest-to-waist and shoulder-to-waist ratios of these cast members did not differ as a function of program type (i.e., reality drama, endurance, and romance). Young men who view RTV programs included in the present study would be exposed to an unrepresentative muscular ideal. PMID:23523084

  11. Real-Time Trace Gas Sensing of Fluorocarbons using a Swept-wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Stahl, Robert D.; Schiffern, John T.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2014-05-04

    We present results demonstrating real-time sensing of four different fluorocarbons at low-ppb concentrations using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) operating in a swept-wavelength configuration. The ECQCL was repeatedly swept over its full tuning range at a 20 Hz rate with a scan rate of 3535 cm-1/s, and a detailed characterization of the ECQCL scan stability and repeatability is presented. The sensor was deployed on a mobile automotive platform to provide spatially resolved detection of fluorocarbons in outdoor experiments. Noise-equivalent detection limits of 800-1000 parts-per-trillion (ppt) are demonstrated for 1 s integration times.

  12. Frequency locking of single-mode 3.5-THz quantum cascade lasers using a gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Hovenier, J. N.; Cui, M.; Hayton, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Shi, S. C.; Kao, T.-Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report frequency locking of two 3.5-THz third-order distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) by using methanol molecular absorption lines, a proportional-integral-derivative controller, and a NbN bolometer. We show that the free-running linewidths of the QCLs are dependent on the electrical and temperature tuning coefficients. For both lasers, the frequency locking induces a similar linewidth reduction factor, whereby the narrowest locked linewidth is below 18 kHz with a Gaussian-like shape. The linewidth reduction factor and the ultimate linewidth correspond to the measured frequency noise power spectral density.

  13. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  14. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine

    PubMed Central

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  15. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Hardal, Ali Ü C; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2015-01-01

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart. PMID:26260797

  16. Purification of noisy quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the problem of improving noisy quantum measurements by suitable preprocessing strategies making many noisy detectors equivalent to a single ideal detector. For observables pertaining to finite-dimensional systems (e.g., qubits or spins) we consider preprocessing strategies that are reminiscent of quantum error correction procedures and allow one to perfectly measure an observable on a single quantum system for increasing number of inefficient detectors. For measurements of observables with an unbounded spectrum (e.g., photon number and homodyne and heterodyne detection), the purification of noisy quantum measurements can be achieved by preamplification as suggested by Yuen [Opt. Lett. 12, 789 (1987)].

  17. Analysis of an idealized Stirling thermocompressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kornhauser, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    A thermocompressor uses thermal energy to increase the pressure of a fluid without the intermediate production of mechanical work. The thermocompressor described here is essentially a cold-connected Gamma Stirling engine with the power cylinder replaced by inlet and discharge check valves. It is analyzed based on assumptions similar to those made in the analysis of an ideal Stirling engine. The analysis gives closed form predictions for thermocompressor thermal efficiency, volumetric efficiency, and non-dimensional heat input as functions of pressure and temperature ratio. It is also used to compare thermocompressor performance to that of an ideal Otto engine-driven mechanical compressor.

  18. Simple correlation for predicting detonation velocity of ideal and non-ideal explosives.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2009-07-30

    This paper describes a simple method for prediction of detonation velocity of ideal and non-ideal explosives. A non-ideal aluminized and nitrated explosive can have Chapman-Jouguet detonation velocity significantly different from that expected from existing thermodynamic computer codes for equilibrium and steady-state calculations. Detonation velocity of explosives with general formula C(a)H(b)N(c)O(d)Al(e) can be predicted only from values of a, b, c, d, e and a specific structural parameter without using any assumed detonation products, heat of formation and experimental data. Predicted detonation velocities by this procedure for ideal and non-ideal explosives show good agreement with respect to experimental values as compared to computed results of BKWR and BKWS equations of state. PMID:19135789

  19. Axisymmetric ideal MHD stellar wind flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Olbert, S.

    1978-01-01

    The ideal MHD equations are reduced to a single equation under the assumption of axisymmetric flow. A variational principle from which the equation is derivable is given. The characteristics of the equation are briefly discussed. The equation is used to rederive the theorem of Gussenhoven and Carovillano.

  20. Rabindranath Tagore's Ideals of Aesthetic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lal, Swati

    1984-01-01

    Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was an Indian educator who established the Santiniketan schools, which replicated to a large extent the ashram or forest school of ancient India, where gurus and their pupils lived in a residential hermitage. Tagore's aesthetic ideals of education as manifested in the school at Santiniketan are discussed. (RM)

  1. Water: The Ideal Early Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Bathtubs and swimming pools provide the ideal learning environment for people with special needs. For young preschool children, the activities that take place through water can help them develop physical fitness, facilitate motor development, reinforce perceptual-motor ability, encourage social development, and enhance self-esteem and confidence.…

  2. Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1980-01-01

    A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

  3. Street Children Draw the Ideal Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Margaret A.; And Others

    Forty-three adolescents (11-16 years of age) attending a health care program, Project Alternatives, for "street children" in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, drew randomly assigned pictures of either the ideal man or woman, engaged in some activity. These drawings were compared to samples from adolescents in various parts of the world to assess the global…

  4. What Is an "Ideal" Pedagogical Grammar?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadkarni, Mangesh V.

    1987-01-01

    Questions the validity of two assumptions behind the search for the "best" pedagogical (English as a second language) grammar: (1) that there is one ideal pedagogical grammar; and (2) that the success of a pedagogical grammar depends primarily on the linguistic theoretical assumptions incorporated in it. (Author/CB)

  5. The World Grant Ideal and Engagement Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Simon, Lou Anna K.

    2012-01-01

    Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon's concept of the world grant ideal is grounded in three core values: quality, inclusiveness, and connectivity. These core values fuel the 21st-century imperative to build sustainable global prosperity. They represent an affirmation of the Morrill Act of 1862 in the context of a global society and…

  6. The Nautilus: An Ideal Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Gertrude M.

    The author presents the design for an ideal elementary school that would create a climate in which children could be educated to their maximum potential. The design arises from a philosophical base that incorporates this century's research in child development and learning theory. Consideration is given to the needs of the individual at the…

  7. Developing Ideal Student and Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvin, Gerald J.

    1993-01-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) is a primary educator of optometry students, with each college of optometry being affiliated with at least one VA hospital. Ideally, fourth-year optometry students rotate through a specific VA facility for about 12 weeks. Guidelines are designed to provide optimum care in a rich learning environment. (MSE)

  8. Ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of orifice pulse tube refrigerators has raised questions as to what limits their ultimate performance. Using an analogy to the Stirling cycle refrigerator, the efficiency (cooling power per unit input power) of an ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator is shown to be T1/T0, the ratio of the cold temperature to the hot temperature.

  9. Real vs. Ideal Self Discrepancy in Bulimics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosak, Karen

    Bulimia is an eating disorder prevalent among young women, characterized by binge eating episodes followed by purging with subsequent depressive moods and self-deprecating thoughts. To determine whether bulimic women exhibit a greater discrepancy between their perceived and ideal selves than do nonbulimics, three samples of women were assessed.…

  10. The ideal Kolmogorov inertial range and constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The energy transfer statistics measured in numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wavenumbers in the inertial range. Using the measured self-similar form, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate were deduced. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant was calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  11. Infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence with a CW quantum-cascade laser for spatially resolved CO2 and gas properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Miller, Victor A.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2015-08-01

    The design and demonstration of a new infrared laser-induced fluorescence (IR-LIF) technique that enables spatially resolved measurements of CO2, temperature, and pressure, with potential for velocity, are presented. A continuous-wave, wavelength-tunable, quantum-cascade laser (QCL) near with up to 120 mW was used to directly excite the asymmetric-stretch fundamental-vibration band of CO2 for approximately 200 to times more absorbance compared with previous IR-LIF techniques. This enabled LIF detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio of 1) of 20 and 70 ppm of CO2 in Ar and , respectively, at 1 bar and 296 K in static-cell experiments. Simplified and detailed kinetic models for simulating the LIF signal as a function of gas properties are presented and enable quantitative, calibration-free, IR-LIF measurements of CO2 mole fraction within 1-8 % of known values at 0.5-1 bar. By scanning the laser across two absorption transitions and performing a multi-line Voigt fit to the LIF signal, measurements of temperature, pressure, and within 2 % of known values were obtained. LIF measurements of gas pressure at a repetition rate up to 200 Hz (in argon) are also presented. Planar-LIF (PLIF) was used to image steady and unsteady CO2-Ar jets at 330 frames per second with a spatial signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) up to 25, corresponding to a detection limit (SNR = 1) of 200 ppm with a projected pixel size of . The gas pressure was measured within % of the known value (1 bar) at 5 Hz by scanning the QCL across the P(42) absorption transition and least-squares fitting a Voigt profile to the PLIF signal. Spatially resolved measurements of absolute CO2 mole fraction in a laminar jet are also presented.

  12. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  13. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.

  14. Eigenanalysis of Ideal Hall MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, T.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    Ideal, incompressible, homogeneous, Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) turbulence may be investigated through a Fourier spectral method. In three-dimensional periodic geometry, the independent Fourier coefficients represent a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density. The canonical ensemble is based on the conservation of three invariants: total energy, generalized helicity, and magnetic helicity. Generalized helicity in HMHD takes the place of cross helicity in MHD. The invariants determine the modal probability density giving the spectral structure and equilibrium statistics of ideal HMHD, which are compared to known MHD results. New results in absolute equilibrium ensemble theory are derived using a novel approach that involves finding the eigenvalues of a Hermitian covariance matrix for each modal probability density. The associated eigenvectors transform the original phase space variables into eigenvariables through a special unitary transformation. These are the normal modes which facilitate the analysis of ideal HMHD non-linear dynamics. The eigenanalysis predicts that the low wavenumber modes with very small eigenvalues may have mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, contrary to the ideal ensemble prediction of zero mean values. (Expectation values may also be relatively large at the highest wave numbers, but the addition of even small levels of dissipation removes any relevance this may have for real-world turbulence.) This behavior is non-ergodic over very long times for a numerical simulation and is termed 'broken ergodicity'. For fixed values of the ideal invariants, the effect is seen to be enhanced with increased numerical grid size. Broken ergodicity at low wave number modes gives rise to large-scale, quasi-stationary, coherent structure. Physically, this corresponds to plasma relaxation to force-free states. For real HMHD turbulence with dissipation, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur at low wave numbers, i.e. largest scales, where dissipation is least. We will discuss the relevant eigenanalysis and present numerical examples.

  15. Real-time trace gas sensing of fluorocarbons using a swept-wavelength external cavity quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mark C; Taubman, Matthew S; Bernacki, Bruce E; Cannon, Bret D; Stahl, Robert D; Schiffern, John T; Myers, Tanya L

    2014-05-01

    We present results demonstrating real-time sensing of four different fluorocarbons at low part-per billion (ppb) concentrations using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) designed for infrared vibrational spectroscopy of molecules with broad absorption features. The ECQCL was repeatedly swept at 20 Hz over its full tuning range of 1145-1265 cm(-1) providing a scan rate of 3535 cm(-1) s(-1), and a detailed characterization of the ECQCL scan stability and repeatability is presented. The ECQCL was combined with a 100 meter path length multi-pass cell for direct absorption spectroscopy. A portable sensor system is described, which was deployed on a mobile automotive platform to provide spatially-resolved detection of fluorocarbons in outdoor experiments. Noise-equivalent detection limits of 800-1000 parts-per-trillion (ppt) are demonstrated for 1 s integration times. PMID:24384671

  16. Quantum steady computation

    SciTech Connect

    Castagnoli, G. )

    1991-08-10

    This paper reports that current conceptions of quantum mechanical computers inherit from conventional digital machines two apparently interacting features, machine imperfection and temporal development of the computational process. On account of machine imperfection, the process would become ideally reversible only in the limiting case of zero speed. Therefore the process is irreversible in practice and cannot be considered to be a fundamental quantum one. By giving up classical features and using a linear, reversible and non-sequential representation of the computational process - not realizable in classical machines - the process can be identified with the mathematical form of a quantum steady state. This form of steady quantum computation would seem to have an important bearing on the notion of cognition.

  17. Ideal photon number amplifier and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dariano, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The photon number-amplification and number-duplication mechanism are analyzed in the ideal case. The search for unitary evolutions leads to consider also a number-deamplification mechanism, the symmetry between amplification and deamplification being broken by the integer-value nature of the number operator. Both transformations, amplification and duplication, need an auxiliary field which, in the case of amplification, turns out to be amplified in the inverse way. Input-output energy conservation is accounted for using a classical pump or through frequency-conversion of the fields. Ignoring one of the fields is equivalent to considering the amplifier as an open system involving entropy production. The Hamiltonians of the ideal devices are given and compared with those of realistic systems.

  18. Non-ideal solution thermodynamics of cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative description of the non-ideal solution thermodynamics of the cytoplasm of a living mammalian cell is critically necessary in mathematical modeling of cryobiology and desiccation and other fields where the passive osmotic response of a cell plays a role. In the solution thermodynamics osmotic virial equation, the quadratic correction to the linear ideal, dilute solution theory is described by the second osmotic virial coefficient. Herein we report, for the first time, intracellular solution second osmotic virial coefficients for four cell types [TF-1 hematopoietic stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), porcine hepatocytes, and porcine chondrocytes] and further report second osmotic virial coefficients indistinguishable from zero (for the concentration range studied) for human hepatocytes and mouse oocytes. PMID:23840923

  19. Defining the ideal femtosecond laser capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Mark; Teuma, E Valas; Glasser, Adrian; Bott, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We define the ideal anterior capsulotomy through consideration of capsular histology and biomechanics. Desirable qualities include preventing posterior capsular opacification (PCO), maintaining effective lens position (ELP) and optimising capsular strength. Methods Laboratory study of capsular biomechanics and literature review of histology and published clinical results. Results Parameters of ideal capsulotomy construction include complete overlap of the intraocular lens to prevent PCO, centration on the clinical approximation of the optical axis of the lens to ensure concentricity with the capsule equator, and maximal capsular thickness at the capsulotomy edge to maintain integrity. Conclusions Constructing the capsulotomy centred on the clinical approximation of the optical axis of the lens with diameter 5.25 mm optimises prevention of PCO, consistency of ELP and capsular strength. PMID:25829488

  20. ICRF coil for the IDEAL plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motley, R. W.; Majeski, R.; Cohen, S. A.; Diesso, M.; Wilson, J. R.

    1994-10-01

    We describe an ICRH coil to drive the plasma in the proposed IDEAL device, a linear plasma machine designed to study the physics and engineering problems of the ITER divertor. In initial operation, 2 MW of CW power at ˜40 MHz will be applied to a hydrogen plasma via four 0.75-m long multiple saddle coils that excite ICRF slow waves. The waves propagate to a 30 % magnetic beach, where they undergo cyclotron absorption. At full heating power the power flow out the ends of IDEAL is designed to equal that in the ITER divertor. Coil loading and the radial distribution of the E+ and E- RF fields have been calculated with the ANTENA Code.

  1. Regular shock refraction in planar ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmont, P.; Keppens, R.

    2010-03-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest, in planar ideal (magneto)hydrodynamics. In the hydrodynamical case, 3 signals arise and the interface becomes Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable due to vorticity deposition on the shocked contact. In the magnetohydrodynamical case, on the other hand, when the normal component of the magnetic field does not vanish, 5 signals will arise. The interface then typically remains stable, since the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions in ideal MHD do not allow for vorticity deposition on a contact discontinuity. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase. Using grid-adaptive MHD simulations, we show that after reflection from the top wall, the interface remains stable.

  2. Trace gas sensing using quantum cascade lasers and a fiber-coupled optoacoustic sensor: Application to formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, A.; Spagnolo, V.; Di Franco, C.; Lugarà, P. M.; Scamarcio, G.

    2010-03-01

    We will report here on the design and realization of an optoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde. The sensor consists of a commercial QCL and a resonant PA cell. Two different cell configurations have been investigated: a "standard" H cell and an innovative T-cell with an optical fiber directly inserted into. Two different type of sound detector have been employed: electret microphones and optical MEMS-based microphone. As possible applications, we will describe the results obtained in the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O), a gas of great interest for industrial processes and environmental monitoring.

  3. The influence of the temperature and density of an electron gas on beta processes in a quantum magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, V. N.; Starcheus, S. G.; Tasev, M. A.; Ternov, I. M.

    1988-01-01

    Beta processes occurring upon variation of the temperature and density of an electron gas in a wide range are investigated by accounting for the effect of a strong magnetic field on the motion of charged particles. The study is performed in the Furry framework. Inherent to the case considered is that, for certain relationships between the main parameters of the problem, the probabilities of beta processes and the neutrino luminosities caused by them exhibit an oscillatory behavior. In the degeneracy case, the interference effects reflecting the nonanalyticity of the expressions upon field vanishing exceed the contributions from perturbation theory. The results are of interest in connection with the collapse of massive stellar nuclei.

  4. VH-1: Multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John; Blondin, John; Lindahl, Greg; Lufkin, Eric

    2012-04-01

    VH-1 is a multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code written in FORTRAN for use on any computing platform, from desktop workstations to supercomputers. It uses a Lagrangian remap version of the Piecewise Parabolic Method developed by Paul Woodward and Phil Colella in their 1984 paper. VH-1 comes in a variety of versions, from a simple one-dimensional serial variant to a multi-dimensional version scalable to thousands of processors.

  5. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We

  6. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We…

  7. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. II. Application to the many-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Baranov, M.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.

    2010-08-01

    We analyze the ground-state phase diagram of attractive lattice bosons, which are stabilized by a three-body onsite hardcore constraint. A salient feature of this model is an Ising-type transition from a conventional atomic superfluid to a dimer superfluid with vanishing atomic condensate. The study builds on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory of coupled bosons with polynomial interactions, proposed in a related paper [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064509 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevB.82.064509]. In this framework, we focus by analytical means on aspects of the phase diagram which are intimately connected to interactions, and are thus not accessible in a mean-field plus spin-wave approach. First, we determine shifts in the mean-field phase border, which are most pronounced in the low-density regime. Second, the investigation of the strong coupling limit reveals the existence of a “continuous supersolid,” which emerges as a consequence of enhanced symmetries in this regime. We discuss its experimental signatures. Third, we show that the Ising-type phase transition, driven first order via the competition of long-wavelength modes at generic fillings, terminates into a true Ising quantum critical point in the vicinity of half filling.

  8. Quantum field theory for the three-body constrained lattice Bose gas. II. Application to the many-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Daley, A. J.; Zoller, P.; Baranov, M.

    2010-08-01

    We analyze the ground-state phase diagram of attractive lattice bosons, which are stabilized by a three-body onsite hardcore constraint. A salient feature of this model is an Ising-type transition from a conventional atomic superfluid to a dimer superfluid with vanishing atomic condensate. The study builds on an exact mapping of the constrained model to a theory of coupled bosons with polynomial interactions, proposed in a related paper [S. Diehl, M. Baranov, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. B 82, 064509 (2010).]. In this framework, we focus by analytical means on aspects of the phase diagram which are intimately connected to interactions, and are thus not accessible in a mean-field plus spin-wave approach. First, we determine shifts in the mean-field phase border, which are most pronounced in the low-density regime. Second, the investigation of the strong coupling limit reveals the existence of a 'continuous supersolid', which emerges as a consequence of enhanced symmetries in this regime. We discuss its experimental signatures. Third, we show that the Ising-type phase transition, driven first order via the competition of long-wavelength modes at generic fillings, terminates into a true Ising quantum critical point in the vicinity of half filling.

  9. Quantum rotor in nanostructured superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Milošević, M. V.; Covaci, L.; Jankó, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its apparent simplicity, the idealized model of a particle constrained to move on a circle has intriguing dynamic properties and immediate experimental relevance. While a rotor is rather easy to set up classically, the quantum regime is harder to realize and investigate. Here we demonstrate that the quantum dynamics of quasiparticles in certain classes of nanostructured superconductors can be mapped onto a quantum rotor. Furthermore, we provide a straightforward experimental procedure to convert this nanoscale superconducting rotor into a regular or inverted quantum pendulum with tunable gravitational field, inertia, and drive. We detail how these novel states can be detected via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The proposed experiments will provide insights into quantum dynamics and quantum chaos. PMID:24686241

  10. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  11. Dimensional Analysis Using Toric Ideals: Primitive Invariants

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Mark A.; Bates, Ronald A.; Wynn, Henry P.

    2014-01-01

    Classical dimensional analysis in its original form starts by expressing the units for derived quantities, such as force, in terms of power products of basic units etc. This suggests the use of toric ideal theory from algebraic geometry. Within this the Graver basis provides a unique primitive basis in a well-defined sense, which typically has more terms than the standard Buckingham approach. Some textbook examples are revisited and the full set of primitive invariants found. First, a worked example based on convection is introduced to recall the Buckingham method, but using computer algebra to obtain an integer matrix from the initial integer matrix holding the exponents for the derived quantities. The matrix defines the dimensionless variables. But, rather than this integer linear algebra approach it is shown how, by staying with the power product representation, the full set of invariants (dimensionless groups) is obtained directly from the toric ideal defined by . One candidate for the set of invariants is a simple basis of the toric ideal. This, although larger than the rank of , is typically not unique. However, the alternative Graver basis is unique and defines a maximal set of invariants, which are primitive in a simple sense. In addition to the running example four examples are taken from: a windmill, convection, electrodynamics and the hydrogen atom. The method reveals some named invariants. A selection of computer algebra packages is used to show the considerable ease with which both a simple basis and a Graver basis can be found. PMID:25436774

  12. Word recognition using ideal word patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheila X.; Srihari, Sargur N.

    1994-03-01

    The word shape analysis approach to text recognition is motivated by discoveries in psychological studies of the human reading process. It attempts to describe and compare the shape of the word as a whole object without trying to segment and recognize the individual characters, so it bypasses the errors committed in character segmentation and classification. However, the large number of classes and large variation and distortion expected in all patterns belonging to the same class make it difficult for conventional, accurate, pattern recognition approaches. A word shape analysis approach using ideal word patterns to overcome the difficulty and improve recognition performance is described in this paper. A special word pattern which characterizes a word class is extracted from different sample patterns of the word class and stored in memory. Recognition of a new word pattern is achieved by comparing it with the special pattern of each word class called ideal word pattern. The process of generating the ideal word pattern of each word class is proposed. The algorithm was tested on a set of machine printed gray scale word images which included a wide range of print types and qualities.

  13. Principles for designing ideal protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Nobuyasu; Tatsumi-Koga, Rie; Liu, Gaohua; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Unlike random heteropolymers, natural proteins fold into unique ordered structures. Understanding how these are encoded in amino-acid sequences is complicated by energetically unfavourable non-ideal features—for example kinked α-helices, bulged β-strands, strained loops and buried polar groups—that arise in proteins from evolutionary selection for biological function or from neutral drift. Here we describe an approach to designing ideal protein structures stabilized by completely consistent local and non-local interactions. The approach is based on a set of rules relating secondary structure patterns to protein tertiary motifs, which make possible the design of funnel-shaped protein folding energy landscapes leading into the target folded state. Guided by these rules, we designed sequences predicted to fold into ideal protein structures consisting of α-helices, β-strands and minimal loops. Designs for five different topologies were found to be monomeric and very stable and to adopt structures in solution nearly identical to the computational models. These results illuminate how the folding funnels of natural proteins arise and provide the foundation for engineering a new generation of functional proteins free from natural evolution. PMID:23135467

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the Ground-State Properties of a Fermi Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgini, S.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.

    2006-11-07

    The ground-state properties of a two-component Fermi gas with attractive short-range interactions are calculated using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method. The interaction strength is varied over a wide range by tuning the value of the s-wave scattering length of the two-body potential. We calculate the ground-state energy per particle and we characterize the equation of state of the system. Off-diagonal long-range order is investigated through the asymptotic behavior of the two-body density matrix. The condensate fraction of pairs is calculated in the unitary limit and on both sides of the BCS-BEC crossover.

  15. Quantum quench and prethermalization dynamics in a two-dimensional fermi gas with long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Nessi, N; Iucci, A; Cazalilla, M A

    2014-11-21

    We study the effect of suddenly turning on a long-range interaction in a spinless Fermi gas in two dimensions. The short- to intermediate-time dynamics is described using the method of bosonization of the Fermi surface. The space-time dependence of the nonequilibrium fermion density matrix as well as the evolution after the quench of the discontinuity at the Fermi momentum of the momentum distribution are computed. We find that the asymptotic state predicted by bosonization is consistent with the existence of a prethermalization plateau, which is also predicted by a perturbative approach in terms of the fermionic degrees of freedom. The bosonized representation, however, explicitly allows for the construction of the generalized Gibbs ensemble describing the prethermalized state. PMID:25479478

  16. Molecular structure and benzene ring deformation of three cyanobenzenes from gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Anna Rita; Domenicano, Aldo; Ramondo, Fabio; Hargittai, Istvn

    2008-10-30

    The molecular structures of cyanobenzene, p-dicyanobenzene, and 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene have been accurately determined by gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio/DFT MO calculations. The equilibrium structures of these molecules are planar, but their average geometries in the gaseous phase are nonplanar because of large-amplitude vibrational motions of the substituents out of the plane of the benzene ring. The use of nonplanar models in electron diffraction analysis is necessary to yield ring angles consistent with the results of MO calculations. The angular deformation of the benzene ring in the three molecules is found to be much smaller than obtained from previous electron diffraction studies, as well as from microwave spectroscopy studies of cyanobenzene. While the deformation of the ring CC bonds and CCC angles in p-dicyanobenzene is well interpreted as arising from the superposition of independent effects from each substituent, considerable deviation from additivity occurs in 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene. The changes in the ring geometry and C ipso-C cyano bond lengths in this molecule indicate an enhanced ability of the cyano group to withdraw pi-electrons from the benzene ring, compared with cyanobenzene and p-dicyanobenzene. In particular, gas-phase electron diffraction and MP2 or B3LYP calculations show a small but consistent increase in the mean length of the ring CC bonds for each cyano group and a further increase in 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene. Comparison with accurate results from X-ray and neutron crystallography indicates that in p-dicyanobenzene the internal ring angle at the place of substitution opens slightly as the molecule is frozen in the crystal. The small geometrical change, about 0.6 degrees , is shown to be real and to originate from intermolecular C identical withN...HC interactions in the solid state. PMID:18834088

  17. Fractal hard drives for quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, James R.

    2016-02-01

    A quantum hard drive, capable of storing qubits for unlimited timescales, would be very useful for quantum computation. Unfortunately, the most ideal solutions currently known can only be built in a universe of four spatial dimensions. In a recent publication (Brell 2016 New J. Phys. 18 013050), Brell introduces a new family of models based on these ideal solutions. These use fractal lattices, and result in models whose Hausdorff dimension is less than 3. This opens a new avenue of research towards a quantum hard drive that can be build in our own 3D universe.

  18. Vibrational effects in a weakly-interacting quantum solvent: The CO molecule in 4He gas and in 4He droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesani, F.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2002-06-01

    The coupling between the intermolecular motion and the internal vibrational coordinate in the He-CO system is computed at the post-Hartree-Fock level using the DFT+DISP model already employed by us for similar systems and reviewed here in the main text. The quality of the computation of such weak effects is compared with other, earlier model calculations and then used for the evaluation of the vibrational relaxation cross sections of the CO molecule diluted in 4He gas. A further assessment of the vibrational coupling is carried out by computing, with a stochastic approach that employs the Diffusion Monte Carlo method, the effects on the vibrational frequency of the CO impurity from its immersion in 4He droplets of variable size. Both sets of results are analyzed and discussed to gauge the reliability of the computed coupling vis-a-vis one of those suggested by earlier calculations. This study provides further evidence on the difficulty of quantitatively obtaining from calculations the extremely small effects connected with molecular vibrational features in this system and caused by the weak interaction between the title molecule and a quantum solvent like 4He.

  19. Steric and electronic interactions between source gas and substrate surface during the Al-CVD/Al selective epitaxy process as investigated by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, R.; Yamauchi, R.; Yamano, H.; Kubo, M.; Miyamoto, A.; Ohta, T.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed quantum chemical calculations by semiempirical MNDO and by density functional theory (DFT) to rationalize the selection of an Al source gas for the selective Al-CVD/Al process. The electronic properties of Al(CH 3) nH 3-n, ( n = 0 to 3) and their adsorption complexes over representative aluminum metal clusters were calculated. Initially, the interaction of Al source gases with a representative Al metal was studied by both MNDO and DFT methods and the results were found to be qualitatively comparable. Further detailed calculations were performed by MNDO to understand the interaction of Al(CH 3) nH 3-n with larger cluster models of Al substrate as well as insulator silica surface. The results of the calculations indicate that the interaction energy between the substrate and the source are controlled by both steric and electronic factors. The steric factor favors the interaction of unsubstituted hydride, namely aluminum trihydride and the electronic factor favors the interaction of maximum substituted aluminum organic, namely trimethyl aluminum with the substrates. However, dimethyl aluminum hydride has the most favorable interaction energy with the Al metal, since it has the right combination of steric and electronic factors. The interaction energy of DMAH with chlorided silica surface is more favorable than the untreated silica surface.

  20. Semi-insulating InP:Fe for buried-heterostructure strain-compensated quantum-cascade lasers grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Aleksandrova, A.; Elagin, M.; Monastyrskyi, G.; Kischkat, J.-F.; Flores, Y. V.; Masselink, W. T.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the realization of buried-heterostructure strain-compensated quantum-cascade lasers that incorporate a very high degree of internal strain and are grown on InP substrates using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy (GSMBE). The active region of the lasers contains AlAs layers up to 1.6 nm thick with 3.7% tensile strain; restricting any post-growth processing to temperatures below 600 °C to avoid relaxation. We demonstrate that buried-heterostructure devices can be realized by using GSMBE to over-grow the etched laser ridge with insulating InP:Fe at temperatures low enough to preserve the crystal quality of the strain-compensated active region. Two distinct growth techniques are described, both leading to successful device realization: selective regrowth at 550 °C and non-selective regrowth at 470 °C. The resulting buried-heterostructure lasers are compared to a reference laser from the same wafer, but with SiO2 insulation; all three have very similar threshold current densities, operational thermal stability, and waveguide losses.

  1. Landau levels and spin splitting in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well near the critical width for the topological phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, M.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Stier, A. V.; McCombe, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report a detailed low-temperature study of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in a 6.1-nm-wide HgTe quantum well with H g0.3C d0.7Te barriers by terahertz magnetophotoconductivity and magnetotransmission combined with magnetotransport measurements (Rx x and Rx y) in magnetic fields up to 10 T. This well width, close to that at the topological phase transition, corresponds to conventional band ordering, and we probe the "bulk" quasi-2D Landau-level (LL) spectrum of the conduction band at high energies (≈135 -160 meV ) above the Dirac point. The calculated separations between adjacent LLs of the same spin based on published parameters for this structure are in fair agreement with the measured cyclotron resonance energies. However, the very large spin splittings observed (Espin>Ecyclotron) require a significantly larger g -parameter ge for electrons. Tilted field coincidence experiments are consistent with the large spin splitting showing coincidences at 3/2 and twice the cyclotron energy. This large value of ge also leads to interesting crossings of the calculated LLs, and we find direct evidence of these crossings in the Rx x measurements at lower electron densities (Fermi energies) produced by negative gate bias.

  2. Photoluminescence of charged CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in the gas phase: effects of charge and heating on absorption and emission probabilities.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Bell, David M; Furakawa, Kevin H; Johnson, Ryan C; Fang, Zhiyuan; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-12-23

    Gas phase spectral measurements for CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) before and after heating with both infrared (CO2) and visible lasers are reported. As-trapped QDs are spectrally similar to the same QDs in solution; however their photoluminescence (PL) intensities are very low, at least partly due to low absorption cross sections. After heating, the PL intensities brighten by factors ranging from ∼4 to 1800 depending on the QD size and pump laser wavelength. The emission spectra no longer resemble solution spectra and are similar, regardless of the QD diameter. Emission extends from the pump laser wavelength into the near-IR, with strong emission features above the band gap energy, between 645 and 775 nm, and in the near-infrared. Emission spectra from brightened QD ensembles, single QD aggregates, and single QD monomers are similar, showing that even single QDs support PL from a wide variety of states. The heating and cooling processes for QDs in this environment are analyzed, providing limits on the magnitudes of the absorption cross sections before and after thermal brightening. A model, based on absorption bleaching by extra electrons in the conduction band, appears to account for the changes in absorption and emission behavior induced by charging and heating. PMID:25427008

  3. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin; Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra; Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-01

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  4. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-30

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  5. Quantum Kinematics of Bosonic Vortex Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, G.A.; Owczarek, R.; Sharp, D.H.

    1999-05-06

    Poisson structure for vortex filaments (loops and arcs) in 2D ideal incompressible fluid is analyzed in detail. Canonical coordinates and momenta on coadjoint orbits of the area-preserving diffeomorphism group, associated with such vortices, are found. The quantum space of states in the simplest case of ''bosonic'' vortex loops is built within a geometric quantization approach to the description of a quantum fluid. Fock-like structure and non-local creation and annihilation operators of quantum vortex filaments are introduced.

  6. ABJM theory as a Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Marcos; Putrov, Pavel

    2012-03-01

    The partition function on the 3-sphere of many supersymmetric Chern-Simons-matter theories reduces, by localization, to a matrix model. We develop a new method to study these models in the M-theory limit, but at all orders in the 1/N expansion. The method is based on reformulating the matrix model as the partition function of an ideal Fermi gas with a non-trivial, one-particle quantum Hamiltonian. This new approach leads to a completely elementary derivation of the N3/2 behavior for ABJM theory and {N}=3 quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories. In addition, the full series of 1/N corrections to the original matrix integral can be simply determined by a next-to-leading calculation in the WKB or semiclassical expansion of the quantum gas, and we show that, for several quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories, it is given by an Airy function. This generalizes a recent result of Fuji, Hirano and Moriyama for ABJM theory. It turns out that the semiclassical expansion of the Fermi gas corresponds to a strong coupling expansion in type IIA theory, and it is dual to the genus expansion. This allows us to calculate explicitly non-perturbative effects due to D0- and D2-brane instantons in the AdS background.

  7. Dust Transport in MRI Turbulent Disks: Ideal and Non-Ideal MHD With Ambipolar Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Bai, Xue-Ning

    2015-03-01

    We study dust transport in turbulent protoplanetary disks using three-dimensional global unstratified MHD simulations including Lagrangian dust particles. The turbulence is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) with either ideal or non-ideal MHD that includes ambipolar diffusion (AD). In ideal MHD simulations, the surface density evolution (except for dust that drifts fastest), turbulent diffusion, and vertical scale height of dust can all be reproduced by simple one-dimensoinal and/or analytical models. However, in AD dominated simulations which simulate protoplanetary disks beyond 10s of AU, the vertical scale height of dust is larger than previously predicted. To understand this anomaly in more detail, we carry out both unstratified and stratified local shearing box simulations with Lagrangian particles, and find that turbulence in AD dominated disks has very different properties (e.g., temporal autocorrelation functions and power spectra) than turbulence in ideal MHD disks, which leads to quite different particle diffusion efficiency. For example, MRI turbulence with AD has a longer correlation time for the vertical velocity, which causes significant vertical particle diffusion and large dust scale height. In ideal MHD the Schmidt numbers (Sc) for radial and vertical turbulent diffusion are S{{c}r}∼ 1 and S{{c}z}≳ 3, but in the AD dominated regime both Scr and Scz are ≲ 1. Particle concentration in pressure bumps induced by MRI turbulence has also been studied. Since non-ideal MHD effects dominate most regions in protoplanetary disks, our study suggests that modeling dust transport in turbulence driven by MRI with non-ideal MHD effects is important for understanding dust transport in realistic protoplanetary disks.

  8. Transforming quantum operations: Quantum supermaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2008-08-01

    We introduce the concept of quantum supermap, describing the most general transformation that maps an input quantum operation into an output quantum operation. Since quantum operations include as special cases quantum states, effects, and measurements, quantum supermaps describe all possible transformations between elementary quantum objects (quantum systems as well as quantum devices). After giving the axiomatic definition of supermap, we prove a realization theorem, which shows that any supermap can be physically implemented as a simple quantum circuit. Applications to quantum programming, cloning, discrimination, estimation, information-disturbance trade-off, and tomography of channels are outlined.

  9. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the rotation axis.

  10. Dimensional analysis using toric ideals: primitive invariants.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Mark A; Bates, Ronald A; Wynn, Henry P

    2014-01-01

    Classical dimensional analysis in its original form starts by expressing the units for derived quantities, such as force, in terms of power products of basic units [Formula: see text] etc. This suggests the use of toric ideal theory from algebraic geometry. Within this the Graver basis provides a unique primitive basis in a well-defined sense, which typically has more terms than the standard Buckingham approach. Some textbook examples are revisited and the full set of primitive invariants found. First, a worked example based on convection is introduced to recall the Buckingham method, but using computer algebra to obtain an integer [Formula: see text] matrix from the initial integer [Formula: see text] matrix holding the exponents for the derived quantities. The [Formula: see text] matrix defines the dimensionless variables. But, rather than this integer linear algebra approach it is shown how, by staying with the power product representation, the full set of invariants (dimensionless groups) is obtained directly from the toric ideal defined by [Formula: see text]. One candidate for the set of invariants is a simple basis of the toric ideal. This, although larger than the rank of [Formula: see text], is typically not unique. However, the alternative Graver basis is unique and defines a maximal set of invariants, which are primitive in a simple sense. In addition to the running example four examples are taken from: a windmill, convection, electrodynamics and the hydrogen atom. The method reveals some named invariants. A selection of computer algebra packages is used to show the considerable ease with which both a simple basis and a Graver basis can be found. PMID:25436774

  11. Time-resolved gas-phase kinetic and quantum chemical studies of the reaction of silylene with oxygen.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Rosa; Bowes, Sarah-Jane; Ogden, J Steven; Cannady, J Pat; Adamovic, Ivana; Gordon, Mark S; Almond, Matthew J; Walsh, Robin

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved kinetic studies of the reaction of silylene, SiH2, generated by laser flash photolysis of phenylsilane, have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reaction with O(2). The reaction was studied in the gas phase over the pressure range 1-100 Torr in SF(6) bath gas, at five temperatures in the range 297-600 K. The second order rate constants at 10 Torr were fitted to the Arrhenius equation: [see text] The decrease in rate constant values with increasing temperature, although systematic is very small. The rate constants showed slight increases in value with pressure at each temperature, but this was scarcely beyond experimental uncertainty. From estimates of Lennard-Jones collision rates, this reaction is occurring at ca. 1 in 20 collisions, almost independent of pressure and temperature. Ab initio calculations at the G3 level backed further by multi-configurational (MC) SCF calculations, augmented by second order perturbation theory (MRMP2), support a mechanism in which the initial adduct, H(2)SiOO, formed in the triplet state (T), undergoes intersystem crossing to the more stable singlet state (S) prior to further low energy isomerisation processes leading, via a sequence of steps, ultimately to dissociation products of which the lowest energy pair are H2O+SiO. The decomposition of the intermediate cyclo-siladioxirane, via O-O bond fission, plays an important role in the overall process. The bottleneck for the overall process appears to be the T-->S process in H2SiOO. This process has a small spin-orbit coupling matrix element, consistent with an estimate of its rate constant of 1x10(9) s-1 obtained with the aid of RRKM theory. This interpretation preserves the idea that, as in its reactions in general, SiH2 initially reacts at the encounter rate with O2. The low values for the secondary reaction barriers on the potential energy surface account for the lack of an observed pressure dependence. Some comparisons are drawn with the reactions of CH2+O2 and SiCl2+O2. PMID:16189609

  12. Idealized simulations of aerosol influences on tornadogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerach, David G.; Gaudet, Brian J.; Cotton, William R.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of an idealized supercell thunderstorm were performed to assess effects of increased aerosol concentrations acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and giant CCN (GCCN) on tornadogenesis. Initial background profiles of CCN and GCCN concentrations were set to represent ``clean'' continental and aerosol-polluted environments, respectively. With a reduction in warm- and cold-rain processes, the polluted environment produced a longer-lived supercell with a well-defined rear flank downdraft (RFD) and relatively weak forward flank downdraft (FFD) that produced weak evaporative cooling, a weak cold pool, and an EF-1 tornado. The clean environment produced no tornado and was less favorable for tornadogenesis.

  13. "The Scientific Method" as Myth and Ideal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Brian A.

    2014-10-01

    "The Scientific Method" as it has been portrayed in popular and introductory contexts has been declared a myth. The variation that one finds in introductory presentations of "The Scientific Method" is explained by the fact that there is no canonical account among historians and philosophers of science. What, in particular, is wrong with "The Scientific Method"? This essay provides a fairly comprehensive survey of shortcomings of "The Scientific Method". Included are corrections to several misconceptions that often accompany such presentations. Rather than treating "The Scientific Method" as a useful approximation or an ideal, the myth should be discarded. Lessons can be learned for introductory pedagogical contexts from considering the shortcomings of the myth.

  14. Ideal functional outcomes for amputation levels.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert H; Melton, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    This article provides a generalized overview of amputation classifications and the idealized outcomes for upper and lower amputations at their respective levels. The following levels are discussed: above knee/transfemoral, below knee/transtibial, above elbow/transhumeral, below elbow/transradial, and bilateral for upper and lower extremities. This classification defines a framework for clinicians to share with patients so that they understand the potential for their expected functional outcomes regarding mobility and activities of daily living, both with and without a prosthesis. Moreover, it addresses some of the vocational and avocational needs of the individual regarding amputation. PMID:24287248

  15. Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is examined from a Hamiltonian perspective. The Hamiltonian point of view provides a unifying framework; by understanding the Hamiltonian perspective, one knows in advance (within bounds) what answers to expect and what kinds of procedures can be performed. The material is organized into five lectures, on the following topics: rudiments of few-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems illustrated by passive advection in two-dimensional fluids; functional differentiation, two action principles of mechanics, and the action principle and canonical Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid; noncanonical Hamiltonian dynamics with examples; tutorial on Lie groups and algebras, reduction-realization, and Clebsch variables; and stability and Hamiltonian systems.

  16. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  17. Relativistic quantum private database queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Si-Jia; Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Ou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Jakobi et al. (Phys Rev A 83, 022301, 2011) suggested the first practical private database query protocol (J-protocol) based on the Scarani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 92, 057901, 2004) quantum key distribution protocol. Unfortunately, the J-protocol is just a cheat-sensitive private database query protocol. In this paper, we present an idealized relativistic quantum private database query protocol based on Minkowski causality and the properties of quantum information. Also, we prove that the protocol is secure in terms of the user security and the database security.

  18. Optimal forager against ideal free distributed prey.

    PubMed

    Garay, József; Cressman, Ross; Xu, Fei; Varga, Zoltan; Cabello, Tomás

    2015-07-01

    The introduced dispersal-foraging game is a combination of prey habitat selection between two patch types and optimal-foraging approaches. Prey's patch preference and forager behavior determine the prey's survival rate. The forager's energy gain depends on local prey density in both types of exhaustible patches and on leaving time. We introduce two game-solution concepts. The static solution combines the ideal free distribution of the prey with optimal-foraging theory. The dynamical solution is given by a game dynamics describing the behavioral changes of prey and forager. We show (1) that each stable equilibrium dynamical solution is always a static solution, but not conversely; (2) that at an equilibrium dynamical solution, the forager can stabilize prey mixed patch use strategy in cases where ideal free distribution theory predicts that prey will use only one patch type; and (3) that when the equilibrium dynamical solution is unstable at fixed prey density, stable behavior cycles occur where neither forager nor prey keep a fixed behavior. PMID:26098343

  19. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, such as those found in the space environment or in plasma confinement devices, are often modeled as electrically conducting fluids. When fluids and plasmas are energetically stirred, regions of highly nonlinear, chaotic behavior known as turbulence arise. Understanding the fundamental nature of turbulence is a long-standing theoretical challenge. The present work describes a statistical theory concerning a certain class of nonlinear, finite dimensional, dynamical models of turbulence. These models arise when the partial differential equations describing incompressible, ideal (i.e., nondissipative) homogeneous fluid and magnetofluid (i.e., plasma) turbulence are Fourier transformed into a very large set of ordinary differential equations. These equations define a divergenceless flow in a high-dimensional phase space, which allows for the existence of a Liouville theorem, guaranteeing a distribution function based on constants of the motion (integral invariants). The novelty of these particular dynamical systems is that there are integral invariants other than the energy, and that some of these invariants behave like pseudoscalars under two of the discrete symmetry transformations of physics, parity, and charge conjugation. In this work the 'rugged invariants' of ideal homogeneous turbulence are shown to be the only significant scalar and pseudoscalar invariants. The discovery that pseudoscalar invariants cause symmetries of the original equations to be dynamically broken and induce a nonergodic structure on the associated phase space is the primary result presented here. Applicability of this result to dissipative turbulence is also discussed.

  20. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M

    2008-09-03

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  1. Nonlinear electrophoresis of ideally polarizable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliuzzi, Bruno; Chan, Wai Hong Ronald; Buie, Cullen R.

    2013-11-01

    We focus in this presentation on the nonlinear electrophoresis of ideally polarizable particles. At high applied voltages, significant ionic exchanges occur between the EDL which surrounders the particle and the bulk solution. In this situation, the velocity field, the electric potential and the ionic concentration at the immediate vicinity of the particle are described by a complicated set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. These equations are classically considered in the limit of a weak applied field, which enables further analytical progress (Khair and Squires, Phys. Fluids, 2010). However, in the general case, the equation governing the electrophoretic motion of the particle must be solved numerically. In this study, we rely on a numerical approach to determine the electric potential, ionic concentration and velocity field in the bulk solution surrounding the particle. The numerical simulations use a pseudo-spectral which was used successfully by Chu and Bazant to determine the electric potential and the ionic concentration around an ideally polarizable metallic sphere (Physical Review E, 2006). Our numerical model also incorporates the steric model developed by Kilic et al. in 2007 to account for crowding effects in the electric double layer.

  2. Global invariants in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, John V.

    2013-10-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an important though incompletely understood factor affecting the dynamics of many astrophysical, geophysical, and technological plasmas. As an approximation, viscosity and resistivity may be ignored, and ideal MHD turbulence may be investigated by statistical methods. Incompressibility is also assumed and finite Fourier series are used to represent the turbulent velocity and magnetic field. The resulting model dynamical system consists of a set of independent Fourier coefficients that form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function (PDF). This PDF is similar in form to that of Boltzmann, except that its argument may contain not just the energy multiplied by an inverse temperature, but also two other invariant integrals, the cross helicity and magnetic helicity, each multiplied by its own inverse temperature. However, the cross and magnetic helicities, as usually defined, are not invariant in the presence of overall rotation or a mean magnetic field, respectively. Although the generalized form of the magnetic helicity is known, a generalized cross helicity may also be found, by adding terms that are linear in the mean magnetic field and angular rotation vectors, respectively. These general forms are invariant even in the presence of overall rotation and a mean magnetic field. We derive these general forms, explore their properties, examine how they extend the statistical theory of ideal MHD turbulence, and discuss how our results may be affected by dissipation and forcing.

  3. Conservative regularization of ideal hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagaraja, A.

    2010-03-15

    Inviscid, incompressible hydrodynamics and incompressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) share many properties such as time-reversal invariance of equations, conservation laws, and certain topological features. In three dimensions, these systems may lead to singular solutions (involving vortex and current sheets). While dissipative (viscoresistive) effects can regularize the equations leading to bounded solutions to the initial-boundary value (Cauchy) problem which presumably exist uniquely, the time-reversal symmetry and associated conservation properties are certainly destroyed. The present work is analogous to (and suggested by) the Korteweg-de Vries regularization of the one-dimensional, nonlinear kinematic wave equation. Thus the regularizations applied to the original equations of hydrodynamics and ideal MHD retain conservation properties and the symmetries of the original equations. Integral invariants which generalize those known for the original systems are shown to imply bounded enstrophy. The regularization developed can also be applied to the corresponding dissipative models (such as the Navier-Stokes equations and the viscoresistive MHD equations) and may imply interesting regularity properties for the solutions of the latter as well. The models developed thus have intrinsic mathematical interest as well as possible applications to large-scale numerical simulations in systems where dissipative effects are extremely small or even absent.

  4. Modeling of non-ideal aluminized explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1999-06-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the combustion of Al in a condensed detonation that depends on the pressure and the detonation product gases. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities for HMX/Al composites to within a few percent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives.

  5. What constitutes an ideal dental restorative material?

    PubMed

    Rekow, E D; Bayne, S C; Carvalho, R M; Steele, J G

    2013-11-01

    Intense environmental concerns recently have prompted dentistry to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of existing restoration materials. Doing so entices us to explore the 'what if?' innovation in materials science to create more ideal restorative materials. Articulating a specification for our design and evaluation methods is proving to be more complicated than originally anticipated. Challenges exist not only in specifying how the material should be manipulated and perform clinically but also in understanding and incorporating implications of the skill of the operator placing the restoration, economic considerations, expectations patients have for their investment, cost-effectiveness, influences of the health care system on how and for whom restorations are to be placed, and global challenges that limit the types of materials available in different areas of the world. The quandary is to find ways to actively engage multiple stakeholders to agree on priorities and future actions to focus future directions on the creation of more ideal restorative materials that can be available throughout the world. PMID:24129813

  6. An ideal sealed source life-cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, Joseph Andrew

    2009-01-01

    In the last 40 years, barriers to compliant and timely disposition of radioactive sealed sources have become apparent. The story starts with the explosive growth of nuclear gauging technologies in the 1960s. Dozens of companies in the US manufactured sources and many more created nuclear solutions to industrial gauging problems. Today they do not yet know how many Cat 1, 2, or 3 sources there are in the US. There are, at minimum, tens of thousands of sources, perhaps hundreds of thousands of sources. Affordable transportation solutions to consolidate all of these sources and disposition pathways for these sources do not exist. The root problem seems to be a lack of necessary regulatory framework that has allowed all of these problems to accumulate with no national plan for solving the problem. In the 1960s, Pu-238 displaced Pu-239 for most neutron and alpha source applications. In the 1970s, the availability of inexpensive Am-241 resulted in a proliferation of low energy gamma sources used in nuclear gauging, well logging, pacemakers, and X-ray fluorescence applications for example. In the 1980s, rapid expansion of worldwide petroleum exploration resulted in the expansion of Am-241 sources into international locations. Improvements of technology and regulation resulted in a change in isotopic distribution as Am-241 made Pu-239 and Pu-238 obsolete. Many early nuclear gauge technologies have been made obsolete as they were replaced by non-nuclear technoogies. With uncertainties in source end of life disposition and increased requirements for sealed source security, nuclear gauging technology is the last choice for modern process engineering gauging solutions. Over the same period, much was learned about licensing LLW disposition facilities as evident by the closure of early disposition facilities like Maxey Flats. The current difficulties in sealed source disposition start with adoption of the NLLW policy act of 1985, which created the state LLW compact system they we have today. This regulation created a new regulatory framework seen as promising at the time. However, now they recognize that, despite the good intentions, the NIJWP/85 has not solved any source disposition problems. The answer to these sealed source disposition problems is to adopt a philosophy to correct these regulatory issues, determine an interim solution, execute that solution until there is a minimal backlog of sources to deal with, and then let the mechanisms they have created solve this problem into the foreseeable future. The primary philosophical tenet of the ideal sealed source life cycle follows. You do not allow the creation (or importation) of any source whose use cannot be justified, which cannot be affordably shipped, or that does not have a well-delinated and affordable disposition pathway. The path forward dictates that we fix the problem by embracing the Ideal Source Life cycle. In figure 1, we can see some of the elements of the ideal source life cycle. The life cycle is broken down into four portions, manufacture, use, consolidation, and disposition. These four arbitrary elements allow them to focus on the ideal life cycle phases that every source should go through between manufacture and final disposition. As we examine the various phases of the sealed source life cycle, they pick specific examples and explore the adoption of the ideal life cycle model.

  7. Quantum grid infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhinson, L.P.; Chen, C.J.; Tsui, D.C.; Vawter, G.A.; Choi, K.K.

    1999-02-01

    In this letter we introduce a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) structure, which we refer to as the quantum grid infrared photodetector (QGIP). In an ideal structure, a grid pattern with very narrow linewidth is created in the QWIP active region to achieve lateral electron confinement, thereby improving its absorption as well as transport characteristics. In order to realize this detector structure, we have fabricated QGIPs with line patterns of lithographical linewidths w{sub l} ranging from 0.1 to 4 {mu}m, allowing for possible sidewall depletion. Low-damage reactive ion beam etching was employed to produce vertical sidewalls. From the experimental data, although the best detector performance occurs at w{sub l}{approx}1.5 {mu}m, the detector starts to improve when w{sub l}{lt}0.5 {mu}m, indicating a possible quantum confinement effect. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Performance of quantum annealing in solving optimization problems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.

    2015-02-01

    Quantum annealing is one of the optimization method for generic optimization problems. It uses quantum mechanics and is implemented by a quantum computer ideally. At the earlier stage, several numerical experiments using conventional computers have provided results showing that quantum annealing produces an answer faster than simulated annealing, a classical counterpart of quantum annealing. Later, theoretical and numerical studies have shown that there are drawbacks in quantum annealing. The power of quantum annealing is still an open problem. What makes quantum annealing a hot topic now is that a quantum computer based on quantum annealing is manufactured and commercialized by a Canadian company named D-Wave Systems. In the present article, we review the study of quantum annealing, focusing mainly on its power.

  9. Time-Resolved Gas-Phase Kinetic, Quantum Chemical, and RRKM Studies of the Reaction of Silylene with 2,5-Dihydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Rosa; Cannady, J Pat; Pfrang, Christian; Walsh, Robin

    2015-11-19

    Time-resolved kinetics studies of silylene, SiH2, generated by laser flash photolysis of phenylsilane, were performed to obtain rate coefficients for its bimolecular reaction with 2,5-dihydrofuran (2,5-DHF). The reaction was studied in the gas phase over the pressure range of 1-100 Torr in SF6 bath gas, at five temperatures in the range of 296-598 K. The reaction showed pressure dependences characteristic of a third body assisted association. The second-order rate coefficients obtained by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM)-assisted extrapolation to the high-pressure limit at each temperature fitted the following Arrhenius equation where the error limits are single standard deviations: log(k/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) = (-9.96 ± 0.08) + (3.38 ± 0.62 kJ mol(-1))/RT ln 10. End-product analysis revealed no GC-identifiable product. Quantum chemical (ab initio) calculations indicate that reaction of SiH2 with 2,5-DHF can occur at both the double bond (to form a silirane) and the O atom (to form a donor-acceptor, zwitterionic complex) via barrierless processes. Further possible reaction steps were explored, of which the only viable one appears to be decomposition of the O-complex to give 1,3-butadiene + silanone, although isomerization of the silirane cannot be completely ruled out. The potential energy surface for SiH2 + 2,5-DHF is consistent with that of SiH2 with Me2O, and with that of SiH2 with cis-but-2-ene, the simplest reference reactions. RRKM calculations incorporating reaction at both π- and O atom sites, can be made to fit the experimental rate coefficient pressure dependence curves at 296-476 K, giving values for k(∞)(π) and k(∞)(O) that indicate the latter is larger in magnitude at all temperatures, in contrast to values from individual model reactions. This unexpected result suggests that, in 2,5-DHF with its two different reaction sites, the O atom exerts the more pronounced electrophilic attraction on the approaching silylene. Arrhenius parameters for the individual pathways were obtained. The lack of a fit at 598 K is consistent with decomposition of the O-complex to give 1,3-butadiene + silanone. PMID:26487151

  10. Quantum Chemical Benchmark Studies of the Electronic Properties of the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore. 1. Electronically Excited and Ionized States of the Anionic Chromophore in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Polyakov, Igor; Grigorenko, Bella; Nemukhin, Alexander; Krylov, Anna I

    2009-07-14

    We present the results of quantum chemical calculations of the electronic properties of the anionic form of the green fluorescent protein chromophore in the gas phase. The vertical detachment energy of the chromophore is found to be 2.4-2.5 eV, which is below the strongly absorbing ππ* state at 2.6 eV. The vertical excitation of the lowest triplet state is around 1.9 eV, which is below the photodetachment continuum. Thus, the lowest bright singlet state is a resonance state embedded in the photodetachment continuum, whereas the lowest triplet state is a regular bound state. Based on our estimation of the vertical detachment energy, we attribute a minor feature in the action spectrum as due to the photodetachment transition. The benchmark results for the bright ππ* state demonstrated that the scaled opposite-spin method yields vertical excitation within 0.1 eV (20 nm) from the experimental maximum at 2.59 eV (479 nm). We also report estimations of the vertical excitation energy obtained with the equation-of-motion coupled cluster with the singles and doubles method, a multireference perturbation theory corrected approach MRMP2 as well as the time-dependent density functional theory with range-separated functionals. Expanding the basis set with diffuse functions lowers the ππ* vertical excitation energy by 0.1 eV at the same time revealing a continuum of "ionized" states, which embeds the bright ππ* transition. PMID:26610014

  11. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  12. Thermal stability of idealized folded carbyne loops

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-unfolding items provide a practical convenience, wherein ring-like frames are contorted into a state of equilibrium and subsequently  pop up’ or deploy when perturbed from a folded structure. Can the same process be exploited at the molecular scale? At the limiting scale is a closed chain of single atoms, used here to investigate the limits of stability of such folded ring structures via full atomistic molecular dynamics. Carbyne is a one-dimensional carbon allotrope composed of sp-hybridized carbon atoms. Here, we explore the stability of idealized carbyne loops as a function of chain length, curvature, and temperature, and delineate an effective phase diagram between folded and unfolded states. We find that while overall curvature is reduced, in addition to torsional and self-adhesive energy barriers, a local increase in curvature results in the largest impedance to unfolding. PMID:24252156

  13. Symmetry transforms for ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg I

    2002-11-01

    A method for constructing ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria is introduced. The method consists of the application of symmetry transforms to any known MHD equilibrium [ O. I. Bogoyavlenskij, Phys. Rev. E. 62, 8616, (2000)]. The transforms break the geometrical symmetries of the field-aligned solutions and produce continuous families of the nonsymmetric MHD equilibria. The method of symmetry transforms also allows to obtain MHD equilibria with current sheets and exact solutions with noncollinear vector fields B and V. A model of the nonsymmetric astrophysical jets outside of their accretion disks is developed. The total magnetic and kinetic energy of the jet is finite in any layer c(1)

  14. The theoretically ideal donor site dressing.

    PubMed

    Birdsell, D C; Hein, K S; Lindsay, R L

    1979-06-01

    Many of the choices for managing split-thickness skin graft donor sites are satisfactory, but none is ideal. Epidermal regeneration in a donor site is readily available for clinical study. We have reviewed experimental studies of epidermal regeneration and applied those results to the clinical study of a new donor site dressing. This dressing is a vapor-permeable, transparent, polyurethane film with a polyvinyl ether adhesive. Used on 100 patients, it was found to be safe and effective in allowing rapid and painless healing. Although the dressing is occlusive and theoretically could promote infection in a contaminated wound, no infections were encountered. Comparison was made with 15 patients managed by other methods. No marked difference in healing time was noted clinically. The striking advantage of the new dressing was painless healing. PMID:396845

  15. Idealized Studies With A Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, S.; Danilov, S.; Kivman, G.; Schröter, J.

    The Finite Element Method provides advantages when applied to oceanographic tasks. The discretization of the model domain is characterized by its large flexibility in mesh refinement and representation of shore lines and bathimetry. Furthermore, boundary conditions can be directly implemented. FENA (Finite Element Model for the North Atlantic) is a 3D-model developed at AWI for investigations of the large scale circulation in the North Atlantic. It is based on primitive equations and uses a tetrahedral discretization. Experiments under idealized conditions have been carried out with FENA, approving the model's reliability. In a rectangular basin the general wind driven circulation of FENA shows results which approximate the analytical solutions. Additional simulations of the propagation of Rossby waves, as well as the influence of topography in a stratified ocean were performed and will be presented.

  16. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<

  17. Thermal stability of idealized folded carbyne loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranford, Steven W.

    2013-11-01

    Self-unfolding items provide a practical convenience, wherein ring-like frames are contorted into a state of equilibrium and subsequently pop up' or deploy when perturbed from a folded structure. Can the same process be exploited at the molecular scale? At the limiting scale is a closed chain of single atoms, used here to investigate the limits of stability of such folded ring structures via full atomistic molecular dynamics. Carbyne is a one-dimensional carbon allotrope composed of sp-hybridized carbon atoms. Here, we explore the stability of idealized carbyne loops as a function of chain length, curvature, and temperature, and delineate an effective phase diagram between folded and unfolded states. We find that while overall curvature is reduced, in addition to torsional and self-adhesive energy barriers, a local increase in curvature results in the largest impedance to unfolding.

  18. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  19. [What criteria for an ideal antipsychotic treatment?].

    PubMed

    Bordet, R

    2015-02-01

    Antipsychotics are, by definition, drugs to treat all symptomatic dimensions of schizophrenia, even if, following the discovery of chlorpromazine, the effect assessment has been focused on the ability to reduce positive symptoms. Nevertheless, expectations of treatment are no longer limited to only support this one dimension, but integrate the need to treat negative, cognitive and affective symptoms, through long-term modulation of dopamine transmission but also non-dopaminergic pathways. Beyond symptomatic treatment, it is also necessary to have a treatment modifying the evolution course of the disease (disease modifier), acting by a long-term effect on neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities. The limitation of long-term effect remains the issue of therapeutic observance. Moreover, this concern for efficiency should be at the cost of reduced induction of adverse effects to maximize the benefit/risk ratio. All these dimensions should the components to profile an ideal antipsychotic treatment in 2015. PMID:25638050

  20. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.