Sample records for identification field test

  1. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification. PMID:6438051

  2. Evaluation of anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests for talent identification in female field hockey.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Weber, Clare L; Dalton, Carl T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an effective testing battery for female field hockey by using anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests to distinguish between regional representative (Rep, n = 35) and local club level (Club, n = 39) female field hockey players. Rep players were significantly leaner and recorded faster times for the 10-m and 40-m sprints as well as the Illinois Agility Run (with and without dribbling a hockey ball). Rep players also had greater aerobic and lower body muscular power and were more accurate in the shooting accuracy test, p < 0.05. No significant differences between groups were evident for height, body mass, speed decrement in 6 x 40-m repeated sprints, handgrip strength, or pushing speed. These results indicate that %BF, sprinting speed, agility, dribbling control, aerobic and muscular power, and shooting accuracy can distinguish between female field hockey players of varying standards. Therefore talent identification programs for female field hockey should include assessments of these physical parameters. PMID:12955867

  3. Field study on moving force identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hung-tin Tommy; Yung, Tak H.; Law, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    A field measurement to validate a moving force identification method was carried out on an existing prestressed concrete highway bridge with a span length of 28 m. The test bridge is located at Ma Tau Wai, Kowloon, Hong Kong. A heavy 2-axle truck with known axle loads was used as a control vehicle. Besides the control vehicle, axle load data of in-service vehicles were also collected. The bridge responses acquired for the identification were indirectly measured using strain gauges. Results show that dynamic axle loads induced from both control and in-service vehicles can be identified indicating the method is valid for identification of moving forces.

  4. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  5. FIELD DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's OHMSETT facility has developed a rapid field test that includes some of the theoretical aspects and conditions of dispersion at sea. This Field Dispersant Effectiveness Test (FDET) has been used to evaluate the dispersibility of various commonly-transported oils and mak...

  6. Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

  7. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1979-01-01

    Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

  8. Introduction Field Testing

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shengli

    variants of direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) Commonly used in UWA modems Favored for simplicity Sequence Spread Spectrum over Underwater Acoustic Channels with Multiuser Interference Sean Mason1Introduction Field Testing Simulation A Comparative Study of Differential and Noncoherent Direct

  9. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAMELA K. WALKER; PHILIP J. RODACY

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns

  10. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  11. Anisotropic parameter identification using inhomogeneous tensile test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Khalfallah; H. Bel Hadj Salah; A. Dogui

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, an inverse identification strategy of constitutive laws for elastoplastic behaviour is presented. The proposed inverse algorithm is composed on an appropriate finite element calculation combined with an optimisation procedure. It is applied to identify material anisotropic coefficients using a set up of easy performed laboratory tests. The used experimental data are the plane tensile test and the

  12. Japanese refrigerators field testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1989-01-01

    Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual

  13. Japanese Refrigerators Field Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert T

    1989-01-01

    Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual

  14. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 ?m & 285 ?m) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 ?m & 199 ?m) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  15. Identification of Blimp Dynamics via Flight Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Goto, Norihiro

    A blimp is introduced as a stable platform for remote-sensing instruments required for unmanned aerial observation and surveillance. In order to develop flight control systems for a blimp, two series of experiments were conducted to identify flight dynamics: constrained flight tests, and indoor free-flight tests. This paper addresses the blimp configuration, experimental set-up, method for identifying dynamics, and the results of identification in comparison with the analytical estimation for each experimental method. Both tests employed a full-scale blimp. The identification method for the constrained flight tests used the extended least-squares method involving the gradient algorithm, and the indoor free-flight tests, the eigen-system realization algorithm involving the autoregressive model fitting algorithm. The results suggest that analytical formulas for estimating the parameters, including added mass effects and stability derivatives, may yield values consistent with experimentally identified ones.

  16. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01falseIdentification of test procedures.136.3 Section 136...CONTINUED) GUIDELINES ESTABLISHING TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS§ 136.3Identification of test procedures. (a) Parameters...

  17. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01falseIdentification of test procedures.136.3 Section 136...CONTINUED) GUIDELINES ESTABLISHING TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS§ 136.3Identification of test procedures. (a) Parameters...

  18. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01falseIdentification of test procedures.136.3 Section 136...CONTINUED) GUIDELINES ESTABLISHING TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS§ 136.3Identification of test procedures. (a) Parameters...

  19. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01false Identification of test procedures.136.3Section 136...CONTINUED) GUIDELINES ESTABLISHING TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS§ 136.3Identification of test procedures. (a) Parameters...

  20. Mixed numerical–experimental technique for orthotropic parameter identification using biaxial tensile tests on cruciform specimens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Lecompte; Arwen Smits; Hugo Sol; John Vantomme; Danny Van Hemelrijck

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mixed numerical–experimental method for the identification of the four in-plane orthotropic engineering constants of composite plate materials. A biaxial tensile test is performed on a cruciform test specimen. The heterogeneous displacement field is observed by a CCD camera and measured by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The measured displacement field and the subsequently computed strain

  1. Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System Based on Short-Term Electrostatic Field Variations at the Active Volcano Popocatepetl, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocatepetl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially- designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocatepetl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocatepetl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release and mass flux and (3) immediate risk assessment of ongoing volcanic eruptions using permanent sensors located on volcanoes with pyroclastic eruptions.

  2. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1980-01-01

    After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

  3. Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

  4. Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

  5. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Electromagnetic test-facility characterization: An identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicker, J. E.; Candy, J. V.

    1982-12-01

    The response of an object subjected to high energy, transient electromagnetic (EM) fields sometimes called electromagnetic pulses (EMP), is an important issue in the survivability of electronic systems (e.g., aircraft), especially when the field is generated by a high altitude nuclear burst. The characterization of transient response information is a matter of national concern. Techniques to: (1) improve signal processing at a test facility; and (2) parameterize a particular object response are discussed. The application of identification based signal processing techniques to improve signal levels is considered. Models of test equipment are identified and used to deconvolve the input/output sequences for the object under test. A parametric model of the object is identified from this data. The model can be used to extrapolate the response to these threat level EMP. Also discussed is the development of a facility simulator (EMSIM) useful for experimental design and calibration and a deconvolution algorithm (DECONV) useful for removing probe effects from the measured data.

  7. Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2 optical for the bi-axial characterization of in vitro human arteries10 and we prove its feasibility on an example in arterial segments. From the full-field experimental data12 obtained in inflation/extension tests

  8. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  9. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  10. A direct identification method for current dipoles from electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatani, Katsu; Ohe, Takashi; Ohnaka, Kohzaburo

    2007-04-01

    We discuss the identification problem for current dipoles in a spherically symmetric conductor. This mathematical model is used for a biomedical inverse problem such as the source current identification for the human brain activity. We have already proposed a direct identification method for this inverse source problem using observations of the magnetic fields outside of the conductor. One of the difficulties of current dipole identification using the magnetic fields is caused by the fact that magnetic field does not include any information about the radial component of dipole moments. In this paper, we consider an improvement of the direct method to identify both radial and tangential components of current dipole moments by combining electric and magnetic observation data. Furthermore, our approach is effective in the case where the number of dipoles is unknown.

  11. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  12. The “Sniffin' Kids” Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years. PMID:24979650

  13. The "Sniffin' Kids" test--a 14-item odor identification test for children.

    PubMed

    Schriever, Valentin A; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified "Sniffin' Sticks" odor identification test, the "Sniffin' Kids" test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the "Sniffin' Sticks" 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item "Sniffin' Kids" odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the "Sniffin' Kids" test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification "Sniffin' Kids" test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6-17 years. PMID:24979650

  14. A comprehensive concept and system for measurement and testing Near Field Communication devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Langer; C. Saminger; S. Grunberger

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes new methods and concepts for testing near field communication (NFC) devices and radio frequency identification (RFID) tags and readers. NFC is a new emerging technology and has still many open issues in standards and test methods. We developed an NFC test system to find concepts solving the open issues of the standards. The test cases of the

  15. Identification of temperature field in thermoacoustic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselý, Martin; Dan?ová, Petra; Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

    2014-03-01

    Presented paper includes description of design and assemblage of an experimental device for measuring temperature field into thermoacoustic generator using holographic interferometry method. This paper introduces the process of measurement on this apparatus and processing and analysis results too.

  16. Contribution of Kinematical and Thermal Full-field Measurements for Identification of High Cycle Fatigue Properties of Steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Munier; C. Doudard; S. Calloch; B. Weber

    \\u000a Using kinematical and thermal full-field measurements for identification of mechanical parameters has become a very promising\\u000a area of experimental mechanics. The purpose of this work is to extend the use of non-conventional tests and full field measurements\\u000a (kinematical and thermal) to the identification of the fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel. A particular attention is\\u000a paid to the influence of

  17. Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.

    PubMed

    Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

    2014-11-01

    A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions. PMID:25151655

  18. Testing two-field inflation

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Courtney M.

    We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and ...

  19. Techniques for implementing structural model identification using test data

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Martinez, D.R.

    1990-06-01

    Structural system identification methods are analytical techniques for reconciling test data with analytical models. However, for system identification to become a practical tool for engineering analysis, the estimation techniques/codes must communicate with finite element software packages without intensive analyst intervention and supervision. This paper presents a technique used to integrate commercial software packages for finite element modeling (MSC/NASTRAN), mathematical programming techniques (ADS), and linear system analysis (PRO-MATLAB). The parameter estimation techniques and the software for controlling the overall system were programmed in PRO-MATLAB. Two examples of application of this software using measured data are presented. The examples consist of a truss structure in which the model form is well defined, and an electronics package whose model form is ill-defined since it is difficult to model with finite elements. A comparison of the resulting updated models with the experimental data showed significant improvement. 22 refs.

  20. SNAP: an integral field spectrograph for supernova identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Ealet; Eric Prieto; Alain Bonissent; Roger Malina; G. Bernstein; Stephane Basa; Oliver Le Fèvre; Alain Mazure; Christophe Bonneville; Carl W. Akerlof; Greg Aldering; R. Amanullah; Pierre Astier; E. Barrelet; Christopher Bebek; Lars Bergstrom; John Bercovitz; Manfred Bester; C. R. Bower; William C. Carithers Jr.; Eugene D. Commins; C. Day; Susana E. Deustua; Richard S. DiGennaro; R. Ellis; Mikael Eriksson; Andrew Fruchter; Jean-Francois Genat; Gerson Goldhaber; Ariel Goobar; Donald E. Groom; Stewart E. Harris; Peter R. Harvey; Henry D. Heetderks; Steven E. Holland; Dragan Huterer; Armin Karcher; Alex G. Kim; William F. Kolbe; B. Krieger; R. Lafever; J. Lamoureux; Michael L. Lampton; Michael E. Levi; Daniel S. Levin; Eric V. Linder; Stewart C. Loken; R. Massey; Timothy McKay; Shawn P. McKee; Ramon Miquel; E. Moertsell; N. Mostek; Stuart Mufson; J. A. Musser; Peter E. Nugent; Hakeem M. Oluseyi; Reynald Pain; Nicholas P. Palaio; David H. Pankow; Saul Perlmutter; R. Pratt; Alexandre Refregier; J. Rhodes; Kem E. Robinson; N. Roe; Michael Sholl; Michael S. Schubnell; G. Smadja; George F. Smoot; Anthony Spadafora; Gregory Tarle; Andrew D. Tomasch; H. von der Lippe; D. Vincent; J.-P. Walder; Guobin Wang

    2003-01-01

    A well-adapted spectrograph concept has been developed for the SNAP (SuperNova\\/Acceleration Probe) experiment. The goal is to ensure proper identification of Type Ia supernovae and to standardize the magnitude of each candidate by determining explosion parameters. An instrument based on an integral field method with the powerful concept of imager slicing has been designed and is presented in this paper.

  1. Field Test for Titratable Acidity in Milk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. O. Jaynes; M. G. Pearsall; H. C. Holt

    1981-01-01

    A field test was developed to enable milk haulers to assess titratable acidity at pickup. The test involved adding a volume of milk to a set volume of standard base in calibrated screwcapped test tubes. Judgment was based on final color after adding phenolphthalein. No color change indicated titratable acidity above a chosen cutoff point, and the typical pink color

  2. FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS II. - THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1) B. U. HOFSTRA D. MINKEMA Research Institute for Animal Husbandry « Schoonoovd », Dviebevgseweg IOd, Zeist, the Nethevlands SUMMARY The accuracy of the field test, for the individual selection of gilts and for the progeny tes

  3. Germination test for identification of gamma-irradiated rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Suzuki, Naomi; Uchiyama, Sadao; Saito, Yukio

    Husked rice ( Oryza sativa L.) was used for the identification test of irradiation, since it grows faster than unhusked rice after 1 month of storage, and germination success is not affected by storage time and temperature. The critical dose that inhibited root elongation varied from 0.15 to 0.5kGy according to the rice cultivar. All cultivars tested exhibited similar reductions in root elongation after ?-irradiation of 0.5kGy or more. Most of the rice samples which were irradiated above 0.5kGy exhibited root growth of less than 10 mm after 3 days of incubation. The reduction was not affected so much by the presence of a husk at the time of irradiation. Storage periods of up to 12 months had little effect. This test can thus discriminate between irradiated and non-irradiated rice for 12 months or more after ?-irradiation.

  4. Molecular identification of Tuber magnatum ectomycorrhizae in the field.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Luana; Rossi, Ismaela; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Amicucci, Antonella; Sacchi, Achille; Cecchini, Matteo; Gregori, Gianluigi; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2006-01-01

    Tuber ectomycorrhizae in a Tuber magnatum "truffière", located in Central Italy, were studied using molecular methods. Specifically, RFLP-ITS analyses, ITS sequencing and specific probes hybridization were used to identify 335 Tuber-like ectomycorrhizal morphotypes. Molecular identification was possible even when distinct morphological characteristics were lacking. For the first time, T. magnatum ectomycorrhizae and other coexisting Tuber species collected in the field were analysed using molecular tools for unambiguous identification. Although the "truffière" under investigation yields good harvests of T. magnatum fruiting bodies, the percentage of T. magnatum ectomycorrhizae found was very low (less than 4.4% of the 335 root tips analysed), whereas the percentages of Tuber maculatum and Tuber rufum were considerably higher (48.9% and 19.0%, respectively). PMID:16338592

  5. AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS

    E-print Network

    AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS APPENDICES Kenneth Koyama Office Manager, acting Energy Systems Research Office Martha Krebs, Ph.D. Deputy Director.................................................................................... 5 B.2. DR Automation Server User Guide

  6. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  7. Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France

    SciTech Connect

    Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

    1981-04-01

    A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

  8. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A. [and others

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  9. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  10. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification : comparison between experimental and

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification : comparison between- plane biaxial tensile tests on sheet specimens. For this biaxial test, a dedicated cruciform specimen-axial states of stress, then limiting the mechanical behavior identification of materials to uniaxial tensile

  11. Identification of Medically Relevant Nocardia Species with an Abbreviated Battery of Tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deanna L. Kiska; Karen Hicks; David J. Pettit

    2002-01-01

    Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several

  12. Identification of sources of potential fields with the continuous wavelet transform

    E-print Network

    Sailhac, Pascal

    Identification of sources of potential fields with the continuous wavelet transform: Two fields with the continuous wavelet transform: Two-dimensional wavelets and multipolar approximations, J wavelet-based transformation techniques of potential field maps and propose interpretation schemes

  13. Thermal Target Projector For Mrtd Testing And Vehicle Identification Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Joseph R.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes a unique Thermal Target Projector (TTP) that has been developed for use with infrared imagers operating in the 8-12 and 3-5 micrometer regions. The application of the TTP includes measurement of the minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) of thermal night sights in laboratory or remote field environments and thermal combat vehicle identification training when used with a library of target scenes. The TTP produces highly realistic target embedded scenes containing single or multiple target arrays when viewed by thermal night sights. The thermal scenes and MRTD patterns are hosted on an IR filmstrip under microprocessor control that permits image frame and temperature intensity selection using a remote pendant. Sample imagery obtained using the TTP and representative IR filmstrips will be presented and discussed as part of the presentation.

  14. On-line test for fault-secure fault identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Norman Hamilton; Alex Orailoglu

    2000-01-01

    In an increasing number of applications, reliability is essential. On-line resistance to permanent faults is a difficult and important aspect of providing reliability. Particularly vexing is the problem of fault identification. Current methods are either domain specific or expensive. We have developed a fault-secure methodology for permanent fault identification through algorithmic duplication without necessitating complete functional unit replication. Fault identification

  15. Field Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Field Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) offers broadly applicable, self-contained modular classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and discipline-specific tools for science, technology, engineering, and math performance. Each has been developed, tested, and refined in real college and university classrooms. The FLAG also contains an assessment primer and a section to help teachers select the most appropriate assessment technique(s) for their course goals, and other resources.

  16. Field Tests of 3Component geophones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don C. Lawton; Malcolm B. Bertram

    Field tests of Litton, Geosource and Oyo 3-component geophones showed similar performance characteristics for all three geophones for a test signal generated by a seismic cap at a horizontal distance of 7.5 m from the geophones. Output signal levels from the Litton and Geosource geophones were similar, with the Oyo output being about 20% lower. No cross-coupling between the elements

  17. EVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK Reproduction, 3738n Nouzilly, France Résumé VALEUR DE TROIS TESTS RAPIDES D'IDENTIFICATION DE STAPHYLOCOCCUS rapide des souches bovines de Staphylococcus aureus isolées du lait, nous avons cherché à établir la

  18. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

  19. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

  20. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

  1. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

  2. APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

  3. RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

  4. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  5. Field trip to Nevada test site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1976-01-01

    Two road logs guide the reader through the geologic scene from Las Vegas to Mercury and from Mercury through eight stops on the Nevada Test Site. Maps and cross sections depict the geology and hydrology of the area. Included among the tables is one showing the stratigraphic units in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and another that lists the geologic maps covering the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. The relation of the geologic environment to nuclear-explosion effects is alluded to in brief discussions of collapse, surface subsidence, and cratering resulting from underground nuclear explosions.

  6. Development of toxicant identification procedures for whole sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Besser, J.M. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States); Ankley, G.T.; Norberg-King, T.J.; West, C.W. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    To effectively assess and manage contaminated sediments, identifying the specific contaminants responsible for sediment toxicity is highly desirable. Though effective toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods are well established for water column toxicity, new TIE methodologies are needed that address the special characteristics of whole sediment toxicity tests. Much of the effort to date has focused on the assessment of ammonia toxicity. Whereas pH manipulation is a key tool used to characterize ammonia toxicity in water column TIE, control of pH in interstitial water is much more challenging. Direct addition of hard acid has shown undesirable side effects (e.g., liberation and oxidation of iron), while CO{sub 2}-enrichment is limited in penetration of fine-grained sediments. Biological buffers (MES and POPSO) incorporated into the sediment are effective at altering interstitial pH without causing direct toxicity to Chironomus tentans, Lumbriculus variegatus, and to a lesser extent Hyalella azteca, but the range of pH control achieved has been small ({+-} 0.5 units). Introduction of aquatic plants reduces ammonia concentrations in the water column, but may not provide sufficient control of interstitial water. To date, the most promising results have been achieved using zeolite; adding zeolite to sediment produces moderate reductions in interstitial ammonia concentrations and is non-toxic to the organisms referenced above. Attempts to induce microbial removal of ammonia have been unsuccessful thus far. This presentation will review these and other sediment TIE methods currently under development in laboratories.

  7. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly voice station identification on aural AM, FM and TV transmitters. (3) The transmitter output power or antenna input power may...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly voice station identification on aural AM, FM and TV transmitters. (3) The transmitter output power or antenna input power may...

  9. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly voice station identification on aural AM, FM and TV transmitters. (3) The transmitter output power or antenna input power may...

  10. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly voice station identification on aural AM, FM and TV transmitters. (3) The transmitter output power or antenna input power may...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly voice station identification on aural AM, FM and TV transmitters. (3) The transmitter output power or antenna input power may...

  12. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed...

  13. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed...

  14. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed...

  15. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed...

  16. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed...

  17. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  18. Statistical estimation and testing for variation root-cause identification of multistage manufacturing Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiyu Zhou; Yong Chen; Jianjun Shi

    2004-01-01

    Root-cause identification for quality-related problems is a key issue in quality and productivity improvement for a manufacturing process. Unfortunately, root-cause identification is also a very challenging engineering problem, particularly for a multistage manufacturing process. In this paper, root-cause identification is formulated as a problem of estimation and hypothesis testing of a general linear mixed model. First, a linear mixed fault-quality

  19. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  20. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  1. Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D sonic anemometer

    E-print Network

    Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D Conclusions: So far, spinner anemometry seem to work according to the idea. Wind tunnel and free field tests

  2. Interactive ultrasonic field simulation for nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jason; Rougeron, Gilles; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lacassagne, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an ultrasonic field simulation software, dedicated to Non Destructive Testing, aiming at interactivity. This work relies on Civa Software semi-analytical model. By restricting its scope to homogeneous isotropic specimens with simple geometry and half-skip modes, an almost completely regular algorithm, well suited to modern hardware, can be derived. The performance of three implementations on multicore SIMD general purpose processors (GPP), manycore accelerators (MIC) and graphical processing units (GPU) over a set of 18 realistic configurations (a standard one plus 17 variations) are presented and analysed. For GPP and the GPU, interactive performances with almost 30 fps have been reached on the standard configuration. This is, to our knowledge, the very first time for a NDT ultrasonic field simulation software.

  3. Field tests of a small instrumented pile

    E-print Network

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01

    vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

  4. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  5. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform using Frequency Responses Analysis

    E-print Network

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency swept is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency swept is guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that we can set the safety parameter during the flight test (maximum roll or pitch value, minimum altitude, etc) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot for automated flight test will be tested using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  6. Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

  7. An efficient method for identification of motion error sources from circular test results in NC machines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong-Wook Hong; Young-Jae Shin; Hu-Sang Lee

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient method for the identification of motion error sources involved in NC machines by the circular test, which is often used in estimating the motion accuracy of NC machines. The motion error signal from the circular test is classified into two fundamental patterns: a nondirectional error pattern (the mean of the clockwise and counterclockwise test signals);

  8. Identification of Anisotropic Yield Criterion Parameters from a Single Biaxial Tensile Test

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Identification of Anisotropic Yield Criterion Parameters from a Single Biaxial Tensile Test ZHANG biaxial tensile test. It is shown, from finite element simulations, that the strain distribution biaxial tensile test. Introduction Sheet metals usually exhibit a plastic anisotropy due to previous

  9. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

  10. Testing Tactics to Localize De-Identification Cyril GROUIN a

    E-print Network

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    -identification challenge was organized in 2007 by the i2b2 center [6] and received contributions by seven teams. Most, France; E-mail: pz@limsi.fr. 2 For instance, the i2b2 challenge on obesity status detection, http://www.i2b2.org/NLP/. 3 US Office for Civil Rights, http://www

  11. The Canada-UK Deep Submillimetre Survey - VIII. Source identifications in the 3-hour field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dave Clements; Steve Eales; Kris Wojciechowski; Tracy Webb; Simon Lilly; Loretta Dunne; Rob Ivison; Henry McCracken; Min Yun; Ashley James; Mark Brodwin; Olivier Le Fèvre; Walter Gear

    2004-01-01

    We present optical, near-infrared (IR) and radio observations of the 3-hour field of the Canada-UK Deep Submillimetre Survey (CUDSS). Of the 27 submillimetre sources in the field, nine have secure identifications with either a radio source or a near-IR source. We show that the percentage of sources with secure identifications in the CUDSS is consistent with that found for the

  12. Long Range Science Rover (Rocky 7) Mojave Desert Field Tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samad Hayati

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes current rover field testing activities of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and p resents results obtained to-date. These field tests were c ollaborative ac tivities between JPL engineers and a team of scientists from several universities and NASA centers. The broad objective of these field tests is to simulate, as closely as possible, realistic mission scenarios for

  13. Identification of hazelnut fields using spectral and Gabor textural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Selçuk; Ta?demir, Kadim

    2011-09-01

    Land cover identification and monitoring agricultural resources using remote sensing imagery are of great significance for agricultural management and subsidies. Particularly, permanent crops are important in terms of economy (mainly rural development) and environmental protection. Permanent crops (including nut orchards) are extracted with very high resolution remote sensing imagery using visual interpretation or automated systems based on mainly textural features which reflect the regular plantation pattern of their orchards, since the spectral values of the nut orchards are usually close to the spectral values of other woody vegetation due to various reasons such as spectral mixing, slope, and shade. However, when the nut orchards are planted irregularly and densely at fields with high slope, textural delineation of these orchards from other woody vegetation becomes less relevant, posing a challenge for accurate automatic detection of these orchards. This study aims to overcome this challenge using a classification system based on multi-scale textural features together with spectral values. For this purpose, Black Sea region of Turkey, the region with the biggest hazelnut production in the world and the region which suffers most from this issue, is selected and two Quickbird archive images (June 2005 and September 2008) of the region are acquired. To differentiate hazel orchards from other woodlands, in addition to the pansharpened multispectral (4-band) bands of 2005 and 2008 imagery, multi-scale Gabor features are calculated from the panchromatic band of 2008 imagery at four scales and six orientations. One supervised classification method (maximum likelihood classifier, MLC) and one unsupervised method (self-organizing map, SOM) are used for classification based on spectral values, Gabor features and their combination. Both MLC and SOM achieve the highest performance (overall classification accuracies of 95% and 92%, and Kappa values of 0.93 and 0.88, respectively) when multi temporal spectral values and Gabor features are merged. High F? values (a combined measure of producer and user accuracy) for detection of hazel orchards (0.97 for MLC and 0.94 for SOM) indicate the high quality of the classification results. When the classification is based on multi spectral values of 2008 imagery and Gabor features, similar F? values (0.95 for MLC and 0.93 for SOM) are obtained, favoring the use of one imagery for cost/benefit efficiency. One main outcome is that despite its unsupervised nature, SOM achieves a classification performance very close to the performance of MLC, for detection of hazel orchards.

  14. Drop-weight test based identification of elastic half-space model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, P.; Szyd?o, A.

    2005-04-01

    A method enabling the conversion of dynamic drop-weight test results into a statical substitute is presented. Owing to this substitution, statical models, instead of complex dynamical models, can be used for subsoil elastic moduli identification. An elastic half-space was adopted as the subsoil model. Identification was limited to the determination of the subsoil's modulus of elasticity. The results were verified in two ways. One way consisted in the simulation of experimental results on the basis of theoretical results. The latter were obtained by analytically solving the problem of half-space vibrations caused by an impact pulse. The elastic moduli identified on the basis of the simulated results were compared with the assumed elastic moduli. In the other verification method, the results obtained by the proposed identification method were compared with the result yielded by the standard statical identification method. The load and displacement values used were from tests carried out on actual soils.

  15. Identification of the four orthotropic plate stiffnesses using a single open-hole tensile test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Molimard; R. Le Riche; A. Vautrin; J. R. Lee

    2005-01-01

    The identification of mechanical parameters for real structures is still a challenge. With the improvement of optical full-field\\u000a measurement techniques, it has become easier, but in spite of many publications showing the feasibility of such methods, experimental\\u000a results are still scarce. In this paper we present a first step towards a global approach of mechanical identification for\\u000a composite materials. The

  16. [Multiplex amplification test system for the identification and differentiation of Bacillus anthracis].

    PubMed

    Tsygankova, O I; Eremenko, E I; Riazanova, A G; Tsygankova, E A

    2005-01-01

    The multiplex amplification test system for the identification of Bacillus anthracis with primers to plasmid cya (pX01), capC (pX02) genes and chromosomal sap gene were developed. The primers to sap gene were selected by the authors and, after being tested on 72 microbial strains of the genus Bacillus, proposed as more specific in comparison with the known primers to chromosomal locus Ba 813. The proposed test system permitted the simultaneous identification of B. anthracis of all plasmid variants, the evaluation of their potential virulence and the differentiation of B. anthracis nonplasmid strains from bacilli of the group Bacillus cereus. PMID:16028518

  17. Drop-weight test based identification of elastic half-space model parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ruta; A. Szydlo

    2005-01-01

    A method enabling the conversion of dynamic drop-weight test results into a statical substitute is presented. Owing to this substitution, statical models, instead of complex dynamical models, can be used for subsoil elastic moduli identification. An elastic half-space was adopted as the subsoil model. Identification was limited to the determination of the subsoil's modulus of elasticity.The results were verified in

  18. A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.

    PubMed

    Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

    2013-11-01

    The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol. PMID:24237835

  19. Identification of Flutter Derivatives of Bridge Dec ks in Wind Tunnel Test by Stochastic Subspace Identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Janesupasaeree; V. Boonyapinyo

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Flutter derivatives are the essential parameters i n the estimations of the flutter critical wind velocity and the response s of long-span cable supported bridges. These derivatives can be experimentally estimated from wi nd tunnel test results. Generally, wind tunnel test methods can be divided into free decay test and buf feting test. Compared with the free decay

  20. HYDROMECHANICAL COUPLED FIELD SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION - APPLICATION TO WATER RESERVOIRS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lahmer

    It is well known that the precision of the output of any model simulation strongly depends on the caliber of the model parameters. The detection of the model parameters requires generally an adaption of the mathematical model output to certain experimental data. This pro- cedure is referred to as parameter or system identification. Due to the fact that the input

  1. Modulation Spectral Features for Robust Far-Field Speaker Identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiago H. Falk; Wai-Yip Chan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, auditory inspired modulation spectral features are used to improve automatic speaker identification (ASI) performance in the presence of room reverberation. The modulation spectral signal representation is obtained by first filtering the speech signal with a 23-channel gammatone filterbank. An eight-channel modulation filterbank is then applied to the temporal envelope of each gammatone filter output. Features are extracted

  2. Methods Studies on System Identification from Transient Rotor Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.; Yin, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the more important methods are discussed that have been used or proposed for aircraft parameter identification. The methods are classified into two groups: Equation error or regression estimates and Bayesian estimates and their derivatives that are based on probabilistic concepts. In both of these two groups the cost function can be optimized either globally over the entire time span of the transient, or sequentially, leading to the formulation of optimum filters. Identifiability problems and the validation of the estimates are briefly outlined, and applications to lifting rotors are discussed.

  3. Field tests assess novel air-injection EOR processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Fassihi; T. H. Gillham; D. V. Yannimaras; D. Hassan

    1996-01-01

    Two ongoing field tests are assessing novel air-injection processes, in situ combustion, for enhancing oil recovery from light and heavy oil fields. Amoco Producing Co. operates the light oil test in the West Hackberry field in Cameron Parish, La. This test combines air injection with the double-displacement process. The other test is Amoco Canada Petroleum Co.`s air-injection project that involves

  4. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  5. Exploiting test technology in the field test environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lyon; T. Coles; D. MacLennan

    2004-01-01

    The growing expeditionary nature of defense force operations is increasing the utilization and deployment of sophisticated electronic equipment into geographically remote areas. In these situations, the equipment's operational availability becomes increasingly dependent on the efficacy of front line test capability. Yet the operational scenario restricts the amount of test resources that can be made available. The built-in test (BIT) solution

  6. Modeling and identification investigation of multi-field hysteretic dynamics in flexure-guided piezo platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yanbin; Tang, Liang; Xu, Yufei; Bai, Yu-guang; Liao, He

    2015-01-01

    The completely modeling and comprehensive identification approaches of the multi-field hysteretic dynamics in the flexure-guided piezo stage are proposed in this paper. First, the system description and the experimental setup are proposed. Next, the hysteretic dynamics is completely modeled in which the static Preisach hysteresis, creep, electrical and vibration dynamics are derived from the material, electrical and mechanical fields, respectively. Then, according to the model characteristics, a comprehensive identification approach is presented. A novel technique is provided to identify the electrical and vibration dynamics. Special inputs and sampling are proposed to identify the Preisach hysteresis. Finally, the experimental study is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and identification approaches. The modeling and identification approaches in this paper will be beneficial to further developments and high-performance control of the flexure-guided piezo systems.

  7. Genetic Analyses of Juvenile Steelhead, Coastal Cutthroat Trout, and Their Hybrids Differ Substantially from Field Identifications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Baumsteiger; David Hankin; Eric J. Loudenslager

    2005-01-01

    Because of their similar appearance and frequent hybridization, juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii are difficult to distinguish visually. Nevertheless, field biologists often use visual methods to classify juvenile individuals. This study investigated hybridization between these species and determined the accuracy of field identification where hybridization occurred. Using a five-point classification system, two evaluators identified

  8. A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow

    E-print Network

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow Jingbo Wang concentration is modeled as a pair-wise Markov Random Field (MRF) and the distribution is updated using current, the anisotropic dispersion effect is considered. It is verified that the MRF model can effectively model

  9. The resolution of field identification fixed points in diagonal coset theories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jürgen Fuchs; Bert Schellekens; Christoph Schweigert

    1996-01-01

    The fixed point resolution problem is solved for diagonal coset theories. The primary fields into which the fixed points are resolved are described by submodules of the branching spaces, obtained as eigenspaces of the automorphisms that implement field identification. To compute the characters and the modular S-matrix we use ‘orbit Lie algebras’ and ‘twining characters’, which were introduced in a

  10. Aquifer field test for compressed-air energy storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. D. Kannberg; T. J. Doherty; R. D. Allen

    1980-01-01

    Planned field testing of this compressed air energy storage (CAES) concept by injection of air into a sandstone aquifer followed by cyclic incremental air withdrawal and injection at various temperatures is described. The injection\\/withdrawal well will simulate the behavior of a single well within a hypothetical commercial CAES well field. The field test was devised to fulfill three objectives: demonstrate

  11. The geometry of distributional preferences and a non-parametric identification approach: The Equality Equivalence Test?

    PubMed Central

    Kerschbamer, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a geometric delineation of distributional preference types and a non-parametric approach for their identification in a two-person context. It starts with a small set of assumptions on preferences and shows that this set (i) naturally results in a taxonomy of distributional archetypes that nests all empirically relevant types considered in previous work; and (ii) gives rise to a clean experimental identification procedure – the Equality Equivalence Test – that discriminates between archetypes according to core features of preferences rather than properties of specific modeling variants. As a by-product the test yields a two-dimensional index of preference intensity.

  12. Comparison of the MK test and EMD method for trend identification in hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Zhonggen; Liu, Changming

    2014-03-01

    Trend identification is an important issue in hydrological time series analysis, but it is also a difficult task due to the diverse performances of methods. This paper mainly investigated the performances between the Mann-Kendall (MK) test and the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method for trend identification of series. Analyses of both synthetic and observed series indicate the better performance of EMD compared with the other. The results show that pre-whitening cannot really improve trend identification when using the MK test, but cause wrong results sometimes. It can be due to the good correlation of trend, so pre-whitening would weaken trend's magnitude. If the trend of the analyzed series has small magnitude, it cannot be accurately identified by the MK test, because the trend would be submerged too severely by other components of series to accurately identify trend. When the analyzed series has short length, its trend cannot be accurately identified by the MK test. However, the EMD method can eliminate the influences of trends' magnitude and series' length, so it has more effective power for trend identification. As a result, it is suggested that series' trend can be directly identified by the MK test but need not do pre-whitening; moreover, the influences of trends' magnitude should be carefully considered for trend identification. Comparatively, the EMD method can adaptively determine the specific shape of the nonlinear and non-stationary trend of series by considering statistical significance, so it can be an effective alternative for trend identification of hydrological time series.

  13. Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2001-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

  14. I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays 

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Lan

    1997-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAS) represent an exciting technology that is changing the way logic circuits are designed. It is not until recently that testing of FPGA chips has received considerable attention. Research in testing of FPGAs has...

  15. Genotoxicity of nanomaterials: refining strategies and tests for hazard identification.

    PubMed

    Pfuhler, Stefan; Elespuru, Rosalie; Aardema, Marilyn J; Doak, Shareen H; Maria Donner, E; Honma, Masamitsu; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Landsiedel, Robert; Manjanatha, Mugimane; Singer, Tim; Kim, James H

    2013-05-01

    A workshop addressing strategies for the genotoxicity assessment of nanomaterials (NMs) was held on October 23, 2010 in Fort Worth Texas, USA. The workshop was organized by the Environmental Mutagen Society and the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. The workshop was attended by more than 80 participants from academia, regulatory agencies, and industry from North America, Europe and Japan. A plenary session featured summaries of the current status and issues related to the testing of NMs for genotoxic properties, as well as an update on international activities and regulatory approaches. This was followed by breakout sessions and a plenary session devoted to independent discussions of in vitro assays, in vivo assays, and the need for new assays or new approaches to develop a testing strategy for NMs. Each of the standard assays was critiqued as a resource for evaluation of NMs, and it became apparent that none was appropriate without special considerations or modifications. The need for nanospecific positive controls was questioned, as was the utility of bacterial assays. The latter was thought to increase the importance of including mammalian cell gene mutation assays into the test battery. For in-vivo testing, to inform the selection of appropriate tests or protocols, it was suggested to run repeated dose studies first to learn about disposition, potential accumulation, and possible tissue damage. It was acknowledged that mechanisms may be at play that a standard genotoxicity battery may not be able to capture. PMID:23519787

  16. Lumped parameter identification of a quarter car test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskin, Y.; Yagiz, N.; Yuksek, I.

    2013-02-01

    Quarter car model is a simple and widely used mathematical model to analyze the vibration and control problem of vehicles. In this study, a quarter car test rig is modeled as a lumped parameter system. Model parameters of the system are determined by measurements and experiments. Forced vibration method is used to identify the stiffness and damping parameters of the lumped model. A modal shaker is used to generate the road input in the test rig. The accelerations of the road input, sprung and unsprung masses are measured by piezoelectric accelerometers. The frequency response functions are obtained by using acceleration data. The identified parameters of the test rig are adjusted by comparing the experimental and simulation results.

  17. Mine field detection and identification using terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiander, Robert; Miragliotta, Joseph A.; Jiang, Zhiping; Xu, Jingzhou; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2003-08-01

    The spatial, temporal, and spectroscopic characteristics associated with pulsed THz (100 GHz - 70 THz) radiation provide this emerging technology with the potential for reliable identification of buried objects such as non-metallic landmines. With a suitable integration of these attributes, one can envision a THz detection platform that provides: (1) accurate identification of buried objects, and (2) a source-to-sample working distance that is sufficient for remote sensing applications. In our preliminary laboratory studies, we have demonstrated the detection capabilities of THz radiation by imaging a small rubber object embedded in a moist, sand-like soil. Despite the significant attenuation of the THz radiation via water absorption and particle scattering, the initial transmission results showed that pulsed THz imaging could identify the non-metallic object when buried in a few inches of soil. The sub-millimeter resolution observed in our THz images illustrates the potential to discriminate landmines from other buried objects. Finally, THz calculations and measurements determined that our current THz source and detector has sufficient SNR to detect a buried object to a depth of 6 inches in moist sand.

  18. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  19. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  20. Accuracy of traffic monitoring equipment field tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Harvey; G. H. Champion; R. Deaver

    1993-01-01

    The tests being performed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute and the Georgia Department of Transportation are described. The object of these tests is to determine the adequacy of vehicle counting devices, the adequacy of equipment to correctly sort vehicles into the 13 FWHA vehicle classes, the adequacy of automatic measurement of overall vehicle length, the effects of vehicle and

  1. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Ikura; M Ohsawa; E Hai; H Jomura; M Ueda

    2003-01-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological

  2. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing reduce antibiotic use and accelerate pathogen-directed antibiotic use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Kerremans; P. Verboom; Th. Stijnen; L. Hakkaart-van Roijen; W. H. F. Goessens; H. A. Verbrugh; A. Voss

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Rapid bacterial identification and susceptibility tests can lead to earlier microbiological diagnosis and pathogen-directed, appropriate therapy. We studied whether accelerated diagnostics affected antibiotic use and patient outcomes. Patients and methods: A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed over a 2-year period. Inpatients were selected on the basis of a positive culture from normally sterile body fluids and randomly assigned

  3. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a ?Toxicity Identification Evaluation? (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  4. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Desmond J. Smith; Edward M. Rubin

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  5. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections. PMID:25350577

  6. HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

  7. Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s). PMID:22789017

  8. Ozone field studies adjacent to a hvdc transmission test line

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Droppo; O. B. Abbey; D. W. Glover

    1979-01-01

    Field studies of atmospheric ozone concentrations adjacent to high voltage direct current (hvdc) transmission test lines were conducted at the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) hvdc Test Facility at The Dalles, Oregon. The transmission lines were operating at voltages from +- 400 to +- 600 kV during the field studies. The downwind ozone plumes were studied using a roving vertical profiling

  9. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Field Testing Volunteer Geographic

    E-print Network

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Field Testing Volunteer Geographic Information Collection University of Minnesota Extension Ahme0004@umn.edu #12;FIELD TESTING VOLUNTEER GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION COLLECTION: THE VIABILITY OF COMMUNITY MAPPING 2 Abstract The ubiquity of Internet service and the GPS chip

  10. Radio Identification of Sub-mm Sources in the Hubble Deep Field

    E-print Network

    Eric. A. Richards

    1998-11-06

    Determination of the epoch dependent star-formation rate of field galaxies is one of the principal goals of modern observational cosmology. Recently, Hughes et al. (1998) using the SCUBA instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, report the detection of a new population of heavily dust enshrouded, star-forming galaxies at high redshifts (z > 2), dramatically altering the picture of galaxy evolution. However, we show that this interpretation must be treated with caution because of ambiguities in the identification of the host galaxies. Based on our deep, high resolution 1.4 GHz obervations of the Hubble Deep Field, we suggest alternate identifications to the sub-mm detections. These identifications argue for a substantially lower redshift to the sub-mm population with a consequential lowering of the z > 2 sub-mm/far infrared luminosity density and global star-formation rate.

  11. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  12. Use of the Coccidioides posadasii Deltachs5 strain for quality control in the ACCUPROBE culture identification test for Coccidioides immitis.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Michael R; Smith, Michael B; Hinson, Elizabeth

    2006-11-01

    Coccidioides posadasii Deltachs5 is a strain that is excluded from the select agent list. Sixteen assays using test reagents from three different ACCUPROBE Coccidioides immitis culture identification test lots had an average of 132,998 relative light units (RLU), which is well beyond the 50,000-RLU positive cutoff value for the test. Coccidioides posadasii Deltachs5 is a satisfactory quality control isolate in the ACCUPROBE culture identification test for Coccidioides immitis. PMID:17088372

  13. Implementation of the hypothesis testing identification in power system state estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Mili, L.; Van Cutsem, T.

    1988-08-01

    This paper deals with the on-line implementation of a general, reliable and efficient bad data analysis procedure for power system state estimation. It is based on the so-called hypothesis testing identification, previously proposed and subsequently improved by the authors. The procedure involves a sequential measurement error estimator along with adequate sparsity programming techniques. Both make the procedure easy to implement on any state estimator. A criterion for multiple non-interacting bad data identification is also proposed, which is applicable to any bad data analysis method. Simulations are reported on systems of up to 700 buses. A thorough comparison with classical methods is also included.

  14. Field sobriety tests: are they designed for failure?

    PubMed

    Cole, S; Nowaczyk, R H

    1994-08-01

    Field sobriety tests have been used by law enforcement officers to identify alcohol-impaired drivers. Yet in 1981 Tharp, Burns, and Moskowitz found that 32% of individuals in a laboratory setting who were judged to have an alcohol level above the legal limit actually were below the level. In this study, two groups of seven law enforcement officers each viewed videotapes of 21 sober individuals performing a variety of field sobriety tests or normal-abilities tests, e.g., reciting one's address and phone number or walking in a normal manner. Officers judged a significantly larger number of the individuals as impaired when they performed the field sobriety tests than when they performed the normal-abilities tests. The need to reevaluate the predictive validity of field sobriety tests is discussed. PMID:7991338

  15. FIELD-TESTING DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article briefly reviews an extensive field study by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Penn Water Authority, which resulted in the development of a series of models to investigate contaminant propagation in a water distribution system. The application of on...

  16. A low-power CMOS integrated circuit for field-powered radio frequency identification tags

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Friedman; H. Heinreich; D.-W. Duan

    1997-01-01

    Cheap, compact radio frequency identification (RFID) tags will make a wide range of new applications cost-effective. Minimum cost can be achieved only in a passive tag (that acquires operating power from the interrogating RF field). A compact tag form factor demands a small tag antenna, that in turn demands either external components or a high-frequency RF carrier for effective tag

  17. The Role of Forensic Odontology in the Field of Human Identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HO WOHN KIM

    1986-01-01

    The profession of forensic odontology can make a significant contribution to the field of forensic science in the identification of people both dead and living. The opinion of this author is that this profession is often neglected. This article is a non-technical review of the basic methods that can be used to gather scientific evidence through the use of forensic

  18. Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-print Network

    M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

    2008-07-26

    It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

  19. Testing Multi-Field Inflation: A Geometric Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Courtney M. Peterson; Max Tegmark

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach for testing inflation models with multiple scalar fields by linking geometric and kinematical features of their inflationary Lagrangians to observable quantities like the power spectra, bispectrum, and trispectrum. Our approach also provides geometric intuition for when a complicated multi-field model can be well-approximated by a model with one, two, or a handful of fields. To arrive

  20. Alpha-mannosidase: a rapid test for identification of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, P; Kontiainen, S

    1994-01-01

    A 4-h alpha-mannosidase test for identification of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum strains (n = 139) and differentiation of A. haemolyticum from Actinomyces pyogenes strains (n = 30) and other gram-positive rods was evaluated. Practically all A. haemolyticum strains (138 of 139) and the Listeria monocytogenes type strain were alpha-mannosidase positive, while all A. pyogenes strains and Corynebacterium (n = .25) strains as well as the Rhodococcus equi and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae type strains were negative. The rapid alpha-mannosidase test, in conjunction with a Gram stain and catalase and reverse CAMP tests, was useful in identification of A. haemolyticum and in differentiation of A. haemolyticum from A. pyogenes and Corynebacterium spp. PMID:7710479

  1. Flight test validation of a frequency-based system identification method on an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Orme, John S.; Hreha, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency-based performance identification approach was evaluated using flight data from the NASA F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control aircraft. The approach used frequency separation to identify the effectiveness of multiple controls simultaneously as an alternative to independent control identification methods. Fourier transformations converted measured control and response data into frequency domain representations. Performance gradients were formed using multiterm frequency matching of control and response frequency domain models. An objective function was generated using these performance gradients. This function was formally optimized to produce a coordinated control trim set. This algorithm was applied to longitudinal acceleration and evaluated using two control effectors: nozzle throat area and inlet first ramp. Three criteria were investigated to validate the approach: simultaneous gradient identification, gradient frequency dependency, and repeatability. This report describes the flight test results. These data demonstrate that the approach can accurately identify performance gradients during simultaneous control excitation independent of excitation frequency.

  2. FIELD PERMEABILITY TESTING FOR A RCRA LANDFILL FINAL COVER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew M. Petsonk; Walter Romanowski; Vince Richards

    A Quality Assurance - Quality Control (QA\\/QC) Program developed for use at the BKK Corporation Landfill in Southern California involves a unique approach for permeability testing of the Landfill final cover. T he program contains five major elements: (i) in-situ, field permeability testing of the compacted cover material as it is being placed, (ii) laboratory permeameter testing of soil cores,

  3. Adaptive cruise control field operational test—the learning phase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Weinberger; Hermann Winner; Heiner Bubb

    2001-01-01

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) provides extended functionality in comparison to conventional cruise control. A radar sensor makes it possible to regulate the distance to preceding vehicles automatically.A field operational test with 15 test persons was performed, in which each participant used a prototype test vehicle over a period of four weeks.Different methods were used for data acquisition. Questionnaires and interviews

  4. Designing an Online In-House Major Field Learning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilda, Agacer; Christofi, Andreas; Moliver, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Our paper provides some critical attributes of an online homegrown assessment test, which we labelled Major Field Learning Test (MFLT). These attributes are also valid for departmental tests, directly connected to coursework which makes up the MFLT. The paper provides helpful recommendations for online assessment of learning as well as retention…

  5. Identifications of FIRST radio sources in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. El Bouchefry; C. M. Cress

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an optical and near infrared identification of 514 radio sources from the FIRST survey (Faint Images of the Radio Sky Survey at Twenty centimetres) with a flux-density limit of 1 mJy in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) Boötes field. Using optical ({B w, R, I}) and {K} band data with approximate

  6. 2011 Field Crop Scout School, Ames, IA Insect identification,

    E-print Network

    Jurenka, Russell A.

    metamorphosis: egg, nymph, adult E.g., grasshoppers, true bugs Complete metamorphosis: egg, larva, pupa, adult E Chewing: grasshoppers, beetles Piercing sucking: mosquito Chewing lapping: honey bee Siphoning, IA How to ID insects: antennae #12;2011 Field Crop Scout School, Ames, IA How to ID insects: legs #12

  7. Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

  8. Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sheppard; R. Weil; A. Desjarlais

    1988-01-01

    The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which

  9. THE EXTENDED COLUMN TEST: A FIELD TEST FOR FRACTURE INITIATION AND PROPAGATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ron Simenhois; Karl Birkeland

    For dry slab avalanches, fractures initiate and propagate in a weak layer or along an interface. Current field tests like compression or stuffblock tests are designed for assessing fracture initiation; however, these tests may not be as useful for assessing fracture propagation. Furthermore, in some cases these tests may identify layers that are most likely to initiate a fracture under

  10. Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

  11. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  12. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kap?on, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance. PMID:24161465

  14. Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

  15. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  16. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

  17. Automatic localization and identification of vertebrae in arbitrary field-of-view CT scans.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Ben; Feulner, J; Criminisi, Antonio; Haynor, D R; Konukoglu, E

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for automatic localization and identification of vertebrae in arbitrary field-of-view CT scans. No assumptions are made about which section of the spine is visible or to which extent. Thus, our approach is more general than previous work while being computationally efficient. Our algorithm is based on regression forests and probabilistic graphical models. The discriminative, regression part aims at roughly detecting the visible part of the spine. Accurate localization and identification of individual vertebrae is achieved through a generative model capturing spinal shape and appearance. The system is evaluated quantitatively on 200 CT scans, the largest dataset reported for this purpose. We obtain an overall median localization error of less than 6mm, with an identification rate of 81%. PMID:23286179

  18. Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

  19. Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In today's educational system, most science and engineering graduate students enter teaching careers with little or no teaching experience, and then are buried with so many competing responsibilities that their teaching skills take many years to improve. At the same time, incoming college students bring years of accumulated learning experiences (and attitudes) to their learning expectations. This Website offers classroom-tested methods for assessing the learning environment in college classrooms -- the first step to better teaching AND learning. Provided by the National Institute for Science Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the FLAG Website is intended for college and university instructors in the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) disciplines. The Guide offers up-to-date assessment tools "for instructors who have an interest in sharing and implementing new approaches to evaluating student learning, attitudes and performance." Four main sections encompass the site's main objectives and resources. For an explanation of why assessment is useful and necessary, see Getting Started. Setting course goals and matching those goals with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT)s are described in the subsequent sections; discipline-specific assessment techniques are contained in Searchable Tools; and the Resources section provides additional materials on assessment. This Website offers excellent and much-needed material, and will be useful to any educators (new or seasoned) who wish to improve their class learning levels.

  20. Field test of stormwater best management practices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.L.; Kaighn, R.J. Jr.; Liao, S.L. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics; [Virginia Transportation Research Council, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Barnes, S.L. [CH2M-Hill, Herndon, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A dry detention pond, hydraulically modified and draining a small and highly impervious area, and a highway median grassed swale in Charlottesville, Virginia were monitored for a fifteen-month period to test their ability in reducing stormwater pollution. Pollutants examined included total suspended solids, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, and total zinc. The results indicate that for the modified dry pond (with a 7.6 cm or 3 in outflow orifice) an average removal rate of about 50% was obtained for total suspended solids; 40% for total phosphorus; and 30% for both chemical oxygen demand and total zinc. Slightly higher removal rates were obtained for the 31 m or 100 ft long swale with a check dam. Modeling analyses of the pond show that the pollutant removal rate is closely related to the total volume and the intensity of the rainfall events. Both the pond and the swale are fairly effective in removing pollutants when the rainfall volume is small and when storm intensity is low and duration is long.

  1. Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes

    E-print Network

    Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

    2015-04-25

    We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'on-Beato-Garc\\'ia regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

  2. Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided.

  3. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  4. Elastoplastic parameter identification by simulation of static and dynamic indentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizzi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a numerical optimisation procedure for the identification of elastoplastic material parameters by means of inverse analysis, through both static and dynamic indentation tests. A finite element method (FEM) modelling of the indentation test is put in place by analysing first macroscopic effects (indentation curve, residual imprint geometry) at variable constitutive parameters (elastic modulus, yield stress, hardening coefficient). The FEM solver is then linked to an optimisation routine by assembling an integrated loop towards the solution of the inverse problem. Later, the FEM solver is replaced by a radial basis function network interpolation of pre-calculated data, combined to a principal component analysis, allowing the reduction of the computational burden of each non-linear analysis. Next, a detailed study on the identification procedure is performed by applying it to pseudo-experimental data that is generated numerically prior to the inverse analysis, which is possibly affected by random noise with given variance. The reliability of the inverse procedure is then demonstrated for both static and dynamic indentation tests as a necessary condition for further validations with true experimental data. The information from only the imprint geometry is shown to be sufficient for consistent material parameter identification.

  5. The development and field testing of a passive mercury dosimeter

    E-print Network

    Zahray, Robert Karl

    1982-01-01

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD TESTING OF A PASSIVE MERCURY DOSIMETER A Thesis by ROBERT KARL ZAHRAY Submitted to t. he Graduate College of Texas AddS University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree o' f MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD TESTING OF A PASSIVE MERCURY DOSIMETER A Thesis by ROBERT KARL ZAHRAY Approved as to style and content by: R. J. mon (Chairman of . Committee) J. Su (Member K. Irgolic...

  6. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  7. ANALYSIS OF RADIOLOGICAL DECONTAMINATION DATA OBTAINED FROM FIELD TESTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1959-01-01

    Reclamation data on ground and buildings contaminated with fall-out from ; Operation PLUMBBOB are used to illustrate a method of treating and analyzing such ; data obtained in field-test experiments. The method utilizes available radiation-; scatterfng computations to estimate the contributfon of radiation sources outside ; reclaimed areas to the radiation field inside the areas. These contributions are ; then

  8. Testing Multi-Field Inflation: A Geometric Approach

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Courtney M

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach for testing inflation models with multiple scalar fields by linking geometric and kinematical features of their inflationary Lagrangians to observable quantities like the power spectra, bispectrum, and trispectrum. Our approach also provides geometric intuition for when a complicated multi-field model can be well-approximated by a model with one, two, or a handful of fields. To arrive at these results, we focus on the mode interactions, simplify them using a novel result, and then explore how these interactions depend on the geometry of the inflationary Lagrangian and on the kinematics of the associated field trajectory. In the process, we introduce a multi-field observable \\beta_2 that can potentially distinguish two-field scenarios from scenarios involving three or more effective fields. We also present a multi-field consistency relation, which involves the primordial bispectrum parameter f_{NL}, trispectrum parameter \\tau_{NL}, and other spectral observables. These combined results p...

  9. Electrophysiological systems for neurotoxicity field testing: PEARL II and alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.; Hudnell, H.K.

    1989-02-10

    PEARL II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. The battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory, and visual), event-related slow brain potentials (CNV, P300), and associated behavioral measures. Field-testing capabilities have been demonstrated in pediatric lead studies. Several dozen PEARL II systems are currently being used in fixed-base laboratories. Factors which limit the use of PEARL II in neurotoxicity field testing include: operation and maintenance of the system requires a highly trained staff; PEARL II is a relatively expensive system; it is not commercially available or serviced; the hardware is obsolescent. Although sensory-evoked potential tests have proven to be very sensitive to chemical exposure in humans and animals, the effectiveness of such tests for neurotoxicity screening of exposed populations has not been demonstrated. Several commercial systems suitable for neurotoxicity field testing are reviewed briefly. Electrophysiological tests of visual toxicity currently under development are also described.

  10. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

  11. Results of field tests of a transportable calorimeter assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakel, D.A.; Lemming, J.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Duff, M.F.; Jarvis, J.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A transportable calorimetric assay system, developed for use by US Department of Energy inspectors, is described. The results of field tests at three DOE sites are presented. The samples measured in these tests represent a variety of forms (ash, oxide, metal buttons), isotopic composition, and total plutonium content.

  12. Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

  13. FIELD TESTING OF VOCS IN SOIL USING SENSIDYNE DETECTOR TUBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Present field testing for VOCs in soil and water involves sending samples to distant laboratories, waiting weeks for results, at a cost of 30 - 50 $ per sample. The goal of this science activity was to develop and test in the laboratory a methodology to detect VOCs in soil and w...

  14. DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

  15. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips 

    E-print Network

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01

    Suucture (Spindt, et al) Fabrication Procedure to Produce Mo Cones Page Vanadium Carbide Fibers Method to Produce Mo Gate Cross-section of Si Pyramids Silicon Field Emitter Array Oxidized Porous Silicon Field Emitting Device Structure of the Porous...FABRICATION AND TESTING OF OXIDIZED POROUS SILICON FIELD EM11TER STRIPS A Thesis by VASANTA BHANU MADDURI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  16. Development of normative data for the Brazilian adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    PubMed

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms. PMID:25547105

  17. Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories

    SciTech Connect

    O`Gorman, T.J.; Ross, J.M.; Taber, A.H.; Ziegler, J.F.; Muhlfeld, H.P.; Montrose, C.J.; Curtis, H.W.; Walsh, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of case studies on four different memory chips show that cosmic rays are an important source of the ionizing radiation that causes soft errors. The results of field testing are used to confirm the accuracy of the modeling and the accelerated testing of chips.

  18. Star-field identification algorithm. [for implementation on CCD-based imaging camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    A description of a new star-field identification algorithm that is suitable for implementation on CCD-based imaging cameras is presented. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates, and their visual magnitudes. The algorithm incorporates tolerance to faulty input data, errors in the reference catalog, and instrument-induced systematic errors.

  19. Diagnostic tools based on minor groove binder probe technology for rapid identification of vaccinal and field strains of canine parvovirus type 2b.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabriella; Desario, Costantina; Campolo, Marco; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Bellacicco, Anna Lucia; Tempesta, Maria; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2006-12-01

    TaqMan-based diagnostic tests have been developed for the identification of canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains in the faeces of dogs with diarrhoea, including a minor groove binder (MGB) probe assay for identification of type 2-based vaccines and field strains (types 2a, 2b and 2c). Since type 2b vaccines have been licensed recently in Europe, two novel MGB assays were developed for discrimination between type 2b vaccines and field strains of CPV. Such assays have been found to be highly sensitive, specific and reproducible, allowing for simultaneous detection of type 2b vaccinal and field strains present in the same specimens. These new assays will help resolution of the diagnostic problems related to the detection of a type 2b strain in the faeces of dogs shortly after the administration of a type 2b vaccine. PMID:16911835

  20. Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

    1993-07-01

    A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

  1. Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 10, October 2001 ( c 2001) IDENTIFICATION, SYNTHESIS, AND FIELD EVALUATION

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 10, October 2001 ( c 2001) IDENTIFICATION, SYNTHESIS aurantiana has been identified by gas chromatography coupled to an electroantennographic detector (GC costly way to prevent crop damage. This prompted us to undertake the identification, synthesis, and field

  2. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification

    PubMed Central

    Ikura, Y; Ohsawa, M; Hai, E; Jomura, H; Ueda, M

    2003-01-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological technology was used to resolve the issue. Liver biopsy was performed on two patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. During sample transfer or tissue processing, the biopsy specimens were mixed up. Because the ABO blood group of the two patients was identical (type AB), the specimens were subsequently identified by analysing the HCV genotypes. RNA extracted from the paraffin wax embedded liver specimens was examined by a polymerase chain reaction based HCV genotype assay. This enabled the correct identification of the specimens, and each patient received the appropriate treatment on the basis of the accurate diagnosis. PMID:14645359

  3. Smell testing: an additional tool for identification of adult Refsum's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gibberd, F; Feher, M; Sidey, M; Wierzbicki, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and degree of olfactory dysfunction in patients with ARD. Method: The olfactory function of 16 patients with ARD was assessed using the quantitative University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Results: All patients had complete anosmia or grossly impaired smell function with a mean UPSIT score of 14.7 (SD 4.7) (normal>34) despite having been treated with an appropriate diet for a median of 15 years (range 1–25). Conclusions: Identification of ARD patients can be facilitated by using the UPSIT in combination with the presence of retinitis pigmentosa, even if they have no neurological or bony features. Phytanic acid screening should be performed in any patient manifesting these two signs. PMID:15314127

  4. On-Orbit System Identification Experiments of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Tokio; Yamaguchi, Isao; Igawa, Hirotaka; Mitani, Shinji; Ohtani, Takashi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Kei

    This paper presents the results of on-orbit system identification of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII (ETS-VIII), which was launched by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 11 in December 2006. On-orbit system identification experiments were performed using data acquired during normal operations in the initial check-out phase, such as station acquisition and wheel unloading. The satellite's unconstrained modes were identified using attitude rates and data from accelerometers located on the main body, solar array paddles and large deployable antenna reflectors at various solar array paddle angles. In addition, the constrained modal parameters of the solar array paddles and large deployable antenna reflectors were estimated for comparison with the analytical model.

  5. Development of a blood-based molecular biomarker test for identification of schizophrenia before disease onset.

    PubMed

    Chan, M K; Krebs, M-O; Cox, D; Guest, P C; Yolken, R H; Rahmoune, H; Rothermundt, M; Steiner, J; Leweke, F M; van Beveren, N J M; Niebuhr, D W; Weber, N S; Cowan, D N; Suarez-Pinilla, P; Crespo-Facorro, B; Mam-Lam-Fook, C; Bourgin, J; Wenstrup, R J; Kaldate, R R; Cooper, J D; Bahn, S

    2015-01-01

    Recent research efforts have progressively shifted towards preventative psychiatry and prognostic identification of individuals before disease onset. We describe the development of a serum biomarker test for the identification of individuals at risk of developing schizophrenia based on multiplex immunoassay profiling analysis of 957 serum samples. First, we conducted a meta-analysis of five independent cohorts of 127 first-onset drug-naive schizophrenia patients and 204 controls. Using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression, we identified an optimal panel of 26 biomarkers that best discriminated patients and controls. Next, we successfully validated this biomarker panel using two independent validation cohorts of 93 patients and 88 controls, which yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (0.95-1.00) for schizophrenia detection. Finally, we tested its predictive performance for identifying patients before onset of psychosis using two cohorts of 445 pre-onset or at-risk individuals. The predictive performance achieved by the panel was excellent for identifying USA military personnel (AUC: 0.90 (0.86-0.95)) and help-seeking prodromal individuals (AUC: 0.82 (0.71-0.93)) who developed schizophrenia up to 2 years after baseline sampling. The performance increased further using the latter cohort following the incorporation of CAARMS (Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State) positive subscale symptom scores into the model (AUC: 0.90 (0.82-0.98)). The current findings may represent the first successful step towards a test that could address the clinical need for early intervention in psychiatry. Further developments of a combined molecular/symptom-based test will aid clinicians in the identification of vulnerable patients early in the disease process, allowing more effective therapeutic intervention before overt disease onset. PMID:26171982

  6. Field testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: spent fuel test and radionuclide migration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.B.; Isherwood, D.J.; Patrick, W.C.

    1982-12-31

    Two field tests in the Climax Stock are being conducted. The Climax Stock, a granitic instrusive, has been administratively excluded from consideration as a full-scale repository site. However, it provides a readily available facility for field testing with high-level radioactive materials at a depth (420 m) approaching that of a repository. The major test activity in the 1980 fiscal year has been initiation of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). This test, which was authorized in June 1978, is designed to evaluate the generic feasibility of geologic storage and retrievability of commercial power reactor spent fuel assemblies in a granitic medium. In addition, the test is configured and instrumented to provide thermal and thermomechanical response data that will be relevant to the design of a repository in hard crystalline rock. The other field activity in the Climax Stock is a radionuclide migration test. It combines a series of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of existing hydrologic models for pretest predictions and data interpretation. Goals of this project are to develop: (1) field measurement techniques for radionuclide migration studies in a hydrologic regime where the controlling mechanism is fracture permeability; (2) field test data on radionuclide migration; and (3) a comparison of laboratory- and field-measured retardation factors. This radionuclide migration test, which was authorized in the middle of the 1980 fiscal year, is in the preliminary design phase. The detailed program plan was prepared and subjected to formal peer review in August. In September/October researchers conducted preliminary flow tests with water in selected near-vertical fractures intersected by small horizontal boreholes. These tests were needed to establish the range of pressures, flow rates, and other operating parameters to be used in conducting the nuclide migration tests. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  7. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

  8. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

  9. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

  10. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  11. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-12-01

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

  12. Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

  13. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation

    E-print Network

    Ivan Melo; Boris Tomasik; Giorgio Torrieri; Sascha Vogel; Marcus Bleicher; Samuel Korony; Mikulas Gintner

    2009-02-10

    We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The test is particularly suitable to recognise non-statistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events which would not be expected if all events evolve according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

  14. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, Ivan [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physics Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 11, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Torrieri, Giorgio [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogel, Sascha; Bleicher, Marcus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Korony, Samuel [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Gintner, Mikulas [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)

    2009-08-15

    We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The test is particularly suited to recognizing nonstatistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events that would not be expected if all events evolved according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

  15. Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

  16. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management.

  17. Rapid field test for detection of hantavirus antibodies in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Sirola, H.; Kallio, E. R.; Koistinen, V.; Kuronen, I.; Lundkvist, A.; Vaheri, A.; Vapalahti, O.; Henttonen, H.; Närvänen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a mild form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. PUUV is transmitted to humans via aerosolized excreta of the infected bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). Current methods for screening of the PUUV prevalence among bank vole populations are laborious, combining sampling in the field and subsequent analyses in the laboratory. In order to facilitate animal testing, a new serological immunochromatographic rapid test was developed. The test uses PUUV nucleocapsid protein as antigen, and it detects anti-PUUV IgG antibodies in rodents. With fresh and undiluted bank-vole blood samples (n = 105) the efficacy of the test was 100%, and with frozen and diluted samples (n = 78) the efficacy was 91%. The test was also shown to detect related hantavirus infections in Norway lemmings and sibling voles (n = 31) with 99% efficacy. The test provides an applicable tool for studying PUUV and related hantavirus infections in arvicoline rodents. PMID:15188724

  18. Development of a field test for upper-body power.

    PubMed

    Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

  19. Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

    2010-12-01

    The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

  20. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, R. W.; Rhodes, W. D., Jr.

    A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel ship configuration for Navy ocean going vessels. The signal-processing and data-processing architectures of the receivers are described. Specific test data are presented which highlight dynamic position accuracy, static position accuracy, acquisition times, and field reliability.

  1. Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as “retests,” beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

  2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of NotI digests of leptospiral DNA: a new rapid method of serovar identification.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, J L; Bellenger, E; Perolat, P; Baranton, G; Saint Girons, I

    1992-01-01

    Fingerprints for 72 reference serovar strains of pathogenic Leptospira spp. were obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) following NotI restriction digests of the chromosome. These strains included the serovar reference strains of serogroups Australis, Ballum, Bataviae, Grippotyphosa, Panama, Pomona, and Pyrogenes. Sixty-four serovars could be identified by a unique NotI restriction profile. The remaining serovars were differentiated by chromosomal digestion with SgrAI. These included four serovars from serogroup Australis, two serovars from serogroup Ballum, and two serovars from serogroup Bataviae. Thirteen of 18 recent clinical isolates identified by microagglutination test and cross-adsorption procedure were correctly typed by PFGE. The results indicate that PFGE, which is considerably more rapid than serology, should be useful for identification and epidemiological studies. Images PMID:1629323

  3. Identifications and Photometric Redshifts of the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Brusa, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Mainieri, V.; Rafferty, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Silverman, J. D.; Vignali, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the ?2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 442 (95.7%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of ? 6.2%; we also selected four additional likely counterparts. The majority of the other 16 X-ray sources appear to be off-nuclear sources, sources associated with galaxy groups and clusters, high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or spurious X-ray sources. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). High accuracy in the derived photo-z's is accomplished owing to (1) the up-to-date photometric data covering the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the X-ray sources, (2) more accurate photometric data as a result of source deblending for ?10% of the sources in the infrared bands and a few percent in the optical and near-infrared bands, (3) a set of 265 galaxy, AGN, and galaxy/AGN hybrid templates carefully constructed to best represent all possible SEDs, (4) the Zurich Extragalactic Bayesian Redshift Analyzer used to derive the photo-z's, which corrects the SED templates to best represent the SEDs of real sources at different redshifts and thus improves the photo-z quality. The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of |?z|/(1 + z) ? 1% and an outlier [with |?z|/(1 + z)>0.15] fraction of ?1.4% for sources with spectroscopic redshifts. We performed blind tests to derive a more realistic estimate of the photo-z quality for sources without spectroscopic redshifts. We expect there are ?9% outliers for the relatively brighter sources (R <~ 26), and the outlier fraction will increase to ?15%-25% for the fainter sources (R >~ 26). The typical photo-z accuracy is ?6%-7%. The outlier fraction and photo-z accuracy do not appear to have a redshift dependence (for z ? 0-4). These photo-z's appear to be the best obtained so far for faint X-ray sources, and they have been significantly (gsim50%) improved compared to previous estimates of the photo-z's for the X-ray sources in the ?2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North and ?1 Ms CDF-S.

  4. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  5. Field experience with an SRB rapid detection test kit

    SciTech Connect

    Horacek, G.L. (Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States))

    1992-12-01

    This paper reports field experience with a new rapid method to detect and count sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) accurately. Test results are available in 15 minutes, compared with the 3 to 4 weeks required with traditional culture methods. This new test method detects SRB that grow poorly or not at all on culture media and gives superior results with such solids samples as biofilms, soils, and sludge.

  6. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Blank

    1988-01-01

    Statistical and operational results of extensive government field-testing of the Rockwell-Collins Global Positioning System (GPS) units are summarized. The equipment has exhibited better than 16-m spherical-error probable-position accuracy in over 6300 hours of testing conducted during the past two years. One-channel, two-channel, and five-channel receivers were subjected to thorough evaluation. Their respective signal-processing and data-processing architectures are described. Data highlighting

  7. Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. J. Weirick; D. R. Johnson

    1981-01-01

    Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188°C (370°F) and 340 psia. It was found

  8. TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermis, William J.

    Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

  9. Circuit Failure Prediction by Field Test - A New Task of Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuo SATO

    2010-01-01

    The main task of test had traditionally been screening of hard defects before shipping. However, current chips are taking risk of field reliability with rapidly reducing marginality due to increasing process variations and degradation mechanisms. Therefore, effective methodologies that guarantee quality in the field are strongly required. The talk will firstly survey the related works, then, discuss the required features

  10. Seasonal variations of grounding parameters by field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.G. (Georgia Power Co., Forest Park, GA (United States). Research Center)

    1992-07-01

    The past fifteen years have seen considerable research in the area of substation grounding design, analysis and testing. These research include the revision of the IEEE Std.-80, the development of PC based computer programs, the in depth analysis of grounding parameters and the development of new field testing methods and devices. In spite of these advances, several questions were often asked, primarily due to safety concerns. The questions were related to the seasonal variation of critical grounding parameters such as the soil and gravel resistivities and their influence on the body current in an accidental circuit. There was also a need to study the total behavior of a substation ground grid with respect to different weather conditions by performing field tests. In response to the above needs, a comprehensive field test program was developed and implemented. The field test consisted of flowing approximately 150 amperes through the Texas Valley ground grid from a remote substation. The parameters investigated in this project were the grid impedance, the grid potential rise (GPR) , the fault current distribution, the touch/step voltages, the body current on different gravel beds and the soil/gravel resistivities. The measurements were performed in the rainy, winter and summer weather conditions during 1989--1990. The field test results, overall, indicate that the rainy weather is the worst condition for the substation safety because of the substantial reduction in the protective characteristics of the gravel. Among the gravel types, the washed gravel has much superior protective characteristics compared to the crusher run type of gravel. A comparison of SGSYS computed grounding parameters with measured results indicates that the grid resistance and GPR compare well but the computed touch voltage and body current are substantially higher than the measured values.

  11. Evaluation of affirm VP Microbial Identification Test for Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Briselden, A M; Hillier, S L

    1994-01-01

    A commercial system (Affirm VP Microbial Identification Test; MicroProbe Corp.) for detection of vaginal pathogens was evaluated with 176 consecutive women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic for genital complaints. Vaginal swab specimens were used for culture of Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas vaginalis, preparation of a vaginal smear for Gram stain interpretation, and wet mount evaluation. An additional swab was used to evaluate the 30-min nonisotopic oligonucleotide probe test. The automated probe system detected G. vaginalis in 69 (95%) of 73 women having > 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml by culture, and 20 (43%) of 47 specimens with < or = 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml. There were three false positives and four false negatives for the Affirm VP test compared with > 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml. The probe system detected G. vaginalis in 57 (90%) of 63 vaginal specimens from women having clue cells on wet mount examination, and in only 3 (3%) of 113 women without clue cells, suggesting that the Affirm probe for G. vaginalis could be used as a surrogate for wet mount examination for clue cells. The T. vaginalis probe was positive for 12 of 12 specimens positive by wet mount and 12 of 15 specimens positive by culture. There were no false positives and three false negatives for the Affirm VP test compared with culture and/or wet mount for T. vaginalis. The Affirm VP Microbial Identification System is a rapid, objective, and automated test for the detection of T. vaginalis and clinically significant levels of G. vaginalis that is comparable to wet mount examination for clue cells and is superior to wet mount examination for the detection of trichomonads. PMID:8126171

  12. Evaluation of affirm VP Microbial Identification Test for Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Briselden, A M; Hillier, S L

    1994-01-01

    A commercial system (Affirm VP Microbial Identification Test; MicroProbe Corp.) for detection of vaginal pathogens was evaluated with 176 consecutive women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic for genital complaints. Vaginal swab specimens were used for culture of Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas vaginalis, preparation of a vaginal smear for Gram stain interpretation, and wet mount evaluation. An additional swab was used to evaluate the 30-min nonisotopic oligonucleotide probe test. The automated probe system detected G. vaginalis in 69 (95%) of 73 women having > 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml by culture, and 20 (43%) of 47 specimens with < or = 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml. There were three false positives and four false negatives for the Affirm VP test compared with > 5 x 10(5) CFU of G. vaginalis per ml. The probe system detected G. vaginalis in 57 (90%) of 63 vaginal specimens from women having clue cells on wet mount examination, and in only 3 (3%) of 113 women without clue cells, suggesting that the Affirm probe for G. vaginalis could be used as a surrogate for wet mount examination for clue cells. The T. vaginalis probe was positive for 12 of 12 specimens positive by wet mount and 12 of 15 specimens positive by culture. There were no false positives and three false negatives for the Affirm VP test compared with culture and/or wet mount for T. vaginalis. The Affirm VP Microbial Identification System is a rapid, objective, and automated test for the detection of T. vaginalis and clinically significant levels of G. vaginalis that is comparable to wet mount examination for clue cells and is superior to wet mount examination for the detection of trichomonads. Images PMID:8126171

  13. Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

  14. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  15. Field performance testing : heritability and correction of sex effect

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Field performance testing : heritability and correction of sex effect J. NAVEAU S.C.A., Pen animals from the selection centre of Pen-Ar-Lan (France). The sex effect was estimated on the basis models, one including sex, the other excluding it. Results showed that in a farm unit, sex may

  16. Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie

    This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

  17. A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

  18. REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF COPPER CYANIDE RINSE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field tests of reverse osmosis (RO) were conducted on copper cyanide rinse waters at two different sites: Whyco Chromium Co. and New England Plating Co. At both sites, closed-loop treatment was used with plating chemicals recycled to the bath and purified water recycled to the ri...

  19. Design and testing of the LITE Variable Field Stop mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Field Stop (VFS) is a rotary mechanism that reliably positions any of four aperture plates in the optical path of a spaceflight experiment, limiting the amount of light reaching the detectors. This paper discusses the design, operation, and testing of the VFS.

  20. 27. AERIAL VIEW OF ARVFS FIELD TEST SITE AS IT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. AERIAL VIEW OF ARVFS FIELD TEST SITE AS IT LOOKED IN 1983. OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. BUNKER IS IN FOREGROUND, PROTECTIVE SHED FOR WFRP AT TOP OF IMAGE. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 83-574-12-1, TAKEN IN 1983. PHOTOGRAPHER: ROMERO. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy J. O'gorman; John M. Ross; Allen H. Taber; James F. Ziegler; Hans P. Muhlfeld; Charles J. Montrose; Huntington W. Curtis; James L. Walsh

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of

  2. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  3. MISSISSIPPI COTTON YIELD MONITOR: THREE YEARS OF FIELD TEST RESULTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui

    The Mississippi cotton yield monitor, which is based on an optical cotton-flow sensor comprised of emitters and detectors in one unit that can be affixed to only one side of a pneumatic duct, has been under development at Mississippi State University since 1999. One prototype of the yield monitor was field tested that year in Mississippi. In 2000, three prototypes

  4. Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Analog Missions and Field Tests

    E-print Network

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAfacts Analog Missions and Field Tests NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Reef Base, located 63 feet beneath is actively planning to expand the frontier of human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit to destinations

  6. Cosmic Censorship, Black Holes and Integer-spin Test Fields

    E-print Network

    Koray Düzta?; ?brahim Semiz

    2013-10-12

    It has been argued that, starting with a slightly sub-extremal Kerr black hole instead of an extremal one, it is possible to overspin a black hole past the extremal limit and turn it into a naked singularity by sending test bodies, if one neglects radiative and self-force effects. In this work we show that (i) an extremal Kerr black hole can not be overspun as a result of the interaction with massless integer spin test fields (scalar, electromagnetic, or gravitational), (ii) overspinning can be achieved if we start with a nearly extremal black hole instead, and (iii) for the scalar field, the argument applies to more general black holes, and also allows use of a more general field configuration. Our analysis also neglects radiative and self-force effects.

  7. Spectral modeling for the identification and quantification of algal blooms: A test of approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malthus, T.J.; Grieve, L. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Harwar, M.D. [Univ. of Wolverhampton (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and test a Monte Carlo modelling approach for the characterization of reflectance for different bloom-forming marine phytoplankton species. The model was tested on optical data for four species (Dunaliella salina, Pavlova pinguis, Emiliania huxleyi and Synechocystes spp.) and simulations performed over a range of chlorophyll concentrations. Discriminant analysis identified 10 key wavelengths which could be used to maximize the separation between the four species. The resulting wavelengths were combined in a neural network to show 100% accuracy in classifying species type. Further simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of aquatic humus on reflectance characteristics and the change in wavelengths for algal discrimination. The implications for the development of algorithms for the identification of algal bloom species type by remote sensing are briefly discussed.

  8. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  9. Loop Identification and Capacity Estimation of Digital Subscriber Lines with Single Ended Line Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neus, Carine; Foubert, Wim; van Biesen, Leo

    Digital subscriber lines offer the possibility to deliver broadband services over the existing telephone network. Still, beforehand subscriber loops must be tested to see whether they can support high-speed data services, and at what bit rate. From the existing measurement techniques, Single Ended Line Testing is often preferred because all necessary measurements can be performed from the central office. Consequently the capacity cannot be measured directly, but should be calculated through the estimation of the loop make-up. This paper discusses some main difficulties of this identification. Moreover, in contrast to the traditional approach where the data are interpreted in the time domain, this paper presents a new approach by doing most of the processing in the frequency domain.

  10. Choking Under the Pressure of a Positive Stereotype: Gender Identification and Self-Consciousness Moderate Men's Math Test Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Tagler

    2011-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly

  11. Choking Under the Pressure of a Positive Stereotype: Gender Identification and Self-Consciousness Moderate Men's Math Test Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Tagler

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly

  12. A Kalman filter based strategy for linear structural system identification based on multiple static and dynamic test data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Tipireddy; H. A. Nasrellah; C. S. Manohar

    2009-01-01

    The problem of identification of stiffness, mass and damping properties of linear structural systems, based on multiple sets of measurement data originating from static and dynamic tests is considered. A strategy, within the framework of Kalman filter based dynamic state estimation, is proposed to tackle this problem. The static tests consists of measurement of response of the structure to slowly

  13. Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Bactec Blood Culture Broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus Test

    PubMed Central

    Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth. PMID:24153135

  14. A new autosomal STR nineplex for canine identification and parentage testing.

    PubMed

    van Asch, Barbara; Alves, Cíntia; Gusmão, Leonor; Pereira, Vânia; Pereira, Filipe; Amorim, António

    2009-01-01

    A single multiplex PCR assay capable of simultaneously amplifying nine canine-specific autosomal STR markers (FH3210, FH3241, FH2004, FH2658, FH4012, REN214L11, FH2010, FH2361 and the newly described C38) was developed for individual identification and parentage testing in domestic dogs. In order to increase genotyping efficiency, amplicon sizes were optimized for a 90-350 bp range, with fluorescently labelled primers for use in Applied Biosystems, Inc., platforms. The performance of this new multiplex system was tested in 113 individuals from a case-study population and 12 random dogs from mixed-breed origin. Co-dominant inheritance of STR alleles was investigated in 101 father, mother and son trios. Expected heterozygosity values vary between 0.5648 for REN214L11 and 0.9050 for C38. The high level of genetic diversity observed for most markers provides this multiplex with a very high discriminating power (matching probability=1.63/10(10) and matching probability among siblings=4.9/10(3)). Allele sequences and a proposal for standardized nomenclature are also herein presented, aiming at implementing the use of this system in forensic DNA typing and population genetic studies. This approach resulted in an optimized and well-characterized canine DNA genotyping system that is highly performing and straightforward to integrate and employ routinely. Although this STR multiplex was developed for use and tested in a case-study population, the Portuguese breed Cão de Gado Transmontano, it proved to be useful for general identification purposes or parentage testing. PMID:19204943

  15. Disorder Identification in Hysteresis Data: Recognition Analysis of the Random-Bond-Random-Field Ising Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, O. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bintacchit, P.; Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2009-10-09

    An approach for the direct identification of disorder type and strength in physical systems based on recognition analysis of hysteresis loop shape is developed. A large number of theoretical examples uniformly distributed in the parameter space of the system is generated and is decorrelated using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA components are used to train a feed-forward neural network using the model parameters as targets. The trained network is used to analyze hysteresis loops for the investigated system. The approach is demonstrated using a 2D random-bond-random-field Ising model, and polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric capacitors.

  16. Testing Weak-lensing Maps with Redshift Surveys: A Subaru Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2012-05-01

    We use a dense redshift survey in the foreground of the Subaru GTO2deg2 weak-lensing field (centered at ?2000 = 16h04m44s; ?2000 = 43°11'24'') to assess the completeness and comment on the purity of massive halo identification in the weak-lensing map. The redshift survey (published here) includes 4541 galaxies; 4405 are new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. Among the weak-lensing peaks with a signal-to-noise greater than 4.25, 2/3 correspond to individual massive systems; this result is essentially identical to the Geller et al. test of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) field F2. The Subaru map, based on images in substantially better seeing than the DLS, enables detection of less massive halos at fixed redshift as expected. We demonstrate that the procedure adopted by Miyazaki et al. for removing some contaminated peaks from the weak-lensing map improves agreement between the lensing map and the redshift survey in the identification of candidate massive systems.

  17. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  18. Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs?=??0.65 and ?0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min?1) and relative (mL·kg?1·min?1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs?=??0.79 to 0.55 and ?0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg?1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  19. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  20. Comparison of the MUREXC. albicans, Albicans-Sure, and BactiCard Candida Test Kits with the Germ Tube Test for Presumptive Identification ofCandida albicans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ARTHUR E. CRIST; THERESA J. DIETZ

    1996-01-01

    The MUREXC. albicans(MC) (Murex Diagnostics), Albicans-Sure (AS) (Clinical Standards Laboratories), and BactiCard Candida (BC) (Remel) test kits were compared with the germ tube (GT) test for the rapid, presumptive identification ofCandida albicans. All three test kits detect the enzymes L-proline aminopeptidase and b-galactosaminidase in yeast cells grown on culture media and are based on the principle thatC. albicans produces both

  1. Testing Multi-Field Inflation with Galaxy Bias

    E-print Network

    Biagetti, Matteo; Riotto, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Multi-field models of inflation predict an inequality between the amplitude tauNL of the collapsed limit of the four-point correlator of the primordial curvature perturbation and the amplitude fNL of the squeezed limit of its three-point correlator. While a convincing detection of non-Gaussianity through the squeezed limit of the three-point correlator would rule out all single-field models, a robust confirmation or disproval of the inequality between tauNL and fNL would provide crucial information about the validity of multi-field models of inflation. In this paper, we discuss to which extent future measurements of the scale-dependence of galaxy bias can test multi-field inflationary scenarios. The strong degeneracy between the effect of a non-vanishing fNL and tauNL on halo bias can be broken by considering multiple tracer populations of the same surveyed volume. If halos down to 1e13 Msun/h are resolved in a survey of volume 25(Gpc/h)^3, then testing multi-field models of inflation at the 3-\\sigma level wo...

  2. Boric acid as alternative reference substance for earthworm field tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petra Stegger; Klaus Peter Ebke; Jörg Römbke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  Boric acid was applied in an earthworm field test according to ISO 11268-3 as a possible alternative for the currently used\\u000a reference substances that may no longer be available in the near future.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Material and methods  The test site was a pasture with a silt- and clay-dominated soil, a pH of 5.7 and an organic content of 2.8%. In addition\\u000a to

  3. Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

    1982-05-01

    Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

  4. [Studies on identification of drugs of abuse by diode array detection. I. Screening-test and identification of benzodiazepines by HPLC-DAD with ICOS software system].

    PubMed

    Shimamine, M; Masunari, T; Nakahara, Y

    1993-01-01

    For the establishment of screening-test and identification of 20 benzodiazepines (Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Clonazepam, Clotiazepam, Cloxazolam, Diazepam, Estazolam, Fludiazepam, Flunitrazepam, Flurazepam, Lorazepam, Lormetazepam, Medazolam, Midazepam, Nimetazepam, Nitrazepam, Oxazepam, Prazepam, Triazolam), the optimum separation condition on HPLC was investigated by using Interactive Computer Optimization for HPLC Separation (ICOS) software. The two eluent systems of 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.1)-methanol-acetonitrile (66.4:5.7:27.9) and 0.1% TFA-methanol-acetonitrile (61.6:16.1:22.3) were selected by HPLC analyses using ICOS. These optimum separation conditions enabled the screening test and identification of the 20 benzodiazepines on HPLC with photodiode array detection. PMID:7920567

  5. Use of the Coccidioides posadasii chs5 Strain for Quality Control in the ACCUPROBE Culture Identification Test for Coccidioides immitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. McGinnis; Michael B. Smith; Elizabeth Hinson

    Coccidioides posadasii chs5 is a strain that is excluded from the select agent list. Sixteen assays using test reagents from three different ACCUPROBE Coccidioides immitis culture identification test lots had an average of 132,998 relative light units (RLU), which is well beyond the 50,000-RLU positive cutoff value for the test. Coccidioides posadasii chs5 is a satisfactory quality control isolate in

  6. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  7. Passive aircraft detection and noncooperative helicopter identification using extremely low-frequency (ELF) electric field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, David M.; Vinci, Stephen J.

    1998-12-01

    A new type of passive electric field sensor concept that measures extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields shows promise for detecting low-flying aircraft near, for example, airport runways or national borders. Because different types of aircraft (jets, airplanes, and helicopters) exhibit different signature characteristics, this type of sensor allows basic target classification. Additionally, helicopters generate ELF electric fields with strong spectral lines corresponding to the rotation of the main and tail rotors, so that the sensor can perform passive, noncooperative helicopter identification. Arrays of these sensors can be used to estimate aircraft speed, direction and height above the ground. We developed detailed 3-D models of an electrically charged helicopter and ground-based sensors, and simulated both target fields and sensor responses. We designed and built prototype sensors, which we used to collect data for various aircraft in the field; the collected signatures compare favorably with the simulated date. Our investigations to date indicate that these sensors naturally complement both fixed radars and distributed acoustic sensors; such a sensor could also be used alone as a low-cost and rugged alternative. This paper outlines the ELF sensor concept, the models, and the sensor hardware we used, and compares simulated and collected signatures.

  8. Field test of bistatic forward-looking synthetic aperture radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Balke; Azimuth Beamwidth

    2005-01-01

    Monostatic radar systems reach their limits if a two-dimensional resolution is desired for a forward-looking geometry. Bistatic systems offer an alternative to handle this problem if the transmitter operates as a separated illuminator while the receiver is arranged in a forward-looking mode. A newly arranged field test presented in this paper successfully showed the applicability of the chosen approach. By

  9. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  10. On-site cell field test support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  11. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Blank; W. D. Rhodes Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack\\/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel

  12. ? Pegasi: testing Vega-like magnetic fields in B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Monin, D.; Leroy, B.; Mathis, S.; Bohlender, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The bright B pulsator ? Peg shows both p and g modes of ? Cep and SPB types. It has also been claimed that it is a magnetic star, while others do not detect any magnetic field. Aims: We check for the presence of a magnetic field, with the aim to characterise it if it exists, or else provide a firm upper limit of its strength if it is not detected. If ? Peg is magnetic as claimed, it would make an ideal asteroseismic target for testing various theoretical scenarios. If it is very weakly magnetic, it would be the first observation of an extension of Vega-like fields to early B stars. Finally, if it is not magnetic and we can provide a very low upper limit on its non-detected field, it would make an important result for stellar evolution models. Methods: We acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric Narval data at Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). We also gathered existing dimaPol spectropolarimetric data from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and Musicos spectropolarimetric data from TBL. We analysed the Narval and Musicos observations using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeeman signatures in lines. The longitudinal field strength was also extracted from the H? line observed with the DAO. With a Monte Carlo simulation we derived the maximum strength of the field possibly hosted by ? Peg. Results: We find that no magnetic signatures are visible in the very high quality spectropolarimetric data. The average longitudinal field measured in the Narval data is Bl = -0.1 ± 0.4 G. We derive a very strict upper limit of the dipolar field strength of Bpol ~ 40 G. Conclusions: We conclude that ? Peg is not magnetic: it hosts neither a strong stable fossil field as observed in a fraction of massive stars nor a very weak Vega-like field. There is therefore no evidence that Vega-like fields exist in B stars, contrary to the predictions by fossil field dichotomy scenarios. These scenarios should thus be revised. Our results also provide strong constraints for stellar evolution models. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.Tables 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.

    PubMed

    Tagler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure. PMID:22822682

  14. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  15. Testing An Identification Algorithm for Extragalactic OB Associations Using a Galactic Sample

    E-print Network

    Christine D. Wilson; Karen J. Bakker

    1996-06-28

    We have used a Galactic sample of OB stars and associations to test the performance of an automatic grouping algorithm designed to identify extragalactic OB associations. The algorithm identifies the known Galactic OB associations correctly when the search radius (78 pc) is defined by the observed stellar surface density. Galactic OB associations identified with a 78 pc search radius have diameters that are $\\sim$3 times larger than OB associations identified with a 22 pc search radius in M33. Applying the smaller search radius to the Galactic data matches both the sizes and the number of member stars between the two galaxies quite well. Thus, we argue that this and similar algorithms should be used with a constant physical search radius, rather than one which varies with the stellar surface density. Such an approach would allow the identification of differences in the giant molecular cloud populations and star formation efficiency under most circumstances.

  16. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  17. Testing Multi-Field Inflation with Galaxy Bias

    E-print Network

    Matteo Biagetti; Vincent Desjacques; Antonio Riotto

    2012-08-08

    Multi-field models of inflation predict an inequality between the amplitude tauNL of the collapsed limit of the four-point correlator of the primordial curvature perturbation and the amplitude fNL of the squeezed limit of its three-point correlator. While a convincing detection of non-Gaussianity through the squeezed limit of the three-point correlator would rule out all single-field models, a robust confirmation or disproval of the inequality between tauNL and fNL would provide crucial information about the validity of multi-field models of inflation. In this paper, we discuss to which extent future measurements of the scale-dependence of galaxy bias can test multi-field inflationary scenarios. The strong degeneracy between the effect of a non-vanishing fNL and tauNL on halo bias can be broken by considering multiple tracer populations of the same surveyed volume. If halos down to 1e13 Msun/h are resolved in a survey of volume 25(Gpc/h)^3, then testing multi-field models of inflation at the 3-\\sigma level would require, for instance, a detection of tauNL at the level of tauNL~1e5 given a measurement of a local bispectrum with amplitude fNL~10. However, we find that disproving multi-field models of inflation with measurements of the non-Gaussian bias only will be very challenging, unless |fNL| > 80 and one can achieve a halo mass resolution of 1e10 Msun/h.

  18. Laboratory and Field Testing of two Rotational Seismometer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigbor, R. L.; Evans, J. R.; Hansen, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    There is a renewed interest in the measurement of rotational components of earthquake ground motion and structural response, both for strong and weak motions. While there are a small number of commercially- available sensors to measure rotational velocities, the behavior of these sensors has not been thoroughly tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes. To address this need, the authors, with assistance from colleagues in the U.S. and Taiwan, have developed performance test methodologies and performed initial testing of two such rotational velocity sensors: the eentec model R-1 and the PMD model RSB-20 (both magnetohydrodynamic rotational-velocity sensors, the latter with force feedback). Two examples of each sensor and two 19-bit data acquisition units (Kinemetrics six-channel K2) were obtained courtesy of the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan and the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica. Both sensor models have three orthogonal sensors with sensitivities of 50 V/rad/s. The data acquisition units also have internal force-balance linear accelerometers. Performance testing of these sensors consists of: 1) Low-level ambient vibration measurements side-by-side in the upper floors of two buildings; 2) Noise floor measurements at a quiet site; 3) Cross-axis measurements on a linear shake table, at strong-motion levels to 1 g; 4) Field measurements of known rotations using the NEES SFSI Test Structure at Garner Valley; and 5) Field measurements of microtremor and earthquake ground motions at two existing seismic array sites — GVDA (Garner Valley Downhole Array of surface and borehole strong-motion accelerometers) and Piñon Flat (collocated with a high-precision ring-laser interferometetric rotation sensor and weak-motion broadband seismometers). Results of these tests are analyzed not only to characterize the performance of these specific sensors but also to define the performance envelope needs for rotational sensor deployments.

  19. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. This section outlines the...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. This section outlines the...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. This section outlines the...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection... AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General...of procedures for laboratory and field testing. This section outlines the...

  3. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  4. Lessons Learned From Field Tests Of Planetary Surface Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.

    2003-04-01

    I review results and lessons learned from field tests of planetary surface rovers. Terrestrial field tests help to train scientists in rover capabilities, and guides developments to improve them. Key metrics of rover science performance include distance traveled and number of science targets studied using instrument placement or sample manipulation. Field tests show that traverse range is governed primarily by commanding frequency rather than a rover’s maximum speed. With real-time feedback, teleoperated rovers can traverse kilometers per day. With commanded operations, typical traverses are a few meters. Longer traverses are risky and error prone. Tasks requiring moving a few meters to a target followed by manipulation or instrument placement take several command cycles per target. Higher level autonomy for navigation and manipulation is needed to improve performance. Rovers are being called upon to play a key role in the search for evidence of life on Mars. Conditions on the Martian surface today appear to preclude living organisms, but more clement conditions in the past may have supported the formation of a fossil record. However, any fossil record on Mars is likely to be produced by microbial life, and to be extremely ancient. Finding unambiguous evidence of biogenic origin of putative fossil structures will require collecting high priority samples and returning them to Earth. Recognition of fossiliferous deposits using rover data is problematical. Information provided by a rover is of very low bandwidth and fidelity compared to that observed by a field geologist. Limitations arise in both quality and quantity of data transmitted to Earth. In a rover mission simulation performed in a fossil-rich terrestrial field site hosting dinosaur tracks and stromatolites, science teams did not find any evidence of fossils. However, living organisms such as endolithic microorganisms and lichens have been identified in field experiments using color imaging and spectroscopy. Field experiments show that interpretations of a site are heavily effected by what data is sampled by the rover, and due to sparse sampling, inevitably many important clues that guide correct and complete geologic interpretation are missed. Performance might be improved by autonomously recognizing science value onboard the rover.

  5. Boundary shape identification problems in two-dimensional domains related to thermal testing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kojima, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    The identification of the geometrical structure of the system boundary for a two-dimensional diffusion system is reported. The domain identification problem treated here is converted into an optimization problem based on a fit-to-data criterion and theoretical convergence results for approximate identification techniques are discussed. Results of numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of the theoretical ideas are reported.

  6. Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

  7. Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Two types of experimental bits were subjected to laboratory air drilling tests at 250/sup 0/C (482/sup 0/F) in cast iron. These tests indicated field testing could be conducted without danger to the hole, and that bearing wear would be substantially reduced. Six additional experimental bits, and eight conventional bits were then subjected to air drilling a 240/sup 0/C (464/sup 0/F) in Francisan Graywacke at The Geysers, CA. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction-pin wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. Geysers drilling performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling life was increased by 70%. All bits at The Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole over the conventional bits. These tests demonstrated a potential well cost reduction of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  8. Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, M.W.; Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wallace, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1987-01-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet the design objective, which is to meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Diffusion is the predominant mechanism for release of contaminants to the environment. Leach testing in unsaturated soil, at soil moisture levels above 1 wt %, has shown no difference in leach rate compared to leaching in distilled water. Field leach testing of three thirty-ton blocks of saltstone in lysimeters has been underway since January 1984. Mathematical models were applied to assess design features for saltstone disposal. One dimensional infinite-composite and semi-infinite analytical models were developed for assessing diffusion of nitrate from saltstone through a cement barrier. Numerical models, both finite element and finite difference, were validated by comparison of model predictions with the saltstone lysimeter results. Validated models were used to assess the long-term performance of the saltstone stored in surface vaults. The maximum concentrations of all contaminants released from saltstone to shallow groundwater are predicted to be below drinking water standards at the disposal area boundary. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Dark Ages Radio Explorer - Field Tests of a Prototype Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J. J.

    2012-05-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept designed to measure the sky-averaged redshifted HI 21-cm signal from the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization between 40 - 120 MHz (z = 11 - 35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the intense human-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) found on Earth. The science objectives of DARE include charting the history of the formation of the first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization, and end of the Dark Ages. A prototype science instrument has been constructed, consisting of bi-conical dipole antennas and a differential amplifier balun followed by a receiver and JPL-Caltech designed digital spectrometer. Extensive tests with this instrument are underway in order to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the overall DARE instrument. Here, we present results from preliminary field tests at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site in Green Bank, West Virginia. Further field tests will be performed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. This research has been supported by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR), headquartered at the University of Colorado Boulder and funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A. Part of this research was conducted at that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Field Test of an Aqueous Surfactant System For Oil Recovery, Benton Field, Illinois

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. French; G. W. Keys; G. L. Stegemeier; R. C. Ueber; A. Abrams; H. J. Hill

    1973-01-01

    A pilot study of surfactant systems in tertiary recovery operations was conducted on the Tar Springs sandstone in the Benton field, Illinois. The test site covered an area of one acre and included five process wells, three observation wells, and four evaluation core holes. There were four injection phases: (1) a preflood of low-salinity water to displace the high-salinity formation

  11. Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is…

  12. Alcohol Use and Sexual Risks: Use of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) Among Female Sex Workers in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiyun Chen; Xiaoming Li; Chen Zhang; Yan Hong; Yuejiao Zhou; Wei Liu

    2012-01-01

    The association between alcohol use and sexual risks among female sex workers (FSWs) has been insufficiently studied. This article reports a cross-sectional study of the relationship between alcohol use risk, measured by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and sexual risk behaviors among 1,022 FSWs in Guangxi, China. Bivariate analysis showed that FSWs at higher AUDIT levels tended to

  13. An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twissell, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

  14. Incorporating conditional random fields and active learning to improve sentiment identification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunpeng; Xie, Yusheng; Yang, Yi; Sun, Aaron; Liu, Hengchang; Choudhary, Alok

    2014-10-01

    Many machine learning, statistical, and computational linguistic methods have been developed to identify sentiment of sentences in documents, yielding promising results. However, most of state-of-the-art methods focus on individual sentences and ignore the impact of context on the meaning of a sentence. In this paper, we propose a method based on conditional random fields to incorporate sentence structure and context information in addition to syntactic information for improving sentiment identification. We also investigate how human interaction affects the accuracy of sentiment labeling using limited training data. We propose and evaluate two different active learning strategies for labeling sentiment data. Our experiments with the proposed approach demonstrate a 5%-15% improvement in accuracy on Amazon customer reviews compared to existing supervised learning and rule-based methods. PMID:24856246

  15. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  16. Applicability of subchronic toxicity test with Hyalella azteca for toxicity identification evaluation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, A.E.; Jop, K.M. [Springborn Labs., Wareham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A series of screening tests including the short-term chronic exposure of Ceriodaphnia dubia to sediment pore waters, 10-day exposures of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to bulk sediments and a bioaccumulation study with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment of Plow Shop Pond, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Chronic endpoints such as reproduction and growth indicated sediment toxicity, however, a toxicity identification evaluation program was initiated to further define the source and extent of the toxicity. A short-term chronic exposure with C. dubia was a logical choice for the TIE, however, since amphipods are epibenthic organisms, they are a better surrogate of sediment dwelling organisms than a water column species such as C. dubia. Observations performed during H. azteca culture suggested that this species of amphipod could thrive in the water column for up to three weeks. Therefore, 7-day old H. azteca were exposed to pore water samples under static-renewal conditions for 10 days. Survival and growth (i.e., dry weight) were determined at the termination of each exposure. Laboratory control group performance consistently averaged a {>=}90% survival and {>=}43 {micro}g of dry weight per amphipod. Growth of amphipods used in each exposure generally exceeded two times the initial body weight after 10 days of exposure. Previous studies have indicated that the growth and reproductive response of H. azteca are positively correlated for a given set of exposure conditions. The results of these 10-day subchronic exposures with H. azteca provide a consistent and reliable measure of the chronic sediment toxicity with a benthic invertebrate for toxicity identification evaluation programs.

  17. Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of radiofrequency identification (RFID) in healthcare is increasing and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have documented that RFID can interfere with medical devices. The majority of past studies have concentrated on implantable medical devices such as implantable pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study examined EMC between RFID systems and non-implantable medical devices. Methods Medical devices were exposed to 19 different RFID readers and one RFID active tag. The RFID systems used covered 5 different frequency bands: 125–134 kHz (low frequency (LF)); 13.56 MHz (high frequency (HF)); 433 MHz; 915 MHz (ultra high frequency (UHF])) and 2.4 GHz. We tested three syringe pumps, three infusion pumps, four automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), and one ventilator. The testing procedure is modified from American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C63.18, Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio-Frequency Transmitters. Results For syringe pumps, we observed electromagnetic interference (EMI) during 13 of 60 experiments (22%) at a maximum distance of 59 cm. For infusion pumps, we observed EMI during 10 of 60 experiments (17%) at a maximum distance of 136 cm. For AEDs, we observed EMI during 18 of 75 experiments (24%) at a maximum distance of 51 cm. The majority of the EMI observed was classified as probably clinically significant or left the device inoperable. No EMI was observed for all medical devices tested during exposure to 433 MHz (two readers, one active tag) or 2.4 GHz RFID (two readers). Conclusion Testing confirms that RFID has the ability to interfere with critical medical equipment. Hospital staff should be aware of the potential for medical device EMI caused by RFID systems and should be encouraged to perform on-site RF immunity tests prior to RFID system deployment or prior to placing new medical devices in an RFID environment. The methods presented in this paper are time-consuming and burdensome and suggest the need for standard test methods for assessing the immunity of medical devices to RFID systems. PMID:23845013

  18. Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    E-print Network

    Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2014-08-11

    A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

  19. Design and field testing of a Savonius windpump in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Smalera, A.; Kammen, D.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One important means of improving water availability and reducing disease exposure from polluted or stagnant sources involves the design and diffusion of inexpensive and reliable water pumps. Modernized versions of the decades-old Savonius vertical axis windmill present one technology that can play an important role in this effort. To be successful, these systems must be tailored to exploit the local wind and hydrological resources, constructed and managed locally, and inexpensive to operate and maintain. We report here on our design efforts and cooperative field research with several Kenyan development organizations. Performance tests from 10-15 meter deep water pumping applications at two field sites are presented, as well as preliminary results of an analysis of the steps involved in disseminating such technology. Our research suggests that the combination of reliability and performance offered by the Savonius design make it a useful resource for community managed energy initiatives, particularly in developing nation settings.

  20. Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

    1980-04-01

    There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

  1. Field application of hydraulic impedance testing for fracture measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, R.W.; Murray, L.R.; Roberts, J.D.M. (BP Exploration, Sunbury (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-01

    Hydraulic impedance testing (HIT) is a technique for detecting and measuring formation fractures intersecting wellbores. A pressure pulse is introduced into a well, and the resulting pressure trace is interpreted to give fracture dimensions. The first part of this paper describes how HIT can be used to estimate fracture dimensions and presents some results from a laboratory experiment that show that dimensions can be measured accurately with HIT. The remainder of the paper describes field examples of the application of HIT. A demonstration of how HIT traces change as pressure is reduced, which provides a method for determining fracture closure pressure, is included.

  2. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  3. Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, Mark A; Huebner, Wendy W; Nicolich, Mark J; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions. The curriculum was field tested among seventh-grade urban students using a quasi-experimental design. Analysis of covariance of pre- and post-test scores examined five outcomes, including students' perceptions of their abilities in science as inquiry, scientific literacy, and knowledge about five enduring epidemiologic understandings; their self reported interest in science, and assessment of students' epidemiological reasoning ability. The 378 experimental students, compared to 620 controls, had generally higher post-test improvements in epidemiology-related outcomes and smaller increases in the other measures. A dose-response was suggested by higher scores among students exposed to more than 10 lessons. Strengths of this evaluation include a large sample and availability of data to account for differences in demographic and school performance variables. Limitations of this evaluation include randomization by school as opposed to student, the relatively short-term and generally self-reported outcomes, and inconsistencies in proportion of the curriculum actually taught. The findings offer encouragement about the potential for Detectives in the Classroom to improve students' perceptions of their science abilities and scientific literacy, their interest in science and their abilities in basic epidemiologic reasoning. Further tests of this and other epidemiology curricula are needed to respond to the growing interest in teaching public health science to younger students. And while it is important to test near-term impacts, an additional challenge from a curriculum evaluation standpoint will be to follow students over several years to examine subsequent choices concerning selected courses, college majors, and career paths. PMID:18274623

  4. FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

  5. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

  6. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification By Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2014-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV ?-ray photons that result from a positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons, and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype, adaptable to a space-flight design, was designed, built, and tested. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV ? rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has since been exposed to beams of energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at Massachusetts General Hospital's Francis H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Center and positrons and electrons (up to ~10 MeV) at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We will present a summary of modeling calculations and analysis of data taken at the accelerator tests. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G.

  7. Comparison of SVM RBF-NN and DT for crop and weed identification based on spectral measurement over corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important to find an appropriate pattern-recognition method for in-field plant identification based on spectral measurement in order to classify the crop and weeds accurately. In this study, the method of Support Vector Machine (SVM) was evaluated and compared with two other methods, Decision ...

  8. MSU Extension offers this water resistant identification guide ideal for field use developed by Extension specialists. The guide

    E-print Network

    MSU Extension offers this water resistant identification guide ideal for field use developed that provide natural pest control by feeding on pest insects, such as aphids, thrips, caterpillars and beetles and Landscapes $10 3-digit Vcode · Ants · Beetles · Lacewings · Parasitoids · Predatory flies · Spiders · True

  9. Fabrication and testing of a high field dipole mechanical model

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, S. [and others

    2000-01-06

    As a first step towards the development of a high field Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting dipole for a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), a short mechanical model was built and tested at Fermilab. The aim of this work was to develop simpler fabrication techniques and test new structural materials to use in the dipole model. The coil design was based on a two-layer cos({theta}) approach. The end parts were designed using ROXIE magnet optimization program and manufactured using a 6-axis EDM machine. The two layers of each half-coil were wound using one piece of cable without any interlayer splices. After winding, a ceramic matrix was applied to the each half-coil and the coil was cured under compression at 150 C. The two half-coils were then assembled together in a reaction fixture for heat treatment at 450 C for 8 hours. After reaction, the coils were placed in a curing fixture for epoxy impregnation. Finally some mechanical and electrical tests were performed after which the coils were sectioned to check the cable positioning and impregnation quality. This paper summarizes the results and experience obtained from the mechanical model.

  10. Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs

    PubMed Central

    Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

  11. Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A

    2012-03-01

    Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females' signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

  12. A chi**2 test used for particle identification with the Hall A RICH detector at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Urciuoli, G M; Cusanno, F; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Iodice, M; Lagamba, L; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S

    2009-12-01

    An algorithm, based on the ?2 test, employed for particle identification by RICH detectors, is described. This algorithm is independent and complementary to the traditional algorithm based on the comparison between the average of the measured Cherenkov angles and the expected Cherenkov angles of the photons generated in the RICH by the particle to be identified. On the other hand it is much simpler and faster than a full likelihood analysis of the full event pattern. The particle rejection ratios achievable with the combined use of this algorithm and the algorithm based on the comparison between the average and the expected Cherenkov angles are very high. The algorithm also allows one to identify noise easily. The application of the algorithm is shown for the Hall A RICH detector in the E94-107 experiment at JLab. In this experiment an enormous background made up of pions and protons is 30 000 times bigger than the signal and had to be identified and rejected in order to extract the kaons from the electroproduction of hypernuclei.

  13. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

  14. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  15. 78 FR 30899 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies...AGENCY: Institute of Education Sciences/National Center for Education...Title of Collection: NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies...operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory activities,...

  16. Field comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction and bacterial culture for identification of bovine mastitis bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, M T; Wellenberg, G J; Sampimon, O C; Holopainen, J; Rothkamp, A; Salmikivi, L; van Haeringen, W A; Lam, T J G M; Pyörälä, S

    2010-12-01

    Fast and reliable identification of the microorganisms causing mastitis is important for management of the disease and for targeting antimicrobial treatment. Methods based on PCR are being used increasingly in mastitis diagnostics. Comprehensive field comparisons of PCR and traditional milk bacteriology have not been available. The results of a PCR kit capable of detecting 11 important etiological agents of mastitis directly from milk in 4h were compared with those of conventional bacterial culture (48h). In total, 1,000 quarter milk samples were taken from cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis, or from clinically healthy quarters with low somatic cell count (SCC). Bacterial culture identified udder pathogens in 600/780 (77%) of the clinical samples, whereas PCR identified bacteria in 691/780 (89%) of the clinical samples. The PCR analysis detected major pathogens in a large number of clinical samples that were negative for the species in culture. These included 53 samples positive for Staphylococcus aureus by PCR, but negative by culture. A total of 137 samples from clinical mastitis, 5 samples from subclinical mastitis, and 1 sample from a healthy quarter were positive for 3 or more bacterial species in PCR, whereas culture identified 3 or more species in 60 samples from clinical mastitis. Culture identified a species not targeted by the PCR test in 44 samples from clinical mastitis and in 9 samples from subclinical mastitis. Low SCC samples provided a small number of positive results both in culture (4/93; 4.3%) and by PCR (7/93; 7.5%). In conclusion, the PCR kit provided several benefits over conventional culture, including speed, automated interpretation of results, and increased sensitivity. This kit holds much promise as a tool to complement traditional methods in identification of pathogens. In conventional mastitis bacteriology, a sample with 3 or more species is considered contaminated, and resampling of the cow is recommended. Further study is required to investigate how high sensitivity of PCR and its quantitative features can be applied to improve separation of relevant udder pathogens from likely contaminants in samples where multiple species are detected. Furthermore, increasing the number of species targeted by the PCR test would be advantageous. PMID:21094742

  17. Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

  18. Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, C.A.; Finlayson, C.G.; Van der Kolk, C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water bearing intervals the CET is shown to compare favourably with the CBL/VDL and yields significant additional information on channeling, cement distribution, and the success of casing centralization. In addition, the accuracy of the acoustic calipers have proved sufficient to be used in assisting drilling and completion operations. The response of the tool to a microannulus has also been demonstrated by multiple runs under varying wellbore pressures.

  19. Field tests of interspecific resource-based competition among phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Heath J.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that interspecific resource-based competition caused the spring and summer vertical segregation of phytoplankton species was tested in Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada). Two species (Cyclotella glomerata Bachmann and Synedra radians Kütz.) became dominant at different depth intervals (0-30 m and 60-90 m, respectively). Experimental transplants of assemblages between depths demonstrated asymmetrical competition. In the phosphate-limited region near the surface, growth of S. radians declined in the presence of C. glomerata. However, growth of C. glomerata was not affected by the presence of S. radians in the light-limited region at depth. This study provides field verification of resource-based competition theory. Images PMID:16593853

  20. Deployable, field-sustainable, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for rapid screening and serotype identification of dengue virus in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    McAvin, James C; Powers, Michael D; Blow, Jamie A; Putnam, John L; Huff, William B; Swaby, James A

    2007-03-01

    Dengue virus universal and serotype 1 to 4 fluorogenic probe hydrolysis, reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and positive-control RNA template were freeze-dried in a thermally stable, hydrolytic enzyme-resistant format and deployed for testing in a dengue fever-endemic region of Thailand. The study site presented austere testing conditions. Field-collected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes spiked with inoculated A. aegypti mosquitoes and individual and pooled, field-collected, A. aegypti, A. albopictus, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes were used for RT-PCR assay evaluations. For dengue virus-inoculated A. aegypti mosquitoes and spiked samples, in vitro sensitivity and specificity results for all five assays were concordant with indirect fluorescent antibody assay results. A single pool of field-collected, female, A. aegypti mosquitoes was identified as dengue virus positive. Cross-reactivity was not observed across heterologous serotypes, mosquito vectors, or human DNA. The limit of detection was >7 to < or =70 genomic equivalents. Sample processing and analysis required <2 hours. These results show promise of field-formatted RT-PCR reagents for rapid, sensitive, specific dengue virus screening and serotype identification in mosquitoes under field-deployed conditions. PMID:17436782

  1. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study FY 2003 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2003-04-15

    Conceptual models have been identified as one of the sources of uncertainty in the interpretation and prediction of contaminant migration through the vadose zone at Hanford. Current conceptual models are limited partly because they often do not account for the random heterogeneity that occurs under the extremes of very nonlinear flow behavior typical of the Hanford vadose zone. Over the last two years significant progress has been made in characterizing physical heterogeneity and in the development of techniques for incorporating this heterogeneity into predictive and inverse models for field-scale subsurface flow. One of the remaining pieces of the puzzle is the impact of heterogeneity on the distribution of reactive contaminants. Reactive transport occurs over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, the manner in which the various subsurface physical and chemical processes interact to influence transport is not very well understood. Hydrogeologic characterization and model analysis, however, have traditionally focused on measurement of physical properties and predicting the effects of variability in these properties on flow and transport. As a result, the role of geochemical heterogeneity on solute transport has remained largely unexplored. This project will use a combination of geophysical and soil physics techniques to investigate the infiltration and redistribution of water and reactive tracers in a controlled field experiment at the Army loop Road clastic dike site. In the FY2003 tests, surface deployed ground penetrating radar will be used to identify the discrete three-dimensional pattern of horizonation and small-scale heterogeneities that characterize the test site and to develop a lithofacies map. The transect will be instrumented to allow water to be applied along its length from a line source. Local-scale water content, matric potential, and tracer concentrations will be monitored as a function of spatial scale by multipurpose TDR probes and suction lysimeters. The tension infiltrometer will be used to measure mobile-immobile parameters. The resulting data will used characterize fine-scale heterogeneity as well as correlation lengths of hydraulic and transport parameters. Tracer breakthrough data will be used to determine longitudinal and transverse dispersivities and their scale dependence. Parameters will be analyzed to identify a suitable averaging (upscaling) procedure for field-scale infiltration predictions. A combination of in situ permeability, water content and resistivity measurements will be combined with the granulometry and core analysis to quantify hydraulic geochemical properties in the laboratory. These data will be coupled with the field-measured hydraulic and transport parameters and the 3-D lithofacies map to generate a 3-D hydrofacies map of the site that includes the distribution geochemical properties controlling sorption. This map, along with measured distributions of water and solute, will be used to validate a numerical model for forward predictions and the applicability of upscaled parameters to reactive transport processes that typically occur under transient flow and at large spatial and temporal scales. The results of this study will help to bridge the gap between local-scale transport observations and field-scale transport behavior. It will allow validation of recently developed inverse procedures for predicting field-scale parameters and will improve our prediction capability fort reactive transport in heterogeneous sediments at Hanford. The improved conceptualizations will permit the DOE to make defensible corrective and remedial action decisions at Hanford and other waste sites.

  2. Testing neoclassical competitive market theory in the field

    PubMed Central

    List, John A.

    2002-01-01

    This study presents results from a pilot field experiment that tests predictions of competitive market theory. A major advantage of this particular field experimental design is that my laboratory is the marketplace: subjects are engaged in buying, selling, and trading activities whether I run an exchange experiment or am a passive observer. In this sense, I am gathering data in a natural environment while still maintaining the necessary control to execute a clean comparison between treatments. The main results of the study fall into two categories. First, the competitive model predicts reasonably well in some market treatments: the expected price and quantity levels are approximated in many market rounds. Second, the data suggest that market composition is important: buyer and seller experience levels impact not only the distribution of rents but also the overall level of rents captured. An unexpected result in this regard is that average market efficiency is lowest in markets that match experienced buyers and experienced sellers and highest when experienced buyers engage in bargaining with inexperienced sellers. Together, these results suggest that both market experience and market composition play an important role in the equilibrium discovery process. PMID:12432103

  3. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  4. Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimcak, Charles M.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1999-02-01

    We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite processing area, an estuarine marsh, a paint storage locker, and several indoor locations including chemical laboratory fume hoods and bathrooms. In addition, a group were set aside in a sealed enclosure for control purposes. The dosimeters were retrieved at monthly intervals and exposed to measured doses of hydrazine vapor to determine the effects of the field exposure on their hydrazine response. Our analysis indicated that 90% of the exposed dosimeters were able to sense hydrazine at a dose detectivity of less than 15 ppb-hr, a value that meets the current hydrazine sensing requirement. Consequently, we are planning to deploy a full scale, continuously operating fiber optic system for detecting potential hydrazine leaks during launch operations at Cape Canaveral.

  5. Identification of aquifer and well parameters from step-drawdown tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Cem B.; Ciftci, Emin; Sahin, A. Ufuk

    2010-11-01

    A new analysis technique has been proposed for interpreting transient step-drawdown test data. The proposed method is based on taking the derivative of the drawdown with respect to time for the entire pumping test period to eliminate the time-independent well-loss terms. The derivative function is subsequently integrated to obtain the time-dependent aquifer drawdown as a continuous function. The well-loss parameters are then obtained with higher accuracy once the aquifer behavior is identified. The proposed method is applicable for analyzing data obtained not only from ideal confined aquifers but also from other aquifer types (i.e. unconfined) and non-ideal aquifers (i.e. heterogeneous). The technique was tested for synthetically generated and field data; the proposed approach was noted to provide accurate aquifer and well-loss parameter estimates. The results of the proposed method were compared with those of some of the existing methods for analyzing step-drawdown test data and were found to be more reliable and robust.

  6. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  7. Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

  8. STRESS GERMINATION RING TEST WITH IIRB AND FIELD VALIDATION IN MICHIGAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This test was conducted to validate field emergence on lines selected by European breeding companies for a ‘ring test’ to evaluate the water germination stress test developed at East Lansing for predicting relative field emergence. Water and hydrogen peroxide germination tests were conducted prior t...

  9. Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D’Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

  10. Prediction System for Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes Based on Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B.; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J.

    2012-01-01

    A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as “unknown” by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

  11. Control and identification of strong field dissociative channels in CO_2^+ via molecular alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, M.; Weber, S. J.; Morales, F.; Richter, M.; Patchkovskii, S.; Csehi, A.; Vibók, Á.; Ivanov, M.; Smirnova, O.; Marangos, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    The dissociative excitation of CO_2^+ was studied in the molecular frame as a function of probe laser intensity, ellipticity and polarization with respect to the molecular bond at laser wavelengths of 800 nm and 1350 nm. This allowed the identification of the main excitation pathway consisting of tunnel ionization from HOMO-2 followed by a parallel dipole transition from the second excited state B to the predissociating, third excited state C. Recollision excitation was shown to play a negligible role. Using laser induced impulsive alignment, the strong field induced coupling at 800 nm and 1350 nm of the ionic states B and C could thus be controlled by the laser polarization. This leads to a suppression of the fragmentation yield of up to 70% when the laser polarization was perpendicular to the molecular axis compared to parallel polarization. We have performed simulations of various ionization channels of CO2. Our simulations reflect the experimental findings and show that dissociation of CO_2^+ is induced by tunnelling from deeper molecular orbitals HOMO-1, HOMO-2, HOMO-3, followed by laser driven hole dynamics in the ion.

  12. Taste identification used as a potential discriminative test among depression and Alzheimer?s disease in elderly: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Marine; Mondon, Karl; El-Hage, Wissam; Perriot, Elise; Boudjarane, Mohamed; Desmidt, Thomas; Lorette, Adrien; Belzung, Catherine; Hommet, Caroline; Atanasova, Boriana

    2015-08-15

    Major Depression and Alzheimer?s disease (AD) are two diseases in the elderly characterized by an overlap of early symptoms including memory and emotional disorders. The identification of specific markers would facilitate their diagnosis. The aim of this study was to identify such markers by investigating gustatory function in depressed and AD patients. We included 20 patients with unipolar major depressive episodes (MDE), 20 patients with mild to moderate AD and 24 healthy individuals. We investigated the cognitive profile (depression, global cognitive efficiency and social/physical anhedonia) and gustatory function (ability to identify four basic tastes and to judge their intensity and hedonic value) in all participants. We found that AD patients performed worse than healthy participants in the taste identification test (for the analysis of all tastants together); however, this was not the case for depressed patients. We found no significant differences among the three groups in their ability to evaluate the intensity and hedonic value of the four tastes. Overall, our findings suggest that a taste identification test may be useful to distinguish AD and healthy controls but further investigation is required to conclude whether such a test can differentiate AD and depressed patients. PMID:25998001

  13. Evaluation of the BD MGIT TBc Identification Test (TBc ID), a rapid chromatographic immunoassay for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from liquid culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anandi Martin; Deirdre Bombeeck; Krista Fissette; Pim de Rijk; Ivan Hernández-Neuta; Patricia Del Portillo; Juan Carlos Palomino

    2011-01-01

    The BACTEC MGIT 960 system is increasingly used to culture Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We evaluated the performance of the new immunochromatographic assay BD MGIT TBc Identification Test (TBc ID) for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex in clinical samples when performed directly from BACTEC MGIT 960 culture positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB).Of 92 cultures evaluated, the sensitivity and specificity of

  14. How much does automatic text de-identification impact clinical problems, tests, and treatments?

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Ferrández, Oscar; South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Samore, Matthew H

    2013-01-01

    Clinical text de-identification can potentially overlap with clinical information such as medical problems or treatments, therefore causing this information to be lost. In this study, we focused on the analysis of the overlap between the 2010 i2b2 NLP challenge concept annotations, with the PHI annotations of our best-of-breed clinical text de-identification application. Overall, 0.81% of the annotations overlapped exactly, and 1.78% partly overlapped. PMID:24303260

  15. Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

    2009-01-01

    The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

  16. Field tests of X-ray backscatter mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Shope, S.L.; Wehlburg, J.C.; Selph, M.M.; Jojola, J.M.; Turman, B.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jacobs, J.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The implementation of a backscattered X-ray landmine detection system has been demonstrated in laboratories at both Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Florida (UF). To assess the system`s response to a variety of objects, buried plastic and metal antitank landmines, surface plastic antipersonnel landmines, and surface metal fragments were used as targets. The X-ray machine used for the field test system was an industrial X-ray machine which was operated at 150 kV and 5 mZ and collimated to create a 2 cm diameter X-ray spot on the soil. The detectors used were two plastic scintillation detectors: one collimated to respond primarily to photons that have undergone multiple collision and the other uncollimated to respond primarily to photons that have had only one collision. To provide motion, the system was mounted on a gantry and rastered side-to-side using a computer-controlled stepper motor with a come-along providing the forward movement. Data generated from the detector responses were then analyzed to provide the images and locations of landmines. A new analysis method that increases resolution was used. Changing from the lab environment to the field did not decrease the system`s ability to detect buried or obscured landmines. The addition of rain, blowing dust, rocky soil and native plant-life did not lower the system`s resolution or contrast for the plastic or the metal landmines. Concepts for a civilian mine detection system based on this work using commercial off the shelf (COTS) equipment were developed.

  17. Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188/sup 0/C (370/sup 0/F) and 340 psia. It was found that in mildly basic steam all three materials performed adequately for substantial exposure times (approximately 25 days). An initial effort to introduce SO/sub 2/ gas into the generator feedwater (used as a marker gas) caused the steam discharge to become mildly acidic. During this exposure period the corrosion rates for the carbon steel and drill rod became unacceptably high. Rates were particularly high at the junction with the stainless steel specimen holder where galvanic effects (dissimilar metal couples) enhanced corrosion. The 303 Se stainless steel material did not suffer from this coupling in that the 304L stainless steel holder and 303 Se stainless steel specimen have similar electrochemical potentials. The results show that stainless steel does have adequate corrosion resistance in mildly acidic steam atmospheres. When SO/sub 2/ in high concentrations was added to the steam (for reservoir interaction determinations), the corrosive attack on all three materials became severe. Even after short exposure times (8 days steam, < 1 day steam plus SO/sub 2/), the carbon steels had disappeared and the stainless steel was severely pitted. Chromel-alumel thermocouples with stainless steel sheaths also were severely attacked by this high SO/sub 2/ environment.

  18. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  19. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  20. X-ray identifications of FIRST radio sources in the XBoötes field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouchefry, K.

    2009-07-01

    With the goal of investigating the nature and the environment of the faint radio sources (at mJy level), here are presented results of X-ray identifications of Faint Imaging Radio Survey at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) in the 9 deg2 Boötes field of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS), using data from the Chandra XBoötes survey. A total of 92 (10 per cent) FIRST radio sources are identified above the X-ray flux limit fX(0.5-7)keV = 8 × 10-15ergs-1cm-2, and 79 optical counterparts are common to both the radio and X-ray sources. Spectroscopic identifications [obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) survey] were available for 22 sources (27 per cent). The majority of these sources (59 per cent) are classified as broad line active galactic nuclei (BLAGNs), and 18 per cent as low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), 14 per cent as star-forming galaxies and one source classified as BL Lac object. Multiwavelength optical/infrared photometric data (Bw ~ 25.5 mag, R ~ 25.8 mag, I ~ 25.5 mag and K ~ 19.4 mag) were available for this field and were used to derive photometric redshift for the remaining 57 sources without spectroscopic information. Most of the radio-X-ray matches are optically extended objects in the R band with a red colour, their radio emission is associated with AGN activity hosted in massive early type host galaxies with a photometric redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.7. Based on the hardness ratio and X-ray luminosity, 37 sources (89 per cent) were classified as AGN-1, 19 as AGN-2, 12 as quasi-stellar object 1 (QSO-1), two as QSO-2 and nine sources as normal galaxies. While the majority of these sources have a hard X-ray luminosity LX(2-7) keV > 1042ergs-1, about one third of the sources have LX(2-7) keV > 1044ergs-1 and therefore classified as QSO-1, 92 per cent of these objects are spectroscopically identified as QSOs. I found good agreement between the X-ray classification scheme and the classical AGN classification based on optical spectroscopic diagnostics. The majority (68 per cent) of the radio-X-ray matched population are found to have logfX/fopt within 0.0 +/- 1 region indicative of AGNs (Stocke et al.), 23 per cent with high X-ray to optical flux ratio (logfX/fopt > 1), suggesting high redshift and/or dust obscured AGN, and 11 per cent of the radio-X-ray matches that are X-ray faint optically bright sources with logfX/fopt < -1, and most of these sources are optically extended. These objects are low z, normal galaxies or low-luminosity AGNs (LINERs). Five sources of the radio-X-ray matches are associated with the so called extremely red object (ERO) having a colour of R - K > 5. No clear correlation has been found between the R - K colour and the hardness ratio. The very hard radio-X-ray matches (ignoring QSOs) all have low R - K colour which could be a consequence of the correlation found between the hardness ratio and redshift, and the fact that low R - K galaxies are mostly at low redshift.

  1. A new dynamic test for the identification of high speed friction law using a gas-gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, I.; Pantalé, O.; Caperaa, S.; Sattouf, C.

    2003-09-01

    In the framework of metal forming, which involves high speed loads, the determination of the friction law is one of the most essential topics. Especially for Finite-element simulation the development of innovative local friction laws improves the quality of the numerical results. One of the most critical point reside in the accuracy of the identification of the governing friction law parameters. A new experimental test is based on conical extrusion. The idea is to launch a cylindrical projectile into a target provided with a conical bore prolonged with a cylindrical one. The projectile is stopped by friction forces occurring at the interface between those materials. After impact the length of extrusion is taken into account for friction law identification. The experimental set-up used is a ballistic gas-gun device capable to launch the projectile, in vacuum conditions, up to 300m/s. The experiment is simulated by a numerical model using ABAQUS Explicit finite-element code. This code allows the implementation of various user friction laws through a FORTRAN subroutine. In order to obtain accurate results, the viscoplastic constitutive law used for both materials (projectile and target) was previously experimentally identified. The friction law identification uses a combined Monte-Carlo and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm which provides a very precisely set of parameters law. The test presented in this paper involves two metallic materials: steel 42CrMo4 for the target and aluminum 2017 for the projectile. The friction law for the pair of materials used was validated using experimental test at different speeds of impact (149 up to 235m/s) and the results are quite good proving a good identification of the friction law parameters.

  2. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  3. A semi-field approach to testing effects of fresh pesticide residues on bees in multiple-rate test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Bakker; J. N. M. Calis

    2003-01-01

    We describe a semi-field cage test specifically designed to test effects of delayed exposure to plant protection products. The trial involved the use of standardised mini-beehives. The principle of the trial was to prepare two groups of potted test plants per treatment. The first group of plants remained untreated, while the second group was treated at the desired rate and

  4. Deep field weak lensing: testing (Lambda)CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. Anthony; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Wittman, David; Bernstein, Gary; Guhathakurta, Raja; Kochanski, Greg

    1999-02-01

    We propose to observe weak gravitational lensing shear correlations as a function of source redshift. A deep 50 arcmin BTC mosaic forms a ``thick" pencil-beam probe, covering an adequate area at both low and high redshift. Different cosmologies predict significantly different dependences of shear on source redshift. This observation will test the competing flat universe models (Lambda)CDM, Hot-Cold DM, and SCDM. In the first case (suggested by recent SNIa observations) the universe is older and larger, giving rise to larger deflections and shear. Such a deep mass probe will pass through many large-scale filaments/walls/lumps of the kind expected from n-body CDM simulations. In addition to measuring the shear correlations induced by the large scale structure, mass maps made from inverting the 100,000 arclets will reveal some of these projected stuctures directly. Three color photometric redshifts enable a reliable low/high source redshift selection. Because these two fields will go fainter than any other planned observations, we propose to release the data to the community 12 months after acquisition.

  5. What Predicts Changes in Useful Field of View Test Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Lunsman, Melissa; Edwards, Jerri D.; Andel, Ross; Small, Brent J.; Ball, Karlene K.; Roenker, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The Useful Field of View Test (UFOV1) has been used to examine age-related changes in visual processing and cognition and as an indicator of everyday performance outcomes, particularly driving, for over 20 years. How UFOV performance changes with age and what may impact such changes have not previously been investigated longitudinally. Predictors of change in UFOV performance over a five-year period among control-group participants (n = 690) from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study were examined. Random effects models were estimated with four-subtest total UFOV as the outcome and baseline age, education, gender, race, visual acuity, depressive symptoms, mental status, and self-rated health, as well as attrition, as predictors. UFOV performance generally followed a curvilinear pattern, improving and then declining over time. Only increased age was consistently related to greater declines in UFOV performance over time. UFOV and WAIS-R Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS), a standard measure of cognitive speed, had similar trajectories of change. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19140660

  6. Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

    1999-07-01

    A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

  7. Identification of the elastic stiffness of composites using the virtual fields method and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lebin; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an effective methodology for characterizing the mechanical parameters of composites using digital image correlation combined with the virtual fields method. By using a three-point bending test configuration, this method can identify all mechanical parameters of the material with merely a single test. Successful results verified that this method is especially effective for characterizing composite materials. In this study, the method is applied to measure the orthotropic elastic parameters of fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites before and after the hygrothermal aging process. The results indicate that the hygrothermal aging environment significantly influences the mechanical property of a composite. The components of the parameters in the direction of the fiber bundle decreased significantly. From the accuracy analysis, we found that the actual measurement accuracy is sensitive to a shift of the horizontal edges and rotation of the vertical edges.

  8. Identification of Rhizoctonia solani associated with field-grown tulips using ITS rDNA polymorphism and pectic zymograms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. M. Schneider; O. Salazar; V. Rubio; J. Keijer

    1997-01-01

    Methods based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphism and pectic zymograms (ZG) were compared for their use in routine identification of Rhizoctonia solani isolates occurring in flower bulb fields. Thirty three AG 2-t isolates, pathogenic to tulips, could be distinguished from AG 1-IC, AG 2-2IIIB and AG 2-2IV, AG 3 and AG 5 by means of ITS

  9. Field test of the in situ permeable ground water flow sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew S. Alden; Clyde L. Munster

    1997-01-01

    Two in situ permeable flow sensors, recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas, The flow sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to quantify the magnitude and direction of ground water flow in three dimensions. Two aquifer pumping tests lasting eight and 13 days were used to field

  10. Evaluation of field test kits including immunoassays for the detection of contaminants in soil and water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Waters; R. R. Smith; R. W. Counts; J. H. Stewart; R. A. Jenkins

    1993-01-01

    Effective field test methods are needed for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation. Useful field methods should be rapid, analyte-specific, cost-effective and accurate in the concentration range at which the analyte is regulated. In this study, field test kits for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury, lead and nitrate were evaluated with reference to these criteria. PCBs and mercury, in soils, were

  11. Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

  12. Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA)); Cooper, G.A. (Univ. of California, Berkley, CA (USA)); Curry, D.A. (International Drilling and Downhole Technology Centre in Aberdeen (Great Britian)); McCann, D. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA))

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

  13. Field test of electret ion chambers for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fjeld, R A; Montague, K J; Haapala, M H; Kotrappa, P

    1994-02-01

    A field test of electret ion chambers was performed to evaluate their performance in making environmental exposure measurements at nuclear facilities. The objectives of the study were to determine electret ion chamber variability and to perform comparisons with thermoluminescent dosimeter and high-pressure ion chamber measurements. Three electret ion chambers were placed at each of 40 monitoring locations in the vicinity of a commercial nuclear power station during four consecutive quarters. The electret ion chamber measurements were compared to thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements made by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Two types of comparison were made with the high-pressure ion chamber. One used yearly average electret ion chamber measurement and instantaneous high-pressure ion chamber measurements at 15 of the monitoring locations. The other involved the simultaneous exposure of five electret ion chambers and the high-pressure ion chamber for 15 d at a single location. The mean ratios of electret ion chamber measurements to thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements was 1.06. The mean ratio of electret ion chamber measurements to instantaneous and simultaneous high-pressure ion chamber measurements were 1.06 and 1.07, respectively. Electret variability, defined here as the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean, was determined for each set of three detectors. The average variability for the 160 sets of quarterly measurements was approximately 7%. Among the 450 individual electret measurements, there were six outliers. Based on the results of this study, electret ion chambers appear to yield accurate measurements of environmental exposure provided that measures are taken to either minimize or correct for radon interferences and care is taken to prevent spurious discharges during handling. PMID:8282554

  14. A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, D.; Nithya, M.; Singh, K. D.; Bharti, Rishikesh

    2013-02-01

    This work illustrates the efficiency of field spectroscopy for rapid identification of minerals in ore body, alteration zone and host rocks. The adopted procedure involves collection of field spectra, their processing for noise, spectral matching and spectral un-mixing with selected library end-members. Average weighted spectral similarity and effective peak matching techniques were used to draw end-members from library. Constrained linear mixture modelling technique was used to convolve end-member spectra. Linear mixture model was optimized based on root mean square error between field- and modelled-spectra. Estimated minerals and their abundances were subsequently compared with conventional procedures such as petrography, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence for accuracy assessment. The mineralized zone is found to contain azurite, galena, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, marcacite, gahnite, hematite, goethite, anglesite and malachite. The alteration zone contains chlorite, kaolinite, actinolite and mica. These mineral assemblages correlate well with the petrographic measurements ( R 2 = 0.89). Subsequently, the bulk chemistry of field samples was compared with spectroscopically derived cumulative weighted mineral chemistry and found to correlate well ( R 2 = 0.91-0.98) at excellent statistical significance levels (90-99%). From this study, it is evident that field spectroscopy can be effectively used for rapid mineral identification and abundance estimation.

  15. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Protective barrier test results (FY 1990, the third year)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) was constructed to test protective barriers for isolating low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes from the biosphere. Protective barriers are specially configured earth materials placed over near-surface wastes to prevent intrusion of water, plants, and animals. Low-level radioactive waste is stored in near-surface repositories at the Hanford Site and can be transported into the biosphere by water, plants, and animals. The purpose of the FLTF is to measure water balance within barriers as precipitation is partitioned to evaporation (including transpiration), storage, and drainage. Runoff was prevented by raised edges on the lysimeters. Water balance in protective barriers depends on the water-holding capacity of the soil, the gradient of a potential, and the conductivity of the underlying capillary barrier. Current barrier design uses soil with a high water storage capacity and a capillary barrier underlying the soil to increase its water storage capacity. This increased storage capacity is to hold water, which would normally drain, near the the surface where evaporation can cycle it back to the atmosphere. 7 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. The LBK tests consisted of five small scale experiments in which approximately 900 to 1800 cubic feet (25 to 50 cubic meters) of coal were affected in each test. The LBK tests indicated that the Centralia site was a reasonable candidate for UCG. The PSC test was then conceived along with a third test, the Full Seam CRIP test, to provide the technical data needed to further evaluate the economic potential of UCG at the Centralia site, as well as enhance our general knowledge concerning the UCG process. The PSC test represents a 20 to 30 fold increase in scale over the LBK tests with the full-seam test representing another five fold increase in size. This series of three tests have become known as the Tono Basin Tests. During the active gasification phase, which lasted 30 days, 1400 cubic meters (2000 tons) of coal were affected. The test utilized primarily steam and oxygen as the injected reactants. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf). 7 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  17. COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF A FIELD TEST KIT FOR LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hach Lead-Trak(R) test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. onsidered were: perator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. nterferences tested were realistic levels off: a, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, C...

  18. A comprehensive test method for reprogammable field programmable gate arrays 

    E-print Network

    Ashen, David Glen

    1996-01-01

    are not optimized. These test vectors can be easily generated using appropriate configurations in the FPGA. The number of test vectors required is dependent on the number of Logic Elements in the chip. The number of times the chip must be reprogrammed to test...

  19. Experience with a Mouse Intranasal Test for the Predictive Identification of Respiratory Sensitization Potential of Proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Blaikie; D. A Basketter

    1999-01-01

    The predictive identification of respiratory allergenic potential is an important primary step in the safety evaluation of (novel) proteins, such as the enzymes used in a range of consumer laundry products. In the past this has been achieved by assessing the relative ability of proteins to give rise to the formation of anaphylactic antibody in the guinea pig. Recently, an

  20. DNA BASED SPECIES IDENTIFICATION TEST FOR PARASITIC WASPS OF THE WHITEFLY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant problem in using parasitic wasp species in biological control of the whitefly is identification of the individual wasp species parasitizing the nymph. This is particularly important in areas where imported foreign species are released It is necessary to follow these releases to deter...

  1. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  2. New Jersey High School Proficiency Test: Identification of the Skills and Development of the Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carl I.

    This booklet describes the test development process used to upgrade New Jersey's basic skills competency test, the High School Proficiency Test (HSPT). Ninth-grade students in New Jersey public schools must pass this test of reading, writing, and mathematics skills in order to receive a state endorsed high school diploma. Test development…

  3. Exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Munsters, Carolien C B M; van Iwaarden, Alexandra; van Weeren, René; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2014-10-01

    Regular exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses may, as in racing, potentially help to characterise fitness indices in different disciplines and at various competition levels and assist in understanding when a horse is 'fit to compete'. In this review an overview is given of the current state of the art of exercise testing in the Olympic disciplines of eventing, show jumping and dressage, and areas for further development are defined. In event horses, a simple four-step incremental exercise test measuring heart rate (HR), lactate concentration (LA) and velocity (V) is most often used. In dressage and riding horses, a wide variety of exercise tests have been developed, including incremental exercise tests, indoor riding tests and lunging tests. In show jumping, the use of a five-step incremental exercise test and exercise tests evaluating technical skills and fatigue of the horse has been reported. The velocity at a plasma LA of 4?mmol/L (VLA4) and HR recovery during submaximal exercise intensity have been shown to be the best parameters in event horses for predicting performance and impending injuries. In riding horses, the fitness level of horses is also an important determinant of injuries. Implementation of regular exercise testing and monitoring of training sessions may have important added value in the assessment of performance ability and potential future injuries in Warmblood sport horses. However, there is an urgent need to standardise methodologies and outcome parameters in order to make results comparable. PMID:25172838

  4. 40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and...temperature changes. (2) Ambient pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical shock and vibration....

  5. Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

  6. Missile warning and countermeasure systems in-flight testing by threat simulation and countermeasure analysis in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabib, Dario; Buckwald, R. A.; Lavi, Moshe; Gil, Amir; Dolev, Jacob; Rahav, Amir; Blau, Moshe

    2006-05-01

    Proliferation and technological progress of Mid Wave Infrared (MWIR) sensors for Missile Warning Systems (MWS) 1,2 and increased sophistication of countermeasures require demanding in-flight testing. The IR sensors are becoming more sensitive for longer range of detection, the spatial resolution is improving for better target detection and identification, spectral discrimination is being introduced for lower False Alarm Rate (FAR), and the imaging frame rate is increasing for faster defensive reaction. As a result, testing a complex MWS/countermeasure system performance before deployment requires more realistic simulation of the threats in their natural backgrounds, and more accurate measurement of the radiometric output, directionality and time response of the countermeasures. Existing stimulator systems for MWS testing during R&D and production cannot reproduce the field conditions faithfully enough, so that it is possible to rely on them for the most sophisticated MWS' testing. CI has developed a unique integrated MWS/countermeasure test system for field use, composed of: i) high intensity dynamic Infrared Threat Stimulator (IRTS), based on large optics and high speed shutter for time dependent scenario construction and projection to several kilometers; ii) sensitive IR Jam Beam Radiometer (JBR) for countermeasure testing. The IRTS/JBR system tests the MWS/countermeasure combination: efficiency range, probability of detection, reaction time, and overall well functioning2 can be determined in-flight through projection of threat profiles prepared in advance by the user, and through measurement of the countermeasure IR radiation output as function of time. Design, performance, and example of operation of the IRTS/JBR are described here.

  7. Star forming galaxies in the AKARI deep field south: identifications and spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma?ek, K.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Bienias, P.; Shirahata, M.; Matsuura, S.; Kawada, M.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature and properties of far-infrared (FIR) sources in the AKARI deep field south (ADF-S). Methods: We performed an extensive search for the counterparts to 1000 ADF-S objects brighter than 0.0301 Jy in the WIDE-S (90 ?m) AKARI band in the public databases (NED and SIMBAD). We analyzed the properties of the resulting sample: statistics of the identified objects, quality of position determination of the ADF-S sources, their number counts, redshift distribution, and comparison of morphological types, when the corresponding information was available. We performed a simplifield analysis of the clustering properties of the ADF-S sources and compliled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects with the highest quality photometry, using three different models. Results: Among 1000 investigated ADF-S sources, 545 were identified with sources at other wavelengths in public databases. From them, 518 are known galaxies and 343 of these were previously known as infra-red sources. Among the remaining sources, there are two quasars and both infrared and radio sources of unknown origin. Among six stellar identifications, at least five are probably the effect of contamination. We measured the redshifts of 48 extragalactic objects and determined the morphological types of 77 galaxies. We present SED models of 47 sources with sufficiently good photometric data. Conclusions: We conclude that the bright FIR point sources observed in the ADF-S are mostly nearby galaxies. Their properties are very similar to the properties of the local population of optically bright galaxies, except for unusually high ratio of peculiar or interacting objects and a lower percentage of elliptical galaxies. The percentage of lenticular galaxies is the same as in the optically bright population, which suggests that galaxies of this type may frequently contain a significant amount of cool dust. It is possible that source confusion plays a significant role in more than 34% of measurements. The SEDs correspond to a variety of galaxy types, from very actively star forming to very quiescent. The AKARI long wavelength bands data have enabled us to determine for the first time that these galaxies are objects with very cool dust. Tables A.1-A.8 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/514/A11

  8. Female sex pheromone of Cystidia couaggaria couaggaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae): identification and field attraction.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Rei; Takubo, Yoshiko; Ohbayashi, Kanako; Naka, Hideshi; Ando, Tetsu

    2012-01-01

    The plum cankerworm moth, Cystidia couaggaria couaggaria (Geometridae: Ennominae), is a defoliator of Chinese plum trees (Prunus mume). The pheromone components of the female were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with an electro-antennographic (EAG) detector and GC coupled with mass spectrometry. The crude pheromone extract included several EAG-active components, i.e., trienyl, dienyl, and saturated hydrocarbons, with a C21-C25 straight chain. The characteristic mass spectra indicated the unsaturated hydrocarbons to be (3Z,6Z,9Z)-3,6,9-trienes and (6Z,9Z)-6,9-dienes. In the fields, mixtures of the synthetic C<21 and C<23 trienes in a ratio of 2:3 and 1:4 successfully attracted males of this diurnal species during daytime. While the male antennae responded to the C25 triene and saturated hydrocarbons, their synergistic effects were not observed on the male attraction in the fields. Addition of the C21 diene interestingly inhibited the activity of the triene mixture. Males of Cystidia truncangulata, a sympatric diurnal congener of C. c. couaggaria, showed similar EAG responses to the unsaturated hydrocarbons, but no C. truncangulata males were attracted by the lures tested for C. c. couaggaria males, indicating that the identified hydrocarbons comprised the species-specific pheromone of C. c. couaggaria females. PMID:22785473

  9. Identification and field evaluation of pear fruit volatiles attractive to the oriental fruit moth, Cydia molesta.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng-Fei; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2012-08-01

    Plant volatiles play a key role in host plant location of phytophagous insects. Cydia molesta is an important pest of pear fruit late in the growing season. We identified and quantified volatiles from immature and mature fruits of six pear varieties by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Attractiveness of synthetic blends to adults based on gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) activity was investigated in both field and laboratory. Consistent electroantennographic activity was obtained for 12 compounds from headspace collections of the mature fruits of the six pear varieties. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among six odor profiles. Among the six mixtures, the mixture of 1-hexanol, nonanal, ethyl butanoate, butyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, hexyl butanoate, and farnesene (different isomers) with a 1:1:100:70:7:5:1:4 ratio from the variety Jimi and the mixture of nonanal, ethyl butanoate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, and farnesene with a 1:100:1:32:1:2 ratio from the variety Huangjin were highly attractive to both sexes in the field. However, male captures were much higher than those of females. Further wind tunnel tests proved that both sexes exhibited upwind flight to the lures, but only males landed on the source. Our finding indicates that mixtures mimicking Jimi and Huangjin volatiles attract both females and males of C. molesta, and these host volatiles may be involved in mate finding behavior. PMID:22730107

  10. Preliminary results from pressure tank test and field acceleration test of New-Profiling float of Japan (NINJA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Izawa; K. Ando; K. Mizuno; A. Inoue; N. Shikama; K. Takeuchi; M. Sekimoto

    2002-01-01

    As one of contributions of Japan to the international Argo community, one of Japanese ocean instrument manufacturers, Tsurumi Seiki Co. (TSK), has started the development of original profiling float in 2000. We purchased the four TSK floats in 2001, and performed the pressure tank test and the acceleration field test in the north Pacific. Among four floats, two are carrying

  11. Pharmacogenetic tests: the need for a level playing field.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Hughes, Dyfrig A

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of more personalized medicinecould be accelerated by addressing the substantial differences in the level of evidence required for the inclusion of pharmacogenetic tests in treatment guidelines, drug labelling and reimbursement schemes compared with that needed for non-genetic diagnostic tests. PMID:23274456

  12. Field testing and evaluation of PV module performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Forman

    1978-01-01

    Between March of 1977 and June of 1978, MIT Lincoln Laboratory in conjunction with the Department of Energy, placed 41.5 kilowatts of photovoltaic modules at various experimental test sites in the United States. The largest of these include a 25 kilowatt array in Mead, Nebraska, which is used for corn irrigation and crop drying and a 15 kilowatt rooftop test

  13. Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles M. Klimcak; Y. Chan; B. Jaduszliwer

    1999-01-01

    We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite

  14. Test modeling and parameter identification of a gun magnetorheological recoil damper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hu Hongsheng; Wang Jiong; Qian Suxiang; Jiang Xuezheng

    2009-01-01

    Since its performance requirements of gun recoil mechanism have been continuously increased, this paper was explored and aimed at its dynamic model and parameter identification of a new type of gun magnetorheological recoil damper. Combining with its recoil resistance rule and stroke requirements of the 37mm caliber gun, a long-stroke magnetorheological recoil damper was developed. Using the developed hardware-in-the-loop simulation

  15. Testing Multi-Field Inflation: A Geometric Approach

    E-print Network

    Courtney M. Peterson; Max Tegmark

    2012-11-22

    We develop an approach for linking the power spectra, bispectrum, and trispectrum to the geometric and kinematical features of multifield inflationary Lagrangians. Our geometric approach can also be useful in determining when a complicated multifield model can be well approximated by a model with one, two, or a handful of fields. To arrive at these results, we focus on the mode interactions in the kinematical basis, starting with the case of no sourcing and showing that there is a series of mode conservation laws analogous to the conservation law for the adiabatic mode in single-field inflation. We then treat the special case of a quadratic potential with canonical kinetic terms, showing that it produces a series of mode sourcing relations identical in form to that for the adiabatic mode. We build on this result to show that the mode sourcing relations for general multifield inflation are extension of this special case but contain higher-order covariant derivatives of the potential and corrections from the field metric. In parallel, we show how these interactions depend on the geometry of the inflationary Lagrangian and on the kinematics of the associated field trajectory. Finally, we consider how the mode interactions and effective number of fields active during inflation are reflected in the spectra and introduce a multifield consistency relation, as well as a multifield observable that can potentially distinguish two-field scenarios from scenarios involving three or more effective fields.

  16. GUIDELINES FOR FIELD TESTING AQUATIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guidance has been developed for those attempting to field validate aquatic fate and transport models. Included are discussions of the major steps in validating models and sections on the individual fate and transport processes: biodegradation, oxidation, hydrolysis, photolys...

  17. Test of the gravitomagnetic field via laser-ranged satellites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ignazio Ciufolini

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new experiment to measure the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth. This field, a consequence of the general relativistic formulation of Mach's principle (WEM—Wheeler-Einstein-Mach principle), has never been detected. The idea is to measure the Lense-Thirring precession of the nodal lines of two laser-ranged satellites with supplementary inclinations. In this way it is possible to separate the relativistic

  18. Two succussful steam/form field tests, sections 15a and 26c, Midway-Sunset Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ploeg, J.F.; Duerksen, J.H.

    1985-03-01

    Two successful steam-diverting field tests were conducted at the Midway-Sunset Field in the San Joaquin Valley, California. A Chevron proprietary sulfonate was used as a steam-diverting agent to improve oil recovery. The results showed that, for the conditions of the field experiment, the sulfonate used is very economic, significantly increasing oil recovery. Also, there were no associated sulfonate-handling and produced oil-treating problems.

  19. Two succussful steam\\/form field tests, sections 15a and 26c, Midway-Sunset Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Ploeg; J. H. Duerksen

    1985-01-01

    Two successful steam-diverting field tests were conducted at the Midway-Sunset Field in the San Joaquin Valley, California. A Chevron proprietary sulfonate was used as a steam-diverting agent to improve oil recovery. The results showed that, for the conditions of the field experiment, the sulfonate used is very economic, significantly increasing oil recovery. Also, there were no associated sulfonate-handling and produced

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of a field test kit for lead

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.K.; Schock, M.R.; Kelty, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Hach Lead-Trak test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. Considered were: operator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. Interferences tested were realistic levels of: Ca, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, Cu, Zn, Fe(II), Fe(III), Al, NO3(-), Cl(-), F(-), PO4(3-), P2O7(4-), P6O18(-6), and P3O10(5-). Interferences were tested individually in deionized water, using a linear regression slope technique to detect bias. Results of analyses of split spiked samples and actual drinking water samples were compared to GFAAS values. Agreement with GFAAS was generally good from 0 to 50 micrograms Pb/L, but the kit suffered from significant negative interferences from Fe(II), Zn(II), and all polyphosphates. Recoveries of Pb from 6 different tap waters ranged from 81 to 109%. No operator bias was found.

  1. Morphometric features of Pacific and American Golden-Plovers with comments on field identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    OSCAR W. JOHNSON; PATRICIA M. JOHNSON

    We measured linear dimensions and evaluated identification criteria in Pacific and American Golden-Plovers (Pluvialisfidva and P. dominica) captured for banding. Most of thefidva sampled were wintering birds in Hawaii, representative of the mid-Pacific flyway; additionalfidva and all dominica were from breeding grounds on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The sexes were monomorphic in dominica, and for all practical purposes infidva as

  2. Stimulus magnification equates identification and discrimination of biological motion across the visual field q,qq

    E-print Network

    Troje, Nikolaus

    the eccentricity at which stimulus size must double to achieve equivalent-to-foveal performance) all data could at which stimulus size must double to elicit equivalent-to-foveal performance.1 Therefore, not only doesStimulus magnification equates identification and discrimination of biological motion across

  3. Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

  4. Identification of compartmentalization and Free Water Level using Borehole Images and high Resolution Formation Testing in the Panonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S?reg, Viktor; Amran, Ahmed; Balogh, József; Tóth, József; Vargáné Tóth, Ilona; Bize, Emmanuel; Bize-Forest, Nadege; Ngallemo, Edmond

    2010-05-01

    Of all the methods used for investigating petroleum reservoirs, Well Testing is of particular interest because it proves reservoir potential and confirms well performance. Well testing involves flowing the well at a control rate and measuring the reservoir response. Conventional well testing is performed in a completed well while high resolution well testing applies to uncompleted well, using wireline technology. This paper describes the use of high technology wireline formation testers to improve reservoir characterization. The Schlumberger formation testing tools (PressureXpress and Modular Reservoir Dynamic Tester) are presented, with applications in geological modeling, drilling, completion and testing optimization as well as formation evaluation. One of the main goal of the study was to identify the gas (oil) saturated layers, to avoid testing unproductive zones. In well K4 utilization of formation tester allowed to point only the potential layers in a sand shale reservoir and a thorough study of these zones has allow the determination of potential reserves. Second successful objective was also to determine eventual compartments in the reservoir, i.e. which reservoir where in the same hydrodynamic system. Last but no least it has allowed an estimation of the free water level. Combination of formation tester with FMI has also helped to visualize the Free Water Level (FWL) in the well, and to determine, in real time, the different points to be tested with XPT. FMI was also of huge benefits in these fractured reservoirs. The determination of free water level and the identification of hydrocarbon saturated layers reduce the cost of completion and conventional testing. Downhole fluid analysis provides a unique solution to the understanding of complex reservoirs. Based on the lessons learned, Improvements have been proposed for future operations.

  5. A NEW APPROACH TO TIME-DOMAIN VIBRATION CONDITION MONITORING: GEAR TOOTH FATIGUE CRACK DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION BY THE KOLMOGOROV–SMIRNOV TEST

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. ANDRADE; I. Esat; M. N. M. Badi

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a new technique for early identification of spur gear tooth fatigue cracks, namely the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. This test works on the null hypotheses that the cumulative density function (CDF) of a target distribution is statistically similar to the CDF of a reference distribution. In effect, this is a time-domain signal processing technique that compares two signals, and

  6. Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for the Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Three Species of Nonfermenting Gram Negative Rods Frequently Isolated from Clinical Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PROVIDENCIA JOYANES; MARIA DEL CARMEN CONEJO; LUIS MARTINEZ-MARTINEZ; EVELIO J. PEREA

    2001-01-01

    VITEK 2 is a new automatic system for the identification and susceptibility testing of the most clinically important bacteria. In the present study 198 clinical isolates, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n 146), Acinetobacter baumannii (n 25), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n 27) were evaluated. Reference susceptibility testing of cefepime, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, tobramycin, levofloxacin (only for P. aeruginosa),

  7. Identification by Virtual Screening and In Vitro Testing of Human DOPA Decarboxylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, Barbara; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Giardina, Giorgio; Bossa, Francesco; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Dopa decarboxylase (DDC), a pyridoxal 5?-phosphate (PLP) enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of dopamine and serotonin, is involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a neurodegenerative disease mainly due to a progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the midbrain. Co-administration of L-Dopa with peripheral DDC inhibitors (carbidopa or benserazide) is the most effective symptomatic treatment for PD. Although carbidopa and trihydroxybenzylhydrazine (the in vivo hydrolysis product of benserazide) are both powerful irreversible DDC inhibitors, they are not selective because they irreversibly bind to free PLP and PLP-enzymes, thus inducing diverse side effects. Therefore, the main goals of this study were (a) to use virtual screening to identify potential human DDC inhibitors and (b) to evaluate the reliability of our virtual-screening (VS) protocol by experimentally testing the “in vitro” activity of selected molecules. Starting from the crystal structure of the DDC-carbidopa complex, a new VS protocol, integrating pharmacophore searches and molecular docking, was developed. Analysis of 15 selected compounds, obtained by filtering the public ZINC database, yielded two molecules that bind to the active site of human DDC and behave as competitive inhibitors with Ki values ?10 µM. By performing in silico similarity search on the latter compounds followed by a substructure search using the core of the most active compound we identified several competitive inhibitors of human DDC with Ki values in the low micromolar range, unable to bind free PLP, and predicted to not cross the blood-brain barrier. The most potent inhibitor with a Ki value of 500 nM represents a new lead compound, targeting human DDC, that may be the basis for lead optimization in the development of new DDC inhibitors. To our knowledge, a similar approach has not been reported yet in the field of DDC inhibitors discovery. PMID:22384042

  8. VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    323 CHAPTER 17 VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX \\B E Van D A The Tennessee Energy Conservation In Housing (TECH) complex has been utilized since 1977 as a field test site Conservation in Housing (TECH) program, initiated in 1975 as a joint venture of the Energy Research

  9. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

  13. Wireless GPS system for module fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer's farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  14. Wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer’s farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  15. Second Field Test of the AEL Measure of School Capacity for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copley, Lisa D.; Meehan, Merrill L.; Howley, Caitlin W.; Hughes, Georgia K.

    2005-01-01

    The major purpose of the second field test of the AEL MSCI instrument was to assess the psychometric properties of the refined version with a larger, more diverse group of respondents. The first objective of this field test was to expand the four-point Likert-type response scale to six points in order to yield more variance in responses. The…

  16. Field test implementation to evaluate a flash LIDAR as a primary sensor for safe lunar landing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Keim; S. Mobasser; Da Kuang; Yang Cheng; T. Ivanov; A. E. Johnson; H. R. Goldberg; G. Khanoyan; D. B. Natzic

    2010-01-01

    From May 2 through May 7 of 2008, the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) Exploration Technology Development Program carried out a helicopter field test to assess the use of a flash LIDAR as a primary sensor during lunar landing. The field test data has been used to evaluate the performance of the LIDAR system and of algorithms for

  17. Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers

    E-print Network

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic .............................................................................14 3.4. KNMI wind tunnel

  18. Bayesian sparse regularization in near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging for wind tunnel test

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian sparse regularization in near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging for wind tunnel test N. On simulated and wind tunnel data, proposed approach is compared with the beamforming, DAMAS, Diagonal Remove to investigate near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging on vehicle surface in wind tunnel test based on the 2D

  19. A test rig for the identification of rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film bearings

    E-print Network

    Robison, Lewis Miller

    1995-01-01

    acquisition and computer system record the dynamic response at a frequency of 12,000 samples per second. Test bearing elements undergo multiple forced dynamic tests, and the corresponding time responses are transformed into the frequency domain and averaged...

  20. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  1. Genetic tests for ability?: talent identification and the value of an open future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Miah; Emma Rich

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the prospect of genetic tests for performance in physical activity and sports practices. It investigates the terminology associated with genetics, testing, selection and ability as a means towards a socio-ethical analysis of its value within sport, education and society. Our argument suggests that genetic tests need not even be used (or widely used) as a tool for

  2. Testing chameleon theories with light propagating through a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe [Service de Physique Theorique CEA/DSM/SPhT, Unite de recherche associee au CNRS, CEA-Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Bruck, Carsten van de [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Davis, Anne-Christine [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge CB2 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16/19, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Shaw, Douglas [Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge CB2 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    It was recently argued that the observed PVLAS anomaly can be explained by chameleon field theories in which large deviations from Newton's law can be avoided. Here we present the predictions for the dichroism and the birefringence induced in the vacuum by a magnetic field in these models. We show that chameleon particles behave very differently from standard axionlike particles (ALPs). We find that, unlike ALPs, the chameleon particles are confined within the experimental setup. As a consequence, the birefringence is always bigger than the dichroism in PVLAS-type experiments.

  3. Methodology for Identification of Testing to Conduct on Type A and Industrial Packagings

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.; OBRIEN, J.H.

    2001-04-11

    This document furnishes knowledge and methods for determining how to demonstrate compliance with the US. Department of Transportation (DOT) packaging testing requirements for Type A packagings (DOT Type A) and Industrial Packagings (IP). The primary emphasis is on the requirements identified in Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) 173.411, ''Industrial packagings,'' 173.412, ''Additional design requirements for Type A packages,'' 173.461, ''Demonstration of compliance with tests,'' 173.462, ''Preparation of specimens for testing,'' 173.465 ''Type A packaging tests,'' 173.466, ''Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases,'' and 178.350, ''Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.'' These sections of the regulations identify the testing requirements and methods for demonstration of compliance. This document does not provide guidance for the testing of fissile materials packagings.

  4. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  5. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Bugnion; Axel Volkwein; Corinna Wendeler; Andrea Roth

    2010-01-01

    Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30°

  6. Preparation of the ITER poloidal field conductor insert (PFCI) test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Zanino; S. Egorov; K. Kim; N. Martovetsky; Y. Nunoya; K. Okuno; E. Salpietro; C. Sborchia; Y. Takahashi; P. Weng; M. Bagnasco; L. Savoldi Richard; M. Polak; A. Formisano; E. Zapretilina; A. Shikov; G. Vedernikov; D. Ciazynski; L. Zani; L. Muzzi; M. Ricci; A. della Corte; M. Sugimoto; K. Hamada; A. Portone; F. Hurd; N. Mitchell; A. Nijhuis; Yu. Ilyin

    2005-01-01

    The Poloidal Field Conductor Insert (PFCI) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been designed in the EU and is being manufactured at Tesla Engineering, UK, in the frame of a Task Agreement with the ITER International Team. Completion of the PFCI is expected at the beginning of 2005. Then, the coil shall be shipped to JAERI Naka, Japan,

  7. Field tests with a molluscicide containing iron phosphate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Speiser; C. Kistler

    2002-01-01

    The effect of slug pellets containing iron phosphate was evaluated in field trials. In comparison with untreated controls, iron phosphate reduced leaf loss of lettuce, increased the number of marketable lettuce heads and reduced numbers of the slug Arion lusitanicus. The reference treatment metaldehyde was more effective in preventing slug damage and reduced numbers of all slug species present (A.

  8. Laboratory and Field Tests of Ultrasonic Sensors for Precision Sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable function of sensors under rough field conditions is required for the development of variable-rate sprayers to deliver pest control agents to tree liners in ornamental nurseries. Two ultrasonic sensors were examined to identify how their durability and detection stability would be influenced...

  9. Field Coil Insulation Testing for Pulse Power Alternators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clay S. Hearn; Jon J. Hahne; Steven M. Manifold; Scott P. Pish

    2007-01-01

    Current pulse power alternator designs operate at high speeds and high current densities. The field coil insulation systems for pulse power alternators must provide sufficient stand-off voltage while limiting the amount of thermal resistance for actively cooled designs, and also withstand the strain excursions experienced at full operating speed. Repetitive cycling of the strain excursion overtime may induce cracks in

  10. FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

  11. Vegetative propagation of kura clover: a field-scale test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kura clover is a potentially valuable forage legume, but it has been underutilized. A major reason is the difficulty of establishing it from seed. Since kura is rhizomatous, there have been attempts to propagate it vegetatively, but no reports of success at the field scale. Two harvesting methods we...

  12. Hydraulic fracturing theoretical principles, laboratory research, field tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baron

    1967-01-01

    In the past, experimental investigations into hydraulic fracturing have very often been at variance with theoretical principles and results obtained in the field. Technological progress has made it possible to carry out significant experimental investigations both on rocks and on models and to determine fracturing pressures, direction and propagation of fractures, effect of stresses, and effect of stratigraphy. A method

  13. An Alternative Approach to Specifying Test Electric Field Magnitude for Evaluation of Broadband LMR Antennas

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    An Alternative Approach to Specifying Test Electric Field Magnitude for Evaluation of Broadband LMR the disadvantage that the magnitude of the applied electric field is determined by the performance at the nominal field magnitude that is not associated with an arbitrarily-determined frequency. In this report, we

  14. Testing the tracer ratio method for modeling active compositional fields in mantle convection simulations

    E-print Network

    Tackley, Paul J.

    are attractive for modeling compositional fields because they offer the potential of zero numerical diffusion chemical fields in numerical simula- tions, some representative implementations of which were comparedTesting the tracer ratio method for modeling active compositional fields in mantle convection

  15. A Test of the Earth's Magnetic Field during Permian Time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis G. Stehli

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative paleontologic data sensitive to the planetaw temperature gradient are used with similar data for living organisms to test two possible Permian latitude models for the Northern Hemisphere. The Permian paleontologic data applied to a present-earth model yield a pattern strikingly similar to that of living organisms on the same model. Permian paleontologic data applied to a Permian palcomagnetic earth

  16. Heave Compensation Systems: Analysis and Results of Field Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenceslao Azpiazu; M. Thatcher; E. Schwelm

    1983-01-01

    A program to determine the performance of heave compensator systems under actual at-sea working conditions has been undertaken. As a result of this test program, parameters have been determined for heave compensation systems that will allow design of these systems with preestablished performance goals. A description of the methods used to determine the coefficients that control system performance is presented

  17. Field Application of Hydraulic Impedance Testing for Fracture Measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Paige; L. R. Murray; J. D. M. Roberts

    1995-01-01

    Hydraulic impedance testing (HIT) is a technique for detecting and measuring formation fractures intersecting wellbores. A pressure pulse is introduced into a well, and the resulting pressure trace is interpreted to give fracture dimensions. The first part of this paper describes how HIT can be used to estimate fracture dimensions and presents some results from a laboratory experiment that show

  18. Identification of 3D Vortex structure using Cluster satellite magnetic field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, DongSheng; Lembege, Bertrand; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; NIshikawa, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Identifying vortices are the key to understand the turbulence in plasma shear layers. Vortices are often viewed as "the sinews and muscles of turbulence" (Kuchermann 1965) and there still have no effective vortex identification method due to the lack of accepted mathematical definitions. Here we refer to the term 'vortex' a 'vortex core' that is the regions of Galilean invariance (for details please see Jeong

  19. Results of the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers: CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-08-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the US (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

  20. Results from the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers-CATSI and AIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

    2002-02-01

    The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the U.S (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

  1. Field test of re-refined automotive engine oil in RCMP vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1980-01-01

    A field test has been designed to isolate the performance characteristics of the virgin and re-refined base oils being studied. The conditions selected for the test are those normally experienced by Royal Canadian Mounted Police vehicles in similar service. All test and reference vehicles have been subjected to as equal treatment as possible, in both driving conditions and maintenance schedules.

  2. Employment of the Large Coil Test Facility in toroidal field coil development

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.; Miller, H.E.; Ryan, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The international Large Coil Task (LCT), involving EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, is developing competing concepts of superconducting toroidal field coils. Six different coils will be tested together in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF). All participants are collaborating in planning and will share all test data.

  3. Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

  4. GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective Conclusion Testing strong-field general relativity at the

    E-print Network

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective Conclusion Testing strong-field general/34 Frédéric VINCENT Testing GR at the galactic center #12;GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective : ongoing work 2/34 Frédéric VINCENT Testing GR at the galactic center #12;GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO

  5. WIND TUNNEL AND FIELD TEST OF THREE 2D SONIC ANEMOMETERS Wiel M.F. Wauben,

    E-print Network

    Wauben, Wiel

    WIND TUNNEL AND FIELD TEST OF THREE 2D SONIC ANEMOMETERS Wiel M.F. Wauben, Instrumental Department upgraded and the tests commenced. Wind tunnel tests were performed for wind speeds up to 75m/s. Overall and the Vaisala WAS425. The sonics have been compared to the KNMI cup anemometer and wind vane that are used

  6. FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS (1) DESCRIPTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PERFORMANCE INDEX

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS (1) 1. - DESCRIPTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PERFORMANCE breeding pigs, samples of gilts and of boars from the Dutch Landvace breed and the Dutch York- shire breed it was concluded that for farm testing one measurement would suffice. INTRODUCTION Farm testing of young breeding

  7. COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

  8. FIELD TEST KIT FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL-BRINE EFFLUENTS FROM OFFSHORE DRILLING PLATFORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated to evaluate test methods for characterizing oil-brine effluents from offshore oil production platforms and to package and deliver a field test kit for on-site oil-brine analyses. After an initial laboratory evaluation and selection of test meth...

  9. Identification of Possible Artifacts in the Association of Official Analytical Chemists Sporicidal Test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NORMAN A. MINER; GAYLE K. MULBERRY; AUBRIE N. STARKS; ANN POWERS-PRATHER; MARK ENTRUP; MICHELLE ARMSTRONG; ANDBRAULIA MAIDA

    Two laboratories tested four different brands of alkaline 2% glutaraldehyde sterilants by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists sporicidal test. Each laboratory found survival ofClostridium sporogenesspores on spore-labeledunglazedporcelainpenicylinders(cylinders)tovaryfromtesttotest,andsurvivaldidnotalways correlate with increasing sterilant exposure time. These results were consistent with a theory that there may be random conditions within the test that prevent the sterilant from contacting all spores. Further studies

  10. A tensile test to facilitate identification of defects in dentine bonded specimens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Nakabayashi; A. Watanabe; T. Arao

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the efficacy of a miniaturized dumbbell test procedure designed to more easily identify defect(s) in bonded dentine test specimens.Methods: Extracted human dentine substrates were pre-conditioned with 10-3 solution for 10, 30 or 60 s prior to dentine bonding with 4-META\\/MMA-TBB resin. Miniaturized dumbbell-shaped test specimens were prepared from the resin bonded samples. After 24 h storage in

  11. Identification of the existence of quantum Hall edge-state in graphene field-effect transistor at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Gyu; Kang, Haeyong; Park, Jeongmin; Yun, Yoojoo; Truong, Thuy Kieu; Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Park, Nahee; Lee, Yourack; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2015-03-01

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is one of the unique properties of two-dimensional electronic systems providing the universal standard of electrical resistance. Due to edge-state transport features in quantum Hall regime, the two-terminal graphene field-effect transistor (FET) is frequently examined for the study of the integer as well as the fractional QHEs of graphene. In this work, we present a simple method to identify the existence of quantum Hall state in the graphene FET especially at high temperatures. Using the monolayer graphene FET sample with fully broken degeneracy, we modified the equipotential line inside graphene FET by the addition of extra electrode for the clear identification of the quantum Hall state formation at given temperature and magnetic field. We suggest a simple model to explain the difference and similarity between two-terminal and multi-terminal configurations, including the discussion about the QHE devices connected in series.

  12. Field tests of synthetic Manduca sexta sex pheromone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H. Tumlinson; Everett R. Mitchell; Robert E. Doolittle; D. Michael Jackson

    1994-01-01

    In field experiments traps were baited with live females or with a two-, four-, or eight-component blend of the 16-carbon aldehydes previously identified as components of the sex pheromone emitted by femaleManduca sexta moths. The blends were formulated on rubber septa. Traps baited with a blend of all eight aldehydes captured moreM. sexta males than any other treatment. Septa loaded

  13. Field test of a three-channel seismic event discriminator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Buck; D. S. Burns; L. J. Freier

    1975-01-01

    A practical three-channel seismic event discriminator breadboard was employed at the Harvard College Observatory to monitor, in real time, three short-period seismometers. The major objective for placing this breadboard system in the field was to demonstrate that preprocessing of seismic data on-site (thereby reducing recording and transmitting requirements) is a viable and workable concept. Background information pertaining to the event

  14. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  15. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  16. Interference test analysis at the Takigami geothermal field, JP

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuichi Itol; Michihiro Fukuda; Kenji Jinno; Hiroki Gotoh

    1993-01-28

    A long term interference test was conducted under conditions of multiwell variable flow rate at Takigami for about ten months in 1987. The test data have been analyzed with an on-line analysis method on the basis of the linesource solution. This method employs Kalman filtering to process the data and then provides the best estimates of reservoir transmissivity and storativity when a new pressure data at an observation well becomes available. The pressure changes measured at seven observation wells have been analyzed with the present method using an infinite reservoir model. The data from one observation well have been further analyzed assuming a presence of a linear boundary. Performances of the parameters estimated for different reservoir models are compared. Fairly good estimates of reservoir parameters are obtained on the basis of an infinite reservoir model for two wells using the entire pressure data whereas for other five wells using a part of the pressure data.

  17. Heave compensation systems: analysis and results of field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Azpiazu, W.; Schweim, E.R.; Thatcher, M.T.

    1983-05-01

    A program to determine the performance of heave compensator systems under actual at-sea working conditions has been undertaken. As a result of this test program, parameters have been determined for heave compensation systems that will allow design of these systems with preestablished performance goals. A description of the methods used to determine the coefficients that control system performance is presented and equations are given to determine system response to the full spectrum of envisioned working conditions.

  18. Identification of wind turbine testing practices and investigation of the performance benefits of closely-spaced lateral wind farm configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTavish, Sean

    The current thesis investigates the development of guidelines for testing small-scale wind turbines and identifies a method that can be used to increase the performance of wind farms. The research was conducted using two scaled wind turbine designs. The first design was a three-bladed wind turbine designed in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAAE) to operate in a low Reynolds number regime and to generate a thrust coefficient representative of commercial-scale wind turbines. An Eppler E387 airfoil was selected for the wind turbine due to its behaviour at low Reynolds numbers and the chord of the turbine was increased relative to full-scale designs in order to increase the range of Reynolds numbers that could be attained. The second design was a geometrically-scaled version of an existing two-bladed wind turbine with a NACA 0012 airfoil that was originally designed at the Delft University of Technology. Experiments were conducted in a 0.61 m x 0.81 m water channel in order to independently evaluate the effects of increasing blockage and Reynolds number on the development of the wind turbine wake. Quantitative dye visualisation was used to identify the position of tip vortex cores relative to the blade tip in order to assess how blockage and Reynolds number effects modified the initial expansion in the near wake. Blockage effects on the wake development were assessed using five wind turbines with diameters ranging from 20 cm to 40 cm, corresponding to blockage of 6.3% to 25.4%. The rotors were all operated at a similar tip speed ratio of 6 and a Reynolds number of 23,000 based on the blade tip speed and tip chord. One Outcome of the research was the identification of a limit beyond which blockage narrowed the expansion in the near wake of a wind turbine. It was observed that blockage should be maintained at less than 10% in order to prevent the wake from narrowing artificially due to the flow acceleration around the turbine caused by excessive blockage. The experimental results were compared to a freestream computational simulation of the same turbine using the vortex particle method code GENUVP. The magnitude of the wake expansion in the freestream computation was similar to the experimental wake expansion observed with 6.3% and 9.9% blockage. Following the identification of testing practices related to blockage, the effect of the Reynolds number on the development of the initial wake expansion was investigated using two different rotors. The wake expansion downstream of a 25 cm diameter, three-bladed MAAE wind turbine became less sensitive to the Reynolds number above a Reynolds number of 20,000. This behaviour may be related to the laminar-to-turbulent transition behaviour of the E387 airfoil on the rotor blades. The wake downstream of the geometrically-scaled rotor was found to be 40% to 60% narrower than the initial wake expansion downstream of the corresponding medium-scale rotor. The work identified the need to develop a wind turbine design for a particular Reynolds number regime as opposed to merely geometrically-scaling a turbine. The performance of scaled wind farm configurations was then evaluated using 20 cm diameter MAAE wind turbines installed in the 1.68 m x 1.12 m atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at Carleton University. A scaled boundary layer was generated using triangular boundary layer spires and roughness elements installed along the upstream fetch of the tunnel. Each wind turbine was outfitted with a DC generator and the power output generated by the scaled turbines was used to characterise their performance. A single-normal hot-wire probe was used to determine the mean speed profiles in the fiowfield. Two laterally-aligned wind turbines were separated by a gap and it was observed that when the gap was less than 3 diameters (D), the speed of the flow between the rotors was increased from the rotor plane to approximately 2.5D downstream. This behaviour was identified as an in-field blockage effect and is analogous to the increase in wind speed caused by blockage in a closed

  19. Construction of a BAC library and identification of Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel, Monopterus albus

    SciTech Connect

    Jang Songhun [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou Fang [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xia Laixin [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhao Wei [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng Hanhua [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

    2006-09-22

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed using nuclear DNA from the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). The BAC library consists of a total of 33,000 clones with an average insert size of 115 kb. Based on the rice field eel haploid genome size of 600 Mb, the BAC library is estimated to contain approximately 6.3 genome equivalents and represents 99.8% of the genome of the rice field eel. This is first BAC library constructed from this species. To estimate the possibility of isolating a specific clone, high-density colony hybridization-based library screening was performed using Dmrt1 cDNA of the rice field eel as a probe. Both library screening and PCR identification results revealed three positive BAC clones which were overlapped, and formed a contig covering the Dmrt1 gene of 195 kb. By sequence comparisons with the Dmrt1 cDNA and sequencing of first four intron-exon junctions, Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel was predicted to contain four introns and five exons. The sizes of first and second intron are 1.5 and 2.6 kb, respectively, and the sizes of last two introns were predicted to be about 20 kb. The Dmrt1 gene structure was conserved in evolution. These results also indicate that the BAC library is a useful resource for BAC contig construction and molecular isolation of functional genes.

  20. Challenges for mining explosion identification under a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty: Quantification of the problem and discussion of synergetic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, B.W.

    1994-11-01

    Seismic networks provide the primary technology for monitoring compliance with a comprehensive test ban treaty. The design goal of the network is the identification of possibly clandestine explosions detonated below the earth`s surface and possible in the oceans. Complementary technologies such as infrasonic, hydroacoustic and radionuclide monitoring supplement the seismic monitoring covering explosions in the atmosphere and oceans. This paper will focus on the problems or ambiguities that can arise in the identification process for chemical explosions. Key questions addressed include: How many mining explosions produce seismograms at regional distances that will have to be detected, located and ultimately identified by the National Data Center? What are the waveform characteristics of these particular mining explosions? Can discrimination techniques based on empirical studies be placed on a firm physical basis so that they can be applied to other regions where we have little monitoring experience? With this information, can evasion capabilities be assessed in a region? Can large scale chemical explosions be used to calibrate source and propagation path effects to regional stations? Can source depth of burial and decoupling effects be studied in such a controlled environment?

  1. IOWA SOIL-TEST FIELD CALIBRATION RESEARCH UPDATE: POTASSIUM AND THE MEHLICH-3 ICP PHOSPHORUS TEST

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio P. Mallarino; David J. Wittry; Pedro A. Barbagelata

    Iowa soil-test interpretations and fertilizer recommendations for phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were last updated in 1999. The only change from previous recommendations (Voss et al., 1996; Voss and Mallarino, 1996) was to add interpretations for the Mehlich-3 (M3) P and K tests to existing interpretations for the Bray-1 P, Olsen P, and ammonium-acetate K tests (Voss et al., 1999).

  2. WORKSHOP REPORT: IDENTIFICATION OF PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS FOR TEST KIT MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a 1 1/2 day workshop to review the status of chemical test kit technology designed for testing lead (Pb) in solids. he goals of the workshop were to identify problems and limitations that could result in measurement error and to ...

  3. Remote identification and information processing with a near field communication compatible mobile phone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raine Kelkka; Tommi Kallonen; Jouni Ikonen

    2009-01-01

    Mobile phones have become a popular platform for diverse applications in different fields. Near Field Communication (NFC), short range contactless communication standard developed especially for end user devices, is one the most novel technologies integrated into mobile phones. This paper presents a scenario where a Near Field Communication enabled mobile phone is used to identify a construction element, display information

  4. Identification of Power Frequency Industrial Magnetic Field Sources for Shielding Purposes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aldo Canova; Fabio Freschi; Maurizio Repetto; Michele Tartaglia

    2008-01-01

    In any industrial installation, power electric systems generate extremely low frequency magnetic fields. Field amplitude values must fulfill the limits related to health effects or to disturbances on electromagnetic devices, and a shielding system is sometimes necessary. The design of magnetic field shields requires the simulation of the sources and of the shields in order to evaluate the main parameters

  5. Identification of power frequency industrial magnetic field sources for shielding purposes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Canova; F. Freschi; M. Repetto; M. Tartaglia

    2004-01-01

    In any industrial installation power frequency electric systems generate extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. Field amplitude values must fulfill the limits related to health effects or to disturbances on electromagnetic devices and a shielding system could be necessary. The design of a magnetic field shielding apparatus requires the simulation of the sources and of the shields in order to

  6. Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

  7. First tests of a Micromegas TPC in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Lepeltier, V.; Ronan, M.

    2004-12-10

    Since the summer of 2003, a large Micromegas TPC prototype (1000 channels, 50 cm drift, 50 cm diameter) has been operated in a 2T superconducting magnet at Saclay. A description of this apparatus and first results from cosmic ray tests are presented. Additional measurements using simpler detectors with a laser source, an X-ray gun and radio-active sources are discussed. Drift velocity and gain measurements, electron attachment and aging studies for a Micromegas TPC are presented. In particular, using simulations and measurements, it is shown that an $Argon-CF_4$ mixture is optimal for operation at a future Linear Collider.

  8. Field Tests with Corn at College Station and Beeville.

    E-print Network

    Pittuck, B. C.; Connell, J. H.

    1898-01-01

    inches in the drill. 2. V arie ty and D istance Test?Embracing 5 varieties, th e d istance varying between rows from 3 feet to 5 feet, and 2 1-2 feet to 3 feet in the drill. SUMMARY OF RESULTS. COLLEGE STATION. Varieties?W ith th e varie... Forsyth ?s F avorite ..........26.5 ? Hickory K ing ....................26.3 ? Iowa Silver M ine............. 26.2 ct *Early M astodon............ 25.8 ? Champion Y ellow D ent. 25.7 ? * First mentiond grown in Ohio; latter grown in Illinois. CORN...

  9. Hyperboloidal evolution of test fields in three spatial dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Zenginoglu, Anil [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Kidder, Lawrence E. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14853 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We present the numerical implementation of a clean solution to the outer boundary and radiation extraction problems within the 3+1 formalism for hyperbolic partial differential equations on a given background. Our approach is based on compactification at null infinity in hyperboloidal scri fixing coordinates. We report numerical tests for the particular example of a scalar wave equation on Minkowski and Schwarzschild backgrounds. We address issues related to the implementation of the hyperboloidal approach for the Einstein equations, such as nonlinear source functions, matching, and evaluation of formally singular terms at null infinity.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  11. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  12. EMISSION TEST REPORT - FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL - CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  13. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2012-01-01

    Many configurations proposed for the next generation of aircraft rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from the observers on the ground. However, the ability to predict the shielding effect and any new noise sources that arise from the high-speed jet flow interacting with a hard surface is currently limited. Furthermore, quality experimental data from jets with surfaces nearby suitable for developing and validating noise prediction methods are usually tied to a particular vehicle concept and, therefore, very complicated. The Jet/Surface Interaction Test was intended to supply a high quality set of data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions and jet flows to researchers developing aircraft noise prediction tools. During phase one, the goal was to measure the noise of a jet near a simple planar surface while varying the surface length and location in order to: (1) validate noise prediction schemes when the surface is acting only as a jet noise shield and when the jet/surface interaction is creating additional noise, and (2) determine regions of interest for more detailed tests in phase two. To meet these phase one objectives, a flat plate was mounted on a two-axis traverse in two distinct configurations: (1) as a shield between the jet and the observer (microphone array) and (2) as a reflecting surface on the opposite side of the jet from the observer.

  14. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  15. Wind-Tunnel Survey of an Oscillating Flow Field for Application to Model Helicopter Rotor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirick, Paul H.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was conducted of the flow field produced by the Airstream Oscillator System (AOS) in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The magnitude of a simulated gust field was measured at 15 locations in the plane of a typical model helicopter rotor when tested in the TDT using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) model. These measurements were made over a range of tunnel dynamic pressures typical of those used for an ARES test. The data indicate that the gust field produced by the AOS is non-uniform across the tunnel test section, but should be sufficient to excite a model rotor.

  16. Far-Field Antenna Pattern From a Near-Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plane/polar geometry simplifies measurement of near-field data for this antenna and allows a determination of far-field pattern by Jacobi-Bessel series expansion of data. Measuring probe is an undersized, dielectrically loaded and open-ended waveguide with a far-field pattern similar to that of a small magnetic dipole in its forward directions, making it unnecessary to rotate probe in direction similar to antenna rotation.

  17. MODE IDENTIFICATION OF AN ARCH DAM BY A DYNAMIC AIR-GUN TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Fedock, Joseph J.; Fletcher, Jon B.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen natural frequencies of a concrete arch dam (Monticello Dam near Sacramento, California) have been identified by using a dynamic testing method which employs an air gun firing in the reservoir as the excitation source. These vibrations modes are determined from the peak responses in the Fourier amplitude spectra of the free-vibration data recorded at three crest locations using three-component geophones. Comparisons of the first five natural frequencies with results obtained by forced vibration tests using rotating mass shakers show good agreement. The next eight higher-frequency modes, not previously identified, are determined from data of the present tests.

  18. Alcohol Use and Sexual Risks: Use of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) Among Female Sex Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chen; Hong, Yan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The association between alcohol use and sexual risks among female sex workers (FSWs) has been insufficiently studied. This article reports a cross-sectional study of the relationship between alcohol use risk, measured by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and sexual risk behaviors among 1,022 FSWs in Guangxi, China. Bivariate analysis showed that FSWs at higher AUDIT levels tended to have earlier sexual initiation, younger age of involvement in the sex trade and were more vulnerable to sex under the influence of alcohol. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent association of problem drinking with both unprotected sex and a history of sexually transmitted diseases. Alcohol use in commercial sex shall be considered as an occupational hazard that requires immediate intervention. Future longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the association between alcohol use and sexual risks among this most-at-risk population. PMID:23311906

  19. Preliminary field test of lyophilised contagious caprine pleuropneumonia vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rurangirwa, F R; McGuire, T C; Mbai, L; Ndung'u, L; Wambugu, A

    1991-03-01

    Fifty goats were immunised in the field against contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) using a single dose (0.15 mg) of lyophilised, saponin killed Mycoplasma strain F38. Two months after vaccination, these goats together with 50 unimmunised control goats were challenged by contact with goats experimentally infected with CCPP. Twelve vaccinates and 14 controls died of diarrhoea due to salmonella infection during the first two weeks after challenge. The remaining immunised goats (38) with the exception of two goats which had elevated temperatures were protected from CCPP. Of the remaining 36 control goats, 30 contracted CCPP at a mean of 39 (+/- 14.3 SD) days after challenge and 27 of them died. These results show that the lyophilised killed F38 vaccine conferred 100 per cent protection against mortality and 95 per cent protection against clinical disease caused by Mycoplasma species strain F38. PMID:2034906

  20. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  1. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

  2. Design, production, and testing of field effect transistors. [cryogenic MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sclar, N.

    1982-01-01

    Cryogenic MOSFETS (CRYOFETS), specifically designed for low temperature preamplifier application with infrared extrinsic detectors were produced and comparatively tested with p-channel MOSFETs under matched conditions. The CRYOFETs exhibit lower voltage thresholds, high source-follower gains at lower bias voltage, and lower dc offset source voltage. The noise of the CRYOFET is found to be 2 to 4 times greater than the MOSFET with a correspondingly lower figure of merit (which is established for source-follower amplifiers). The device power dissipation at a gain of 0.98 is some two orders of magnitude lower than for the MOSFET. Further, CRYOFETs are free of low temperature I vs V character hysteresis and balky conduction turn-on effects and operate effectively in the 2.4 to 20 K range. These devices have promise for use on long term duration sensor missions and for on-focal-plane signal processing at low temperatures.

  3. Spinning test particles in a Kerr field - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrian, K.; Semerák, O.

    2007-12-01

    The motion of small spinning free test bodies is usually treated within the `pole-dipole' approximation, which - in general relativity - leads to Mathisson-Papapetrou (MP) equations. These have to be supplemented by three side constraints in order to provide a unique solution. Several different `spin conditions' have been proposed and used in the literature, each leading to different worldlines. In a previous paper, we integrated the MP equations with the p?S?? = 0 condition numerically in Kerr space-time and illustrated the effect of the spin-curvature interaction by comparing the trajectories obtained for various spin magnitudes. Here we also consider other spin conditions and clarify their interrelations analytically as well as numerically on particular trajectories. The notion of a `minimal worldtube' is introduced in order to judge the individual supplementary conditions and to expose the limitations of the pole-dipole approximation.

  4. Identification of field caught Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis by TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Edward D; Thibault, Alisha R; Thelen, Annette P; Bullard, Blair A; Huang, Juan; Odiere, Maurice R; Bayoh, Nabie M; Wilkins, Elizabeth E; Vulule, John M

    2007-01-01

    Background Identification of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis from field-collected Anopheles gambiae s.l. is often necessary in basic and applied research, and in operational control programmes. The currently accepted method involves use of standard polymerase chain reaction amplification of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from the 3' 28S to 5' intergenic spacer region of the genome, and visual confirmation of amplicons of predicted size on agarose gels, after electrophoresis. This report describes development and evaluation of an automated, quantitative PCR method based upon TaqMan™ single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Methods Standard PCR, and TaqMan SNP genotyping with newly designed primers and fluorophore-labeled probes hybridizing to sequences of complementary rDNA specific for either An. gambiae s.s. or An. arabiensis, were conducted in three experiments involving field-collected An. gambiae s.l. from western Kenya, and defined laboratory strains. DNA extraction was from a single leg, sonicated for five minutes in buffer in wells of 96-well PCR plates. Results TaqMan SNP genotyping showed a reaction success rate, sensitivity, and species specificity comparable to that of standard PCR. In an extensive field study, only 29 of 3,041 (0.95%) were determined to be hybrids by TaqMan (i.e., having rDNA sequences from both species), however, all but one were An. arabiensis by standard PCR, suggesting an acceptably low (ca. 1%) error rate for TaqMan genotyping in mistakenly identifying species hybrids. Conclusion TaqMan SNP genotyping proved to be a sensitive and rapid method for identification of An. gambiae s.l. and An. arabiensis, with a high success rate, specific results, and congruence with the standard PCR method. PMID:17326831

  5. Demonstration of the fiducial concept using data from the March 1985 GPS field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Wu, S. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Dixon, T. H.; Williams, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    The first field test of NASA's Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Program took place in March of 1985. The principal objective of this test was the demonstration of the feasibility of the fiducial station approach to precise GPS-based geodesy and orbit determination. Other objectives included an assessment of the performance of the several GPS receiver types involved in these field tests and the testing of the GIPSY software for GPS data analysis. In this article, the GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning System) software system is described and baseline solutions are examined for consistency with independent measurements made using very long baseline interferometry.

  6. Factors Associated with Performance on the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Major Field Achievement Test in Business (MFAT-B)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bycio, Peter; Allen, Joyce S.

    2007-01-01

    Accrediting bodies, including Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-International (AACSB), require evidence that business schools fulfill their stated missions. This often involves using the Major Field Achievement Test in Business (MFAT-B). In this article, the authors studied MFAT-B performance for its relationship to grade point…

  7. An Investigation of Test Variables Potentially Useful to the Washington Pre-College Testing Program for Community College Subject Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenmun, Renny; And Others

    This study was to identify variables potentially useful in predicting a larger proportion of variance in community college study fields than accounted for by the current Washington Pre-College (WPC) battery. Selected tests from the Comparative Guidance and Placement (CGP) Core and Research Batteries, and the Tool and Form Matching subtests from…

  8. Field-testing competing runoff source and hydrochemical conceptualisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, A. W.; Saffarpour, S.; Adams, R.; Costelloe, J. F.; McDonnell, J.

    2014-12-01

    There are competing conceptualisations of heterogeneity in catchment systems. It is often convenient to divide catchments into zones, for example the soil profile, groundwater aquifers (saturated zone), riparian zones, etc. We also often divide flow sources into distinct categories such as surface runoff, interflow and baseflow, implying a few distinct stores of water. In tracer hydrology we typically assume water from such zones has distinct and invariant chemistry that is used to infer the runoff source mixture through conservative mixing model techniques such as End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA). An alternative conceptualisation is that catchments consist of a large number of stores with varying residence times. In this case individual stores contribute a variable proportion of flow and may have a temporally varying composition due to processes such as evapo-concentration. Hence they have a variable influence on the hydrochemistry of runoff. In this presentation, examples from two field studies in southern Australia will be presented that examine the relationships between hydrologic and hydrochemical conceptualisations and the relative variation within and between different hydrologic zones. The implications for water quality behaviour will be examined and the additional behavioural complexities associated with interactions between runoff pathways for non-conservative chemical species will be discussed.

  9. The Savannah River Environmental Technology Field Test Platform: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Jarosch, T.R.; Looney, B.B.; Raymond, R.

    1995-03-14

    The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The DOE complex has devised several strategies to facilitate this transfer including joint research projects between private industries and government laboratories or universities (CRADAs) and streamlined licensing procedures. One strategy that has been under-utilized is a planned sequence gradually moving from laboratory development and field demonstration to long term evaluation and onsite use. Industrial partnership and commercial production can be initiated at any step based on the performance, market, user needs, and costs associated with the technology. This approach allows use of the technology by onsite groups for compliance monitoring tasks (e.g. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management), while following parallel research and development organizations the opportunity to evaluate the long term performance and to make modifications or improvements to the technology. This probationary period also provides regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology`s performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs.

  10. Soil gas carbon dioxide probe: laboratory testing and field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, B M; Furness, A J; Bastow, T P

    2013-05-01

    An automated semi-continuous on-line instrument has been developed to measure CO2 gas concentrations in the vadose zone. The instrument uses semi-permeable polymer tubing (CO2 probe) for diffusion based sampling, coupled to an infra red sensor. The system operated automatically by intermittently purging the CO2 probe, which was installed in the vadose zone, with a non-CO2 gas at a low flow rate. The gas exiting the CO2 probe was monitored at the ground surface using a miniature infra red sensor and the response related to the vadose zone soil gas CO2 concentration. The in situ CO2 probes provided a reliable monitoring technique under long-term (18 months) aggressive and dynamic field conditions, with no interference observed from non-CO2 gases and volatile organic compounds. The probes provided data that were comparable to conventional grab sampling techniques without the labour-intensive sample collection and processing associated with these conventional techniques. Also, disturbance to vadose zone CO2 profiles from repeated grab samples during long-term semi-continuous monitoring could potential be reduced by using the diffusion based sampling technique. PMID:23563305

  11. Wood processing wastes recovery and composted product field test

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.T.; Lin, K.L. [National Inst. of I-Lan Agriculture and Technology, I-Lan City (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1997-12-31

    Lumber mill waste, more than 3,000 tons per month, is one of the main waste sources in I-Lan area. Most of the lumber mill waste is sawdust which takes a large parts of organic-containing wastes in I-Lan county. Wastes from seafood plants around the Sueou Harbor causes a treatment problem because of their high nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations. Furthermore, the distiller-by products in I-Lan Winery are easy to become spoiled and result in odor. In this study, the compost method is suggested to deal with these waste problems and make energy recovery. Microorganisms incubating in the laboratory provide the stable seed needed for composting. Flowers and vegetable raising are scheduled to be used in field to verify the efficiency of the products. The optimal combination ration of wastes and operation criteria then will be concluded in this study after economic analyzing. The results show that the Zinnia elegans leaves growth is relative with organic fertilizer. It can also be illustrated from the statistical value that the F value is 19.4 and above the critical value 9.4.

  12. Numerical analysis of step-drawdown tests: Parameter identification and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, A.; Vandenbohede, A.; Lebbe, L.

    2010-01-01

    SummaryAn inverse, numerical model is presented as an interpretation method for step-drawdown tests. The model consists of an axi-symmetric model to simulate radial flow in a horizontally stratified aquifer, and a nonlinear regression analysis to identify hydraulic parameters and quantify parameter uncertainty. Compared to commonly used methods based on analytical solutions, the inverse model allows a more representative aquifer schematisation, usage of all drawdown observations, and a comprehensive analysis of parameter uncertainty. Data sets from two step-drawdown tests performed in a homogeneous, confined aquifer are interpreted and it is concluded that transmissivity and well loss coefficient are identifiable. Additional data sampled from an observation well are recommended to estimate aquifer storativity. Reliability of parameter estimates decreases with a decrease in the number of steps and therefore it is recommended to conduct step-drawdown tests having at least four steps. Analysis of data from a third test performed in an unconfined, layered aquifer reveals that only the well loss coefficient is identifiable and that prior information about hydraulic parameters of extracted and adjacent layers is required. In general, it is concluded that the inverse, numerical model is a viable interpretation method to identify the well loss coefficient and additional aquifer parameters from step-drawdown test data.

  13. Multiple marker screening test: identification of fetal cystic hygroma, hydrops, and sex chromosome aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Wenstrom, K D; Boots, L R; Cosper, P C

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if the multiple marker screening test (maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, unconjugated estriol, human chorionic gonadotrophin, and maternal age) detects fetal Turner syndrome or just cystic hygroma/hydrops. Multiple marker screening tests from 4 groups were compared: 1) Turner syndrome with hydrops/ hygroma group (n = 10) = fetuses with cystic hygroma/hydrops and a 45X karyotype, 2) Turner syndrome without hydrops/hygroma (n = 9) = sonographically unremarkable fetal Turner syndrome or Turner mosaic, 3) hydrops group (n = 8) = all cases of fetal cystic hygroma/hydrops excluding Turner syndrome, 4) sex chromosome aneuploidy group (n = 16) = other sonographically normal fetal sex chromosome aneuploidies. Positive screening tests (Down syndrome risk > or = 1:190 or MSAFP > or = 2.5 MOM) were found in 60% (6/10) of the Turner syndrome with hydrops/hygroma group, but only 11% (1/9) of the Turner syndrome without hydrops/hygroma group (P = .04). The incidence of positive screening tests in the Hydrops group was 75% (6/8), while it was only 12.5% (2/16) in the other sex chromosome aneuploidy group. We conclude that the multiple marker screening test identifies fetuses with cystic hygroma/hydrops, and may do so independently of the etiology of the hydrops. PMID:8796763

  14. Source Identification Of Airborne Antimony On The Basis Of The Field Monitoring And The Source Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, A.; Sato, K.; Fujitani, Y.; Fujimori, E.; Tanabe, K.; Ohara, T.; Shimoda, M.; Kozawa, K.; Furuta, N.

    2008-12-01

    The results of the long-term monitoring of airborne particulate matter (APM) in Tokyo indicated that APM have been extremely enriched with antimony (Sb) compared to crustal composition. This observation suggests that the airborne Sb is distinctly derived from human activities. According to the material flow analysis, automotive brake abrasion dust and fly ash from waste incinerator were suspected as the significant Sb sources. To clarify the emission sources of the airborne Sb, elemental composition, particle size distribution, and morphological profiles of dust particles collected from two possible emission sources were characterized and compared to the field observation data. Brake abrasion dust samples were generated by using a brake dynamometer. During the abrasion test, particle size distribution was measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer. Concurrently, size- classified dust particles were collected by an Andersen type air sampler. Fly ash samples were collected from several municipal waste incinerators, and the bulk ash samples were re-dispersed into an enclosed chamber. The measurement of particle size distribution and the collection of size-classified ash particles were conducted by the same methodologies as described previously. Field observations of APM were performed at a roadside site and a residential site by using an Andersen type air sampler. Chemical analyses of metallic elements were performed by an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometr. Morphological profiling of the individual particle was conducted by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. High concentration of Sb was detected from both of two possible sources. Particularly, Sb concentrations in a brake abrasion dust were extremely high compared to that in an ambient APM, suggesting that airborne Sb observed at the roadside might have been largely derived from mechanical abrasion of automotive brake pads. The peak of the mass-based particle size distribution of brake abrasion dust was found in a diameter of 2-3 ?m. From the morphological viewpoints, shape of brake abrasion dust particle was typically edge- shaped, and high concentrated Sb and sulfur were simultaneously detected in a brake abrasion dust particle because Sb2S3 is used as a solid lubricant for automotive brake pad. Indeed, at the roadside site, total concentration of airborne Sb was twice as much as that observed at residential site. Moreover, the most concentrated Sb was found in a diameter of 2.1-3.6 ?m for the roadside APM. Furthermore, in the collected particles with this size range, we found a number of particles of which morphological profiles were similar to those of the brake abrasion dust. Consequently, an automotive brake abrasion dust is expected as the predominant source of airborne Sb in the roadside atmosphere.

  15. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W.; Wright, A.D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW ''North Wind 100'' HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations. 6 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Testing a Stakeholder Participation Framework for Fielding Bioremediation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, Robert P.; Focht, Will

    2004-03-17

    This research is investigating stakeholder attitudes about the use of bioremediation technologies with the objective of reducing conflict among stakeholders. The research protocol includes four closely related components. First, we are testing a framework for stakeholder participation that prescribes appropriate stakeholder involvement strategies based on stakeholders trust of the other parties involved in technology deployment decision-making. Second, we are assessing conflict among stakeholders regarding the acceptability of in situ bioremediation as a means to reduce risks posed by radionuclides and metals in the environment. Third, we are assessing the role that awareness of risk exposure plays in the willingness of stakeholders to engage in problem-solving and making risk tradeoffs. Fourth, we are assessing the potential of using the results of these first three components to forge consensus among stakeholders regarding the use and oversight of bioremediation technologies and stakeholder involvement in the decision process. This poster presents preliminary results of a Q methodological survey of stakeholders who are familiar with radionuclide and heavy metal contamination and DOE efforts to remediate that contamination at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Hanford reservations. The Q study allows the research team to diagnose conflict among stakeholders and discover opportunities for consensus.

  17. 12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) AT FACE "A" - VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH 20° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. Officer competency in the Texas Standardized Field Sobriety Testing Program: a quantitative study 

    E-print Network

    Merkley, Rodney Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Many law enforcement officers (LEOs) have successfully completed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Standardized Field Sobriety Testing (SFST) course to enhance their ability to detect impaired drivers. However, in recent...

  19. ExoGeoLab Lander, Rovers and Instruments: Tests at ESTEC & Eifel Volcanic Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Foing; A. Barton; J. K. Blom; P. Mahapatra; S. Som; B. Jantscher; J. Page; T. Zegers; C. Stoker; J. Zavaleta; P. Poulakis; G. Visentin; A. Noroozi; P. Ehrenfreund; M. Mickolacjzak; A. Perrin; S. Chevrier; S. Direito; A. Dene; S. Voute; A. Olmedo; G. Groemer; W. Stumptner; G. Davies; W. van Westrenen; D. Koschny; J. P. Lebreton; M. Guglielmi; M. Freire; R. Walker

    2010-01-01

    We have built an ExoGeoLab lander demonstrator for future planetary missions, equipped with remotely operated instruments. We tested them at ESTEC and at an ILEWG field campaign at Eifel volcanic park in Germany in September 2009.

  20. Automated water monitor system field demonstration test report. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Perreira, J.; Poel, J. D.; Nibley, D.; Nuss, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA Automatic Water Monitor System was installed in a water reclamation facility to evaluate the technical and cost feasibility of producing high quality reclaimed water. Data gathered during this field demonstration test are reported.

  1. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  2. [Identification of semen in bloodstains with the use of alternative light source and biochemical screening tests].

    PubMed

    Gorzkiewicz, Marta; Wo?niak, Marcin; Grzybowski, Tomasz; ?uczak, Sylwia; Linkowska, Katarzyna; Daca, Patrycja

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was the verification of the presence of semen in stains constituting mixtures of semen and blood employing alternative light source (ALS) and commercially available biochemical screening tests based on the activity of acid phosphatase (AP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The tests demonstrated that discrimination between particular components of a blood-semen mixture was impossible either with the naked eye, as well as with the use of ALS. White fluorescence was observed only in stains consisting of pure semen and semen-blood mixtures at a ratio of 100:1. The assay for PSA was positive in the case of all the examined semen dilutions and semen-blood mixtures, whereas the sensitivity of the AP-based test assay was lower by one order of magnitude. PMID:19441689

  3. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  4. Comparison of Short-Term Estrogenicity Tests for Identification of Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Arnold, Steven F.; Autrup, Herman; Barfoed, Marianne; Beresford, Nicola A.; Bjerregaard, Poul; Christiansen, Lisette B.; Gissel, Birgitte; Hummel, René; Jørgensen, Eva Bonefeld; Korsgaard, Bodil; Le Guevel, Remy; Leffers, Henrik; McLachlan, John; Møller, Anette; Bo Nielsen, Jesper; Olea, Nicolas; Oles-Karasko, Anita; Pakdel, Farzad; Pedersen, Knud L.; Perez, Pilar; Skakkebœk, Niels Erik; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.; Sumpter, John P.; Thorpe, Susan M.; Grandjean, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare results obtained by eight different short-term assays of estrogenlike actions of chemicals conducted in 10 different laboratories in five countries. Twenty chemicals were selected to represent direct-acting estrogens, compounds with estrogenic metabolites, estrogenic antagonists, and a known cytotoxic agent. Also included in the test panel were 17?-estradiol as a positive control and ethanol as solvent control. The test compounds were coded before distribution. Test methods included direct binding to the estrogen receptor (ER), proliferation of MCF-7 cells, transient reporter gene expression in MCF-7 cells, reporter gene expression in yeast strains stably transfected with the human ER and an estrogen-responsive reporter gene, and vitellogenin production in juvenile rainbow trout. 17?-Estradiol, 17?-ethynyl estradiol, and diethylstilbestrol induced a strong estrogenic response in all test systems. Colchicine caused cytotoxicity only. Bisphenol A induced an estrogenic response in all assays. The results obtained for the remaining test compounds—tamoxifen, ICI 182.780, testosterone, bisphenol A dimethacrylate, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol dodecylethoxylate, butylbenzylphthalate, dibutylphthalate, methoxychlor, o,p?-DDT, p,p?-DDE, endosulfan, chlomequat chloride, and ethanol—varied among the assays. The results demonstrate that careful standardization is necessary to obtain a reasonable degree of reproducibility. Also, similar methods vary in their sensitivity to estrogenic compounds. Thus, short-term tests are useful for screening purposes, but the methods must be further validated by additional interlaboratory and interassay comparisons to document the reliability of the methods. ImagesFigure 2Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:10229711

  5. "Would you test your children without their consent?" and other sticky dilemmas in the field of cancer genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Karina L; Bonadies, Danielle C; Moyer, Anne; Matloff, Ellen T

    2014-09-01

    Cancer genetic testing is surrounded by myriad ethical, legal, and psychosocial implications which are being revisited as testing expands into an everyday practice and into more complicated areas like whole exome and direct-to-consumer testing. We chose to survey cancer genetic counselors and physicians from a wide range of non-genetics specialties to determine what they would do if faced with the complex decisions associated with cancer genetic testing, how their views compare, and how they align with current guidelines and data. Genetic counselors were significantly more likely than non-genetics physicians to bill their insurance for testing (94.9 vs. 86.8 %; p = 0.001) and purchase life insurance before testing (86.6 vs. 68.6 %; p = 0.000) and were less likely to use an alias (3.2 vs. 13.2 %; p = 0.000) or order testing on their own DNA (15.3 vs. 24.2 %; p = 0.004). They were also less likely to test their minor children (0.9 vs. 33.1 %; p = 0.000) or test their children without their knowledge and consent/assent (1.4 vs.11.5 %; p = 0.000). The results of our study indicate that there is wide variation regarding what clinicians predict they would do in the areas of ethical, legal and psychosocial issues in cancer genetic testing. Cancer genetic counselors' choices are more aligned with professional guidelines, likely due to their experience in the field and awareness of current guidelines. These data are a starting point for a broader discussion of who should offer cancer genetic counseling and testing to patients, particularly as the complexity of the available testing options and associated issues increase with whole exome sequencing. PMID:24804937

  6. Environmental Indication: A Field Test of an Ecosystem Approach to Quantify Biological Self-Organization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Werner L. Kutsch; Wolf Steinborn; Mathias Herbst; Rainer Baumann; Jan Barkmann; Ludger Kappen

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we take an ecosystem approach to examine the degree of biological self-organization at the ecosystem level.\\u000a An integrated set of indicators is derived from a theoretical framework and tested by field data from an ecosystem research\\u000a project focusing on the Bornh?ved Lake district in northern Germany. This field test is based on a comparison of the self-organized

  7. Operation of agricultural test fields for study of stressed crops by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toler, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test site for the study of winter wheat development and collection of ERTS data was established in September of 1973. The test site is a 10 mile square area located 12.5 miles west of Amarillo, Texas on Interstate Hwy. 40, in Randall and Potter counties. The center of the area is the Southwestern Great Plains Research Center at Bushland, Texas. Within the test area all wheat fields were identified by ground truth and designated irrigated or dryland. The fields in the test area other than wheat were identified as to pasture or the crop that was grown. A ground truth area of hard red winter wheat was established west of Hale Center, Texas. Maps showing the location of winter wheat fields in excess of 40 acres in size within a 10 mile radius were supplied NASA. Satellite data was collected for this test site (ERTS-1).

  8. Identification of sources of potential fields with the continuous wavelet transform: Basic theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frédérique Moreau; Dominique Gibert; Matthias Holschneider; Ginette Saracco

    1999-01-01

    The continuous wavelet transform is used to analyze potential fields and to locate their causative sources. A particular class of wavelets is introduced which remains invariant under the action of the upward continuation operator in potential field theory. These wavelets make the corresponding wavelet transforms easy to analyze and the sources' parameters (horizontal location, depth, multipolar nature, and strength) simple

  9. Preliminary results from pressure tank test and field acceleration test of New-Profiling float of Japan (NINJA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, K.; Ando, K.; Mizuno, K.; Inoue, A.; Shikama, N.; Takeuchi, K.; Sekimoto, M.

    2002-12-01

    As one of contributions of Japan to the international Argo community, one of Japanese ocean instrument manufacturers, Tsurumi Seiki Co. (TSK), has started the development of original profiling float in 2000. We purchased the four TSK floats in 2001, and performed the pressure tank test and the acceleration field test in the north Pacific. Among four floats, two are carrying SBE41 CTD sensor, and two are carrying TSK-original CTD sensor. In the pressure tank test, by controlling a tank pressure as float controller expects, we created the ideal ocean in a tank for the float. The TSK float successfully worked as was scheduled, and measured profile data when the float was coming up to the surface (i.e. pressure in tank was decreasing). We also performed the ballasting test of weight of the TSK float to drift at 2000dbars (Swift and Riser, 1994). After these tests, we launched two floats with TSK sensor in the north Pacific in June. One of the floats has finished the 20th profile on 26 August 2002 and is still working. The technical message from the float indicates the stable parking near 2000dbars, the stable profiling speed, and no missing profile data. The temperature and salinity data also indicate the stable T-S relations in deeper layer below 1500dbars among profiles. In this presentation, we will also show the results of field test of the floats with SBE sensor, which will be launched in October 2002.

  10. Social Identification Among Political Party Voters and Members: An Empirical Test of Optimal Distinctiveness Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain van Hiel; Ivan Mervielde

    2002-01-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, minority political parties and parties of intermediate size provide more central and important bases of social identity. The authors tested that prediction in a sample of voters and a sample of political party members. In both samples, adherents of minority and intermediate parties did not perceive their parties to be more representative of them. The

  11. Combined skin prick and patch testing enhances identification of food allergy in infants with atopic dermatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erika Isolauri; Kristiina Turjanmaa

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early recognition of dietary allergies in infants with atopic dermatitis is essential for avoidance of unnecessary elimination diets, amelioration of the skin disease, and secondary prevention of the development of multiple food allergies. Simple and accurate methods of identifying provocative foods are urgently needed. METHODS: The usefulness of skin prick and patch tests as indicators of cow milk allergy

  12. Guided Waves Damage Identification in Beams with Test Pattern Dependent Series Neural Network Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. K. LIEW; M. VEIDT

    In regression neural networks for pattern recognition of preprocessed guided waves signals in beams, a trained network produced large errors when identifying a test pattern not found in the training set. To improve the accuracy of results, a new neural network procedure was introduced where progressive training was performed in a series combined network with the integration of a weight-range

  13. Identification of Differential Responses to an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ciara; O’Grada, Colm; Ryan, Miriam; Roche, Helen M.; Gibney, Michael J.; Gibney, Eileen R.; Brennan, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years an individual’s ability to respond to an acute dietary challenge has emerged as a measure of their biological flexibility. Analysis of such responses has been proposed to be an indicator of health status. However, for this to be fully realised further work on differential responses to nutritional challenge is needed. This study examined whether metabolic phenotyping could identify differential responders to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and examined the phenotypic basis of the response. Methods and Results A total of 214 individuals were recruited and underwent challenge tests in the form of an OGTT and an oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT). Detailed biochemical parameters, body composition and fitness tests were recorded. Mixed model clustering was employed to define 4 metabotypes consisting of 4 different responses to an OGTT. Cluster 1 was of particular interest, with this metabotype having the highest BMI, triacylglycerol, hsCRP, c-peptide, insulin and HOMA- IR score and lowest VO2max. Cluster 1 had a reduced beta cell function and a differential response to insulin and c-peptide during an OGTT. Additionally, cluster 1 displayed a differential response to the OLTT. Conclusions This work demonstrated that there were four distinct metabolic responses to the OGTT. Classification of subjects based on their response curves revealed an “at risk” metabolic phenotype. PMID:23991163

  14. Slipping Anchor? Testing the Vignettes Approach to Identification and Correction of Reporting Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Uva, Teresa Bago; Lindeboom, Maarten; O'Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    We propose tests of the two assumptions under which anchoring vignettes identify heterogeneity in reporting of categorical evaluations. Systematic variation in the perceived difference between any two vignette states is sufficient to reject "vignette equivalence." "Response consistency"--the respondent uses the same response scale to evaluate the…

  15. ISSUES AND RECCOMMENDATIONS FOR POREWATER TOXCITY TESTING: METHODOLOGICAL UNCERTAINTIES, CONFOUNDING FACTORS AND TOXCITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the last decade porewater toxicity tests have gained popularity among researchers and managers as tools for the assessment of the presence and biological effects of bioavailable contaminants in aquatic sediments. However, there are a number of information gaps in our know...

  16. EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT&E HPM methodology testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. A.; Nelson, S. D.

    1997-09-04

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DOD LFT&E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT&E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for ?bird health? purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

  17. EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT E HPM methodology testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. A.; Nelson, S. D.

    1997-09-04

    The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DOD LFT E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for bird health purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

  18. Field Testing of New Interference-Free Ambient Ozone Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollison, W. M.; Capel, J.; Crow, W.; Johnson, T.; Spicer, C. W.

    2013-05-01

    Multibillion-dollar strategies control ambient air ozone (O3) levels in the U.S. so it is essential that the O3 measurements made for developing state implementation plans, assessing population risks, and determining compliance with regulations be accurate. The predominant U.S. regulatory method employed to monitor ambient O3 is ultraviolet (254 nm) photometry and many previous studies have demonstrated positive interferences associated with this technology. We evaluate two new humidity-controlled commercial instruments - a 2B Technology Model 211 ultraviolet O3 photometer that replaces its conventional MnO2 scrubber with gas-phase NO titration and a Teledyne-API Model 265E NO-O3 chemiluminescence monitor - both designed to minimize the aromatic organic, mercury, and water vapor interferences common to O3 photometers. New units were paired with conventional photometers sampling indoor, outdoor, and in-vehicle environments where populations spend most of their time. Overall, during the fixed-site monitor comparisons in Houston, TX, the three instruments were highly correlated (r2 ? 0.99) with regression slopes of 1.00 ± 0.01, and O3 averaged over the study period agreed within 1 ppb; however, U.S. O3 standard compliance depends on fourth highest annual daily maximum 8-hour O3 values, so urban monitors must measure accurately during typically hot, humid, and stagnant O3-conducive day conditions. Conventional photometers reported the highest values for the four highest 8-hour daily maxima during our three month late summer test period, with 8-hour average differences between the new and conventional monitors ranging up to 4 ppb. In paired 10-minute average sampling with a Model 211 in Durham, NC, conventional photometers generally exhibited modest positive interference bias (under 5 ppb) in 176 sampled residences, shops, malls, restaurants, offices, parks, roadways, and vehicles; however, in six percent of our samples indoor differences exceeded 10 ppb and in two 64 ppb and 174 ppb cases exceeded outdoor ambient O3 levels several-fold.

  19. Examining the effectiveness of discriminant function analysis and cluster analysis in species identification of male field crickets based on their calling songs.

    PubMed

    Jaiswara, Ranjana; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2013-01-01

    Traditional taxonomy based on morphology has often failed in accurate species identification owing to the occurrence of cryptic species, which are reproductively isolated but morphologically identical. Molecular data have thus been used to complement morphology in species identification. The sexual advertisement calls in several groups of acoustically communicating animals are species-specific and can thus complement molecular data as non-invasive tools for identification. Several statistical tools and automated identifier algorithms have been used to investigate the efficiency of acoustic signals in species identification. Despite a plethora of such methods, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the appropriate usage of these methods in specific taxa. In this study, we investigated the performance of two commonly used statistical methods, discriminant function analysis (DFA) and cluster analysis, in identification and classification based on acoustic signals of field cricket species belonging to the subfamily Gryllinae. Using a comparative approach we evaluated the optimal number of species and calling song characteristics for both the methods that lead to most accurate classification and identification. The accuracy of classification using DFA was high and was not affected by the number of taxa used. However, a constraint in using discriminant function analysis is the need for a priori classification of songs. Accuracy of classification using cluster analysis, which does not require a priori knowledge, was maximum for 6-7 taxa and decreased significantly when more than ten taxa were analysed together. We also investigated the efficacy of two novel derived acoustic features in improving the accuracy of identification. Our results show that DFA is a reliable statistical tool for species identification using acoustic signals. Our results also show that cluster analysis of acoustic signals in crickets works effectively for species classification and identification. PMID:24086666

  20. Two-Center Collaborative Evaluation of Performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Grazia Menozzi; Ulrich Eigner; Silvia Covan; Sabina Rossi; Pietro Somenzi; Giuseppe Dettori; Carlo Chezzi; Anne-Marie Fahr

    2006-01-01

    The performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, MD) was assessed for identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of the majority of clinically encoun- tered bacterial isolates in a European collaborative two-center trial. A total of 494 bacterial isolates including various species of the Enterobacteriaceae and 110 nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria were investigated: of these,

  1. Development and validation of real-time PCR tests for the identification of four Spodoptera species: Spodoptera eridania, Spodoptera frugiperda, Spodoptera littoralis, and Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Van der Straten, M J

    2014-08-01

    The genus Spodoptera comprises 31 species, 4 of which are listed as quarantine pests for the European Union: Spodoptera eridania (Cramer), Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith), Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval), and Spodoptera litura (F.). In international trade, the earlier life stages (eggs and larvae) are being intercepted at point of inspection most frequently, challenging the possibilities of morphological identification. To realize a rapid and reliable identification for all stages, we developed and validated four simplex real-time polymerase chain reaction identification tests based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using dual-labeled hydrolysis probes. Method validation on dilutions of extracted DNA of the target organisms showed that low levels of template (up to 0.2-100 pg) can reliably be identified. No cross-reactivity was observed with 14 nontarget Spodoptera and 5 non-Spodoptera species in the specific Spodoptera tests. The tests showed to be repeatable, reproducible (both 100%), and robust. The new Spodoptera tests have proven to be suitable tools for routine identification of all life stages of S. eridania, S. frugiperda, S. littoralis, and S. litura. PMID:25195458

  2. Field Test Experience of an Underwater Wireless Network in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shengli

    Field Test Experience of an Underwater Wireless Network in the Atlantic Ocean Zheng Peng*, Son Le share our experience from a recent field experiment in the Atlantic Ocean, in which we have deployed of 2012, we spent 7 days and deployed an underwater wireless network on the Atlantic Ocean, as shown

  3. SOIL BIN AND FIELD TESTS OF AN ON-THE-GO SOIL STRENGTH PROFILE SENSOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    n on-the-go soil strength profile sensor (SSPS) was previously developed to measure the within-field spatial variability in soil strength at 5 evenly-spaced depths up to 50 cm. In this paper, performance of the SSPS was evaluated using soil bin and field data. First, the SSPS was tested in a soil bi...

  4. Solar Residential Heating and Cooling Field Test Program. Volume 1. Domestic hot water systems. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Swanson; T. A. Balasubramaniam; J. C. Burke; R. L. Merriam; P. M. OFarrell; W. C. Osborn; R. J. Rancatore

    1985-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute sponsored a field test program to develop information on the operating characteristics and performance of load-managed solar hot water systems in typical single-family homes. Field demonstrations were conducted in three houses built and occupied under the program: two in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and a third on Long Island in New York. The houses were equipped

  5. Low-frequency electromagnetic radiation of a Schwarzschild black hole in a test nonuniform magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Salukvadze

    1994-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation process of a Schwarzschild black hole moving in the nonuniform magnetic field is investigated. The total flux of radiation was obtained. A theoretical calculation has been carried out under the test magnetic field assumption, i.e., energy-momentum tensor does not disturb Schwarzschild background metric. The technique of the Teukolsky equation has been used. The Greens function from the

  6. Classical Solution of Field Equation of Gravitational Gauge Field and Classical Tests of Gauge Theory of Gravity

    E-print Network

    Ning Wu; Dahua Zhang

    2005-08-01

    A systematic method is developed to study classical motion of a mass point in gravitational gauge field. First, the formulation of gauge theory of gravity in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates is given. Then in spherical coordinates system, a spherical symmetric solution of the field equation of gravitational gauge field is obtained, which is just the Schwarzschild solution. In gauge theory of gravity, the equation of motion of a classical mass point in gravitational gauge field is given by Newton's second law of motion. A relativistic form of the gravitational force on a mass point is deduced in this paper. Based on the spherical symmetric solution of the field equation and Newton's second law of motion, we can discuss classical tests of gauge theory of gravity, including the deflection of light by the sun, the precession of the perihelia of the orbits of the inner planets and the time delay of radar echoes passing the sun. It is found that the theoretical predictions of these classical tests given by gauge theory of gravity are completely the same as those given by general relativity. From the study in this paper, an important qualitative conclusion on the nature of gravity is that gravity can be treated as a kind of physical interactions in flat Minkowski space-time, and the equation of motion of mass point in gravitational field can be given by Newton's second law of motion.

  7. Mechanism-based testing strategy using in vitro approaches for identification of thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Murk, AlberTinka J; Rijntjes, Eddy; Blaauboer, Bas J; Clewell, Rebecca; Crofton, Kevin M; Dingemans, Milou M L; Furlow, J David; Kavlock, Robert; Köhrle, Josef; Opitz, Robert; Traas, Theo; Visser, Theo J; Xia, Menghang; Gutleb, Arno C

    2013-06-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system is involved in several important physiological processes, including regulation of energy metabolism, growth and differentiation, development and maintenance of brain function, thermo-regulation, osmo-regulation, and axis of regulation of other endocrine systems, sexual behaviour and fertility and cardiovascular function. Therefore, concern about TH disruption (THD) has resulted in strategies being developed to identify THD chemicals (THDCs). Information on potential of chemicals causing THD is typically derived from animal studies. For the majority of chemicals, however, this information is either limited or unavailable. It is also unlikely that animal experiments will be performed for all THD relevant chemicals in the near future for ethical, financial and practical reasons. In addition, typical animal experiments often do not provide information on the mechanism of action of THDC, making it harder to extrapolate results across species. Relevant effects may not be identified in animal studies when the effects are delayed, life stage specific, not assessed by the experimental paradigm (e.g., behaviour) or only occur when an organism has to adapt to environmental factors by modulating TH levels. Therefore, in vitro and in silico alternatives to identify THDC and quantify their potency are needed. THDC have many potential mechanisms of action, including altered hormone production, transport, metabolism, receptor activation and disruption of several feed-back mechanisms. In vitro assays are available for many of these endpoints, and the application of modern '-omics' technologies, applicable for in vivo studies can help to reveal relevant and possibly new endpoints for inclusion in a targeted THDC in vitro test battery. Within the framework of the ASAT initiative (Assuring Safety without Animal Testing), an international group consisting of experts in the areas of thyroid endocrinology, toxicology of endocrine disruption, neurotoxicology, high-throughput screening, computational biology, and regulatory affairs has reviewed the state of science for (1) known mechanisms for THD plus examples of THDC; (2) in vitro THD tests currently available or under development related to these mechanisms; and (3) in silico methods for estimating the blood levels of THDC. Based on this scientific review, the panel has recommended a battery of test methods to be able to classify chemicals as of less or high concern for further hazard and risk assessment for THD. In addition, research gaps and needs are identified to be able to optimize and validate the targeted THD in vitro test battery for a mechanism-based strategy for a decision to opt out or to proceed with further testing for THD. PMID:23453986

  8. Pilot test of steam with additives at Midway-Sunset field, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hammershaimb

    1982-01-01

    This work graphically illustrates the results of a pilot test by the CLD Group Inc., Santa Fe Energy, Conoco, Texaco, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the pilot test was to improve efficiency of steam drive enhanced oil recovery with blocking foams in the Midway-Sunset field of California.

  9. Major Field Achievement Test in Business: Guidelines for Improved Outcome Scores--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, J. Patrick; White, Jason T.

    2007-01-01

    Outcomes measurements have always been an important part of proving to outside constituencies how you "measure up" to other schools with your business programs. A common nationally-normed exam that is used is the Major Field Achievement Test in Business from Educational Testing Services. Our paper discusses some guidelines that we are "pilot…

  10. Field Tests of the Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle (HROV) Light Fiber Optic Tether

    E-print Network

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    Field Tests of the Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle (HROV) Light Fiber Optic Tether Chris Young by the installation of a fiber optic data link and a manipulator based work system. Development of the fiber optic. The November 2004 tests consisted of deploying two different types of fiber optic cable from an oceanographic

  11. An experimental test of frequency-dependent selection on male mating strategy in the field

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Troy G.

    strategies.However,if alternative male mating tactics are the outcome of male­male competition, then we may of intraspecific male­male competition. Thus, a complete test of the control of FDS entails a manipulation of bothAn experimental test of frequency-dependent selection on male mating strategy in the field C. Bleay

  12. FIELD TESTING OF PROPOSED DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SYSTEMS PART I: MOBILE DATA COLLECTION SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley Salek; Daniel G. P. Mansergh

    This technical paper describes application of the mobile data collection system that was used to evaluate proponent Digital Audio Radio (DAR) systems in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1996, for a program sponsored by the Consumer Electronics Manufacturers Association (CEMA). To complete the task, the project required development of field test routes, refinement of test procedures, and FCC authorization

  13. Selective Hippocampal Damage in Rhesus Monkeys Impairs Spatial Memory in an Open-Field Test

    E-print Network

    Hampton, Robert

    Selective Hippocampal Damage in Rhesus Monkeys Impairs Spatial Memory in an Open-Field Test Robert for remembering locations in a wide variety of species, including humans. However, recent findings from monkeys in which rodents and birds are tested, we used a spatial memory task in which rhesus monkeys (Macaca

  14. Laboratory and Field Testing of Precast Bridge Elements Used for Accelerated Construction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vernon W. Wineland; F. Wayne Klaiber; Thomas P. Schoellen

    Black Hawk County (BHC) has developed a precast modified beam-in-slab bridge (PMBISB) system for use with accelerated construction. Individual components of the system have been tested in the Iowa State University Structural Laboratory, and the overall system was tested in the field. Using the BHC system, the bridge superstructure can be assembled in two days and the bridge opened to

  15. Experimental tests of proposed relations between the critical field and dislocation cell structure of superconducting niobium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Hill; R. M. Rose

    1971-01-01

    Experimental tests were made of the suggestion that the anomalously large magnitude and anisotropy of the resistive critical field of severely deformed niobium is due to the development of dense dislocation cell walls. The basis for the tests was the theoretical prediction that as the cell size approaches the coherence length xiNb for superconductivity, the superconducting properties of the cell

  16. Field spectrometer (S191H) preprocessor tape quality test program design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Program QA191H performs quality assurance tests on field spectrometer data recorded on 9-track magnetic tape. The quality testing involves the comparison of key housekeeping and data parameters with historic and predetermined tolerance limits. Samples of key parameters are processed during the calibration period and wavelength cal period, and the results are printed out and recorded on an historical file tape.

  17. Water Quality: A Field-Based Quality Testing Program for Middle Schools and High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Water Resources Authority, Boston.

    This manual contains background information, lesson ideas, procedures, data collection and reporting forms, suggestions for interpreting results, and extension activities to complement a water quality field testing program. Information on testing water temperature, water pH, dissolved oxygen content, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrates, total…

  18. Finite element calculation of fields around the end region of a turbine generator test rig

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Eastham; D. Rodger; H. C. Lai; H. Nouri

    1993-01-01

    The use of surface impedance elements and the use of volume elements when modeling at test rig using the MEGA package are compared. The test rig is representative of a turbine generator. The work is supported by practical measurements. Experimental results indicate that it is possible to model 3-D fields in large-scale objects containing nonlinear conducting iron using finite elements.

  19. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jacqueline; Stansfield, Charles

    This paper explores the influence of field independent-dependent cognitive style on second language test performance, especially as it relates to performance on the integrative type of measure known as the cloze test. Approximately 250 college students enrolled in a first semester Spanish course formed the sample group for this correlational…

  20. Field-testing a portable wind tunnel for fine dust emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A protable wind tunnel has been developed to allow erodibility and dust emissions testing of soil surfaces with the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study we report on the field-testing ...