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1

Nonlinear identification of a brushless excitation system via field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, nonlinear identification of the excitation system (EXS) in the gas unit #2 of Rajaee power plant in Iran is presented. Two methods of modeling, i.e., grey-box and black-box modeling are used and compared. In the grey-box (classical) approach, first a block-diagram for the EXS is suggested, then a test procedure for identification of its parameters is outlined.

M. Rasouli; M. Karrari

2004-01-01

2

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

3

PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PR...

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2002-08-04

4

Field test experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), a field-test program was developed to obtain solar photovoltaic (PV) module performance and endurance data. These data are used to identify the specific characteristics of module designs under various environmental conditions. The information obtained from field testing is useful to all participants in the National Photovoltaics Program, from the research planner to the life-cycle cost analyst.

Weaver, R. W.

1983-11-01

5

The Fields Teaching Tests.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using various Latin square and incomplete Latin square formats, the Fields test formats provide a novel way of presenting tests to students using machine scoreable answer sheets that can be item analyzed. Items can be constructed to help students acquire knowledge or to measure the attainment of course objectives. (SLD)

Sax, Gilbert

1996-01-01

6

Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns

PAMELA K. WALKER; PHILIP J. RODACY

2002-01-01

7

Identification and reliability of microbial aerobic respiration and denitrification kinetics using a single-well push-pull field test.  

PubMed

Methods to derive reaction rates of microbial processes are important since these processes are determining many chemical reactions influencing groundwater quality. Thereby, it is not only important to derive the parameters, but also to have a firm idea about the reliability with which these are determined. Analysis of residuals, sensitivity analyses and analysis of joint confidence intervals provide an interesting tool for this purpose. The method is illustrated in this paper using a push-pull test designed to derive aerobic respiration and denitrification. Therefore, a test solution containing dissolved oxygen and nitrate as reactive tracer and bromide as non-reactive tracer was injected in organic matter rich sediment. Afterwards, this test solution was extracted and water quality was monitored. ReacTrans, a finite-difference, axial-symmetric groundwater flow and solute transport model was developed to simulate the test and derive hydraulic, solute transport and chemical parameters. Aerobic respiration and denitrification were simulated with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Maximum reaction rates (10.4 and 2.4 mmol/ld for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) and Michaelis constants (0.14 and 0.1 mmol/l for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) were determined. The reliability with which these parameters are derived is indicated by analysis of residuals, sensitivities and joint confidence intervals. This shows that the Michaelis-Menten parameters can be derived reliable with a push-pull test, whereas the test is insensitive to effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Because of the small scale of the test, longitudinal dispersivity was very small and therefore unidentifiable. PMID:17719674

Vandenbohede, A; Louwyck, A; Lebbe, L

2007-07-17

8

False identification of advertisements in recognition tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The false identification of advertisements which have not before been published averages about 20% and ranges from a few to over 50%. Thus no general formula can be used to correct for false identification in recognition tests. In some cases false identification scores run higher than do the recognition scores of the same advertisements after they have been published.

D. B. Lucas; M. J. Murphy

1939-01-01

9

Field Study of an Iris Identification System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We conducted a field trial of a commercial iris identification scanner at the US Navy Fleet Numerical Meterology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) in Monterey, CA. Scans were performed by US military guards who had received approximately 20 minutes of train...

S. McLaren S. L. Garfinkel

2008-01-01

10

Dynamic redundancy identification in automatic test generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of an automatic test generator can be significantly improved by identifying redundancy by simple techniques which do not involve search. The authors present a technique for identifying redundant faults. This technique works dynamically during test generation but is not based on a search process. It exploits dominance and test-covering relations among faults, which allow identification of additional redundant

M. Abramovici; David T. Miller; R. K. Roy

1989-01-01

11

Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection  

SciTech Connect

One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

2002-01-01

12

Human Factors in Field Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of the study is to develop methods and techniques for evaluating human operator performance during field testing of Navy systems. The procedure adopted has been to develop and test the evaluation techniques using a particular Navy system. Af...

W. G. Matheny G. W. Patterson G. I. Evans

1970-01-01

13

Anisotropic parameter identification using inhomogeneous tensile test  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this contribution, an inverse identification strategy of constitutive laws for elastoplastic behaviour is presented. The proposed inverse algorithm is composed on an appropriate finite element calculation combined with an optimisation procedure. It is applied to identify material anisotropic coefficients using a set up of easy performed laboratory tests. The used experimental data are the plane tensile test and the

A. Khalfallah; H. Bel Hadj Salah; A. Dogui

2002-01-01

14

FSA field test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modified plan for the flat plate solar array (FSA) project was implemented. Accomplishments included completion of six arrays containing Block 4 modules, the portable array data logger and a representative sample of Block 1, 2, and 3 modules and were redeployed for continued endurance testing. The portions of the plan which were modified include: (1) a reduction in the number of Block 4 modules deployed; (2) a reduced data acquisition schedule; (3) abandonment of the Table Mountain and Point Vicente sites; and (4) a sample of the modules from the 12 continental remote sites underwent the final test procedures. Current endurance data are presented for the remaining Block 1, 2, and 3 modules. It is indicated that more of these modules have failed or decreased in power output during this period. None of the Block 4 modules under test during this period have failed, but 11 of the 155 deployed modules show reduced power output.

Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. H.; Meyer, J. D.; Runkle, L. D.

1984-08-01

15

Automated bacterial identification by angle resolved dark-field imaging  

PubMed Central

We propose and demonstrate a dark-field imaging technique capable of automated identification of individual bacteria. An 87-channel multispectral system capable of angular and spectral resolution was used to measure the scattering spectrum of various bacteria in culture smears. Spectra were compared between various species and between various preparations of the same species. A 15-channel system was then used to prove the viability of bacterial identification with a relatively simple microscope system. A simple classifier was able to identify four of six bacterial species with greater than 90% accuracy in bacteria-by-bacteria testing.

Wilson, Benjamin K.; Vigil, Genevieve D.

2013-01-01

16

Testing Polynomials over General Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we fill in the knowledge gap concerning testing polynomials over finite fields. As previous works show, when the cardinality of the field, q, is sufficiently larger than the degree bound, d, then the number of queries sufficient for testing is polynomial or even linear in d. On the other hand, when q = 2 then the number

Tali Kaufman; Dana Ron

2004-01-01

17

Longitudinal changes in response to a cycle-run field test of young male national "talent identification" and senior elite triathlon squads.  

PubMed

This study investigated the changes in cardiorespiratory response and running performance of 9 male "Talent Identification" (TID) and 6 male Senior Elite (SE) Spanish National Squad triathletes during a specific cycle-run (C-R) test. The TID and SE triathletes (initial age 15.2 ± 0.7 vs. 23.8 ± 5.6 years, p = 0.03; V(O2)max 77.0 ± 5.6 vs. 77.8 ± 3.6 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1), nonsignificant) underwent 3 tests through the competitive period and the preparatory period, respectively, of 2 consecutive seasons: test 1 was an incremental cycle test to determine the ventilatory threshold (Th(vent)); test 2 (C-R) was 30-minute constant load cycling at the Th(vent) power output followed by a 3-km time-trial run; and test 3 (isolated control run [R]) was an isolated 3-km time-trial control run, in randomized counterbalanced order. In both seasons, the time required to complete the C-R 3-km run was greater than for R in TID (11:09 ± 00:24 vs. 10:45 ± 00:16 min:ss, p < 0.01 and 10:24 ± 00:22 vs. 10:04 ± 00:14, p = 0.006, for season 2005-2006 and 2006-2007, respectively) and SE (10:15 ± 00:19 vs. 09:45 ± 00:30, p < 0.001 and 09:51 ± 00:26 vs. 09:46 ± 00:06, p = 0.02 for season 2005-2006 and 2006-2007, respectively). Compared with the first season, the completion of the time-trial run was faster in the second season (6.6%, p < 0.01 and 6.4%, p < 0.01, for C-R and R tests, respectively) only in TID. Changes in post cycling run performance were accompanied by changes in pacing strategy, but there were only slight or nonsignificant changes in the cardiorespiratory response. Thus, the negative effect of cycling on performance may persist, independently of the period, over 2 consecutive seasons in TID and SE triathletes; however, improvements over time suggests that monitoring running pacing strategy after cycling may be a useful tool to control performance and training adaptations in TID. PMID:21997447

Díaz, Víctor; Peinado, Ana B; Vleck, Veronica E; Alvarez-Sánchez, María; Benito, Pedro J; Alves, Francisco B; Calderón, Francisco J; Zapico, Augusto G

2012-08-01

18

The North Carolina Field Test  

SciTech Connect

The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

1990-08-01

19

Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System Based on Short-Term Electrostatic Field Variations at the Active Volcano Popocatepetl, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocatepetl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially- designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocatepetl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocatepetl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release and mass flux and (3) immediate risk assessment of ongoing volcanic eruptions using permanent sensors located on volcanoes with pyroclastic eruptions.

Berger, P.

2006-12-01

20

7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION...29.428 Identification of sample for testing. Samples of imported tobacco...

2013-01-01

21

Performance Recertification Field Test Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These performance recertification field-test guidelines were developed for the State of Arizona. The functions of the performance recertification program are as follows: a) the determination of teacher effectiveness by student behavior and growth, utilizing performance objectives, b) the determination of teacher effectiveness utilizing other…

Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

22

Cryopumping field joint can testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

Johnson, Wesley; Fesmire, James; Meneghelli, Barry

2012-06-01

23

Mixed numerical–experimental technique for orthotropic parameter identification using biaxial tensile tests on cruciform specimens  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a mixed numerical–experimental method for the identification of the four in-plane orthotropic engineering constants of composite plate materials. A biaxial tensile test is performed on a cruciform test specimen. The heterogeneous displacement field is observed by a CCD camera and measured by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The measured displacement field and the subsequently computed strain

David Lecompte; Arwen Smits; Hugo Sol; John Vantomme; Danny Van Hemelrijck

2007-01-01

24

Downhole steam generator: field tests  

SciTech Connect

Excessive air pollution and heat losses up to 32% in the surface lines and out the stacks of conventional generators are reasons why conventional steam generation is efficient. These problems are addressed and overcome through the use of a direct-fired down-hole steam generator (DSG). By performing the combustion process at high pressure, and then adding water, a mixture of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and steam is discharged directly into the heavy oil reservoir. This study documents a series of field tests of a direct-fired DSG showing its ability to produce and inject high quality steam into heavy oil reservoirs without the need for expensive stack scrubbers to remove sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), as well as sophisticated nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) control techniques. Results from the 6-in. diameter, 6-ft long, 7.1-mmBtu/hr DSG showed that corrosion can be controlled and production can be improved dramatically in actual field tests in California heavy oil reservoirs.

Eson, R.L.

1982-01-01

25

Field tests using radioactive matter.  

PubMed

During recent years, the assessment of possible radiological consequences of a terrorist attack associated with a release of radioactive substances (RaS) has been in the focus of interest of emergency preparedness and radiation protection specialists, as well as experts dealing with the dispersion of harmful substances in the atmosphere. Suitable tools for these analyses are applications of mathematical and physical models and simulation of this attack under 'realistic' conditions. The work presented here summarises the results of four tests, in which a RaS (a Tc-99 m solution) was dispersed over a free area with the use of an industrial explosive. Detection methods and techniques employed in these tests are described and values characterising the RaS dispersion--dose rates, surface activities in horizontal and vertical directions, volume activities, their space and time distributions and mass concentrations of aerosols produced after the explosion are presented and compared. These data will be applied to a comparison of outcomes of models used for the assessment of radiation accidents as well as in future field tests carried out under conditions of more complex geometry (indoor environment, terrain obstacles, etc.). PMID:20089512

Prouza, Z; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Michalek, V; Rulik, P; Skrkal, J; Hovorka, J

2010-01-19

26

Pescara benchmark: overview of modelling, testing and identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The `Pescara benchmark' is part of the national research project `BriViDi' (BRIdge VIbrations and DIagnosis) supported by the Italian Ministero dell'Universitá e Ricerca. The project is aimed at developing an integrated methodology for the structural health evaluation of railway r/c, p/c bridges. The methodology should provide for applicability in operating conditions, easy data acquisition through common industrial instrumentation, robustness and reliability against structural and environmental uncertainties. The Pescara benchmark consisted in lab tests to get a consistent and large experimental data base and subsequent data processing. Special tests were devised to simulate the train transit effects in actual field conditions. Prestressed concrete beams of current industrial production both sound and damaged at various severity corrosion levels were tested. The results were collected either in a deterministic setting and in a form suitable to deal with experimental uncertainties. Damage identification was split in two approaches: with or without a reference model. In the first case f.e. models were used in conjunction with non conventional updating techniques. In the second case, specialized output-only identification techniques capable to deal with time-variant and possibly non linear systems were developed. The lab tests allowed validating the above approaches and the performances of classical modal based damage indicators.

Bellino, A.; Brancaleoni, F.; Bregant, L.; Carminelli, A.; Catania, G.; Di Evangelista, A.; Gabriele, S.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.; Sorrentino, S.; Spina, D.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

2011-07-01

27

Parameter identification of the fatigue-testing rig  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the dynamic parameter identification of the novel fatigue-testing rig is presented. The applied identification method assumes a priori a simple dynamical model for which parameters are identified through free and forced vibration tests. The rig is comprised of two base excited oscillators providing the dynamic excitation for a fatigue sample and two pneumatic actuators preventing a loss

Nikola Jakši?; Chee-Hoe Foong; Marian Wiercigroch; Miha Boltežar

2008-01-01

28

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

29

40 CFR 455.50 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Test Methods for Pesticide Pollutants § 455.50 Identification of test procedures. The pesticide active ingredients to which this section applies...

2013-07-01

30

Galaxy Merger Identification in the CANDELS GOODS-South Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyzed a catalog of 7,628 galaxies at 0field in order to identify a sample of galaxy mergers and interactions. Mergers are believed to play a fundamental role in galaxy evolution. Developing methods to robustly and efficiently identify mergers becomes vital as we look to higher redshifts. We explored merger identification based on visual morphology classification and preliminary attempts with automated methods. Using multiple detailed visual morphology classifications for each galaxy conducted by the CANDELS structure and morphology team, we created selection criteria to identify mergers from this visual classification catalog. We chose galaxies with high interaction classification and evidence of merger signatures (i.e. tidal features, double nuclei) to generate a catalog of 1051 galaxies we are confident are mergers. This represents a conservative sample of possible mergers. For comparison, we also tested automated merger identification techniques previously used for lower redshift (z<1) galaxies. This is one of the first large investigations of galaxy mergers at z>1. O’Leary was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

O'Leary, Erin M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

2013-01-01

31

Microgrid field test experiences in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Japan, three field tests of microgrid were started in 2005. The DER (distributed energy resources) capacity of each microgrid is 710, 750, and 2400 kW, respectively. A field test of voltage control for a distribution feeder connected with multiple PV systems was started in 2003. In this paper, at first proposed microgrid control system is outlined and then field

T. Funabashi; R. Yokoyama

2006-01-01

32

Evaluation of Rapid Tests for the Identification of Mycobacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY. The use of eight rapid tests for the identification of 1307 strains of mycobacteria belonging to 18 species was evaluated. The standard niacin, nitrate-reductase and catalase tests were supplemented by new tests for the detection of fi glucosidase, urease, penicillinase, trehalase and cephalosporinase. This combination of eight rapid tests was not able to replace more conventional procedures but in

VERONIQUE LEVY-FREBAULT; JEANNINE GRANDRY; H. L. David

1982-01-01

33

Taking Usability Testing to the Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents a case study of a pilot test of usability testing with farm instructions for applying pesticides. Discusses adapting usability testing to the field setting; selecting a topic, usability testing sight, and participants; developing the usability scenario and securing institutional review board approval; conducting usability testing in the…

Zimmerman, Donald E.; Muraski, Michel Lynn; Slater, Michael D.

1999-01-01

34

Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally...

B. E. Meneghelli J. E. Fesmire W. L. Johnson

2011-01-01

35

TESTING BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD  

EPA Science Inventory

An operational definition for success of in situ bioremediation at field scale includes meeting regulatory goals for ground water quality in a timely fashion at a predictable cost. urrent practice for site characterization does not adequately define the amount of contamination su...

36

Plt Toroidal Field Coil Power Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The PLT toroidal field coil power tests were initiated in October, 1974 to gain information in several areas. The most important objectives during the tests were the verification of deflections and stresses as predicted by Frankenberg and Smith. Also, the...

R. Marino J. Citrolo J. Frankenberg

1975-01-01

37

Advanced automatic test pattern generation and redundancy identification techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the sophisticated strategies used in the automatic test pattern generation system SOCRATES, the authors present several concepts aiming at a further improvement and acceleration of the deterministic test pattern generation and redundancy identification process. In particular, they describe an improved implication procedure and an improved unique sensitization procedure. Both procedures significantly advance the deterministic test pattern generation and

Michael H. Schulz; Elisabeth Auth

1988-01-01

38

FIELD TESTS OF POTENTIAL POLAR BEAR REPELLENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field tests of potential repellents were made on free-ranging polar bears (Ursus maritimus) near Churchill, Manitoba, from 11 October through 12 November 1978. Polar bears were attracted to an observation\\/testing area with sardine baits at 11 sites. Commercial dog repellents and household chemicals were tested for their ability to keep bears from visiting baited sites, recorded sounds were tested for

GARY D. MILLER

39

Reinstatement of Context in a Field Experiment on Eyewitness Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This field experiment examines the impact of reinstating contextual information on eyewitness identification performance. Naive store clerks were asked to identify a previously encountered customer from an array of photographs. Context was reinstated by providing physical cues from the customer encounter and by instructing the clerk to privately recall the events leading up to the customer's purchase. When the customer's

Carol Krafka; Steven Penrod

1985-01-01

40

Magdalen Islands VAWT field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the spring of 1977, an experimental large vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) was installed in the Magdalen Islands. The main objectives of the project are installation, operation and evaluation of the VAWT. The turbine has been operated at up to about 80 percent of design rpm. The information presented includes data from some of the 31 rpm tests which

P. South; A. Watts

1979-01-01

41

Field Testing: A Model and Its Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a Social Learning Curriculum (SLC) field test model that focuses on aspects of personnel utilization, communication systems, and the quality of human communication and that highlights the role of the supervisor in the education of the mentally retarded. The four field test model phases discussed are 1) the planning phase (including…

Goldstein, Marjorie T.

42

Onsite fuel cell field test update  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field test has been conducted over three years, efficiently providing both electricity and heat to a variety of multifamily residential, commercial, and light industrial buildings in the United States and Japan. The program has included two other efforts complementing the field test: a parallel technology development project to improve reliability, performance and maintainability as well as to decrease manufacturing

J. J. Cuttica; R. R. Woods; K. A. Trimble

1986-01-01

43

Primordial perturbations of test scalar fields  

SciTech Connect

The primordial perturbations of test scalar fields not affecting the evolution of background may be very interesting since they can be transferred to the curvature perturbations by some mechanisms, and thus under certain condition can be responsible for the structure formation of observable universe. In this brief report we study the primordial perturbations of test scalar fields in various (super)accelerated expanding backgrounds.

Piao Yunsong [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, YuQuan Road 19A, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhang Yuanzhong [CCAST (World Lab.), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100080 (China)

2007-01-15

44

Field identification fixed points in the coset construction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss two related problems in conformal field theory. The first is the construction of the modular transformation matrix S for integer spin modular invariants in which some characters appear with multiplicity larger than 1. The second problem is the relation between the characters and the branching functions in coset theories in which the field identification identifies some fields with themselves (``fixed points''). We find that these problems are closely related, and that the solution is remarkably interesting. The fixed points of any conformal field theory seem always to define a new (not necessarily unitary) conformal field theory whose primary fields are in one-to-one correspondence with the fixed points. The characters of this conformal field theory are needed to modify the coset branching functions. Permanent address: School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.

Schellekens, A. N.; Yankielowicz, S.

1990-04-01

45

Test-Retest Reliability of the San Diego Odor Identification Test and Comparison with the Brief Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

This study described the San Diego Odor Identification Test (SDOIT) reliability and compared the SDOIT and the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT). Ninety participants aged 50–70 years completed this 2-visit olfaction study. During visit 1, the SDOIT and B-SIT were administered according to standard protocols. Three weeks later, participants returned to retake the SDOIT. The SDOIT score was the total number of odorants correctly identified out of 8 odorants presented, and olfactory impairment was defined as correctly identifying less than 6 odorants. The B-SIT score was the total number of odorants correctly identified out of 12 odorants presented, and participants correctly identifying less than 9 odorants were categorized as abnormal. The SDOIT reliability was high (concordance correlation coefficient = 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79–0.91). The same score was obtained on retest for 73% of participants, whereas 18% improved, and 9% declined. Test–retest agreement was 96% for the SDOIT; 4% improved from impaired at visit 1 to unimpaired at visit 2. Overall, SDOIT impairment classification and B-SIT abnormal classification agreed in 96% of participants (? = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.63–0.99). In conclusion, the SDOIT showed good test–retest reliability. Agreement for impaired/abnormal olfaction was demonstrated for the SDOIT and the B-SIT.

Schubert, C.R.; Dalton, D.S.; Zhong, W.; Huang, G.H.; Klein, B.E.K.; Klein, R.; Nieto, F.J.; Cruickshanks, K.J.

2009-01-01

46

Hazard identification and risk assessment procedure for genetically modified plants in the field—GMHAZID  

Microsoft Academic Search

The safe application of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) requires a risk assessment prior to their proposed use. Based\\u000a on methods from the chemical industry, we developed a hazard identification procedure for the risk assessment of field tests\\u000a with genetically modified plants. This risk assessment method, GMHAZID, is carried out in the form of guided brainstorm sessions.\\u000a GMHAZID was tested with

Raija A. Koivisto; Kirsi M. Törmäkangas; Veli S. Kauppinen

2002-01-01

47

A Flexible inField Test Controller  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanometer transistor size makes electronic systems more vulnerable to environmental conditions (temperature, humidity and radiation etc.). Therefore, it is important to test a system in its operational environment (in-field) to ensure constant performance and reliability. This paper presents a novel approach to test a system with ICs connected using multiple IEEE 1149.1 scan paths. A Flexible in-Field Test Controller (FiFTeC)

Saad Arslan; Ghafoor Shah

2011-01-01

48

Inertia Parameter Identification from Base Excitation Test Dat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the purpose to further investigate and improve a method for the identification of inertia parameters, tests with flexible test structures have been carried out. Reference data for the inertia parameters were obtained from a Finite Element model and from conventional weighing and pendulum measurements. For the realization of the base excitation a six-axis vibration simulator was utilized. The base forces were recorded with a special Force Measurement Device (FMD), and the base accelerations of the test structures were measured by accelerometers. Each of the 3 translational and 3 rotational axes of the multi-axial test facility was driven by a sine sweep signal with an appropriate base acceleration input. The application of the identification algorithm to the measured data showed that an acceptable identification of mass and mass moments of inertia is possible. However, a highly accurate identification of the center of gravity location could not be achieved. The results of the analyses are discussed and the advantages and limits of the present method are pointed out. Recommendations for the practical application and improved center of gravity identification are given. Keywords: Inertia parameters, base excitation, multi- axial test facilities, vibration testing.

Fuellekrug, U.; Schedlinski, C.

2004-08-01

49

Phase 1 Testing of Bioflash Technology for White Powder Identification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Phase I proof-of-concept testing of a mock-up of the cellular analysis and notification of antigen risks and yields (CANARY) bioagent- identification system was conducted at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. This testing was sponsored by ...

L. Wallace T. Sickler V. K. Rastogi W. Gardner

2012-01-01

50

Near-field testing of radar antennas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The near-field technique is presented for pattern and gain testing of high-performance radar antennas. Near-field antenna pattern and gain measurement ranges produce a free-space port plane wave through superposition and synthesis. The field radiated by an antenna can be determined anywhere in free space from a set of measurements made on a planar, cylindrical, or spherical near-field measurement surface. The far-field radiation pattern and gain of the antenna may be determined, as well as the radiating component of the field at the aperture of the antenna. The amplitude, phase, and polarization accuracy of the synthesized plane wave is typically better than can be achieved in far-field or compact antenna measurement ranges. The aperture field can be used to phase align phased-array antennas, locate defects in radomes, and determine the surface shape of reflector antennas.

Joy, Edward B.

1990-01-01

51

Thermal Storage Field Test. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In August 1979 the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated the Residential Thermal Storage Field Test to assess the performance, costs, and benefits of off-peak storage systems for residential heating. Eight TVA power distributors participated in the t...

1984-01-01

52

Identification and elimination of the residual ambiguity in the sign of observed photospheric magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The existing methods for the removal of the 180 degree ambiguity in the sign of the observed transverse photospheric magnetic field present some inherent-computational and/or intrinsic limitations. In this work we propose and demonstrate suitable procedures for the identification and elimination of the residual 180 degree ambiguity in the sign of Bperpendicular observed fields, that is of the ambiguity which is not removed by the various methods in use. These procedures are tested on the case of force-free magnetic field configurations for which exact analytical solutions to compare with exist.

Cuperman, S.; Li, J.; Semel, M.

1993-10-01

53

Candidate odours for a short form odorant identification test.  

PubMed

Measurement of olfactory function is difficult and despite the availability of validated olfactory tests these are not in common use in general clinical practice. The mismatch between self-reported olfactory function and objective test response is well known, thus the need for adequate assessment of olfaction is not disputed. We aimed to determine which if any odour in a commercially available olfactory test could be identified by 70 % or more of normal subjects with a view to developing a shortened screening test for use in general otolaryngology and non-specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. Hospital staff and medical students, under 50 years of age were recruited. The tests were undertaken in a quiet room of neutral odour. Subjects were asked to self-identify 12 odorants presented consecutively and to record how strongly they perceived the odorants on a 4-point scale. One hundred and four participants correctly identified the odorant in 466 (37.3 %) of the 1,248 individual odorant identification tests. Peppermint, fish and coffee odours were identified by 88.5, 79.8 and 69.7 % of participants, respectively, without the advantage of a choice of name prompt. These supra-threshold test odour stimuli were perceived as present in all of the individual odour identification tests, but correct identification of the test odour was very much lower for the other nine test stimuli. Peppermint, fish and coffee are odours that should be evaluated further for inclusion in a short form olfactory identification test in a British population. PMID:23389328

Mal, Ranjit K; Webber, Chris; Nunez, Desmond A

2013-02-07

54

Field tests of cement bond logging tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field test of one company's various Cement Bond Log tools was run to evaluate the effect of varying signal frequencies and tool diameters. Two larger diameter sondes with different frequencies were run and results are presented. One higher frequency, smaller diameter tool was run and results are compared with the other logs. Problems that occurred during the test (and

P. E. Pilkington; W. H. Fertl

1975-01-01

55

Simple amidase test for identification of mycobacteria.  

PubMed Central

A modified amidase test for differentiation of mycobacteria is described. A total of 224 atypical mycobacteria, 154 Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 26 M. bovis strains were classified by this procedure. Of the 404 strains of various species studied, 400 exhibited an amidase spectrum identical to the established pattern. The simplicity of this method may promote its application in routine examinations.

Helbecque, D M; Handzel, V; Eidus, L

1975-01-01

56

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25

57

Application of system identification to aircraft flight test data processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nonlinear aerodynamic model for the AV-8B aircraft in the post-stall and departure region was identified from flight test data. A Principal Components Regression algorithm was used to identify model parameters. The identification methodology is described, and the results are compared with wind tunnel derived models.

L. C. Anderson; J. H. Vincent

1985-01-01

58

VOCAL: A framework for test identification and deployment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viewpoint Oriented Verification And Validation (VOCAL) is a novel technique for the identification, and application of a structured life-cycle based software testing process to a broad array of systems. Application of the technique can be specifically tailored to embedded, interactive and multimedia applications, as well as those systems requiring a well defined approach in the quality assurance process. The objective

Duncan Pemberton; Ian Sommerville

1997-01-01

59

Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation.

Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

1980-09-22

60

Field testing of aquifer thermal energy storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of field and laboratory studies of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) indicate both the problems and promise of the concept. Geohydrothermal modeling and field testing demonstrated the ability to recover substantial quantities of aquifer stored energy. However, the local hydrologic conditions play an important role in determining the recovery temperature and storage efficiency. Geochemistry is also an important factor, particularly for higher temperature ATES systems.

Kannberg, L. D.; Allen, R. D.

1984-03-01

61

Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.  

PubMed

The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

1983-04-01

62

Strategy for genotoxicity testing: Hazard identification and risk assessment in relation to in vitro testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes the proceedings of the September 9–10, 2005 meeting of the Expert Working Group on Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment in Relation to In Vitro Testing, part of an initiative on genetic toxicology. The objective of the Working Group was to develop recommendations for interpretation of results from tests commonly included in regulatory genetic toxicology test batteries, and

V. Thybaud; M. Aardema; J. Clements; K. Dearfield; S. Galloway; M. Hayashi; D. Jacobson-Kram; D. Kirkland; J. T. MacGregor; D. Marzin; W. Ohyama; M. Schuler; H. Suzuki; E. Zeiger

2007-01-01

63

SMART CALL BOX FIELD OPERATIONAL TEST EVALUATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Smart call boxes are an enhanced version of devices used as emergency call boxes in California. The overall system consists of a microprocessor, a cellular communications transceiver, solar power sources, data collection devices, maintenance computers, and data recording systems. The Smart Call Box Field Operational Test (FOT) evaluated the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of using smart call boxes for five

James H. Banks; Patrick A. Powell

1997-01-01

64

Produced water treating equipment: Recent field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several decades, flotation cells have been workhorses for treatment of oilfield produced water for disposal or reinjection. In the last few years several alternative devices which have come on the market for the removal of oil from water have been tested in the oil field. Some of these have distinct advantages over flotation cells in terms of space and

R. R. Matthews; M. S. Choi

1987-01-01

65

Reconfigurable Wideband Ground Receiver Field Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Reconfigurable Wideband Ground Receiver (RWGR) system is a variable-data-rate, reprogrammable hardware/software receiver developed to meet the wide range of telemetry demodulation processing needs of the Deep Space Network (DSN). In this article, we report results from a number of field tests with the RWGR deployed to the Deep Space Station 13 (DSS-13) experimental ground station.

Lay, N.; Argueta, A.; Tkacenko, A.; Srinivasan, M.; Andrews, K.

2012-11-01

66

Field Testing of Improved Ion Exchange Techniques.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pilot plant field tests were conducted at four sites to evaluate the potential of some new ion exchange techniques to desalt certain brackish waters. A three bed and four bed system were evaluated. The first bed contains a weak-acid resin, the second bed ...

S. A. Bresler F. Husseini E. Kreusch

1974-01-01

67

Curriculum Field Testing in Architectural Gerontology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The source book, "Environments and Aging: Concepts and Issues," was field tested at the University of Florida College in a project for architectural students. Results indicated that it lacks clarity and interpretive graphics, and that students generally did not utilize information from any readings as effective inputs into their design process.…

McRae, John

1977-01-01

68

The MIMI Field Test of July 1970.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the summer of 1970, a field test was conducted to determine if a portabld signal processing unit built around a small digital computer could be used to run specific underwater propagation experiments in the Straits of Florida. A periodic broadband sign...

R. M. Heitmeyer

1972-01-01

69

Travinfo Field Operational Test Evaluation Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

TravInfo is a Field Operational Test (FOT) sponsored by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration. The goal of the project is to implement a centralized traveler information center to collect, integrate, and broadly disseminate timely and accurate traveler information in the San Francisco Bay Area. This evaluation plan describes the scope, methods, and procedures to measure the effectiveness of the project.

Randolph Hall; Y. B. Yim; Asad Khattak; Mark Miller; Stein Weissenberger

1995-01-01

70

Field Testing of Water Emulsion Epoxies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Civil Engineering Laboratory conducted a field test of two water emulsion epoxy coatings, a low solvent epoxy coating, a regular solvent epoxy coating, and a control alkyd coating. The coatings were placed on either sandblasted steel panels or over we...

R. W. Drisko J. B. Crilly

1975-01-01

71

Error analysis in wind turbine field testing  

SciTech Connect

In wind turbine field testing, one of the most important issues is understanding and accounting for data errors. Extended dynamic testing of wind turbines requires a thorough uncertainty analysis and a regimen of quality assurance steps in order to preserve accuracy. Test objectives need to be identified to determine the accuracy requirements of any data measurement, collection, and analysis process. Frequently, the uncertainty analysis reveals that the major sources of error can be allowed for with careful calibration and signal drift tracking procedures. This paper offers a basis for the discussion and development of a repeatable and accurate process to track errors and account for them in data processing.

McNiff, B [McNiff Light Industries, Carlisle, MA (United States); Simms, D [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-08-01

72

[Personality tests and gender identification in male transsexuals].  

PubMed

The aim of this research project was to study gender identification in male transsexuals compared to male and female controls, using the Rorschach test and the MMPI. In the international literature, many researches have shown that the nature of the human response on Rorschach card III is linked to gender identification, as is the MMPI Mf scale. Ten untreated male homosexual transsexuals and 18 treated and operated male homosexual transsexuals were compared to 10 male and 12 female controls regarding verbal IQ, human content on Rorschach card III and the MMPI Mf scale. Absence of hormonal treatment for the first group of transsexuals was checked by a blood test at the time of the psychological testing. Responses on Rorschach card III were scored according to different kinds of human contents: male (M), female (F), gender-unidentified/neutral (N), bisexual (B), feminine then masculine or the opposite (M/F), and nonhuman (NH). N, B, M/F and NH responses were rare in all Rorschach protocols. As expected, responses given by participants in the control group were significantly more consistent with their anatomical sex than with the opposite sex. Untreated transsexuals do not differ from treated and operated transsexuals on Rorschach data, and both transsexual groups give significantly more female human representations than male controls. Transsexuals' results are similar to female controls. Untreated transsexuals' mean score on the MMPI Mf scale is significantly higher than that of treated and operated transsexuals' score, in the male profile (biological sex). Both groups of transsexuals score higher on the Mf scale in the male profile than in the female profile. The mean Mf score in the male profile is significantly higher than that of male controls, whereas, in the female profile, the mean Mf score is similar to that of female controls. This study shows that for both groups of transsexuals, results are homogenous in respect of Rorschach and MMPI, showing hyper-conformism to self-perceived gender. Results in both groups are similar to results of female controls, but tend to show even more feminine gender identification. The absence of any significant difference between untreated and treated and operated transsexuals seems surprising, suggesting that the hormonal treatment has not had a major impact on gender identification processes. It would doubtless be interesting to study gender identification using even more kinds of data: all human contents in the Rorschach protocol (not just the responses given to card III), MMPI Mf scale, Draw-A-Person Test and Animal-and-Opposite Drawing Test. This would enhance result liability and could provide useful information about how gendter identification processes evolve after surgical sex reassigment. PMID:15971637

Coussinoux, S; Gallarda, T; Smith, J; Bourdel, M C; Cordier, B; Brémont, C; Poirier, M F; Haddou, M; Olié, J P

73

Catalase Test asan AidtotheIdentification of Enterobacteriace ae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Itwas further notedthat a widevariety of methods exist fortheexecution ofthecatalase test, thatthere isno universally accepted strength specified forthehydrogen peroxide, andthat no gradations forthevigor andspeed ofthereaction havebeenmentioned. Underthecondi- tions oftheclinical laboratory, we havedeveloped a simple, rapid, andaccu- ratemethodforthecatalase testthathasbeenofgreatvalue as an aidinthe identification oftheEnterobacteriaceae. With3%H202,itwas observed that Serratia, Proteus, andProvidencia were vigorous catalase reactors. OnlySal- monella andrareEscherichia, Enterobacter, andKlebsiella isolates were

WELTON I. TAYLOR

1972-01-01

74

Field testing of aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent field and laboratory studies of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) indicate both the problems and promise of the concept. Geohydrothermal modeling and field testing have demonstrated the ability to recover substantial quantities of aquifer-stored energy. However, the local hydrologic conditions play an important role in determining the recovery temperature and storage efficiency. Geochemistry is also an important factor, particularly for higher temperature ATES systems. Whereas available hydrothermal models are adequate to estimate the thermal performance of ATES systems, geochemical ATES models are still in their infancy.

Kannberg, L.D.; Allen, R.D.

1984-03-01

75

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...authorized site. (a) Bacteriology isolation and identification tests. User...

2010-01-01

76

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...authorized site. (a) Bacteriology isolation and identification tests. User...

2009-01-01

77

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at... User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at...authorized site. (a) Bacteriology isolation and identification tests. User...

2013-01-01

78

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01

79

Comparison of the RIM-H rapid identification kit with conventional tests for the identification of Haemophilus spp.  

PubMed Central

A commercially available system, the RIM-H system (Austin Biological Laboratories, Austin, Tex.), was evaluated for its ability to rapidly and accurately identify various Haemophilus spp. A total of 110 clinical isolates were tested by both the RIM and conventional identification procedures. The RIM agreed with the standard identification for 100% of the Haemophilus influenzae (76 of 76) and 92.0% of the Haemophilus parainfluenzae (23 of 25) isolates tested. The identifications of Haemophilus parahaemolyticus, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus haemolyticus also correlated with those obtained by conventional methods. The RIM was found to be rapid and easy to use and was considered a suitable alternative to conventional identification procedures.

Palladino, S; Leahy, B J; Newall, T L

1990-01-01

80

Comparison of the RIM-H rapid identification kit with conventional tests for the identification of Haemophilus spp.  

PubMed

A commercially available system, the RIM-H system (Austin Biological Laboratories, Austin, Tex.), was evaluated for its ability to rapidly and accurately identify various Haemophilus spp. A total of 110 clinical isolates were tested by both the RIM and conventional identification procedures. The RIM agreed with the standard identification for 100% of the Haemophilus influenzae (76 of 76) and 92.0% of the Haemophilus parainfluenzae (23 of 25) isolates tested. The identifications of Haemophilus parahaemolyticus, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus haemolyticus also correlated with those obtained by conventional methods. The RIM was found to be rapid and easy to use and was considered a suitable alternative to conventional identification procedures. PMID:2203817

Palladino, S; Leahy, B J; Newall, T L

1990-08-01

81

In Situ Field Testing of Processes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

J. Wang

2001-12-14

82

Flight testing of small remotely piloted aircraft for system identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flight testing of small unmanned aircraft (span 4-8ft, weight 5-15lbs, speed 30-100ft\\/s) in both the academic and small company fields is sparse at best. Most test programs consist of little more than attempting to perform a mission and then determining if objectives were met. Often, a flight test program may determine an aircraft drag polar at most. In order to

Aaron Wypyszynski

2009-01-01

83

Large scale test of sensor fingerprint camera identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a large scale test of camera identification from sensor fingerprints. To overcome the problem of acquiring a large number of cameras and taking the images, we utilized Flickr, an existing on-line image sharing site. In our experiment, we tested over one million images spanning 6896 individual cameras covering 150 models. The gathered data provides practical estimates of false acceptance and false rejection rates, giving us the opportunity to compare the experimental data with theoretical estimates. We also test images against a database of fingerprints, simulating thus the situation when a forensic analyst wants to find if a given image belongs to a database of already known cameras. The experimental results set a lower bound on the performance and reveal several interesting new facts about camera fingerprints and their impact on error analysis in practice. We believe that this study will be a valuable reference for forensic investigators in their effort to use this method in court.

Goljan, Miroslav; Fridrich, Jessica; Filler, Tomáš

2009-02-01

84

Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test) which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel) and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their dimensionality. POD is based on projecting the full field images on a modal basis, constructed from sample simulations, and which can account for the variations of the full field as the elastic constants and other parameters of interest are varied. The fidelity of the decomposition depends on the number of basis vectors used. Typically even complex fields can be accurately represented with no more than a few dozen modes and for our problem we showed that only four or five modes are sufficient [5]. To further reduce the computational cost of the Bayesian approach we use response surface approximations of the POD coefficients of the fields. We show that 3rd degree polynomial response surface approximations provide a satisfying accuracy. The combination of POD decomposition and response surface methodology allows to bring down the computational time of the Bayesian identification to a few days. The proposed approach is applied to Moiré interferometry full field displacement measurements from a traction experiment on a plate with a hole. The laminate with a layup of [45,- 45,0]s is made out of a Toray® T800/3631 graphite/epoxy prepreg. The measured displacement maps are provided in Figure 1. The mean values of the identified properties joint probability density function are in agreement with previous identifications carried out on the same material. Furthermore the probability density function also provides the coefficient of variation with which the properties are identified as well as the correlations between the various properties. We find that while the longitudinal Young’s modulus is identified with good accuracy (low standard deviation), the Poisson’s ration is identified with much higher uncertainty. Several of the properties are also found to be correlated. The identified uncertainty structure of the elastic constants (i.e. variance co-variance matrix) has potential benefits to reliability analyses, by allowing a more accurate description of the input uncertainty. An additional advantage of the Bayesian approach is that it provides a natural way (in the form of the prior probab

Gogu, C.; Yin, W.; Haftka, R.; Ifju, P.; Molimard, J.; Le Riche, R.; Vautrin, A.

2010-06-01

85

Fiber optic sensor applications in field testing  

SciTech Connect

Fiber optic sensors (F.O.S.) are defined, and the application of this technology to measuring various phenomonon in diverse and hostile environments are discussed. F.O.S. advantages and disavantages both technically and operationally are summarized. Three sensor techniques - intensity, interferometric, and polarization - are then discussed in some detail. General environmental instrumentation and controls that support the Nuclear Weapons Test Program at the Nevada Test Site are discussed next to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the programmatic task. This will aid in recognizing the various difficulties of the traditional measurement techniques at the NTS and the potential advantages that fiber optic measurement systems can provide. An F.O.S. development program is then outlined, depicting a plan to design and fabricate a prototype sensor to be available for field testing by the end of FY84. We conclude with future plans for further development of F.O.S. to measure more of the desired physical parameters for the Test Program, and to eventually become an integral part of an overall measurement and control system.

Perea, J.A.

1984-04-11

86

Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) field test comparisons  

SciTech Connect

The Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) is used throughout the utility industry to design and improve the operation of power systems. The objective of this project was to assess the accuracy of the EMTP by comparing field test measurements to corresponding EMTP simulations. The analysis indicates the overall accuracy of EMTP improves as the frequency range of the transient increases. The simulation accuracy is influenced by the abilities of the EMTP user to represent the system properly, and by the accuracy of data more than by EMTP models. EMTP simulations and field test measurements were compared over a wide range of applications and frequencies as selected from approximately 100 collected references. The overall accuracy is expressed in terms of deviation interval (average deviation {plus minus} {sigma}). The composite deviation interval for all the compared studies is {minus}14.9% to +16.7%. The deviation intervals are determined for the individual groups into which the various studies were classified. The data is supported by extracts from the individual studies assembled in the form of fact sheets. These fact sheets also offer help to EMTP users as examples of studies grouped by subjects. 101 refs., 6 figs., 28 tabs.

Skliutas, J.; Panek, J.

1990-03-01

87

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04

88

Cooperative field test program for wind systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W. S., II; Dodge, D. M.

1992-03-01

89

Scoping test plan for field and engineering testing of waste packages for a repository in basalt  

SciTech Connect

A scoping test plan for conducting field and engineering testing to support the design and development of waste packages for a repository in basalt is presented. The test plan covers four test areas, as follow: a waste package backfill performance field test, a waste package backfill development and emplacement/retrieval field test, a waste package materials degradation engineering test, and a radionuclide migration field test.

Barney, G.S.; Moore, E.L.

1982-10-01

90

Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR  

PubMed Central

The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans.

Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otavio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Silvia Dias

2010-01-01

91

Geologic disposal of radioactive waste: program plan for field testing  

SciTech Connect

A series of program plans is being developed to address the field testing needs for various candidate repository host rocks: salt, granitic rocks, tuff, and basalt. This document, NWTS-80(1), is the first plan of the series, and is intended to provide the framework on which subsequent, rock-specific program plans will be based. The series of Field Testing Program Plans (the NWTS-80 series) is as follows: NWTS-80(1) - Geologic Disposal of Radioactive Waste: Program Plan for Field Testing; NWTS-80(2) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Salt; NWTS-80(3) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Granitic Rock; NWTS-80(4) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Basalt at Hanford; and NWTS-80(5) - Program Plan for Field Tests in Tuff at Nevada Test Site. These plans will be revised on a regular basis as issues are resolved or new ones identified, to reflect the evolution of the Field Testing Program.

NONE

1981-04-01

92

Identification of Medically Relevant Nocardia Species with an Abbreviated Battery of Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several

Deanna L. Kiska; Karen Hicks; David J. Pettit

2002-01-01

93

Electromagnetic field immunity test system applying array antenna technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined about the electromagnetic field immunity test system applying the array antenna technology. This system is able to get the electric field uniformity and the high power electric field near the antenna, in a wideband, by the beam forming technology. We constructed an electromagnetic field immunity test system consisting of 64 elements array antenna as a prototype. In this

T. Uchida; C. Miyazaki; N. Oka; K. Misu; Y. Konishi

2009-01-01

94

Development of a multiplex PCR test for identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7, and 12.  

PubMed

A PCR assay for simultaneous species identification and separation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7 and 12 was developed. Primers specific for genes involved in biosynthesis of the capsular polysaccharides (cps genes) of serovars 1, 7, and 12 were combined with a species-specific PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with the serovar reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 183 Danish field isolates. For all typable strains, a complete correspondence was found between results obtained with the multiplex PCR test and results from the traditional serotyping methods. Among eight serologically cross-reacting strains designated K1:O7, seven isolates produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 1 and one isolate produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 7. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated using a collection of 126 strains representing 25 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae including 45 field strains of the phylogenetically affiliated species Actinobacillus lignieresii. All these isolates tested negative for the cps genes by the multiplex PCR test except for 6 isolates of A. lignieresii. Five of these isolates produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 7, whereas one isolate produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 1. In addition, four isolates of Actinobacillus genomospecies 1 tested positive for the omlA gene but negative for the cps genes. The test represents a convenient and specific method for serotyping A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:18572332

Angen, Oystein; Ahrens, Peter; Jessing, Stine G

2008-05-17

95

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31

96

Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

1981-09-01

97

Identification of elastic properties from full-field measurements: a numerical study of the effect of filtering on the identification results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of full-field displacement measurements in mechanical testing has increased dramatically over the last two decades. This is a result of the very rich information they provide, which is enabling new possibilities for the characterization of material constitutive parameters for inhomogeneous tests often based upon inverse approaches. Nonetheless, the measurement errors limit the accuracy of the identification of the constitutive parameters and their possible spatial resolution. The question addressed by this work is the following: can a filtering of the displacement measurement improve the results of the identification of elastic properties? The discussion is based on the study of a numerical example where the elastic parameters of an elastic structure with inhomogeneous properties are sought from synthetic data representative of in-plane full-field data. The displacement data are first filtered through a diffuse approximation algorithm, based on a moving least-squares approximation. Then, the identification of the elastic parameters is performed by an inverse approach based on the minimization of a cost function, defined as the least-squares gap between the experimental data and their numerical counterpart (finite element model updating). Within this framework, a first-order analysis is proposed in order to characterize the errors in the identified parameters, the measurement error characteristics being known. Results from raw and filtered displacement data are compared and discussed, filtering improving the identification for lower spatial resolution. The choice of the norm to define the gap between the experiment and the calculation is also discussed. For practical use and to take advantage of the proposed first-order methodology, two different ways can be considered: applying the methodology to a numerical example, representative of the experimental setup, to determine whether or not a filtering is valuable, and estimating the uncertainties of the identified parameters at the end of the identification process of an experimental characterization.

Ben Azzouna, Mouldi; Feissel, Pierre; Villon, Pierre

2013-05-01

98

Optimizations for the EcoPod field identification tool  

PubMed Central

Background We sketch our species identification tool for palm sized computers that helps knowledgeable observers with census activities. An algorithm turns an identification matrix into a minimal length series of questions that guide the operator towards identification. Historic observation data from the census geographic area helps minimize question volume. We explore how much historic data is required to boost performance, and whether the use of history negatively impacts identification of rare species. We also explore how characteristics of the matrix interact with the algorithm, and how best to predict the probability of observing a previously unseen species. Results Point counts of birds taken at Stanford University's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve between 2000 and 2005 were used to examine the algorithm. A computer identified species by correctly answering, and counting the algorithm's questions. We also explored how the character density of the key matrix and the theoretical minimum number of questions for each bird in the matrix influenced the algorithm. Our investigation of the required probability smoothing determined whether Laplace smoothing of observation probabilities was sufficient, or whether the more complex Good-Turing technique is required. Conclusion Historic data improved identification speed, but only impacted the top 25% most frequently observed birds. For rare birds the history based algorithms did not impose a noticeable penalty in the number of questions required for identification. For our dataset neither age of the historic data, nor the number of observation years impacted the algorithm. Density of characters for different taxa in the identification matrix did not impact the algorithms. Intrinsic differences in identifying different birds did affect the algorithm, but the differences affected the baseline method of not using historic data to exactly the same degree. We found that Laplace smoothing performed better for rare species than Simple Good-Turing, and that, contrary to expectation, the technique did not then adversely affect identification performance for frequently observed birds.

Manoharan, Aswath; Stamberger, Jeannie; Yu, YuanYuan; Paepcke, Andreas

2008-01-01

99

The Mehrum Coalfire Test Field (MCTF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spontaneous self ignition of coal causes an immense emission of climate relevant gases and affects regional groundwater conditions in such a large scale, that it could not be even rough estimated. This problem occurs all over the world where coal is mined, stored or processed. Keeping these things and also global warming problems in mind, the extinction of such fires becomes a significant task for future climate and environmental protection. In the big arid coal mining belt of the northwest PR China the necessity of environmental as well as resource protection is now realized, leading to increased fire fighting activities. Mostly, the burning coal is partially removed, the surface is insufficiently sealed from oxygen and fire-zones are cooled with valuable fresh water. Such cooling of fire centers is often not sustainable because oxygen rich air may keep on penetrating through the soil surface and reach the cooled down coal which subsequently starts to burn again. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" numerical models are developed to simulate the propagation of underground coal fires in realistic scenarios. These models will be adapted to new data from lab and field experiments including multiphase transport and phase transition processes. The Mehrum test site is used to set up a small scale in situ coal fire experiment in order to validate and verify the codes as well as to better understand the coal fire genesis. The experiment will be carried out under usage of two coal heaps with a total volume of about 1 m3. At the bottom, a layer of hydraulic conductive coarse gravel has been built in. Within this layer, a special ventilation system for air supplying has been embedded. The exact amount of led in air is measured by high resolution flow rate devices. The coal lies directly above the coarse gravel layer. The heating source is located in the lower forth of the coal layer. Positions of other sensors (temperature sensors, electrodes for geoelectrical measurements, gas probing tubes) are based on first numerical results. The coverage consists of a 10 cm to 15 cm strong layer of sand (middle to fine sand). Extinction of the fire by application of water with additives (e. g. salt) and its implication for the underground convection can finally be tested with these installations.

Halisch, M.; Wuttke, M. W.; Hesse, Ph.; Han, J.; Kessels, W.

2009-04-01

100

Field tests assess novel air-injection EOR processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two ongoing field tests are assessing novel air-injection processes, in situ combustion, for enhancing oil recovery from light and heavy oil fields. Amoco Producing Co. operates the light oil test in the West Hackberry field in Cameron Parish, La. This test combines air injection with the double-displacement process. The other test is Amoco Canada Petroleum Co.`s air-injection project that involves

M. R. Fassihi; T. H. Gillham; D. V. Yannimaras; D. Hassan

1996-01-01

101

Development of Teaching Materials for Field Identification of Plants and Analysis of Their Effectiveness in Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduces teaching materials developed for field identification of plants with synoptical keys, identification tables, cards, and programs. Selects approximately 2000 seed plants and uses visibly identifiable characteristics for classification. Recommends using the methodology of identification in other areas for biological identification. (YDS)|

Ohkawa, Chizuru

2000-01-01

102

Development of Teaching Materials for Field Identification of Plants and Analysis of Their Effectiveness in Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces teaching materials developed for field identification of plants with synoptical keys, identification tables, cards, and programs. Selects approximately 2000 seed plants and uses visibly identifiable characteristics for classification. Recommends using the methodology of identification in other areas for biological identification. (YDS)

Ohkawa, Chizuru

2000-01-01

103

A computer-controlled olfactometer for a self-administered odor identification test.  

PubMed

Odor identification tests are widely used for the general screening of olfactory function. However, the administration of odor identification tests is often limited due to a lack of investigators' time. Therefore, we attempted to design a computer-controlled olfactometer to present a self-administered odor identification test. The results produced by means of this olfactometer were evaluated in terms of validity and test-retest reliability. To test the validity, participants' performance in the odor identification test using the olfactometer was compared with their performance in the odor identification test using the validated assessment of the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. The ten-item odor identification test was performed two times using two different methods: (1) the self-administered test using the computer-controlled olfactometer and (2) the foreign-administered test using the "Sniffin' sticks." To examine test-retest reliability, 20 participants were asked to repeat these tests on a different day. Participants reached significantly higher scores on a foreign-administered odor identification test using the "Sniffin' sticks" than on the olfactometer-based test; however, this effect was driven by two less correctly identified odors in the olfactometer-based test. The significant difference between both methods in the mean scores disappeared after excluding two odors from the analysis. In addition, both methods showed no significant difference in scores obtained during the first and second session, indicating that results were consistent between sessions. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the computer-controlled olfactometer designed in this study can be used for a self-administered odor identification test. PMID:21461895

Schriever, Valentin Alexander; Körner, Johannes; Beyer, Robert; Viana, Samanta; Seo, Han-Seok

2011-04-03

104

Evaluation of pooled association tests for rare variant identification  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified many common variants associated with complex human diseases. However, a large portion of the remaining heritability cannot be explained by these common variants. Exploring rare variants associated with diseases is now catching more attention. Several methods have been recently proposed for identification of rare variants. Among them, the fixed-threshold, weighted-sum, and variable-threshold methods are effective in combining the information of multiple variants into a functional unit; these approaches are commonly used. We evaluate the performance of these three methods. Based on our analyses of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data, we find that no method is universally better than the others. Furthermore, adjusting for potential covariates can not only increase the true-positive proportions but also reduce the false-positive proportions. Our study concludes that there is no uniformly most powerful test among the three methods we compared (the fixed-threshold, weighted-sum, and variable-threshold methods), and their performances depend on the underlying genetic architecture of a disease.

2011-01-01

105

Industrial Sound Level Meter Magnetic Field Sensitivity Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The test procedure determines the effect of a magnetic field on industrial sound level meter measurements. Reported results include the magnetic field strength up to 1 oersted required to produce a zero reading at each attenuator setting of the industrial...

R. J. Koshut A. L. Dieffenbach

1976-01-01

106

Field Index Test for Estimating Liquefaction Potential.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of using a vane shear device as an in situ index test for evaluating the susceptibility of sands to earthquake-induced liquefaction was investigated. The behavior of sands placed at known densities in a laboratory test cell equipped with a...

D. R. Shields G. Castro J. W. France

1982-01-01

107

Identification of veterinary pathogens by use of commercial identification systems and new trends in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens.  

PubMed Central

Veterinary diagnostic microbiology is a unique specialty within microbiology. Although isolation and identification techniques are similar to those used for human pathogens, many veterinary pathogens require unique cultivation or identification procedures. Commercial identification systems provide rapid, accurate identification of human pathogens. However, the accuracy of these systems with veterinary pathogens varies widely depending on the bacterial species and the host animal from which it was isolated. Increased numbers of veterinary strains or species in the data bases of the various systems would improve their accuracy. Current procedures and interpretive criteria used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens are based on guidelines used for human pathogens. The validity of these guidelines for use with veterinary pathogens has not been established. As with fastidious human pathogens, standardized methodologies and quality control isolates are needed for tests of organisms such as Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus somnus. Furthermore, interpretive criteria for veterinary antimicrobial agents based on the MIC for veterinary pathogens, the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial agent in the host animal, and in vivo efficacy of the antimicrobial agent are needed. This article reviews both the commercial identification systems evaluated with veterinary pathogens and current methods for performing and interpreting antimicrobial susceptibility tests with veterinary pathogens. Recommendations for future improvements in both areas are discussed.

Watts, J L; Yancey, R J

1994-01-01

108

Field test technology relationships to cable quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most controversial issues in the field of cable technology involves trying to determine the status of used cable. There is no consensus within the industry or even among the so-called “experts” as to how this decision should be made. This paper identifies methods and limitations of techniques used by different organizations. These range from recommended practices to

M. O. Durham; D. H. Neuroth; K. Ashenayi; T. Wallace

1995-01-01

109

FIELD-TESTING DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This article briefly reviews an extensive field study by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Penn Water Authority, which resulted in the development of a series of models to investigate contaminant propagation in a water distribution system. The application of on...

110

Training Strategy for Operational Field Test Data Collectors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research note describes a training strategy designed for operational field tests of MANPRINT video reducers. It was developed for and implemented during the Line of Sight Forward Heavy Force Development Test and Experimentation (Phase II). The traini...

J. D. Silver

1991-01-01

111

Silicone Brake Fluids: One-Year Field Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study is being conducted to evaluate the performance of silicone brake fluids in military vehicles operating under various climatic conditions. These fluids are being field tested in vehicles operating at the Tropic Test Center (TTC), Panama Canal Zone;...

J. H. Conley R. Jamison C. B. Jordan

1975-01-01

112

Statistical estimation and testing for variation root-cause identification of multistage manufacturing Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Root-cause identification for quality-related problems is a key issue in quality and productivity improvement for a manufacturing process. Unfortunately, root-cause identification is also a very challenging engineering problem, particularly for a multistage manufacturing process. In this paper, root-cause identification is formulated as a problem of estimation and hypothesis testing of a general linear mixed model. First, a linear mixed fault-quality

Shiyu Zhou; Yong Chen; Jianjun Shi

2004-01-01

113

Perceived discrimination, group identification, and life satisfaction among multiracial people: a test of the rejection-identification model.  

PubMed

Like other racial minority groups, multiracial people face discrimination as a function of their racial identity, and this discrimination represents a threat to psychological well-being. Following the Rejection-Identification Model (RIM; Branscombe, Schmitt, & Harvey, 1999), we argue that perceived discrimination will encourage multiracial people to identify more strongly with other multiracials, and that multiracial identification, in turn, fosters psychological well-being. Thus, multiracial identification is conceptualized as a coping response that reduces the overall costs of discrimination on well-being. This study is the first to test the RIM in a sample of multiracial people. Multiracial participants' perceptions of discrimination were negatively related to life satisfaction. Consistent with the RIM, perceived discrimination was positively related to three aspects of multiracial group identification: stereotyping the self as similar to other multiracial people, perceiving people within the multiracial category as more homogenous, and expressing solidarity with the multiracial category. Self-stereotyping was the only aspect of group identification that mediated a positive relationship between perceived discrimination and life satisfaction, suggesting that multiracial identification's protective properties rest in the fact that it provides an collective identity where one "fits." PMID:23066642

Giamo, Lisa S; Schmitt, Michael T; Outten, H Robert

2012-10-01

114

NAIS FIELD TRIALS: STRENGTHENING IDENTIFICATION of HIGH-RISK ANIMALS USING a NOVEL IDENTIFICATION APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for animal disease surveillance is a subject of constant discussion within the U.S. Choosing an appropriate method of identification (ID) and traceback that coincides with commerce is of the utmost importance. The production cycle of the imported feeder animal is fairly well defined: animals enter the U.S., are either sent to stocker or to feedlot operations, and after

S. P. Porter; C. Smith; A. Clark; J. C. Whittier

115

The Value Added of Field Testing on Concrete Dams  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, field testing of concrete dams has not been widely embraced by dam owners and it is not typically regarded as an essential component in the process of evaluating the seismic performance of these massive structures. Over the years, proponents of field testing and the use of measured response behavior to validate numerical models have had difficulty convincing the

Ziyad H. Duron; Enrique E. Matheu; Robert L. Hall

116

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250

A. K. Agarwal; P. W. Seabaugh; R. E. Zielinski

1981-01-01

117

Field installation and test of an EHV current transducer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upon the successful development and laboratory testing of the EHV current transducer as described in a companion paper, the design was deemed satisfactory and ready for extensive field evaluation. This paper describes the installation, field testing, and performance evaluation of these transducers and a compatible low energy relaying scheme on the EHV power system of Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago.

H. A. Hild; C. Stern; J. C. Gambale; S. C. Sun

1975-01-01

118

Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform using Frequency Responses Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency swept is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency swept is guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that

Widyawardana Adiprawita; Adang Suwandi Ahmad; Jaka Semibiring

2008-01-01

119

Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMerieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm (R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308-314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual

FERNANDO GARCIA-GARROTE; EMILIA CERCENADO; EMILIO BOUZA

2000-01-01

120

Field experiments on eyewitness identification: towards a better understanding of pitfalls and prospects.  

PubMed

The Illinois pilot program on lineup procedures has helped sharpen the focus on the types of controls that are needed in eyewitness field experiments and the limits that exist for interpreting outcome measures (rates of suspect and filler identifications). A widely-known limitation of field experiments is that, unlike simulated crime experiments, the guilt or innocence of the suspects is not easily known independently of the behavior of the eyewitnesses. Less well appreciated is that the rate of identification of lineup fillers, although clearly errors, can be a misleading measure if the filler identification rate is used to assess which of two or more lineup procedures is the better procedure. Several examples are used to illustrate that there are clearly improper procedures that would yield fewer identifications of fillers than would their proper counterparts. For example, biased lineup structure (e.g., using poorly matched fillers) as well as suggestive lineup procedures (that can result from non-blind administration of lineups) would reduce filler identification errors compared to unbiased and non-suggestive procedures. Hence, under many circumstances filler identification rates can be misleading indicators of preferred methods. Comparisons of lineup procedures in future field experiments will not be easily accepted in the absence of double-blind administration methods in all conditions plus true random assignment to conditions. PMID:17610051

Wells, Gary L

2007-07-03

121

Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

1990-04-01

122

Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test  

SciTech Connect

The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

Giangiacomo, L.A.

1999-05-28

123

Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT

Wunan Lin

1993-01-01

124

Field tests on CPV ISFOC plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to generate key knowledge on CPV technology, ISFOC has already installed 1,4MW of CPV and is executing 3MW of power plants incorporating seven different technologies which will be finished in 2009. The objective of these pilot plants is to assist the industries in the setting up of pilot production lines and to obtain very valuable information such as reliability, suitability and production. In collaboration with the various suppliers, ISFOC has followed in detail all the qualification tests and their results. Therefore a great body of knowledge and experience is being built up. After the completion of the plants, ISFOC has started the campaign of measurements, following its own methodology. It is based on the equations of the Shockley model and only one measurement is needed to establish the nominal power of the CPV system. Heat-sink temperature to calculate the cell temperature through the thermal resistance, DNI with a pyrheliometer and the I-V Curve are measured in this procedure. But, ISFOC will also test other rating procedures, like the ASTM 2527-E or the IEC draft for CPV modules. The results will be shown in this paper.

Rubio, F.; Martínez, M.; Perea, J.; Sánchez, D.; Banda, P.

2009-08-01

125

Field testing the wide-field-of-view imaging spectrometer(WFIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wide Field-of-view Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS), a high-performance pushbroom hyperspectral imager designed for atmospheric chemistry and aerosols measurement from an aircraft or satellite, underwent initial field testing in 2004. The results of initial field tests demonstrate the all-reflective instrument's imaging performance and the capabilities of data processing algorithms to render hyperspectral image cubes from the field scans. Further processing results

Robert E. Haring; Randy Pollock; Richard M. Cross; Brian M. Sutin

2004-01-01

126

Field-testing the Wide-field-of-view Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wide Field-of-view Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS), a high-performance pushbroom hyperspectral imager designed for atmospheric chemistry and aerosols measurement from an aircraft or satellite, underwent initial field testing in 2004. The results of initial field tests demonstrate the all-reflective instrument's imaging performance and the capabilities of data processing algorithms to render hyperspectral image cubes from the field scans. Further processing results

Robert Haring; Randy Pollock; Brian Sutin

127

Initial Development of an Advanced Test Method for Jet Fuel Identification and Characterization, Phase 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a report of progress toward developing an advanced test method for jet fuel identification and characterization using GC x GC-TOFMS instrumentation. Sample selection, instrumental methods, and data analysis conducted relevant to the development of...

J. C. Hoggard R. E. Synovec W. C. Siegler

2010-01-01

128

Test for Success: Next Generation Aircraft Identification System RF Simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advancements in Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) systems are generating a variety of signals operating with a common purpose and often over common radio frequency (RF) spectrum. This paper will describe the top level characteristics of each of the following IFF\\/Surveillance systems and the plans and challenges of modeling these systems in ViaSat's RF stimulator systems. (1.) Mark XIIA, Mode

M. L. Garcia; J. M. Hoffman; J. L. Rowley; D. L. Stone

2007-01-01

129

Set Point Identification and Robustness Testing of Electrostatic Separation Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of the optimal operating conditions and evaluation of their robustness are critical issues for the industrial application of electrostatic separation techniques. In spite of extensive investigations performed in recent years, no standard procedure is available for guiding the research of the set point and for minimizing the process sensibility to changes in certain critical factors. The aim of this

Karim Medles; Amar Tilmatine; Farid Miloua; Abdelber Bendaoud; Mohamed Younes; Mostfa Rahli; Lucian Dascalescu

2007-01-01

130

Set point identification and robustness testing of electrostatic separation processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of the optimal operating conditions and evaluation of their robustness are critical issues for the industrial application of the electrostatic separation techniques. In spite of extensive investigations performed during recent years, no standard procedure is available for guiding the research of the set point and for minimizing the process sensibility to changes in certain critical factors. The aim of

Karim Medles; Amar Tilmatine; Farid Miloua; Abdelber Bendaoud; Mohamed Younes; Mostéfa Rahli; Lucian Dascalescu

2004-01-01

131

Geometric determinants of shape segmentation: Tests using segment identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geometric determinants of shape decomposition were studied using a performance-based method. Observers’ identification of contour segments was shown to be systematically modulated by their curvature properties, and by the geometric properties of the enclosed region. Specifically, negative minima of contour curvature provided the best segment boundaries. Segments with negative-minima boundaries were identified with greater accuracy than those with positive

Elias H. Cohen; Manish Singh

2007-01-01

132

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collision with terawatt pulses of 1,054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Physics Dept.; E-144 Collaboration

1996-10-01

133

Status of micellar-polymer field tests: another view  

SciTech Connect

Questions are raised concerning the validity of the data and correlations and on choice of field data in correlations described in Petrol. Eng. Nov. 1979 concerning micellar-polymer field tests. The questions concern the use of incomplete field test results, selection of certain field tests and use of correlations obtained from data in 2 cases not presented consistently. This work develops different micellar-polymer field test graphs and conclusions with regard to the amount of surfactant used, correlation of mobility buffer slug size with oil recovery, effect of salinity of the reservoir, and effect of well spacing. The analysis offered indicates that use of micellar-polymer flooding as a means to provide additional energy shows potential, but determining factors for economic success will be reservoir selection and thorough process design. 13 references.

Holm, L.W.

1980-04-01

134

Project DEEP STEAM preliminary field test, Bakersfield, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A successful field test of the DEEP STEAM technology has been conducted. A direct contact steam generator was operated in the Kern River reservoir in cooperation with Chevron USA. The objectives of the test were demonstration of long term operation of a downhole steam generator, investigation of reservoir response, and the environmental consequences of the technology. The test was extensively

A. J. Mulac; J. A. Beyeler; R. G. Clay; K. R. Darnall; A. B. Donaldson; T. D. Donham; R. L. Fox; D. R. Johnson; R. L. Maxwell

1981-01-01

135

SOLERAS solar active cooling field test operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four small-scale commercial size solar cooling systems being tested in Arizona as part of the SOLERAS program are described, together with 1981 performance summaries. A 63 kW air-cooled Rankine cycle system powered by parabolic troughs is used to cool a one-story office building. The system has both hot and cold storage tanks and uses R-11 fluid. A 49 kW Rankine cycle system driven by 218.5 sq m of evacuated tube collectors features direct expansion cooling of part of an office building, as well as part-time electrical generation for the grid. A water-absorption cycle system with 53 kW of power from 133.8 sq m of tracking parabolic trough receivers is employed to cool a warehouse office area. The system includes a hot storage tank and ground-mounted solar energy collection. Computer room cooling is provided by the fourth system, a 35 kW air-cooled absorption system system featuring 89.2 sq m of Fresnel lens collectors mounted roof-top. Design simplicity has been found to be mandatory for performance optimization, thereby ruling out cogeneration. Alsi, the use of both hot and cold storage has proven beneficial from cost and operational points of view

Williamson, J.; Martin, R.

136

Development of a Smell Identification Test Using a Novel Stick-Type Odor Presentation Kit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The odor identification is strongly influenced by the social and cultural factors; therefore, the odorants used in a smell iden- tification test should be familiar to the test population. In addition, the device used in the test is desired to be simply handled and retain odor quality over time. We developed a novel stick-type odor presentation kit that consists of

S. Saito; Miyako Mise; Yuichi Deguchi; Tatsu Kobayakawa; Saito Sachiko Taste

2006-01-01

137

Field tests assess novel air-injection EOR processes  

SciTech Connect

Two ongoing field tests are assessing novel air-injection processes, in situ combustion, for enhancing oil recovery from light and heavy oil fields. Amoco Producing Co. operates the light oil test in the West Hackberry field in Cameron Parish, La. This test combines air injection with the double-displacement process. The other test is Amoco Canada Petroleum Co.`s air-injection project that involves a variation on steam-assisted gravity drainage in horizontal wells. The test is in a thin pay zone containing heavy oil in the Wabasca area, about 250 km north of Edmonton. Also in its research facility in Tulsa, Amoco is conducting laboratory tests to develop ways for mitigating the risks of air injection.

Fassihi, M.R.; Gillham, T.H. [Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States); Yannimaras, D.V. [Amoco E and P Technology Group, Tulsa, OK (United States); Hassan, D. [Amoco Canada Petroleum Co., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-05-20

138

Nondestructive Testing and Identification for Bridge Rating: Pilot Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A nondestructive bridge testing scheme based on a practical impact testing methodology has been described. In this method, acceleration responses at several points on a test bridge due to impact are measured and frequency response functions are computed. ...

A. E. Aktan M. Raghavendrachar

1990-01-01

139

Identification of the four orthotropic plate stiffnesses using a single open-hole tensile test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification of mechanical parameters for real structures is still a challenge. With the improvement of optical full-field\\u000a measurement techniques, it has become easier, but in spite of many publications showing the feasibility of such methods, experimental\\u000a results are still scarce. In this paper we present a first step towards a global approach of mechanical identification for\\u000a composite materials. The

J. Molimard; R. Le Riche; A. Vautrin; J. R. Lee

2005-01-01

140

Well interference tests at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Two well interference tests were carried out by the LBL at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field located in Baja California, Mexico, during 1978. The first test incorporated five wells located about 1 km south of the power plant. Standard analyses of the well interference test data yielded permeability estimates that are much higher than the values obtained from two-rate tests performed by the CFE during the development of production wells. 4 refs.

Schroeder, R.C.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.; Lippmann, M.J.

1980-01-01

141

Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.  

PubMed

The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

2013-02-01

142

Subcutaneous electronic identification in cattle: a field study.  

PubMed

The use of injectable transponders in cattle for identification purposes, for up to 30 months, was investigated. Passive electronic transponders, encapsulated in either polymer or glass, were injected subcutaneously into either the ear base or the earlobe of 652 calves in three populations. The animals were clinically examined weekly, and transponder signalling was checked immediately before and after injection, after two weeks and after about eight months. About 10 per cent of animals in one population were also checked after 20 and 30 months. No severe clinical or visible pathological changes were observed, and the calves' welfare was not apparently affected by the procedure. None of the transponders migrated from their injection sites. Eight months after injection, a signal was detected from 98.2 per cent of transponders injected in the ear base and from 90.5 per cent of those in the earlobe. At 20 and 30 months after injection, 10.4 per cent and 2.6 per cent of transponders, respectively, had ceased to signal. Thus, most transponders in the calves' ear base demonstrated functionality for up to 30 months. PMID:21813580

Løken, T; Vatn, G; Kummen, E

2011-08-03

143

Validation of Field Test Methods for Use of Tire Bales.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This implementation project validates field test methods for checking the conformity of tire bales used in transportation applications. It also provides guidelines for instrumentation of installations involving tire bales. Specific components include fiel...

B. J. Freilich C. Guzman J. G. Zornberg

2012-01-01

144

Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests  

SciTech Connect

This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided.

Webb, R.H.

1994-10-01

145

Hazard Evaluation Division Standard Evaluation Procedure - Field Testing for Pollinators.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Standard Evaluation Procedure (SEP) for Field Testing for Pollinators is a guidance document primarily intended for Agency reviewers and the regulated industry who assess pesticide hazards to bees. The SEP is also intended to provide information to th...

A. W. Vaughan

1987-01-01

146

The Oklahoma Cooling Retrofit Field Test: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Cooling Retrofit Field Test will be performed to determine the magnitude of the cooling-energy savings attributed to the installation of conservation measures as typically installed by Oklahoma's Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the additional savings that can be achieved by the installation of two cooling retrofit measures: replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and installation of attic radiant barriers. This report is an experimental plan presenting the specific research goals and questions to be addressed by the field test, the responsibilities of the six field test participants, 16 tasks required to complete the field test, the experimental design, the data requirements and the instrumentation to collect the data, a data management procedure to store the data and check it for errors, and analysis procedures to be employed to study the collected data. 13 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Ternes, M.P.; Hu, P.S.

1989-01-01

147

Field Test Plan for Evaluating the Cooperative Breath Analyzer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides basic inputs to the Transportation Systems Center for their continuing development and evaluation of cooperative breath analyzers. Its primary purpose is to indicate a number of potential field test sites and to describe various availa...

J. F. Oates H. H. Jacobs

1971-01-01

148

Reservoir Characterization Constrained to Well Test Data: A Field Example  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a method to integrate well test,production, shut-in pressure, log, core, and geological data toobtain a reservoir description for the Pagerungan Field,offshore Indonesia. The method computes spatialdistributions of permeability and porosity and generates apressure response for comparison to field data. This techniqueproduced a good match with well test data from three wellsand seven shut-in pressures. The permeability and

J. L. Landa; M. M. Kamal; C. D. Jenkins; R. N. Horne

1996-01-01

149

Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10⁻⁶ cm²\\/s. The 1981

J. N. Hartley; H. D. Freeman; E. G. Baker; M. R. Elmore; D. A. Nelson; C. F. Voss; P. L. Koehmstedt

1981-01-01

150

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

SciTech Connect

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

2011-01-17

151

Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years,

J. L. McAlpine; S. D. Joshi

1991-01-01

152

Field identification of birdseye in sugar maple (acer saccharum marsh. ). Forest Service research paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is

D. C. Bragg; D. D. Stokke

1994-01-01

153

An identification procedure of soil profile characteristics from two free field acclerometer records  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, an analytical, numerical and experimental approach for identifying soil profile characteristics by using system identification and free field records, is presented. First, a theoretical soil amplification function for two sites is defined and expressed in terms of the different parameters of the layers constituting the soil profiles (thickness, damping ratio, shear wave velocity and unit weight). Then,

Z. Harichane; H. Afra; S. M. Elachachi

2005-01-01

154

Identification Of Swirling Flow In 3-D Vector Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

An algorithm for identifying the center of swirlingflow in 3-D discretized vector fields has beendeveloped. The algorithm is based on critical pointtheory and has been implemented as a visualizationtool within pV3, a package for visualizing 3-Dtransient data. The scheme works with griddingsupported by pV3: structured meshes as well asunstructured grids composed of tetrahedra,polytetrahedral strips, hexahedra, pyramids, and\\/orprism cells. The results

David Sujudi; Robert Haimes

1995-01-01

155

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which

K. Sheppard; R. Weil; A. Desjarlais

1988-01-01

156

SNAP: An Integral Field Spectrograph for Supernova Identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SNAP supernova measurements rely on acquiring high quality samples of well identified type Ia supernovae. This requires a dedicated and optimized spectrograph. We propose an innovative concept for an integral field spectrograph for the SNAP observatory. Spectra obtained with this instrument will be used to identify Type Ia supernovae discovered by SNAP, and will play an important role in the planned systematic studies. A very compact design with various configurations based on prisms and/or gratings is under evaluation by the IN2P3 and INSU institutes in France. The expected performance of the most efficient configuration that meets the scientific objectives will be presented.

Malina, R.; Ealet, A.; Prieto, E.; Basa, S.; Le Fevre, O.; Mazure, A.; Pain, R.; Smadja, G.; Tilquin, A.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amidei, D.; Astier, P.; Baden, A.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Curtis, D.; Deustua, S.; Edwards, W.; Ellis, R.; Fruchter, A.; Frye, B.; Genat, J. F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Goodman, J.; Graham, J.; Hardin, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Hook, I.; Huterer, D.; Kasen, D.; Kim, A.; Knop, R.; Lafever, R.; Lampton, M.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Levy, J.-M.; Lidman, C.; Lin, R.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Metzger, M.; Miquel, R.; Mourao, A.; Nugent, P.; Pankow, D.; Pennypacker, C.; Perlmutter, S.; Refregier, A.; Rich, J.; Robinson, K.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schubnell, M.; Spadafora, A.; Smoot, G.; Sullivan, G.; Tarle, G.; Tomasach, A.; SNAP Collaboration

2001-12-01

157

Drop-weight test based identification of elastic half-space model parameters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method enabling the conversion of dynamic drop-weight test results into a statical substitute is presented. Owing to this substitution, statical models, instead of complex dynamical models, can be used for subsoil elastic moduli identification. An elastic half-space was adopted as the subsoil model. Identification was limited to the determination of the subsoil's modulus of elasticity. The results were verified in two ways. One way consisted in the simulation of experimental results on the basis of theoretical results. The latter were obtained by analytically solving the problem of half-space vibrations caused by an impact pulse. The elastic moduli identified on the basis of the simulated results were compared with the assumed elastic moduli. In the other verification method, the results obtained by the proposed identification method were compared with the result yielded by the standard statical identification method. The load and displacement values used were from tests carried out on actual soils.

Ruta, P.; Szyd?o, A.

2005-04-01

158

FIELD TESTING OF VOCS IN SOIL USING SENSIDYNE DETECTOR TUBES  

EPA Science Inventory

Present field testing for VOCs in soil and water involves sending samples to distant laboratories, waiting weeks for results, at a cost of 30 - 50 $ per sample. The goal of this science activity was to develop and test in the laboratory a methodology to detect VOCs in soil and w...

159

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

Walker, D. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-12-01

160

Identification of Flutter Derivatives of Bridge Dec ks in Wind Tunnel Test by Stochastic Subspace Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem statement: Flutter derivatives are the essential parameters i n the estimations of the flutter critical wind velocity and the response s of long-span cable supported bridges. These derivatives can be experimentally estimated from wi nd tunnel test results. Generally, wind tunnel test methods can be divided into free decay test and buf feting test. Compared with the free decay

T. Janesupasaeree; V. Boonyapinyo

2009-01-01

161

Drop-weight test based identification of elastic half-space model parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method enabling the conversion of dynamic drop-weight test results into a statical substitute is presented. Owing to this substitution, statical models, instead of complex dynamical models, can be used for subsoil elastic moduli identification. An elastic half-space was adopted as the subsoil model. Identification was limited to the determination of the subsoil's modulus of elasticity.The results were verified in

P. Ruta; A. Szydlo

2005-01-01

162

Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform Using Frequency Responses Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency-sweep is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency-sweep are guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that, we can

Widyawardana Adiprawita; Adang Suwandi Ahmad; Jaka Sembiring

2007-01-01

163

Set-Point Identification and Robustness Testing of a Free-Fall Triboelectrostatic Separation Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of the optimal operating conditions and evaluation of their sensibility to changes in certain critical factors are critical issues for the industrial application of electrostatic separation techniques. The authors have already elaborated a procedure for set-point identification and robustness testing of a roll-type corona-electrostatic separation process. The aim of this paper is to validate a similar procedure for optimizing

A. Tilmatine; S. Bendimerad; K. Medles; A. Bendaoud; M. Younes; L. Dascalescu

2008-01-01

164

On-Orbit System Identification Experiments of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of on-orbit system identification of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII (ETS-VIII), which was launched by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 11 in December 2006. On-orbit system identification experiments were performed using data acquired during normal operations in the initial check-out phase, such as station acquisition and wheel unloading. The satellite's unconstrained modes were identified using attitude

Tokio Kasai; Isao Yamaguchi; Hirotaka Igawa; Shinji Mitani; Takashi Ohtani; Masafumi Ikeda; Kei Sunagawa

2009-01-01

165

Preliminary results from IMB3 muon/electron identification tests at KEK  

SciTech Connect

A test has been conducted at KEK, Japan using beams of electrons and muons in a 1 kiloton water Cherenkov detector instrumented with IMB3 phototubes and electronics to evaluate IMB`s algorithms for identifying electrons and muons. This identification is important because the IMB3 detector`s results on the atmospheric neutrino anomaly depend on the proper identification of the electrons and muons produced in neutrino charged-current interactions. Preliminary results are presented.

Bratton, C.B. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States); Breault, J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Conner, Z. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

166

Selective testing of ?-galactosidase activity in the laboratory identification of Salmonella and Shigella species  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundSalmonella and Shigella species are pathogens of great medical and public health importance. However, laboratory identification of these organisms is time consuming. Using current standard laboratory algorithms, the vast majority of organisms submitted for serological typing with Salmonella-specific and Shigella-specific antisera are not clinically significant.AimsTo assess the addition of the O-nitrophenyl-?-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG) test to the standard screening protocol for identification

Samuel Boadi; Mike W D Wren; Stephen Morris-Jones

2010-01-01

167

Wavelet Denoising of Flight Flutter Testing Data for Improvement of Parameter Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of modal parameter estimation plays a crucial role in flutter boundary prediction. A new wavelet denoising method is introduced for flight flutter testing data, which can improve the estimation of frequency domain identification algorithms. In this method, the testing data is first preprocessed with a gradient inverse weighted filter to initially lower the noise. The redundant wavelet transform

Wei TANG; Zhong-ke SHI

2005-01-01

168

Biochemical and Susceptibility Tests Useful for Identification of Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Rods  

PubMed Central

Six hundred nineteen strains of nonfermenting gram-negative rods were tested for alkaline phosphatase, benzyl-arginine arylamidase, pyrrolidonyl arylamidase, ethylene glycol acidification, and susceptibility to desferrioxamine and colistin. The results were highly discriminant. Therefore, the proposed tests may be helpful for the identification of this group of organisms.

Laffineur, Kim; Janssens, Michele; Charlier, Jacqueline; Avesani, Veronique; Wauters, Georges; Delmee, Michel

2002-01-01

169

Practice and List Effects on the Synthetic Sentence Identification Test in Young and Elderly Listeners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined practice effects and list differences on a test of central auditory processing, the Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) test, with an ipsilateral competing message in 30 young and 20 elderly participants. Results indicated older adults required substantially more practice. Significant list differences were also found.…

Feeney, M. Patrick; Hallowell, Brooke

2000-01-01

170

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial suscep- tibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to

Karen C. Carroll; Brian D. Glanz; Anita P. Borek; Chad Burger; Hasan S. Bhally; Susan Henciak; Diane Flayhart; Merab Kekelidze; Chythanya Rajanna; Arnold Kreger; Alexander Sulakvelidze; Maryvonne Moulin-Schouleur; Catherine Schouler; Patrick Tailliez; Mu-Rong Kao; Eric Oswald; Jacques Mainil; Miguel Blanco; Roger E. Morey; Renee L. Galloway; Sandra L. Bragg; Arnold G. Steigerwalt; Leonard W. Mayer; Paul N. Levett

2006-01-01

171

Comparative testing for the identification of skin-sensitizing potentials of nonionic sugar lipid surfactants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for the identification of skin-sensitizing potentials of chemicals in Europe and is also the first choice method within REACH. In the formal validation, only a very few surfactant chemicals were evaluated and SDS was identified as a false positive. In this study, 10 nonionic sugar lipid surfactants were tested in

Christine Garcia; Nicholas Ball; Stuart Cagen; Juan-Carlos Carrillo; Hans Certa; Dorothea Eigler; Harald Esch; Cynthia Graham; Carl Haux; Reinhard Kreiling; Annette Mehling

2010-01-01

172

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was

R. W. Murphy; N. Domingo

1982-01-01

173

Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification  

SciTech Connect

The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

1996-12-01

174

Identification of the Temperature Field in Pulsatile Impinging Flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presented paper shows the possibility of using holographic interferometry and hot-wire anemometry in the research of heat transfer from impingement pulsatile flow. The intensity of heat transfer in the case of impingement flow is often measured with glue-on heat flux sensors, or by indirect methods such as naphthalene sublimation. All these methods have a response time too long for measuring instant values of the heat transfer coefficient on a surface cooled/heated by impingement pulsatile flow. This shortcoming should be overcome by using CTA glue-on probes or, preferably, by using optical methods such as holographic interferometry. It is necessary to employ a special holographic setup with double sensitivity instead of the commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the Mach-Zehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the holographic interferometry experiments will be compared with the temperature field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

2010-09-01

175

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...testing. For field testing you may...rate expected, the field test system's...changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. ...connectors, ambient sensors, and other...applicable. (d) Field testing may require...vessel, up to the highest power level,...

2009-07-01

176

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...testing. For field testing you may...rate expected, the field test system's...changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. ...connectors, ambient sensors, and other...applicable. (d) Field testing may require...vessel, up to the highest power level,...

2010-07-01

177

Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with {approx}60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

Temnykh A.; Babzien M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

2010-11-10

178

FUNCTIONALITY OF VETERINARY IDENTIFICATION MICROCHIPS FOLLOWING LOW- (0.5 TESLA) AND HIGH-FIELD (3 TESLA) MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.  

PubMed

The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

2013-06-13

179

DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

2001-10-01

180

An evaluation of the educational testing service major field achievement test in business  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly, the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business and other accrediting bodies have been requiring evidence that universities are fulfilling their missions. One approach involves the use of professionally developed, standardized achievement tests such as the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Major Achievement Field Test in Business (MFAT-B). We studied MFAT-B performance for its relationship to GPA and to measures

Joyce S. Allen; Peter Bycio

1997-01-01

181

Field Test of an In-Stack Diffusion Classifier on an Aircraft Engine Test Cell.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An in-stack diffusion classifier was field tested at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Particle size distribution measurements were made on the exhaust stream from the engine test cell while running a J75-P17 jet engine. Samples were collected at the test ...

B. J. Hausknecht D. A. Lundgren

1981-01-01

182

Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects  

SciTech Connect

In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

NONE

1999-07-01

183

Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

1983-12-01

184

High-field conductor testing at the FENIX facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fusion Engineering International experiments (FENIX) Test Facility, which was commissioned at the end of 1991, is the first facility in the world capable of testing prototype conductors for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility provides test conditions that simulate the ITER magnet operating environment; more importantly, it also accommodates specific experiments to determine the operational margins for the prototype conductors. The FENIX facility generates magnetic fields close to 14 T, and transport currents over 40 kA for testing the prototype conductors. This paper describes an experimental program that measures critical currents, current-sharing temperatures, forced-flow properties, and cyclic effects.

Shen, S. S.; Chaplin, M. R.; Felker, B.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Kishiyama, K. I.; Parker, J. M.

1993-04-01

185

Application of odor identification test in Parkinson's disease in China: a matched case-control study.  

PubMed

As one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), hyposmia is of great importance in establishing the early diagnosis of PD. To date, there are still no studies on the application of the 16-item odor identification test from Sniffin' Sticks (SS-16) in Chinese patients with PD. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of SS-16 in Chinese PD patients (n=110) compared with age and gender matched controls (n=110), and to explore the associated factors with olfactory function in PD patients. The 16 odors in the original odor identification test were retained but some alternative descriptions were developed before applications. Mean identification scores in patients were significantly lower than in controls (7.3 ± 2.8 VS. 11.6 ± 2.0 P<0.01), with 66.4% of patients had an impairment of odor identification as evaluated by 95% confidential interval of the identification score of the control group. Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed 86% sensitivity and 81% specificity in separating PD and healthy controls with a cut-off value of 9.5. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that autonomic dysfunction was a significant influential factor of odor identification scores in patients with PD. In conclusion, SS-16 provides a valid instrument for olfactory assessment in Chinese PD patients, and hyposmia may correlate with autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD. PMID:22364958

Chen, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Kang, Wen-Yan; Li, Bo; Xu, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Qin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

2012-02-24

186

Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

NNSA /NV

2001-09-20

187

Identification of Substances Interfering with Illicit Drug Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to intensified urine testing for illicit drugs, drug users have attempted to falsify results by several schemes including in vitro adulteration of specimens. Additives that were claimed to invalidate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) drug assays were i...

S. L. Mikkelsen

1988-01-01

188

40 CFR 455.50 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Test Methods for Pesticide...are named, together with the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS...values required under the Clean Water Act must be determined...Compendiumâ). Each pesticide chemical manufacturer that is...

2011-07-01

189

One test microbial diagnostic microarray for identification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and other Mycoplasma species.  

PubMed

The present study describes the use of microarray technology for rapid identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from other mycoplasmas that may be pathogenic to ruminants, including those of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, genetically and antigenically strictly correlated with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. A microarray containing genetic sequences of 55 different bacterial species from Acholeplasma, Mycoplasma, Spiroplasma and Ureaplasma genera was constructed. Sequences to genes of interest were collected in FASTA format from NCBI. The collected sequences were processed with OligoPicker software. Oligonucleotides were then checked for their selectivity with BLAST searches in GenBank. The microarray was tested with ATCC/NCTC strains of Mycoplasma spp. of veterinary importance in ruminants including Mycoplasma belonging to the mycoides cluster as well as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri field strains. The results showed that but one ATCC/NCTC reference strains hybridized with their species-specific sequences showed a profile/signature different and distinct from each other. The heat-map of the hybridization results for the nine genes interrogated for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides demonstrated that the reference strain Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides PG1 was positive for all of the gene sequences spotted on the microarray. CBPP field, vaccine and reference strains were all typed to be M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, and seven of the nine strains gave positive hybridization results for all of the nine genes. Two Italian strains were negative for some of the genes. Comparison with non-Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides reference strains showed some positive signals or considerable homology to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides genes. As expected, some correlations were observed between the strictly genetically and antigenically correlated Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri strains. Specifically, we observed that some Italian Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains were positive for two out of the three Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri genes, differently from what has been observed for other European or African Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains. This study highlighted the use of microarray technology as a simple and effective method for a single-step identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from other mycoplasmas that may be pathogenic to ruminants, including those of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, genetically and antigenically strictly correlated with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. The opportunity to discriminate several mycoplasmas in a single analysis enhances diagnostic rapidity and may represent a useful tool to screen occasionally mycoplasmas affecting animal farming in territories where diagnostic laboratory support is limited. The heat-map of the hybridization results of the comparative genomic hybridizations DNA-designed chip clearly indicates that the microarray performs well for the identification of the tested Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides reference and field strains, discriminating them from other mycoplasmas. PMID:22271459

Tonelli, A; Sacchini, F; Krasteva, I; Zilli, K; Scacchia, M; Beaurepaire, C; Nantel, A; Pini, A

2012-11-01

190

Statistical analysis of Turbine Engine Diagnostic (TED) field test data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the summer of 1993, a field test of turbine engine diagnostic (TED) software, developed jointly by U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the U.S. Army Ordnance Center and School, was conducted at Fort Stuart, GA. The data were collected in conformance with a cross-over design, some of whose considerations are detailed. The initial analysis of the field test data was exploratory, followed by a more formal investigation. Technical aspects of the data analysis insights that were elicited are reported.

Taylor, Malcolm S.; Monyak, John T.

1994-11-01

191

Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

Schaeffer, J. S.; Haas, R. C.; Diana, J. S.; Breck, J. E.

1999-01-01

192

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

193

Project DEEP STEAM preliminary field test, Bakersfield, California  

SciTech Connect

A successful field test of the DEEP STEAM technology has been conducted. A direct contact steam generator was operated in the Kern River reservoir in cooperation with Chevron USA. The objectives of the test were demonstration of long term operation of a downhole steam generator, investigation of reservoir response, and the environmental consequences of the technology. The test was extensively instrumented to provide data on generator performance and reservoir response. The results show that the system is capable of long term operation in the oil field. It was demonstrated that substantial environmental improvements over surface steam production can be expected from injection of combustion products with steam in the downhole steam concept. The reservoir character was not altered by the test injection and appeared the same as that for pure steam injection.

Mulac, A.J.; Beyeler, J.A.; Clay, R.G.; Darnall, K.R.; Donaldson, A.B.; Donham, T.D.; Fox, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Maxwell, R.L.

1981-04-01

194

Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188°C (370°F) and 340 psia. It was found

L. J. Weirick; D. R. Johnson

1981-01-01

195

Lumped parameter identification of a quarter car test rig  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quarter car model is a simple and widely used mathematical model to analyze the vibration and control problem of vehicles. In this study, a quarter car test rig is modeled as a lumped parameter system. Model parameters of the system are determined by measurements and experiments. Forced vibration method is used to identify the stiffness and damping parameters of the lumped model. A modal shaker is used to generate the road input in the test rig. The accelerations of the road input, sprung and unsprung masses are measured by piezoelectric accelerometers. The frequency response functions are obtained by using acceleration data. The identified parameters of the test rig are adjusted by comparing the experimental and simulation results.

Taskin, Y.; Yagiz, N.; Yuksek, I.

2013-02-01

196

Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management.

Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-06-01

197

Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project  

SciTech Connect

The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

Leshikar, G.A.

1997-05-16

198

The Identification of Radex Properties in Objective Test Items.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a Monte Carlo simulation, a methodology was developed to investigate the existence of radex properties among objective test items. In an experiment with items covering four categories of Bloom's cognitive domain taxonomy, the items did not have the factorial properties of a radex with four levels of complexity. (Author/BW)|

Seddon, G. M.; And Others

1981-01-01

199

Evaluating Gifted Identification Practice: Aptitude Testing and Linguistically Diverse Learners  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined individually administered IQ scores from an entire K–5 population (N = 432) of Limited English Proficient students referred for gifted program eligibility determination in a single large urban district in the southeastern United States. Of 8 IQ tests compared, only 1, the Stanford-Binet V, had scores appreciably lower than expected on the basis of the district's screening

Michael S. Matthews; Lauri Kirsch

2011-01-01

200

Genetic algorithms for nondestructive testing in crack identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method to identify the nature of a crack on the surface of a region using nondestructive testing (NDT) and inverse problem methodology is presented. A genetic algorithm (GA) based approach, which involves a global search to avoid local minima, is presented and applied to solve the inverse problem of identifying the position, shape and the orientation of a surface

A. A. Arkadan; T. Sareen; S. Subramaniam

1994-01-01

201

A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples.  

PubMed

This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of oocyst suspensions of known number of oocysts from Eimeria mitis, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella were prepared and ground using glass beads or mini-pestle. DNA was extracted from ruptured oocysts using commercial systems (GeneReleaser, Qiagen Stoolkit and Prepman) or phenol-chloroform DNA extraction, followed by identification of species-specific ITS-1 sequences by optimised single species PCR assays. The Stoolkit and Prepman protocols showed insufficient repeatability, and the former was also expensive and relatively time-consuming. In contrast, both the GeneReleaser protocol and phenol-chloroform protocols were robust and sensitive, detecting less than 0.4 oocysts of each species per PCR. Finally, we evaluated our new protocol on 68 coccidia positive field samples. Our data suggests that rupturing the oocysts by mini-pestle grinding, preparing the DNA with GeneReleaser, followed by optimised single species PCR assays, makes a robust and sensitive procedure for identifying chicken Eimeria species in field samples. Importantly, it also provides minimal hands-on-time in the pre-PCR process, lower contamination risk and no handling of toxic chemicals. PMID:17386979

Haug, Anita; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G

2007-03-26

202

A new cultural adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a test of olfactory function that is widely used by otolaryngologists, geriatricians, and neurologists, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. In some instances, cultural and socioeconomic factors have necessitated changes in the odorant items or the response alternatives to make the test scores congruent with North American norms. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of Brazilian subjects on a new Portuguese language version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test with their performance on an earlier Portuguese language version of the test, as well as to assess the influences of gender, age, ethnicity, and economic status on the test scores. METHODS: Based on pilot data, several response alternatives of the earlier Portuguese language version of the test were altered in an effort to improve test performance. Forty-nine healthy Brazilian volunteers, who represented several economic classes, were tested. The test scores of the study cohort who received the newer version of the test were compared with those of a group of 25 subjects who received the earlier version of the test. RESULTS: The mean score for the new version [35 (2.1)] was significantly (p?=?0.002) higher than that for the earlier version [32.5 (3.5)]. Although no apparent influence of socioeconomic status was observed, the female participants outperformed the male participants in the current subject cohort. CONCLUSION: The changes made in the new cultural adaptation of the Portuguese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test were effective in increasing the average test scores of the participants. Overall, the female subjects outperformed the male subjects on the test.

Fornazieri, Marco Aurelio; Doty, Richard L; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; de Rezende Pinna, Fabio; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Voegels, Richard Louis

2013-01-01

203

Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel  

SciTech Connect

Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T. [Research Centre on Tools Materials and Processes (CROMeP), Ecole des mines d'Albi-Carmaux, 81013 ALBI Cedex 9 (France)

2007-04-07

204

Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS™) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D®).

Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

2007-04-01

205

Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol.

Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

2013-01-01

206

[Rapid mycobacterium identification and rapid susceptibility testing by the nucleic amplification method].  

PubMed

This review was designed to review mycobacterial infections from the viewpoint of clinical practices. We showed the usefulness of the rapid mycobacterium identification system for the detection of various genes by the nucleic amplification method. However, most PCR-based identifications required NALC-NaOH preprocessing, a special technique, or lengthy, hard work. Although 16S rRNA gene sequences may be provided successfully to identify many mycobacterial species, they lack sufficient discrimination to differentiate certain isolates from some species. We also explained the current methodologies of rapid susceptibility testing for M. tuberculosis and clarified these abilities. Therefore, molecular detection and identification should be considered to isolate these organisms, in settings where bacteria were microscopically visible in clinical samples, involving culturing and performing drug susceptibility testing for mycobacteria. Finally, we should emphasize the importance of collaboration between clinical microbiologists and basic bacterial researchers to promote current and future clinical strategies against mycobacteria. PMID:23672082

Yoshida, Shiomi; Tomita, Motohisa

2013-01-01

207

Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for…

Walker, Bonnie

208

Low-maintenance pipeline water monitor field-tested  

Microsoft Academic Search

A product pipeline water monitor developed by Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) eliminates the causes of problems generally associated with such systems, i.e., bubbles, entrained dust particles, poisoning, erosion, and dirty windows. The device has been extensively tested in the laboratory and in the field and has shown exceptional performance with very little maintenance required. The device consists of two compartments

Kapff

1979-01-01

209

Data Acquisition for Solar Industrial Process Heat Field Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Current solar industrial process heat field tests employ a variety of different types of data acquisition system. In general, data acquisition has been unreliable for these projects and, as a result, only a limited amount of performance data have been ava...

G. Bush C. Kutscher

1980-01-01

210

Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the field testing task, using lysimeter arrays, is to expose samples of solidified resin waste to the actual physical, chemical, and microbiological conditions of disposal enviroment. Wastes used in the experiment include a mixture of synthetic organic ion exchange resins and a mixture of organic exchange resins and an inorganic zeolite. Solidification agents used to produce the

McConnell J. W. Jr; R. D. Rogers

1988-01-01

211

Field Tests of Acoustic Telemetry for a Portable Coastal Observatory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface...

B. Butman D. Frye J. Ware M. Martini

2006-01-01

212

A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

2011-01-01

213

A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

2011-01-01

214

FIELD TEST OF A GENERIC METHOD FOR HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Validation of a method for a particular analyte or group of analytes means that the performance of the sampling and analytical methodology for these analytes has been established and demonstrated through field tests at the type of source category of interest: that is, the precisi...

215

FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

216

Multipacting Tests with Magnetic Field for the LHC Beam Screen  

Microsoft Academic Search

In connection with electron-cloud induced heating of the LHC beam screen, multipacting tests with a resonant coaxial cavity have been successfully performed in presence of a solenoid and a dipole magn etic field. We have developed a simple and reliable technique, based on amplitude modulation of the input signal, to detect electronically the onset of multipacting and to monitor the

Oliver Sim Brüning; Friedhelm Caspers; Jean Michel Laurent; M. Morvillo; F. Ruggiero

1998-01-01

217

Field test of electret ion chambers for environmental monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field test of electret ion chambers was performed to evaluate their performance in making environmental exposure measurements at nuclear facilities. The objectives of the study were to determine electret ion chamber measurements. Three electret ion chambers were placed at each of 40 monitoring locations in the vicinity of a commercial nuclear power station during four consecutive quarters. The electret

R. A. Fjeld; P. Kotrappa; K. J. Montague

1994-01-01

218

Field tracer-transport tests in unsaturated fractured tuff  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a field investigation in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, NV. This investigation included a series of tests during which tracer-laced water was released into a high-permeability zone within a horizontal injection borehole. The tracer concentration was monitored in the seepage collected in an excavated slot

Qinhong Hu; Rohit Salve; William T Stringfellow; Joseph S. Y Wang

2001-01-01

219

Field testing results of downhole scale inhibitor injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first field tests on the addition of scale inhibitors to geothermal brines were carried out in Italy between 1981 and 1985 at Cesano and at Latera. A long-term experiment was recently performed in the Latera 2 well to check the feasibility of the downhole inhibitor injection technique as a reliable solution to the carbonate scaling problem. A plastic-lined injection

S. Pieri; F. Sabatelli; B. Tarquini

1989-01-01

220

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

221

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

222

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF COPPER CYANIDE RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field tests of reverse osmosis (RO) were conducted on copper cyanide rinse waters at two different sites: Whyco Chromium Co. and New England Plating Co. At both sites, closed-loop treatment was used with plating chemicals recycled to the bath and purified water recycled to the ri...

223

Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1972-1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field test of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was conducted jointly by the Falconer Central School, St. Mary's Elementary School in Dunkirk, New York, and the Teacher Education Research Center at the State University College in Fredonia, New York. DMP is a research-based, innovative, process-oriented elementary mathematics…

Schall, William E.; And Others

224

Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of

Timothy J. O'gorman; John M. Ross; Allen H. Taber; James F. Ziegler; Hans P. Muhlfeld; Charles J. Montrose; Huntington W. Curtis; James L. Walsh

1996-01-01

225

Cosmic censorship, black holes and integer-spin test fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been argued that, starting with a slightly subextremal Kerr black hole instead of an extremal one, it is possible to overspin a black hole past the extremal limit and turn it into a naked singularity by sending test bodies, if one neglects radiative and self-force effects. In this work we show that (i) an extremal Kerr black hole cannot be overspun as a result of the interaction with massless integer-spin test fields (scalar, electromagnetic, or gravitational), (ii) overspinning can be achieved if we start with a nearly extremal black hole instead, and (iii) for the scalar field, the argument applies to more general black holes, and also allows use of a more general field configuration. Our analysis also neglects radiative and self-force effects.

Düzta?, Koray; Semiz, ?brahim

2013-09-01

226

Lysostaphin disk test for routine presumptive identification of staphylococci.  

PubMed Central

The sensitivity of the lysostaphin disk test was evaluated for routine differentiation of staphylococci from micrococci. Lyophilized paper disks impregnated with 10 micrograms of lysostaphin were placed on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate inoculated with 10 species of staphylococci and 7 species of micrococci. After 16 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, a circular zone of growth inhibition was noted for all staphylococci species tested. By contrast, all the micrococci species were resistant. The activity of the impregnated disks was not diminished by storing them at 4 degrees C for 3 months. With disks impregnated by 10, 6.6, 5, and 2.5 micrograms of lysostaphin, diameters of the growth inhibition zone for S. aureus Cowan 1 NCTC 8530 strain were proportional to the logarithm of the quantity of lysostaphin present in each disk. Images

Poutrel, B; Caffin, J P

1981-01-01

227

A Functional Decomposition Method for Redundancy Identification and Test Generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new combinational circuit automatic test-pattern generation (ATPG)acceleration method called EST that detects equivalent search states, which are saved for later use. The search space is learned and characterized using E-frontiers, which are circuit cut-sets induced by theimplication stack contents. The search space is reduced by matchingthe current search state against previously-encountered search states(possibly from prior faults), and

Michael L. Bushnell; John Giraldi

1997-01-01

228

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Test Project: Honeywell Technology Strategy Center. Final report, Volume 2. Engineering field test  

SciTech Connect

The SOLERAS solar cooling system at Arizona Public Service Company in Phoenix, Arizona, was subjected to engineering field testing for a period of 18 months. Although some problems arose, which is typical with a new engineering model, the system generally ran well. This document describes the work completed in all three phases of this program, which included the preliminary analysis and detailed design of the solar cooling system, installation, testing, and data analysis.

Not Available

1982-01-01

229

Field tests with the burst transmission system ARMDAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report presents the results from field tests with the burst transmission system ARMDAT. The tests were carried out in February 1995 between Ostersund and Kiruna in Sweden, a distance of 570 km. Burst transmissions with the ARMDAT system were alternated with similar transmissions from KV-DART 301 under equivalent circumstances. The systems were compared with respect to correct received messages. During the test period, the HF channel varied from good to no communication at all. The systems were tested in heavily disturbed ionosphere, together with strong interfering signals. Totally, the test comprised 34 hours measuring time. In bad and very bad conditions, the ARMDAT system performed 35-100% better than the KV-DART 301. In good conditions, ARMDAT received almost all messages correctly, while KV-DART 301 varied from 75-100% correctly received messages.

Ahlin, L.

1995-04-01

230

Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

1996-09-01

231

Validation of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test in a Swedish sample of suspected offenders with signs of mental health problems: Results from the Mental Disorder, Substance Abuse and Crime study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substance abuse is common among offenders. One method widely used for the detection of substance abuse is screening. This study explored the concurrent validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) screening tools in relation to (a) substance abuse and dependency diagnoses and (b) three problem severity domains of the sixth

Natalie Durbeej; Anne H. Berman; Clara H. Gumpert; Tom Palmstierna; Marianne Kristiansson; Charlotte Alm

2010-01-01

232

STRUCTURAL IDENTIFICATION BY DYNAMIC TESTING: THE EXAMPLE OF THE BUILDING N°4 OF THE FIVIZZANO HOSPITAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of the evaluation of the seismic vulnerability of hospital buildings, whose structures often do not respect prescriptions of modern codes, is tackled through a structural identification procedure. In this paper an integrated numerical-experimental methodology is illustrated: forced dynamic tests with harmonic excitation (vibrodyne) are carried out on the existing building and the analysis of signals recorded by accelerometers

Sergio Lagomarsino; Andrea Cavicchi; Andrea Penna

233

Redundancy identification\\/removal and test generation for sequential circuits using implicit state enumeration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Finite state machine (FSM) verification based on implicit state enumeration can be extended to test generation and redundancy identification. The extended method constructs the product machine of two FSMs to be compared, and reachability analysis is performed by traversing the product machine to find any difference in I\\/O behavior. When an output difference is detected, the information obtained by reachability

Hyunwoo Cho; Gary D. Hachtel; Fabio Somenzi

1993-01-01

234

RESEARCH REPORTS Improving the Identification Accuracy of Senior Witnesses: Do Prelineup Questions and Sequential Testing Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eyewitness research has identified sequential lineup testing as a way of reducing false lineup choices while maintaining accurate identifications. The authors examined the usefulness of this procedure for reducing false choices in older adults. Young and senior witnesses viewed a crime video and were later presented with target present or absent lineups in a simultaneous or sequential format. In addition,

Amina Memon; Fiona Gabbert

235

Improving the Identification Accuracy of Senior Witnesses: Do Prelineup Questions and Sequential Testing Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eyewitness research has identified sequential lineup testing as a way of reducing false lineup choices while maintaining accurate identifications. The authors examined the usefulness of this procedure for reducing false choices in older adults. Young and senior witnesses viewed a crime video and were later presented with target present or absent lineups in a simultaneous or sequential format. In addition,

Amina Memon; Fiona Gabbert

2003-01-01

236

Identification of Medically Relevant Nocardia Species with an Abbreviated Battery of Tests  

PubMed Central

Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several biochemical tests and Kirby-Bauer susceptibility patterns for the identification of 75 isolates encompassing the 8 medically relevant Nocardia species. There were few biochemical reactions that were sufficiently unique for species identification; of note, N. nova were positive for arylsulfatase, N. farcinica were positive for opacification of Middlebrook 7H11 agar, and N. brasiliensis and N. pseudobrasiliensis were the only species capable of liquefying gelatin. API 20C sugar assimilation patterns were unique for N. transvalensis, N. asteroides IV, and N. brevicatena. There was overlap among the assimilation patterns for the other species. Species-specific patterns of susceptibility to gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and erythromycin were obtained for N. nova, N. farcinica, and N. brevicatena, while there was overlap among the susceptibility patterns for the other isolates. No single method could identify all Nocardia isolates to the species level; therefore, a combination of methods was necessary. An algorithm utilizing antibiotic susceptibility patterns, citrate utilization, acetamide utilization, and assimilation of inositol and adonitol accurately identified all isolates. The algorithm was expanded to include infrequent drug susceptibility patterns which have been reported in the literature but which were not seen in this study.

Kiska, Deanna L.; Hicks, Karen; Pettit, David J.

2002-01-01

237

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01

238

Evaluation of the reliability of soccer-specific field tests.  

PubMed

The soccer-specific field tests are popular among coaches due to their simplicity, validity, and minimal use of equipment. Nevertheless, there is a general lack of data about their reliability, particularly regarding the tests of anaerobic performance. Twenty professional male soccer players performed 3 consecutive trials of the tests of throwing-in and standing-kick performance (the distance measured) as well as on timed 10-m sprint, flying 20-m sprint, running 10 x 5 m, zigzag running with and without the ball, and the skill index (i.e., the ratio of the zigzag running without and with the ball). With the exception of the throwing-in and standing kick, the evaluated tests revealed high intraclass correlation coefficients (i.e., >0.80), small within-individual variations (coefficient of variation, <4%), and sample sizes for detecting a 2% change in the tested performance that are either close to or below the standard size of a professional soccer squad. In addition to simplicity and face validity, most of the evaluated tests revealed high reliability. Therefore, the evaluated tests are recommended for sport-specific profiling and early selection of young athletes as well as for routine testing procedures that could detect effects of various intervention procedures. Regarding the throwing-in and standing-kick tests, direct measurement of the ball velocity (e.g., with a standard radar gun) is recommended. PMID:18545209

Mirkov, Dragan; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Kukolj, Milos; Ugarkovic, Dusan; Jaric, Slobodan

2008-07-01

239

A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. Abstract: The Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique (Latham et al 2008) hypothesizes that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre seawater particles can enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and increase cloud albedo. Here, we propose a set of field tests to critically assess the efficacy of the MCB geoengineering proposal over a limited area. The tests are de minimus with respect to their climate effects. The tests involve three phases, with increasing logistical complexity, each of which is designed to test one or more important components of the cloud brightening scheme. Each involves the introduction and monitoring of controlled aerosol perturbations from one or more ship-based seeding platforms up to a limited area of 100x100 km2. A suite of observational platforms of increasing number and complexity, including aircraft, ships and satellites, will observe the aerosol plume and in the later experiments the cloud and albedo responses to the aerosol perturbations. These responses must include the necessary cloud physical and chemical processes which determine the efficacy of the cloud brightening scheme. Since these processes are also central to the broader problem of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, such field tests would have significant benefits for climate science in addition to providing a critical test of the MCB hypothesis. Such field experiments should be designed and conducted in an objective manner within the framework of emerging geoengineering research governance structures. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137

Gadian, A.; Wood, R.; Coe, H.; Latham, J.

2011-12-01

240

Internal consistency reliability of the fractionated and whole University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal consistency reliability (ICR) of the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and\\u000a its 10-, 20-, and 30-item fractions was explored, as well as the relationships between the fractions and the entire 40-item\\u000a test. Pearson correlation coefficients (rs) were computed among all independent combinations and permutations of the four 10-item UPSIT booklets using data from 774\\u000a subjects.

Richard L. Doty; Richard E. Frye; Udayan Agrawal

1989-01-01

241

EFFECT OF DISTRACTOR WORD VARIABILITY IN CHILDREN'S PERFORMANCE ON A WORD IDENTIFICATION TEST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Second, third, and fourth grade children were administered one of three different versions of a word identification test. All versions tested the same target words but used a different combination of two different sets of distractor words. One set was deemed “highly confusing” (i.e., all dis?tractors were graphically very similar to target words), the other “easily discriminable” (i.e., distractors were

James F. Baumann; Robert N. Walker; Dale D. Johnson

1981-01-01

242

A Classical Parameter Identification Method and a Modern Test Generation Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many methods have been presented for the testing and diagnosis of analog circuits. Each of these methods has its advantages\\u000a and disadvantages. In this paper we propose a novel sensitivity analysis algorithm for the classical parameter identification\\u000a method and a continuous fault model for the modern test generation algorithm, and we compare the characteristics of these\\u000a methods. At present, parameter

Ting Long; Houjun Wang; Bing Long

2011-01-01

243

Asphalt durability: From laboratory test to field implementation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how data from field trials, which were originally laid to validate the Australian Road Research Board asphalt durability test, were used to develop a field hardening model for the asphalt binder in sprayed seals. The work has been previously reported, and only sufficient information is given here to permit developments in the use of the model to be followed. A second model, which allows prediction of the asphalt viscosity level associated with seal distress in different climatic regions, is put forward in this paper. By using the two models it is possible to make predictions concerning seal life in different areas of a country.

Oliver, J.W.H. (Australian Road Research Board, Nunawading (Australia))

1990-07-01

244

Evaluation of a multiplex PCR test for simultaneous identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6.  

PubMed

Serotype-specific DNA regions involved in the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides (cps region) were used to develop a multiplex PCR test for the simultaneous species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6. Primers specific for serotypes 2, 5, and 6 were combined with the already existing species-specific primers used in a PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with serotype reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 182 Danish field isolates previously serotyped by latex agglutination or immunodiffusion. For all serologically typeable strains, a complete correspondence was found between the results obtained by the multiplex PCR test and the results obtained by the traditional serotyping methods. Six of eight serologically nontypeable strains could be allocated to a serotype on the basis of the multiplex PCR results. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated with a collection of 93 strains representing 29 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as species normally found in the respiratory tracts of swine. All of these strains were negative by the multiplex PCR test, including 50 field isolates of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii. When the multiplex PCR test was used to test Danish field strains, it was able to identify the serotypes of approximately 94% of all strains isolated from swine with clinical disease. More than 90% of the isolates that cross-reacted by the latex agglutination test were of serotype 2, 5, or 6. Determination of the serotype by PCR represents a convenient and specific method for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:12958231

Jessing, Stine G; Angen, Øystein; Inzana, Tomas J

2003-09-01

245

Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Test for Simultaneous Identification and Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotypes 2, 5, and 6  

PubMed Central

Serotype-specific DNA regions involved in the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides (cps region) were used to develop a multiplex PCR test for the simultaneous species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6. Primers specific for serotypes 2, 5, and 6 were combined with the already existing species-specific primers used in a PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with serotype reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 182 Danish field isolates previously serotyped by latex agglutination or immunodiffusion. For all serologically typeable strains, a complete correspondence was found between the results obtained by the multiplex PCR test and the results obtained by the traditional serotyping methods. Six of eight serologically nontypeable strains could be allocated to a serotype on the basis of the multiplex PCR results. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated with a collection of 93 strains representing 29 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as species normally found in the respiratory tracts of swine. All of these strains were negative by the multiplex PCR test, including 50 field isolates of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii. When the multiplex PCR test was used to test Danish field strains, it was able to identify the serotypes of approximately 94% of all strains isolated from swine with clinical disease. More than 90% of the isolates that cross-reacted by the latex agglutination test were of serotype 2, 5, or 6. Determination of the serotype by PCR represents a convenient and specific method for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories.

Jessing, Stine G.; Angen, ?ystein; Inzana, Tomas J.

2003-01-01

246

Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters  

PubMed Central

Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs?=??0.65 and ?0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min?1) and relative (mL·kg?1·min?1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs?=??0.79 to 0.55 and ?0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg?1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity.

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Desiree; Malm, Christer

2013-01-01

247

Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.  

PubMed

Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s). PMID:22789017

Roth, Stephen M

2012-12-01

248

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

249

A field-test battery for elite, young soccer players.  

PubMed

The validity and reliability of a battery of field-based performance tests was examined. The opinions of coaches, fitness professionals and players (n=170, 172 and 101 respectively) on the importance of performance testing were established using a questionnaire. On 2 occasions, separated by 7 days, 80 elite, young soccer players (mean±SD [and range]: age 13.2±2.6 [8.9-19.1] years; stature 1.59±0.18 m [1.32-1.91]; body mass 50.6±17.1 [26.5-88.7] kg) completed a battery of field-based tests comprised of heart rate response to a submaximal Multi-stage fitness test, 3 types of vertical jump, sprints over 10 and 20 m, and an agility test. Physical performance testing was considered important by coaches (97%), fitness professionals (94%) and players (83%). The systematic bias ratio and the random error components of the 95% ratio limits of agreement for the first and second tests, for the U9-U11 vs. U12-U14 vs. U15-U18 age groups, were [Systematic bias (*/÷ ratio limits)]: Heart rate (Level 5): 0.983 (*/÷ 1.044) vs. 0.969 (*/÷ 1.056) vs. 0.983 (*/÷ 1.055); Rocket jump: 0998 (*/÷ 1.112) vs. 0.999 (*/÷ 1.106) vs. 0.996 (*/÷ 1.093); 10 m sprint: 0.997 (*/÷ 1.038) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.033) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.038); Agility test: 1.010 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.014 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.002 (*/÷1.053). All tests, except heart rate recovery from the Multi-stage fitness test, were able to distinguish between different ability and age groups of players (p<0.05). Thus, the field-test battery demonstrated logical and construct validity, and was shown to be a reliable and objective tool for assessing elite, young soccer players. PMID:23143702

Hulse, M A; Morris, J G; Hawkins, R D; Hodson, A; Nevill, A M; Nevill, M E

2012-11-09

250

Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

Not Available

2011-11-01

251

Cloud field identification for earth radiation budget studies. Part II: Cloud field classification for the ScaRaB radiometer  

SciTech Connect

The radiometer ScaRaB (scanner for radiation balance) has two narrowband channels (0.5-0.7 and 10.5-12.5 {mu}m) in addition to the two broadband channels (0.2-4 and 0.2-50 {mu}m) necessary for earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements in order to improve cloud detection. Most automatic cloud classifications were developed with measurements of very good spatial resolution (200 m to 5 km). Earth radiation budget experiments (ERBE), on the other hand, work at a spatial resolution of about 50 km (at nadir), and therefore a cloud field classification adapted to this scale must be investigated. For this study, ScaRaB measurements are simulated by collocated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) ERBE data. The best-suited variables for a global cloud classification are chosen using as a reference cloud types determined by an operationally working threshold algorithm applied to AVHRR measurements at a reduced spatial resolution of 4 km over the North Atlantic. Cloud field types are then classified by an algorithm based on the dynamic clustering method. More recently, the authors have carried out a global cloud field identification using cloud parameters extracted by the 3I (improved initialization inversion) algorithm, from High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS) - Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) data. This enables the authors first to determine mean values of the variables best suited for cloud field classification and then to use a maximum-likelihood method for the classification. The authors find that a classification of cloud fields is still possible at a spatial resolution of ERB measurements. Roughly, one can distinguish three cloud heights and two effective cloud amounts (combination of cloud emissivity and cloud cover). However, only by combining flux measurements (ERBE) with cloud field classifications from sounding instruments (HIRS/MSU) can differences in radiative behavior of specific cloud fields be evaluated accurately. 29 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Stubenrauch, C.J.; Seze, G.; Scott, N.A.; Chedin, A. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique du CNRS, Palaiseau (France)] [and others

1996-03-01

252

Identification of powered parafoil-vehicle dynamics from modelling and flight test data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the final approach and landing phase of the X-38/Crew Return Vehicle, a steerable parafoil is used to maneuver and land at a targeted ground base under autonomous control. To simulate and verify performance of the onboard Parafoil Guidance, Navigation and Control system (PGNC), a commercial powered parafoil-vehicle, called the Buckeye consisting of a parafoil and vehicle two-body system like the X-38/CRV was modified to accommodate the avionics and scale-downed parafoil for aerodynamic similarity and a series of flight tests were conducted. Dynamic modelling and system identification results for the Buckeye are described in this dissertation. The vehicle dynamics are modelled as all 8 degrees-of-freedom system comprising 6 states for the parafoil and 2 states for the relative pitch and yaw motion of the vehicle with respect to the parafoil. Modal analysis for the linearized model from the nonlinear model shows the number and order of dynamic modes as well as the system is controllable and observable. For system identification, the overparameterized Observer/Kalman Filter Identification (OKID) method is applied to identify a linear model of the Buckeye two-body system from the flight data assuming that disturbances at a calm day are represented as periodic disturbances. The identification results show that the overparameterized OKID works well for powered parafoil-vehicle two-body system identification under calm day conditions using flight data. For the data with possible discrete gusts the OKID shows limitation to identify a linearized model properly. Several sensor packages including airdata and Inertial Measurement Unit are designed and installed for the parameters for identification. The sensor packages successfully supply data of the parameters for identification and suggest a feasible, low cost method for the parafoil-vehicle two-body dynamic parameters.

Hur, Gi-Bong

253

Enhancing Building Operations through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of HVAC systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set point deviation to improper implementation of controls. The results from these demonstrations along with the feedback from building operators and managers on the use of diagnostic tools are presented in the paper. Experience from field tests indicates that providing diagnostic tools to building operators can increase their awareness of equipment faults but it will not by itself solve the problems of inefficient operations. Changes in operation and maintenance practices and behavior are needed. We discuss how these new technologies might be delivered and used more effectively to better manage facilities, improving their condition and increasing their energy efficiency.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Pratt, Robert G.

2003-10-13

254

Field test of the superconducting gravimeter as a hydrologic sensor.  

PubMed

We report on a field test of a transportable version of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) intended for groundwater storage monitoring. The test was conducted over a 6-month period at a site adjacent to a well in the recharge zone of the karstic Edwards Aquifer, a major groundwater resource in central Texas. The purpose of the study was to assess requirements for unattended operation of the SG in a field setting and to obtain a gravimetric estimate of aquifer specific yield. The experiment confirmed successful operation of the SG, but water level changes were small (<0.3 m) leading to uncertainty in the estimate of specific yield. Barometric pressure changes were the dominant cause of both water level variations and non-tidal gravity changes. The specific yield estimate (0.26) is larger than most published values and dependent mainly on low frequency variations in residual gravity and water level time series. PMID:21895647

Wilson, Clark R; Scanlon, Bridget; Sharp, John; Longuevergne, Laurent; Wu, Hongqiu

2011-09-06

255

Blind field test evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a forensic tool.  

PubMed

Analytical instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy has advanced rapidly in recent years to the point where commercial field-portable instruments are available. Raman analysis with portable instrumentation is a new capability that can provide emergency response teams with on-site evaluation of hazardous materials. Before Raman analysis is accepted and implemented in the field, realistic studies applied to unknown samples need to be performed to define the reliability of this technique. Studies described herein provide a rigorous blind field test that utilizes two instruments and two operators to analyze a matrix that consists of 58 unknown samples. Samples were searched against a custom hazardous materials reference library (Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) Spectral Library Database). Experimental design included a number of intentionally difficult situations including binary solvent mixtures and a variety of compounds that yield medium-quality spectra that were not contained in the HMRU library. Results showed that over 97% of the samples were correctly identified with no occurrences of false positive identifications (compounds that were not in the library were never identified as library constituents). Statistical analysis indicated equivalent performance for both the operators and instruments. These results indicate a high level of performance that should extrapolate to actual field situations. Implementation of Raman techniques to emergency field situations should proceed with a corresponding level of confidence. PMID:11852198

Harvey, S D; Vucelick, M E; Lee, R N; Wright, B W

2002-01-24

256

Blind Field Test Evaluation of Raman Spectroscopy as a Forensic Tool  

SciTech Connect

Analytical instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy has advanced rapidly in recent years to the point where commercial field-portable instruments are available. Raman analysis with portable instrumentation is a new capability that can provide emergency response teams with on-site evaluation of hazardous materials. Before Raman analysis is accepted and implemented in the field, realistic studies applied to unknown samples need to be performed to define the reliability of this technique. Studies described herein provide a rigorous blind field test that utilizes 2 instruments and 2 operators to analyze a matrix that consists of 58 unknown samples. Samples were searched against a custom hazardous materials reference library[Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) Spectral Library Database]. Experimental design included a number of intentionally difficult situations including binary solvent mixtures and a variety of compounds that yield medium quality spectra that were not contained in the HMRU library. Results showed that over 97% of the samples were correctly identified with no occurrences of false positive identifications (compounds that were not in the library were never identified as library constituents). Statistical analysis indicated equivalent performance for both the operators and instruments. These results indicate a high level of performance that should extrapolate to actual field situations. Implementation of Raman techniques to emergency field situations should proceed with a corresponding level of confidence.

Harvey, Scott D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E. (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Lee, Richard N. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Bob W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2001-12-01

257

University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Field Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Field Test Facility became operational. Experiments demonstrated that the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer will accept injection of 300 gpm (18.9 1 sec (-1)) at reasonable pressures with a heat buildup in the injection well of about 44 psi (31.6 m) over 8 days. Heating of the ground water caused precipitation of carbonate in

M. Walton; M. C. Hoyer

1982-01-01

258

Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL\\/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water

C. A. Leigh; C. G. Finlayson; C. Van der Kolk

1984-01-01

259

Natural gas engine oil passes 7000 hour field test  

SciTech Connect

Conoco reports the successful completion of a 7000 hour field test of its EL MAR 3000 natural gas engine oil in Caterpillar's 3516 lean-burn natural gas engine. The EL MAR product line offers a performance package that includes on-site consultation and product support from engineers and technical support personnel, on-time delivery, state-of-the-art quality control procedures and timely and accurate used oil analysis. 8 figs.

Not Available

1994-12-01

260

Electromagnetic Near-Field Scanning for Microelectronic Test Chip Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of on-chip decoupling capacitors in the power supply network of a CMOS test-chip on radiated noise are investigat- ed by surface scan measurements. The hardware set-up and the mea- surement procedure are briefly described. Applying the calibration method, measurements of separate field components are given in absolute form. This permits one to compare and interpret surface scan images

Adam Tankielun; Uwe Keller; Etienne Sicard; Peter Kralicek; Bertrand Vrignon

261

Field tests of the biphase geothermal rotary-separator turbine  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental Biphase Rotary-Separator Turbine (RST) was designed for moderate wellhead brine conditions. The 30-inch RST was fabricated, mounted in a trailer together with its controls and instrumentation, and tested under laboratory and field conditions. Electric-power production, clean-steam production, and brine repressurization for injection were measured at three different locations with various brine temperatures and compositions. The measured power output

D. Cerini; E. Hughes

1981-01-01

262

Several field tests of Abate larvicides for Aedes control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In preliminary field tests in woodlands swamps of southern Morava, ?SSR, it was found that Abate 500E at the rate 0.1 g\\/m of water surfaces killed Aëdes vexans, A. cinereus and A. sticticus larvae 3 instar during 24 hours, but in other case at the rate 0.05 g\\/m of water surfaces killed not the A. vexans pupae.In southern Morava, CSSR

Dušan Novák

1971-01-01

263

Development and testing of a general amber force field.  

PubMed

We describe here a general Amber force field (GAFF) for organic molecules. GAFF is designed to be compatible with existing Amber force fields for proteins and nucleic acids, and has parameters for most organic and pharmaceutical molecules that are composed of H, C, N, O, S, P, and halogens. It uses a simple functional form and a limited number of atom types, but incorporates both empirical and heuristic models to estimate force constants and partial atomic charges. The performance of GAFF in test cases is encouraging. In test I, 74 crystallographic structures were compared to GAFF minimized structures, with a root-mean-square displacement of 0.26 A, which is comparable to that of the Tripos 5.2 force field (0.25 A) and better than those of MMFF 94 and CHARMm (0.47 and 0.44 A, respectively). In test II, gas phase minimizations were performed on 22 nucleic acid base pairs, and the minimized structures and intermolecular energies were compared to MP2/6-31G* results. The RMS of displacements and relative energies were 0.25 A and 1.2 kcal/mol, respectively. These data are comparable to results from Parm99/RESP (0.16 A and 1.18 kcal/mol, respectively), which were parameterized to these base pairs. Test III looked at the relative energies of 71 conformational pairs that were used in development of the Parm99 force field. The RMS error in relative energies (compared to experiment) is about 0.5 kcal/mol. GAFF can be applied to wide range of molecules in an automatic fashion, making it suitable for rational drug design and database searching. PMID:15116359

Wang, Junmei; Wolf, Romain M; Caldwell, James W; Kollman, Peter A; Case, David A

2004-07-15

264

Developing and pilot testing practical measures of preanalytic surgical specimen identification defects.  

PubMed

Accurate patient identification is a National Patient Safety Goal. Misidentification of surgical specimens is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. The authors developed 12 practical, process-based, standardized measures of surgical specimen identification defects during the preanalytic phase of pathology testing (from the operating room to the surgical pathology laboratory) that could be used to quantify the occurrence of these defects. The measures (6 container and 6 requisition identification defects) were developed by a panel of physicians, pathologists, nurses, and quality experts. A total of 69 hospitals prospectively collected data over 3 months. Overall, there were identification defects in 2.9% of cases (1780/60 501; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0%-4.4%), 1.2% of containers (1018/81 656; 95% CI = 0.8%-2.0%), and 2.3% of requisitions (1417/61 245; 95% CI = 1.2%-4.6%). Future research is needed to evaluate if hospitals are able to use these measures to assess interventions meant to reduce the frequency of specimen identification defects and improve patient safety. PMID:23322909

Bixenstine, Paul J; Zarbo, Richard J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Yenokyan, Gayane; Robinson, Raymond; Hudson, Daniel W; Prescott, Arlene M; Hubble, Ron; Murphy, Mary M; George, Chris T; D'Angelo, Rita; Watson, Sam R; Lubomski, Lisa H; Berenholtz, Sean M

2013-01-15

265

Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

1997-09-01

266

Glenn Pool surfactant flood pilot tests, Part II: Field operations  

SciTech Connect

A surfactant flood pilot test was conducted in a 20-acre, four inverted five-spot pattern in the Glenn Pool Field. The field had been waterflooded and the pay zone, the Upper Sand, was at a depth of 1500 feet. The crude oil had a viscosity of 4.0 cp at a reservoir temperature of 95/sup 0/F. The process consisted of sequential injection of 35% PV of preflush, 10% PV of sulfonate slug and 35% PV of polymer solution, followed by drive water. Injection operation was smooth as no injection well plugging was observed during sulfonated and polymer solution injection. On the other hand, production operation was somewhat hampered due to plugging of producers. Low equivalent weight sulfonate precipitated out around the producers and contributed to the plugging problem. Solvent treatment corrected this situation quite effectively. Although a large oil bank was observed in the two observation wells and all other observation well behavior indicated a successful process performance, the total oil production was rather disappointing. About 63,000 barrels of incremental oil were produced. During the test, through reinterpretation of existing data and a pulse test program, it was established that there was no clear separation between the Upper and Middle Sands. The impermeable shale streaks separating these two zones were not continuous. The implication was that injected fluids were not confined in the Upper Sand. This made the interpretation of field data very difficult.

Bae, J.H.; Syed, E.U.

1986-01-01

267

Specific incremental field test for aerobic fitness in tennis  

PubMed Central

Objectives To compare metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses between subjects undergoing incremental treadmill (non?specific) and tennis field based (sport specific) tests. Methods Nine junior competitive tennis players randomly performed two incremental protocols to exhaustion: a treadmill test (TT) and a tennis specific fitness test (FT). The FT consisted of repeated displacements replicating the game of tennis at increasing speed on a court. In both tests, ventilatory variables and heart rate (HR) were determined at the ventilatory threshold (VT), respiratory compensation point (RCP), and maximal loads (max). Blood lactate concentration was determined at the point of volitional fatigue. Results Percentage (mean (SD)) maximal HR (83.6 (5.1) v 83.0 (2.8) and 92.1 (2.1) v 92.3 (2.1)%, respectively) and percentage maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) (69.4 (8.1) v 73.5 (6.1) and 84.4 (6.5) v 85.5 (8.7)%, respectively) at the VT and RCP were not different between the FT and TT subjects, whereas VO2max was higher in the FT than in the TT (63.8 (3.0) v 58.9 (5.3) ml/min/kg; p<0.05). Blood lactate concentration (10.7 (3.0) v 10.6 (4.3) mmol/l) did not differ between the TT and FT. Conclusions Although cardiorespiratory variables were not different at submaximal intensities between the two tests, VO2max values derived from laboratory measurements were underestimated. Using field testing in addition to treadmill testing provides a better measurement of a player's individual fitness level and may be routinely used to accurately prescribe appropriate aerobic exercise training.

Girard, O; Chevalier, R; Leveque, F; Micallef, J P; Millet, G P

2006-01-01

268

Testing paleosecular variation field models in the Pre-Cambrian  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most useful assumptions in paleomagnetism is that the geomagnetic field is on average close to that of a geocentric axial dipole (GAD). The assumption that the time-averaged geomagnetic field closely approximates that of a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) is valid for at least the last 5 million years and most paleomagnetic studies make this implicit assumption. Following the seminal work of Constable and Parker (1988), Tauxe and Kent (2004) developed a simple statistical model for the geomagnetic field, which allows prediction of the distribution of directions (and intensities) for any given latitude. They found a simple relationship between the North-South elongation of directions and the inclination. If the field model is approximately valid in the past, comparison of observed directions with predicted distributions allows paleomagnetists to assess the reliability of the observed directions in a novel way and in some cases allows data to be corrected for anomalous inclination shallowing, for example. While the model fits the published data for the last 5 million years reasonably well, it is unknown how far back in time the model is even approximately valid. The key objectives of this study were 1) to sample a sequence of lava flows that are some 1.2 Ga, exposed on the western side of Lake Superior and 2) to obtain paleomagnetic directions from them as a test of the statistical field model in the past. We will present results from 80 ancient lava flows sampled from the North Shore Volcanics.

Fields, R.; Tauxe, L.; Kodama, K. P.

2007-12-01

269

Hypothesis Testing through Field Investigation of Mystery Mounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this field exercise, students examine the mystery mounds and patterned ground on the top of Umptanum Ridge in central Washington. Groups of 3-4 students design and conduct a field investigation and write a single joint report. Each group formulates a testable hypothesis that addresses one of the proposed processes involved in forming or subsequently shaping the mounds. The groups design an experiment to test their hypothesis, collect the necessary field observations and measurements during a regular afternoon field lab period and write a scientific report that includes an introduction, statement of hypothesis, background information, methods, data, analysis and interpretations, discussion of uncertainties, conclusions, and references. One week later, reports are turned in and students form "jigsaw" discussion groups composed of one student from each field research group. Each student briefly summarizes their group's research hypothesis and results to the jigsaw group. The jigsaw groups then each develop a revised hypothesis based on these combined results and present that to the entire class. Designed for a geomorphology course Uses online and/or real-time data Has minimal/no quantitative component Addresses student fear of quantitative aspect and/or inadequate quantitative skills Addresses student misconceptions

Ely, Lisa

270

Testing for optic ataxia in a blind field.  

PubMed

Optic ataxia is a component of Balint's syndrome and is a disorder that results from damage to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) leading to deficits in reaching and grasping objects presented in the visual field opposite to the damaged hemisphere. It is also often the case that Balint's syndrome is accompanied by visual field defects due to the proximity of parietal and occipital cortices and also due to the subcortical pathway relaying visual information from the retina to the visual cortex passing underneath the parietal cortex. The presence of primary visual defects such as hemianopia often prevents clinicians from diagnosing higher-level visual deficits such as optic ataxia; the patient cannot reach to targets he/she cannot see. Here, we show that through the use of a paradigm that takes advantage of remapping mechanisms, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. We measured reach endpoints of a patient presenting with left optic ataxia as well as a quadrantanopia in the left lower visual field in eye-static and eye-dynamic conditions. In static conditions, we first asked the patient to reach to targets viewed in her non-optic ataxic intact right visual field (fixating on the left of the target array). In this case, the patient showed undershoots equivalent to controls. Next, we asked her to reach to (the same) targets viewed in the upper left optic ataxic but intact visual field (fixating to the right of the target array). The undershooting pattern increased greatly, consistent with unilateral left optic ataxia. In dynamic conditions, we asked her to view targets in her good (right lower) visual field before reorienting her line of sight to the opposite side, causing the internal representation of the target to be updated into the opposite (ataxic) blind visual field. The patient then reached to the remembered (and updated) location of the target. We found errors typical of optic ataxia for reaches guided toward the quadrantanopic field. This confirmed that reaching errors depended on the updated internal representation of the target and not on where the target was viewed initially. In both the patient and the controls, the updating of target location was partial, with reaching errors observed subsequent to an eye movement made from left to right fixation positions being intermediate between the left and right static conditions. Thus, using this remapping paradigm, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. In conclusion, this remapping paradigm would allow clinicians to test for visuo-manual transformation deficits (optic ataxia) even when it is associated with hemianopia. PMID:23898253

Khan, Aarlenne Z; Pisella, Laure; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves

2013-07-25

271

Field tests of the surface area modulation downhole telemetry system  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests of the surface area modulation (SAM) downhole wireless telemetry system were performed at the DOE Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming in November, 1995 and September, 1996. SAM telemetry involves the introduction of a gap of electrically insulating material in the tubular conductors in the well. The electrical resistance of a switch in this gap can then be modulated to alter the electrical characteristics of a circuit involving the well tubulars. These changes affect the current in the circuit, which is monitored with a surface ammeter. Downhole data are encoded and transmitted to the surface as a pattern of current oscillations. The tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the system to transmit information from depths exceeding 2,000 feet to the surface at up to 2,400 baud.

Keefe, R.G.; Ballard, S.

1997-09-01

272

Field testing of a cornering water jet drill  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is developing a drilling system which uses high velocity water jets to make horizontal holes in a coal seam accessed through a vertical borehole. For underground coal gasification (UCG), these horizontal holes can be drilled to create linking paths between vertical process wells. During shake-down tests in Albuquerque, five holes were drilled in a simulated coal seam. The eight to twelve inch diameter holes deviated from their intended trajectories by less than twelve inches in twenty feet. Similar results have been produced during more recent field tests in an open pit coal mine. An exposed coal seam with undisturbed overburden was penetrated to a depth of over seventy feet with maximum deviations of less than four inches vertically and six degrees horizontally. To date, all tests have utilized an elevated platform to permit observation of the cornering mechanism during drilling operations. For all tests to date, the on board logging instrumentation has provided accurate guidance and hole location data. Test results indicate that the drilling system is capable of producing horizontal holes for UCG applications. A proof of concept test is forthcoming that will require the drill to access a coal seam from an underreamed cavity located at the bottom of a vertical borehole. 13 figures.

Engler, B.P.; Shirey, D.L.

1983-01-01

273

Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing  

SciTech Connect

Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

2000-01-01

274

Multidimensional parametric test set optimization of wafer probe data for predicting in field failures and setting tighter test limits  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work proposes a wafer probe parametric test set optimization method for predicting dies which are likely to fail in the field based on known in-field or final test fails. Large volumes of wafer probe data across 5 lots and hundreds of parametric measurements are optimized to find test sets that help predict actually observed test escapes and final test

Nik Sumikawa; LeRoy Winemberg; Li-C. Wang; Magdy S. Abadir

2011-01-01

275

Disorder identification in hysteresis data: recognition analysis of the random-bond-random-field Ising model.  

PubMed

An approach for the direct identification of disorder type and strength in physical systems based on recognition analysis of hysteresis loop shape is developed. A large number of theoretical examples uniformly distributed in the parameter space of the system is generated and is decorrelated using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA components are used to train a feed-forward neural network using the model parameters as targets. The trained network is used to analyze hysteresis loops for the investigated system. The approach is demonstrated using a 2D random-bond-random-field Ising model, and polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric capacitors. PMID:19905664

Ovchinnikov, O S; Jesse, S; Bintacchit, P; Trolier-McKinstry, S; Kalinin, S V

2009-10-09

276

Evaluation of the sodium polyanethol sulfonate disk test for the identification of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius.  

PubMed

The previously reported sodium polyanethol sulfonate disk test for the identification of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (Graves et al., 1974) was evaluated, with modifications. Three bands of brucella agar, three inoculum sizes, and two inoculum sources were compared. Nine stock cultures of P. anaerobius (eight normal flora isolates and ATCC 27337) and 16 fresh clinical isolates were used. All cultures of P. anaerobius showed inhibition zones of 12 to 30 mm in diameter, regardless of test conditions. Out of 103 clinical isolates of other species of anaerobic gram-positive cocci tested, only two had an inhibition zone size in this range (one P. micros of 11 studied had a zone of 12 mm and one P. prevotii of 14 studied had a zone of 16). The test had an overall accuracy of 98% in the identification of P. anaerobius from clinical specimens. Since P. anaerobius accounts for one-fifth to one-third of all anaerobic gram-positive cocci encountered in clinical specimens, this simple and rapid technique can be very useful for presumptive identification. PMID:185236

Wideman, P A; Vargo, V L; Citronbaum, D; Finegold, S M

1976-10-01

277

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01

278

Field investigation at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of groundwater monitoring at non-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear test sites raised questions about the potential for radionuclide migration from the Faultless event and how to best monitor for such migration. With its long standing interest in the Faultless area and background in Nevada hydrogeology, the Desert Research Institute conducted a field investigation in FY92 to address the following issues: The status of chimney infilling (which determines the potential for migration); the best level(s) from which to collect samples from the nearby monitoring wells, HTH-1 and HTH-2; the status of hydraulic heads in the monitoring well area following records of sustained elevated post-shot heads. The field investigation was conducted from July 27 to 31 and August 4 to 7, 1992. Temperature and electrical conductivity logging were performed in HTH-1, HTH-2, and UC-1-P-2SR. Water samples were collected from HTH-1 and HTH-2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) also collected samples during the July trip, including samples from UC-1-P-2SR. This report presents the data gathered during these field excursions and some preliminary conclusions. Full interpretation of the data in light of the issues listed above is planned for FY93.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.

1992-11-01

279

Rapid motion aftereffect seen within uniform flickering test fields.  

PubMed

Prolonged viewing of a moving pattern selectively elevates the threshold for a pattern moving in the same direction and induces the classical motion aftereffect (MAE). The aftereffect is seen as a slow drift in the opposite direction, which is visible even with the eyes shut or while viewing a uniform field. However, as we report here, a strikingly different aftereffect is seen when the test field is uniform and sinusoidally flickered: the field is filled with rapid motion in the direction opposite the adapting motion. This flicker MAE has distinct properties: the adapting grating must be of low spatial frequency; the effect is promoted by high contrast and high temporal frequencies of both adapting and test stimuli; and the aftereffect does not transfer interocularly. In all these respects the flicker MAE differs from the traditional MAE. Motion detectors have been identified in human vision by the threshold detectability and discriminability of moving patterns and by selective adaptation. The flicker MAE selectively taps a class of transient motion mechanisms that are selective for rapid motion and low spatial frequency. Uniform flicker is an effective stimulus for these mechanisms. It thus appears that the human visual system contains at least two distinct classes of mechanisms for sensing motion. PMID:6866089

Green, M; Chilcoat, M; Stromeyer, C F

280

A Novel Pumping Test Analysis Method for the Geostatistical Characterization of Heterogeneous Transmissivity Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pumping tests are routinely used in field applications for the identification of subsurface flow parameters. Interpretation of these tests is normally performed using conventional methods that are developed based on the assumption of homogeneity and, as such, yield representative or "apparent" estimates of the flow parameter of the aquifer volume surrounding the pumping well. In reality natural subsurface formations are heterogeneous and the apparent flow parameters change with time as the cone of depression due to pumping progresses. At early times the apparent flow parameters reflect local conditions in the vicinity of the well, while at later times, the apparent flow parameters are closer to a weighted spatial average of the perturbed aquifer. In this paper a novel procedure for the analysis of pumping tests in heterogeneous confined aquifers is developed. The method uses the time-drawdown data to estimate the apparent flow parameters as the pumping test progresses in time. The procedure assumes that at any moment in time the heterogeneous aquifer can be represented by an equivalent homogeneous aquifer, and uses the ratio of the drawdown to its derivatives to estimate time-dependent apparent flow parameters. The estimated time- dependent flow parameters are then related to the spatial variability of the flow parameters. A Bayesian framework is then used to estimate the probability density function of the log-transmissivity variance and integral scale. For demonstration that method is applied to heterogeneous porous media where the log- transmissivity is assumed to be multivariate Gaussian random spatial function with stationary spatial mean and exponential semi-variogram. A Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate the transient drawdown for multiple realizations of the log-transmissivity field. The results show that transient drawdown data from single observation points may be used to infer information about the spatial variability of the transmissivity. The reliability of the estimates increases with increase in the number of available pumping tests. Implications to field applications are discussed.

Copty, N. K.; Trinchero, P.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

2008-12-01

281

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); C Production Reactor (C); Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor (K); L Production...

2010-01-01

282

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); C Production Reactor (C); Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor (K); L Production...

2009-01-01

283

Rapid testing and identification of actuator using dSPACE real-time emulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To solve the problem of model identification of actuator in control system design of aerocraft, testing system based on dSPACE emulator is established, sending testing signal and receiving feedback voltage are realized using dSPACE interactive cards, communication between signal generating equipment and feedback voltage acquisition equipment is synchronized. This paper introduces the hardware architecture and key technologies of the simulation system. Constructing, downloading and calculating of the testing model is finished using dSPACE emulator, D/A transfer of testing signal is realized using DS2103 card, DS2002 card transfer the feedback voltage to digital value. Filtering module is added to the signal acquisition, for reduction of noise interference in the A/D channel. Precision of time and voltage is improved by setting acquisition period 1ms. The data gathered is recorded and displayed with Controldesk tools. The response of four actuators under different frequency are tested, frequency-domain analysis is done using least square method, the model of actuator is identified, simulation data fits well with real response of the actuator. The testing system created with dSPACE emulator satisfies the rapid testing and identification of actuator.

Xie, Daocheng; Wang, Zhongwei; Zeng, Qinghua

2011-10-01

284

Improving the identification accuracy of senior witnesses: do prelineup questions and sequential testing help?  

PubMed

Eyewitness research has identified sequential lineup testing as a way of reducing false lineup choices while maintaining accurate identifications. The authors examined the usefulness of this procedure for reducing false choices in older adults. Young and senior witnesses viewed a crime video and were later presented with target present orabsent lineups in a simultaneous or sequential format. In addition, some participants received prelineup questions about their memory for a perpetrator's face and about their confidence in their ability to identify the culprit or to correctly reject the lineup. The sequential lineup reduced false choosing rates among young and older adults in target-absent conditions. In target-present conditions, sequential testing significantly reduced the correct identification rate in both age groups. PMID:12731718

Memon, Amina; Gabbert, Fiona

2003-04-01

285

Identification of diffusive transport properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels from reservoir test.  

PubMed

In this paper the identification of diffusion coefficient, retardation factor and surface distribution coefficient for selected salts in poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels is performed. The identification of the transport parameters is based on the previously developed inverse problem technique using experimental data from the reservoir test and the solution of the diffusive transport equation with linear equilibrium sorption. The estimated values of diffusion coefficient are: for physiological fluid (6.30±0.10)×10(-10)m(2)/s, for 1M NaCl (6.42±0.39)×10(-10)m(2)/s, and for 1M KCl (7.94±0.38)×10(-10)m(2)/s. The retardation factor for all tested materials and salts is equal or close to one. The average value of the effective surface distribution coefficient is equal to 0.5. PMID:24094156

Kazimierska-Drobny, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Mariusz

2013-07-13

286

Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada test site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measures were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy's) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Dracy's).

Zimmerman, R. M.; Vollendorf, W. C.

1982-05-01

287

Use of Positive Blood Cultures for Direct Identification and Susceptibility Testing with the Vitek 2 System  

PubMed Central

In order to further decrease the time lapse between initial inoculation of blood culture media and the reporting of results of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests for microorganisms causing bacteremia, we performed a prospective study in which specially processed fluid from positive blood culture bottles from Bactec 9240 (Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, Md.) containing aerobic media were directly inoculated into Vitek 2 system cards (bio-Mérieux, France). Organism identification and susceptibility results were compared with those obtained from cards inoculated with a standardized bacterial suspension obtained following subculture to agar; 100 consecutive positive monomicrobic blood cultures, consisting of 50 gram-negative rods and 50 gram-positive cocci, were included in the study. For gram-negative organisms, 31 of the 50 (62%) showed complete agreement with the standard method for species identification, while none of the 50 gram-positive cocci were correctly identified by the direct method. For gram-negative rods, there were 50% categorical agreements between the direct and standard methods for all drugs tested. The very major error rate was 2.4%, and the major error rate was 0.6%. The overall error rate for gram-negatives was 6.6%. Complete agreement in clinical categories of all antimicrobial agents evaluated was obtained for 19 of 50 (38%) gram-positive cocci evaluated; the overall error rate was 8.4%, with 2.8% minor errors, 2.4% major errors, and 3.2% very major errors. These findings suggest that the Vitek 2 cards inoculated directly from positive Bactec 9240 bottles do not provide acceptable bacterial identification or susceptibility testing in comparison with corresponding cards tested by a standard method.

de Cueto, Marina; Ceballos, Esther; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Perea, Evelio J.; Pascual, Alvaro

2004-01-01

288

Personnel identification system utilizing low probability-of-intercept techniques: prototype development and testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the design and testing of a prototype laser\\/radio frequency (RF) Personnel Identification (ID) System developed by Dynetics, Inc., Harris, Corp., and the U.S. Army Communications and Electronics Command (CECOM). The system consists of an interrogation Unit, a Responder Unit, and a Programming Unit. The Interrogation Unit consists of a directive, eyesafe laser and a spread-spectrum RF transceiver.

Michael C. Zari; Anthony F. Zwilling; Joe W. Fikes; David A. Hess; Reeder N. Ward; Chris S. Anderson; Dave J. Chiang

1997-01-01

289

Glenn pool surfactant flood pilot test: Part 2 - Field operations  

SciTech Connect

A surfactant flood pilot test was conducted in a 20-acre (8.1-ha), four inverted five-spot pattern in the Glenn Pool field. The field had been waterflooded and the pay zone, the Upper sand, was at a depth of 1,500 ft (457 m). The crude oil had a viscosity of 4.0 cp (4 mPa . s) at a reservoir temperature of 95/sup 0/F (35/sup 0/C). The process consisted of sequential injection of 35% PV of preflush, 10% PV of sulfonate slug, and 35% PV of polymer solution, followed by driver water. Injection operation was smooth; no injection well plugging was observed during sulfonate and polymer solution injection. On the other hand, production operation was somewhat hampered by plugging of producers. Low-equivalent-weight sulfonate precipitated out around the producers and contributed to the plugging problem. Solvent treatment corrected this situation effectively. Although a large oil bank was observed in the two observation wells and all other observation-well behavior indicated a successful process performance, the total oil production was disappointing. About 63,000 bbl (10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/) of incremental oil was produced. During the test, it was established through reinterpretation of existing data and a pulse test program that there was no clear separation between the Upper and Middle sands. The impermeable shale streaks separating these two zones were not continuous. The implication was that injected fluids were not confined in the Upper sand. This made the interpretation of field data very difficult.

Bae, J.H.; Syed, E.U.

1988-08-01

290

Test Observations and Plans For the Hubble Deep Field - South  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will discuss the planning process, scheduling constraints, and scientific considerations which we have studied and undertaken thus far for the southern Hubble Deep Field observations which are to be performed in October of 1998. Observations from a 3-orbit test program taken in October 1997 at the same position angle and with the same guide stars will be presented to the community for comment and for informational purposes. Planning is constrained in part by CVZ passages, by solar avoidance, zodiacal light, effective use of filters and gratings minimizing effects of scattered earthshine, SAA avoidance, avoidance of bright stars, and availability of suitable guide stars. In particular, it is crucial to test the same guide stars that will be used for the full set of observations. This preview of science data on the field will also allow us to fine-tune any other aspects of the program which may be better optimized scientifically. The HDF-S test observations will consist of one orbit of STIS 50CCD clear aperture imaging to image the field around the QSO, and two orbits of STIS NUV-MAMA G230L spectroscopy on the QSO to obtain a low resolution spectrum. In addition, three orbits of WFPC2 F606W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 6.2 arc minutes from the QSO, and three orbits of NIC3 F160W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 8.7 arc minutes from the QSO. The actual HDF-S observations next October are currently planned to include the same complement of filters for WFPC2 as was used in the original HDF-N ( F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W ). Other options yet to be determined will be pursued for STIS and NICMOS for the full campaign. For more information, see our HDF-South Web site at the URL http://www.stsci.edu/ftp/science/hdf/hdfsouth/hdfs.html.

Williams, R. E.; Baum, S. A.; Blacker, B. S.; Carollo, M.; Casertano, S.; Dickinson, M. E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Madau, P.; Postman, M.; Stiavelli, M.

1997-12-01

291

Field test of an autonomous wind-diesel power plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An autonomous power plant composed of a wind energy converter and a diesel generator was tested in laboratory and in the field to assess the wind energy supply as a noninfluenceable parameter in the regulation of the mono and bivalent operation of the power plant, for control of the dynamic behavior of the electrical components, for tuning of the regulation expenditure with comfort requirements, and for model evaluation of energy cost analysis. The interaction between meteorological, technical, economic and energy policy aspects was assessed. The relationship between economical use and comfort limits technical improvement. Development of the concept of a bivalent power supply with wind and diesel is recommended.

Fritzsche, A.; Knoebel, U.; Ruckert, W.

1985-09-01

292

Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

1987-12-01

293

Field test results with the targeted search MCSA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In April 1985, a 74000 channel prototype of the multi-channel spectrum analyzer (MCSA) that NASA plans to use in a systematic search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) was installed at DSS 13, a 26 meter R&D antenna facility at the Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) site. Since that time the instrumentation has been used to validate the performance of signal detection algorithms using locally injected signals and the weak carriers from distant spacecraft. This paper describes results from the Goldstone Field Tests and plans to move the prototype equipment to other sites where SETI may be conducted in the future.

Tarter, J. C.

294

Field test of wavelength-saving quantum key distribution network.  

PubMed

We propose a wavelength-saving topology of a quantum key distribution (QKD) network based on passive optical elements, and we report on the field test of this network on commercial telecom optical fiber at the frequency of 20 MHz. In this network, five nodes are supported with two wavelengths, and every two nodes can share secure keys directly at the same time. We also characterized the insertion loss and cross talk effects on the point-to-point QKD system after introducing this QKD network. PMID:20634861

Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Tao; Li, Hong-Wei; Xu, Fang-Xing; Zhou, Zheng; Yang, Yang; Huang, Da-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Li, Fang-Yi; Liu, Dong; Wang, Yong-Gang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

2010-07-15

295

Cloud Field Identification for Earth Radiation Budget Studies. Part II: Cloud Field Classification for the ScaRaB Radiometer.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gaining a better understanding of the influence of clouds on the earth's energy budget requires a cloud classification that takes into account cloud height, thickness, and cloud cover. The radiometer ScaRaB (scanner for radiation balance), which was launched in January 1994, has two narrowband channels (0.5 0.7 and 10.5 12.5 µm) in addition to the two broadband channels (0.2 4 and 0.2 50 µm) necessary for earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements in order to improve cloud detection. Most automatic cloud classifications were developed with measurements of very good spatial resolution (200 m to 5 km). Earth radiation budget experiments (ERBE), on the hand, work at a spatial resolution of about 50 km (at nadir), and therefore a cloud field classification adapted to this scale must be investigated. For this study, ScaRaB measurements are simulated by collocated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) ERBE data. The best-suited variables for a global cloud classification are chosen using as a reference cloud types determined by an operationally working threshold algorithm applied to AVHRR measurements at a reduced spatial resolution of 4 km over the North Atlantic. Cloud field types are then classified by an algorithm based on the dynamic clustering method. More recently, the authors have carried out a global cloud field identification using cloud parameters extracted by the 3I (improved initialization inversion) algorithm, from High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS)-Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) data. This enables the authors first to determine mean values of the variables best suited for cloud field classification and then to use a maximum-likelihood method for the classification. The authors find that a classification of cloud fields is still possible at a spatial resolution of ERB measurements. Roughly, one can distinguish three cloud heights and two effective cloud amounts (combination of cloud emissivity and cloud cover). However, only by combining flux measurements (ERBE) with cloud field classifications from sounding instruments (HIRS/MSU) can differences in radiative behavior of specific cloud fields be evaluated accurately.

Stubenrauch, C. J.; Seze, G.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Desbois, M.; Kandel, R. S.

1996-03-01

296

The 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin' Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40)  

PubMed Central

Background Most existing olfactory identification (ID) tests have the primary aim of diagnosing clinical olfactory dysfunction, thereby rendering them sub-optimal for experimental settings where the aim is to detect differences in healthy subjects’ odor ID abilities. Materials and methods We have developed an extended version of the olfactory ID subtest of the Sniffin’ Sticks test battery to better assess the variability in ID scores and thereby olfactory abilities of healthy, adult individuals. Twenty-four odorants, corresponding cue labels, and distractor labels were added to the existing 16-item Sniffin’ Sticks ID test to create the 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40). The MONEX-40 was administered to 259 healthy young subjects, of which 72 were retested on an average of 212 days (SD 112 days) later. Results The added odor items demonstrated good validity, as shown by a significant correlation of the results with the original 16-item ID test. In addition, the MONEX-40 achieved a significant test–retest and split-half reliability. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that the MONEX-40 is a reliable method for experimental assessment of odor ID ability in healthy, young individuals. Moreover, its use of a wider range of odors allows the experimenter to present subsets of the MONEX-40 within the same experiment while maintaining statistical power.

Freiherr, Jessica; Gordon, Amy R.; Alden, Eva C.; Ponting, Andrea L.; Hernandez, Monica F.; Boesveldt, Sanne; Lundstrom, Johan N.

2013-01-01

297

Use of Indian smell identification test for evaluating olfaction in idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients in India.  

PubMed

Background: Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease (PD) has been recognized for a long time and a number of studies have been performed in various parts of the world, using culturally appropriate smell identification tests. Objective: In this study, for the first time, olfactory function has been assessed in the Indian Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (IPD) patients using an indigenously developed smell test. Materials and Methods: Olfaction was assessed in 53 IPD patients and 50 healthy controls using SniffIn-sticks ® test and Indian Smell Identification test (INSIT). In both these tests, the subjects were asked to identify the smell from a set of choices and were scored out of 10 and 12 for INSIT and SniffIn-sticks ® test, respectively. Results: Both SniffIn-sticks ® test and INSIT showed significant impairment in olfaction in IPD patients (P < 0.001). There was no significant correlation of the scores of both tests with Hoehn and Yahr (H and Y) stage, duration of illness and Levodopa Equivalent Daily Dose (LEDD). The tests had a high correlation, r = 0.75 (P < 0.001) and the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves did not differ significantly. Using a cut off value of 4 (values ? 4 indicating disease), INSIT showed a sensitivity of 79.2% and specificity of 78%. Conclusion: INSIT, being cheap, convenient and more acceptable in the Indian population, can be considered as a better alternative for SniffIn-sticks ® test in the evaluation of olfaction in Indian PD subjects. PMID:24005726

George, Jaiben; Jose, Toney; Behari, Madhuri

298

Chromogenic Tube Test for Presumptive Identification or Confirmation of Isolates as Candida albicans  

PubMed Central

This report describes a new, modified, simple, and cost-effective method for the use of CHROMagar Candida (CHROMagar Company, Paris, France) for the presumptive identification of isolates as Candida albicans after preliminary growth. Sixty randomly selected clinical isolates were evaluated, including 38 of C. albicans. With incubation at 37°C for 24 h, the sensitivity and specificity appeared to be excellent and the test performed better than the traditional germ tube test. However, at earlier times, C. tropicalis isolates gave false-positive results.

Merlino, John; Tambosis, Evanthia; Veal, Duncan

1998-01-01

299

Rapid Identification of Candida glabrata with a New Commercial Test, GLABRATA RTT  

PubMed Central

The GLABRATA RTT test (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois Perret, France) is based on the ability of Candida glabrata to hydrolyze trehalose but not maltose. It requires an inoculum of only four to six colonies, and the results are available within 20 min. We tested GLABRATA RTT with 330 stock isolates grown in subcultures on four different primary fungal isolation media and obtained a sensitivity of 94 to 98% (depending on the medium used) and a specificity of 97.3 to 98.6%. The false-positive results corresponded to C. tropicalis, C. famata, and C. lusitaniae. GLABRATA RTT thus offers rapid and reliable identification of C. glabrata.

Freydiere, A.-M.; Robert, R.; Ploton, C.; Marot-Leblond, A.; Monerau, F.; Vandenesch, F.

2003-01-01

300

Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions. The curriculum was field tested among seventh-grade urban students using a quasi-experimental design. Analysis of covariance of pre- and post-test scores examined five outcomes, including students' perceptions of their abilities in science as inquiry, scientific literacy, and knowledge about five enduring epidemiologic understandings; their self reported interest in science, and assessment of students' epidemiological reasoning ability. The 378 experimental students, compared to 620 controls, had generally higher post-test improvements in epidemiology-related outcomes and smaller increases in the other measures. A dose-response was suggested by higher scores among students exposed to more than 10 lessons. Strengths of this evaluation include a large sample and availability of data to account for differences in demographic and school performance variables. Limitations of this evaluation include randomization by school as opposed to student, the relatively short-term and generally self-reported outcomes, and inconsistencies in proportion of the curriculum actually taught. The findings offer encouragement about the potential for Detectives in the Classroom to improve students' perceptions of their science abilities and scientific literacy, their interest in science and their abilities in basic epidemiologic reasoning. Further tests of this and other epidemiology curricula are needed to respond to the growing interest in teaching public health science to younger students. And while it is important to test near-term impacts, an additional challenge from a curriculum evaluation standpoint will be to follow students over several years to examine subsequent choices concerning selected courses, college majors, and career paths. PMID:18274623

Kaelin, Mark A; Huebner, Wendy W; Nicolich, Mark J; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L

2007-02-01

301

Field exercise testing for assessing fitness in French standardbred trotters.  

PubMed

This review considers standardized exercise testing which is, routinely used for French Trotters in the field. Track testing provides a more limited range of measurements than treadmill testing, but has the advantage of being performed in the horse's natural environment. Various measurements such as heart rate during exercise and blood lactate concentration after exercise may be measured on the track and lead to the calculation of physiological variables such as V200 (velocity corresponding to a 200 bpm heart rate) and V4 (velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol/L blood lactate concentration). V4 is related to the onset of blood lactate accumulation and relates to the aerobic capacity of the horse, as horses with high values for V4 have higher aerobic capacities. Although V4 is calculated during submaximal intensity exercise, it is related to racing performance and seems to be the most important measurement to assess changes in fitness. V200 represents the cardiac capacity of the horse during exercise and is close to V4 in mature horses. To explain further the clinical usefulness of track testing, and to help interpret both V4 and V200 variables, examples of exercise tests in 3-year-old French Trotters are presented here. These results show that changes may occur in V4 and V200 according to different factors such as the horse's physical ability and either training or disease states. It underlines the importance of exercise tests for both trainers and veterinarians and how they may help in the evaluation of a horse's performance ability; in defining the intensity of a training program, and also in the early detection of underlying diseases. PMID:10204407

Couroucé, A

1999-03-01

302

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01

303

Geodynamo Models and the Inclination Test of Geomagnetic Field Morphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Any zonal model of the geomagnetic field has a unique distribution function for the angle of inclination (I) seen at the surface. In principle, this provides a test for the morphology of the field in the geological past. Of particular interest is the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) field, which is important to much of paleomagnetic research. We have investigated the inclination patterns produced by numerical models of the geodynamo. We find that Earth-like dynamos produce cumulative distribution functions (CDF) of the inclination that are systematically displaced towards values lower than the CDF of the GAD, P(I) = (1+4\\cot2{I})-1/2. The inclination test is based on random sampling over the Earth's surface, so we have sampled our dynamo simulations at random points on the sphere. Consistent with previous work (Bloxham, Nature, 405, 63, 2000) we find that median inclination values of Earth-like dynamo models are lower than the GAD median inclination of 49o. Comparable results have been observed in actual paleomagnetic compilations. To seek the explanation of this shift it is instructive to inspect the pattern of magnetic flux at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). In our models it appears that the tangent cylinder plays an important role, by producing low inclination values at high latitudes on the CMB. If these results are a general feature of numerical geodynamos then the effects on paleomagnetic pole positions will need to be considered. Currently, the models we have investigated suggest that this systematic offset may amount to several degrees of latitude.

Heimpel, M. H.; Evans, M. E.

2011-12-01

304

Field testing of new-technology ambient air ozone monitors.  

PubMed

Multibillion-dollar strategies control ambient air ozone (O3) levels in the United States, so it is essential that the measurements made to assess compliance with regulations be accurate. The predominant method employed to monitor O3 is ultraviolet (UV) photometry. Instruments employ a selective manganese dioxide or heated silver wool "scrubber" to remove O3 to provide a zero reference signal. Unfortunately, such scrubbers remove atmospheric constituents that absorb 254-nm light, causing measurement interference. Water vapor also interferes with the measurement under some circumstances. We report results of a 3-month field test of two new instruments designed to minimize interferences (2B Technologies model 211; Teledyne-API model 265E) that were operated in parallel with a conventional Thermo Scientific model 49C O3 monitor. The field test was hosted by the Houston Regional Monitoring Corporation (HRM). The model 211 photometer scrubs O3 with excess nitric oxide (NO) generated in situ by photolysis of added nitrous oxide (N2O) to provide a reference signal, eliminating the need for a conventional O3 scrubber. The model 265E analyzer directly measures O3-NO chemiluminescence from added excess NO to quantify O3 in the sample stream. Extensive quality control (QC) and collocated monitoring data are assessed to evaluate potential improvements to the accuracy of O3 compliance monitoring. Implications: Two new-technology ozone monitors were compared with a conventional monitor under field conditions. Over 3 months the conventional monitor reported more exceedances of the current standard than the new instruments, which could potentially result in an area being misjudged as "nonattainment." Instrument drift can affect O3 data accuracy, and the same degree of drift has a proportionally greater compliance effect as standard stringency is increased. Enhanced data quality assurance and data adjustment may be necessary to achieve the improved accuracy required to judge compliance with tighter standards. PMID:23926854

Ollison, Will M; Crow, Walt; Spicer, Chester W

2013-07-01

305

Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice (Oryza sativa), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), maize (Zeamays), soybean (Glycine max), red bean (Phaseolus angularis), mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea (Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

1993-07-01

306

Stress Reconstruction and Constitutive Parameter Identification in Plane-Stress Elastoplastic Problems Using Surface Measurements of Deformation Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the identification of elasto-plastic constitutive parameters from deformation fields measured over the\\u000a surface of thin flat specimens with the grid method. The approach for recovering the constitutive parameters is the virtual\\u000a fields method. A dedicated algorithm is used for deriving the distribution of the 2D stress components from the measured deformation\\u000a fields. A state of plane

S. Avril; F. Pierron; Y. Pannier; R. Rotinat

2008-01-01

307

Identifying Personality Disorders that are Security Risks: Field Test Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Accurate identification and assessment of employees with risky personality disorders is imperative for programs that involve access to nuclear materials, weapons, and biological select agents which depend on personnel maintaining mental health and reliabl...

E. L. Lang O. G. Shechter

2011-01-01

308

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2013-01-01

309

Experiments and Material Parameter Identification Using Finite Elements. Uniaxial Tests and Validation Using Instrumented Indentation Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we focus our attention on the relation between instrumented indentation tests and the prediction by means\\u000a of finite element calculations. To this end, a finite strain viscoplasticity model of Perzyna-type with non-linear isotropic\\u000a and kinematic hardening is calibrated at experimental data of steel S690QL. A particular concept for conducting uniaxial tensile\\u000a and compression tests is taken up

S. Hartmann; J. Gibmeier; B. Scholtes

2006-01-01

310

Smell testing: an additional tool for identification of adult Refsum's disease  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the prevalence and degree of olfactory dysfunction in patients with ARD. Method: The olfactory function of 16 patients with ARD was assessed using the quantitative University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Results: All patients had complete anosmia or grossly impaired smell function with a mean UPSIT score of 14.7 (SD 4.7) (normal>34) despite having been treated with an appropriate diet for a median of 15 years (range 1–25). Conclusions: Identification of ARD patients can be facilitated by using the UPSIT in combination with the presence of retinitis pigmentosa, even if they have no neurological or bony features. Phytanic acid screening should be performed in any patient manifesting these two signs.

Gibberd, F; Feher, M; Sidey, M; Wierzbicki, A

2004-01-01

311

On-Orbit System Identification Experiments of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the results of on-orbit system identification of the Engineering Test Satellite-VIII (ETS-VIII), which was launched by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 11 in December 2006. On-orbit system identification experiments were performed using data acquired during normal operations in the initial check-out phase, such as station acquisition and wheel unloading. The satellite's unconstrained modes were identified using attitude rates and data from accelerometers located on the main body, solar array paddles and large deployable antenna reflectors at various solar array paddle angles. In addition, the constrained modal parameters of the solar array paddles and large deployable antenna reflectors were estimated for comparison with the analytical model.

Kasai, Tokio; Yamaguchi, Isao; Igawa, Hirotaka; Mitani, Shinji; Ohtani, Takashi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Kei

312

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

SciTech Connect

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which various insulation materials were installed. The panel was located in an environmental chamber. The test samples included various cellulosic, glass fiber and rockwool insulations as well as sterile cotton as a control. Steel and copper coupons together with water-cooled copper pipes were embedded in the insulation and exposed for 6 months. It was found that moisture absorption by the insulation was the primary factor in causing corrosion but required that chemical activity from insulation components also be present. No corrosion occurred in the absence of insulation or in rockwool and glassfiber insulation. All cellulose insulations caused some corrosion. Mostly this was minimal but in a few cases severe pitting resulted. Such behavior of the cellulose did not correspond to previous laboratory test results in saturated insulation or leachants made from the insulation. However, laboratory testing of leachants made from some of the cellulose after the simulated wall test showed a change in pitting tendency, suggesting that time and/or exposure to moisture can change the corrosiveness. This should be further explored. 12 refs., 9 figs, 3 tabs.

Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.; Desjarlais, A.

1988-09-01

313

Rapid identification of Salmonella from poultry meat products by using 'Mucap Test'.  

PubMed

A study was made in order to improve a new Salmonella identification test (Mucap Test) in which umbelliferone is released, giving a blue fluorescent light under a Wood lamp, after contact with Salmonella colonies. The study concerned 354 colonies, previously isolated from 55 poultry meat samples. Two enrichment media [Tetrathionate Bile Broth (TBB) and Rappaport Vassiliadis (RV)] and two isolation media [Brilliant Green Agar (BGA) and Desoxycholate Agar (DA)] were used, and the results of the test obtained respectively with each association were compared. The sensitivity was consistently good, but the specificity of the test was generally poor. The best association seemed to be RV/DA which gave 85% specificity, against 39% for TBB/BGA, 58% for TBB/DA, and 77% for RV/BGA. The predominant genera responsible for false-positive results were Pseudomonas and Proteus Providencia. PMID:2641489

Humbert, F; Salvat, G; Colin, P; Lahellec, C; Bennejean, G

1989-02-01

314

77 FR 43087 - Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for Comments and Data...have the potential to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). NICEATM also requests...where feasible. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. William S. Stokes,...

2012-07-23

315

Field-deployable cartridge method and test kit for arsenic  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A method and test for field sample arsenic speciation in aqueous solutions, in particular, arsenic speciation in drinking water, is described. In particular, the method and test uses in series three columns wherein the first column removes interfering cations from water, the second column removes dimethylarsenate (DMA) from the water, and the third column removes As(V) (collectively H.sub.3AsO.sub.4/H.sub.2AsO.sub.4.sup.-/HAsO.sub.4.sup.2-/AsO.sub.4.sup.3- -) and monomethylarsinate (MMA) while As(III) (collectively H.sub.3AsO.sub.3/H.sub.2AsO.sub.3.sup.-/HAsO.sub.3.sup.2-/AsO.sub.3.sup.3- -) remains in the water effluent. The bound arsenic species are separately eluted from the columns in a laboratory and then each of the eluants and the effluent are tested for the arsenic species, preferably using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

2006-12-26

316

Field tests of stress measurement techniques in rock salt  

SciTech Connect

Three underground field tests were performed in southeastern New Mexico as part of the US Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Research and Development Program. These tests, one in potash-rich halite and two in relatively pure halite (rock salt), investigated the feasibility of using borehole inclusion stressmeters to measure in situ stress and stress changes in salt. The tests provided a comparison of inclusion stressmeters and demonstrated various qualities of gage response, including time-dependent characteristics, repeatability, and the effects of preload. Three gage types comprising five gages were used: (1) the strain-gaged stressmeter (SGS); (2) two US Bureau of Mines (USBM) hydraulic pressure cells called the borehole pressure cell (BPC) and the cylindrical pressure cell (CPC); and (3) two development pressure cells called the USBMX and the Sandia Pressure Cell (SPC). Gage response has been reasonably consistent. However, further study is required of the correlations between gage types and between gage output and the in situ state of stress. 13 references, 16 figures, 2 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Matalucci, R.V.; Morgan, H.S.

1984-04-01

317

Field testing of sound absorption coefficients in a classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formal procedures for determining the sound absorption coefficients of materials installed in the field do not exist. However, the U.S. Air Force requested such tests to prove that the sound-absorbing material used in classrooms at Beale AFB in Marysville, CA, met the specified NRC of 0.80. They permitted the use of two layers of 0.5-in. fiberboard or 1-in.-thick fiberglass panels to meet the specified NRC rating. Post-construction tests showed reverberation times longer than expected. Unrealistic sound-absorption coefficients for room finish materials had to be used with the Sabine equation to achieve agreement between the measured and predicted reverberation time. By employing the Fitzroy equation and generally published absorption coefficients for ceiling tile, carpet, and fiberboard, the model provided excellent agreement with the measured reverberation times. The NRC of the fiberboard was computed to be 0.35, agreeing with published data. Since this did not meet project specifications, the Fitzroy model was used to learn the type and quantity of material needed to meet design goals. Follow-up tests showed good agreement between the predicted and measured reverberation times with material added, and project specifications were met. Results are also compared with the requirements of ANSI 12.60.

Pettyjohn, Steve

2005-09-01

318

Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors.  

PubMed

The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case. PMID:20370296

Olcay, Ali B; Pottebaum, Tait S; Krueger, Paul S

2010-03-01

319

A new method for the spectroscopic identification of stellar non-radial pulsation modes. I. The method and numerical tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims.We present the Fourier parameter fit method, a new method for spectroscopically identifying stellar radial and non-radial pulsation modes based on the high-resolution time-series spectroscopy of absorption-line profiles. In contrast to previous methods this one permits a quantification of the statistical significance of the computed solutions. The application of genetic algorithms in seeking solutions makes it possible to search through a large parameter space. Methods: .The mode identification is carried out by minimizing ?^2, using the observed amplitude and phase across the line profile and their modeled counterparts. Computations of the theoretical line profiles are based on a stellar displacement field, which is described as superposition of spherical harmonics and that includes the first order effects of the Coriolis force. Results: .We made numerical tests of the method on a grid of different mono- and multi-mode models for 0 ? ? ? 4 in order to explore its capabilities and limitations. Our results show that whereas the azimuthal order m can be unambiguously identified for low-order modes, the error of ? is in the range of ± 1. The value of m can be determined with higher precision than with other spectroscopic mode identification methods. Improved values for the inclination can be obtained from the analysis of non-axisymmetric pulsation modes. The new method is ideally suited to intermediatley rotating ? Scuti and ? Cephei stars.

Zima, W.

2006-08-01

320

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

2002-09-30

321

COMPLETE PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SYSTEM CALIBRATION AND EVALUATION IN THE SJÖKULLA TEST FIELD - CASE STUDY WITH DMC  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the future field calibration and testing will be fundamental parts of photogrammetric production lines. The complete field calibration\\/testing concerns geometric, spatial, radiometric and spectral properties of the systems, and it is a crucial supplement to the laboratory calibration. In this article a method for complete calibration\\/testing of digital photogrammetric sensors, based on the Sjökulla test field of Finnish Geodetic

E. Honkavaara; J. Jaakkola; L. Markelin; J. Peltoniemi; E. Ahokas; S. Becker

322

Boeing 727-100 test project (high energy radiated field tests)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discussed here is a radio frequency (RF) coupling test on a BOEING 727-100 commercial aircraft. The objective of the test was to measure the coupling, or penetration, of RF signals in a BOEING 727-100 in the frequency range of 1.0 MHz to 6.0 GHz. The RF field levels generated inside the airplane during flight are probably not a health hazard with respect to passengers and crew because exposure time to high intensity RF fields is of short duration. However, this project has demonstrated that RF energy can couple into aircraft compartments and onto electrical wiring. The extent to which existing RF sources can impose unwanted electrical signals or voltages on critical aircraft components during flyby are shown.

Crowther, T.; Ybarrondo, L. J.; Skousen, N.; Hintze, M.

1989-07-01

323

Evaluation of 36 Minitek tests and a new approach for identification of nonfermenters.  

PubMed Central

Thirty-six Minitek (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) tests were evaluated with 625 Kansai Medical University stock strains of 22 species and one group of nonfermentative gram-negative rods able to grow on ordinary peptone media. Among the 36 tests, 15 were selected because a clear-cut reaction was shown by all 625 Kansai Medical University strains. Of these 15 tests, 12 were further selected for routine use because they were regarded as useful for the identification of nonfermenters. The 12 tests were arranged into the following four groups: (i) lysine-arginine-ornithine, (ii) urea-ortho-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside-dextrose aerobic, (iii) maltose-xylose-starch, and (iv) esculin-nitrate reduction-indole. A new profile system for four digits, the Minitek Y-Y (Yabuuchi and Yamanaka) system, consisting of 64 numbers which represent each single species and 11 numbers which give two to four species, is herein proposed. The system was designed primarily for a less expensive identification of gram-negative rods already confirmed in a butt of either triple sugar iron or Kligler iron agar for their lack of ability to ferment dextrose. Among the 539 clinical isolates obtained from 3 hospitals, 511 strains identifiable by classical methods were also identified by the Minitek Y-Y system.

Yabuuchi, E; Yamanaka, K; Ohyama, A

1981-01-01

324

Identification of military targets and simple laboratory test patterns in band-limited noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the effect of band-limited masking noise and blur on the minimum contrast required to identify a) military targets, b) the standard MRTD and MTDP four-bar test pattern and c) the TOD equilateral triangle test pattern. First, the image containing the test object was spatially blurred by an amount varying from one pixel up to the maximum blur at which the object could still be identified or resolved. This mimics the effect of sensor optics and detector blur on the image of a target at different ranges. Then, band-limited noise was added to the image. The center spatial frequency fc of the masking noise was varied over 7.0 octaves. Observers had to indicate at which target contrast they were just able to identify the target. The results are a) identification thresholds for all targets are strongly elevated by masking noise of certain spatial wavelengths and much less by coarser or finer noise, showing that identification by human observers is mediated by a relatively narrow visual filter, and b) with increasing blur, maximum masking shifts towards lower noise spatial frequencies in a consistent but non-linear way. Current popular TA models are inconsistent with these results but suggestions for improvement are presented. The laboratory test patterns are appropriate to characterize target acquisition performance with viewing systems that include noise and blur.

Bijl, Piet; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Toet, Alexander

2004-08-01

325

Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2012-01-01

326

Considerations for accurate identification of adult Culex restuans (Diptera: Culicidae) in field studies.  

PubMed

Understanding the ecology and behavior of different mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) is essential for identifying their role in disease transmission cycles and public health risk. Two species of Culex mosquitoes in the northeastern United States, Culex pipiens L. and Culex restuans Theobald, have been implicated in enzootic transmission of West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV). Despite the difficulty of differentiating these two species as adults, many public health workers and vector biologists collecting adults in the field separate these species based on external morphology. This approach is often used rather than examination of dissected male genitalia or polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostics due to time or cost constraints. We evaluated the reliability of seven published morphological characters to differentiate adults of these species by comparing blindly scored morphology with PCR-based confirmations. Our study demonstrates that morphological identification of Cx. pipiens is marginal and often not reliable for Cx. restuans. We also examined error rates with molecular-based approaches. DNA samples were contaminated with as little as one leg from another species. We conclude that to fully understand the respective roles of Culex species in the epidemiology of WNV and other pathogens, more attention should be paid to these considerations for accurate species identification. PMID:18283935

Harrington, Laura C; Poulson, Rebecca L

2008-01-01

327

Unraveling complex hydrogeologic systems using field tracer tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tracking the movement of underground contaminants is vital to protecting public health and the environment worldwide. Scientific efforts using field tracer techniques to solve contaminant migration problems are rapidly evolving to fill critical information gaps and provide confirmation of laboratory data and numerical models. Various chemical tracers are being used to formulate and evaluate alternative conceptual hydrogeologic modelssemi; namely, to constrain hydraulic properties of geologic systems, identify sources of groundwater, flow paths, and rates, and determine mechanisms that affect contaminant transport. Naturally occurring elements and environmental isotopes from atmospheric and underground nuclear testing can make excellent tracers. In addition, characterizing sites of future waste disposal, such as the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, requires new and innovative techniques like injecting surrogate tracers that simulate potential contaminants and shed light on mechanisms that could control future contaminant migration.

Dam, William A.; Nicholson, Thomas

328

Non-contact rail flaw detection system: first field test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers at UCSD, with the initial support of NSF and the current support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), have been working on a flaw detection prototype for rails that uses non-contact ultrasonic probing and robust data processing algorithms to provide high speed and high reliability defect detection in these structures. Besides the obvious advantages of non-contact probing, the prototype uses ultrasonic guided waves able to detect and quantify transverse cracks in the rail head, notoriously the most dangerous of all rail track defects. This paper will report on the first field test which was conducted in Gettysburg, PA in March 2006 with the technical support of ENSCO, Inc. Good results were obtained for the detection of both surface-breaking and internal cracks ranging in size from 2% cross-sectional head area (H.A.) reduction to 80% H.A. reduction.

Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Bartoli, Ivan; Fateh, Mahmood

2007-05-01

329

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-08-01

330

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Jastrow, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wickliff, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01

331

Identification of high-order synchronous generator models from SSFR test data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a direct maximum-likelihood estimation procedure to identify the synchronous machine models based on the standstill frequency response (SSFR) test data. The method presented in this study is the first and only algorithm utilizing all available SSFR test data under both shorted and open field circuit conditions to establish a unique equivalent circuit model by maximizing the conditional

A. Keyhani; H. Tsai

1994-01-01

332

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31

333

Characterization and identification of field ectomycorrhizae of Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer.  

PubMed

Field ectomycorrhizae sampled under Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer have been characterized and described in detail based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The described ectomycorrhiza has traits typical of Boletales: whitish with three differentiated plectenchymatous layers in the mantle in plan view forming ring-like structures and rhizomorphs with highly differentiated hyphae. The inflated, smooth cystidia-like clavate end cells on the surface of the rhizomorphs and their slightly twisted external hyphae are additional characterizing features. The Hartig net occupies 1 1/2 rows of cortical cells, partly reaching the endodermis. Not all hyphae have clamps. The identification of the fungal symbiont as B. edulis was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequence comparison between mycorrhizas and sporocarps. The singularity of this symbiotic association, as well as its ecological and practical implications, are discussed. PMID:16800301

Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; de Miguel, Ana María; Martínez-Peña, Fernando

334

Probing whole cell currents in high-frequency electrical fields: identification of thermal effects.  

PubMed

An open-end coaxial probe is combined with a planar patch-clamp system to apply electric fields with GHz frequencies during conventional patch-clamp measurements. The combination of pulsed microwave irradiation and lock-in detection allows for the separation of fast and slow effects and hence facilitates the identification of thermal effects. The setup and the influence of radiation on the patch-clamp current are thoroughly characterized. For the independent optical verification of heating effects, a temperature microscopy technique is applied with high spatial, temporal and temperature resolution. It is shown that the effect of radiation at GHz frequencies on whole cell currents is predominantly thermal in nature in the case of RBL cells with an endogenous K(ir) 2.1 channel. PMID:17959369

Olapinski, Michael; Manus, Stephan; Fertig, Niels; Simmel, Friedrich C

2007-09-16

335

Identification of Staphylococcus aureus: DNase and Mannitol salt agar improve the efficiency of the tube coagulase test  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The ideal identification of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates requires a battery of tests and this is costly in resource limited settings. In many developing countries, the tube coagulase test is usually confirmatory for S. aureus and is routinely done using either human or sheep plasma. This study evaluated Mannitol salt agar and the deoxyribonuclease (DNase) test for improving the

David P Kateete; Cyrus N Kimani; Fred A Katabazi; Alfred Okeng; Moses S Okee; Ann Nanteza; Moses L Joloba; Florence C Najjuka

2010-01-01

336

Comparative testing for the identification of skin-sensitizing potentials of nonionic sugar lipid surfactants.  

PubMed

The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for the identification of skin-sensitizing potentials of chemicals in Europe and is also the first choice method within REACH. In the formal validation, only a very few surfactant chemicals were evaluated and SDS was identified as a false positive. In this study, 10 nonionic sugar lipid surfactants were tested in an LLNA, guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) and human repeated insult patch test. Of the 10 surfactants tested in the LLNA, 5 showed stimulation indices above 3.0. Three of five positive reactions were concomitant with signs of skin irritation indicated by an increase in ear thickness. In the GPMT, all test products were classified as nonsensitizers. In human volunteers, no skin reactions suggestive of sensitization were reported. In conclusion, these results are indicative of the LLNA overestimating sensitization potentials for this category of chemicals. This may in part be due to irritant effects generated by these surfactants. Until suitable nonanimal alternative tests obtain regulatory acceptance, use of other tests, e.g. GPMTs, may in cases be justified. Results such as these need be taken into account when developing nonanimal alternative methods to ensure reliable data sets for method validation purposes. PMID:20599457

Garcia, Christine; Ball, Nicholas; Cagen, Stuart; Carrillo, Juan-Carlos; Certa, Hans; Eigler, Dorothea; Esch, Harald; Graham, Cynthia; Haux, Carl; Kreiling, Reinhard; Mehling, Annette

2010-07-03

337

Intended and unintended effects of explicit warnings on eyewitness suggestibility: evidence from source identification tests.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that source identification (ID) tests reduce, and in some cases eliminate, eyewitness suggestibility errors. The present study showed that the suggestibility errors participants committed on a source ID test were further reduced when they were given the explicit postwarning that the experimenter was trying to trick them. These postwarnings reduced suggestibility to the same extent as prewarnings, and they did so for both once and repeatedly suggested items. In addition, the benefits of the pre- and postwarnings persisted when participants were retested 1 week later, but only if the suggestions had been repeated. For once-suggested items, the warning had the unintended effect of improving old/new recognition of the suggested information at retest, an effect that offset the improvements in source discrimination accuracy conferred by the warning. The advantages of using source ID tests for investigating group differences in eyewitness suggestibility are discussed. PMID:11913748

Chambers, K L; Zaragoza, M S

2001-12-01

338

Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation  

SciTech Connect

We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The test is particularly suited to recognizing nonstatistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events that would not be expected if all events evolved according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

Melo, Ivan [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physics Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 11, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Torrieri, Giorgio [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogel, Sascha; Bleicher, Marcus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Korony, Samuel [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Gintner, Mikulas [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)

2009-08-15

339

Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

1997-02-01

340

Development, Field and Beta Tests of a Generic Manual Scanner  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel Generic Manual Scanner has been developed that combines simple and inexpensive position encoding hardware, hand-held inspection instruments and a pc computer and software, enabling the production of C-Scan images. A core concept of this development is to use NDT/I equipment already in use by and familiar to inspectors, intending to reduce changes in procedures. A minimal selection of scan sizes and data collection settings are utilized to minimize the training required to operate the unit. The manual scanner system is undergoing field and beta test to evaluate system performance and reliability, with units at the Air Force Research Lab (Dayton, OH), NavAir (Pax River), United Airlines (SFO), Cessna Aircraft Co. (Wichita, KS), as well as other locations. The users have provided valuable feedback on the operation of the system, suggested adding new or deleting unused features as well as reporting of bugs/problems with the C-scan software interface. Reported here are the results of these tests as well as intended future work.

Barnard, D. J.; Hsu, D. K.; Peters, J. J.

2007-03-01

341

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31

342

Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

1993-10-01

343

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01

344

Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

2004-02-11

345

Multilayer flowmeter testing combined with 3D field modeling to enhance the Ameland field development  

SciTech Connect

To assess the level of differential layer depletion in the Ameland gas field, production logging surveys were conducted and interpreted with a multilayer testing (MLT) technique to derive layer pressures. Results were used in a 3D simulation study showing that layer pressure differentials were controlled by offtake redistribution and could be sustained only if vertical permeabilities in silt stone/shale layers were extremely low. Units in undrained flank blocks could be underdepleted by as much as 10 MPa and drilling these blocks would increase developed reserves.

Vogelij, H.N.; Kapteyn, P.K.A. (Nederlandse Aardolie Mij. B.V., Velsen (Netherlands)); Leach, M.J. (Schlumberger E and P Services Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

1993-03-01

346

40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Operational field precision and blank test. 53.58 Section 53.58 Protection...58 Operational field precision and blank test. (a) Overview. ...samplers, retrieve the additional stored (blank, unsampled) filters after at least...

2010-07-01

347

40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Operational field precision and blank test. 53.58 Section 53.58 Protection...58 Operational field precision and blank test. (a) Overview. This...samplers, retrieve the additional stored (blank, unsampled) filters after at least...

2013-07-01

348

40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Operational field precision and blank test. 53.58 Section 53.58 Protection...58 Operational field precision and blank test. (a) Overview. ...samplers, retrieve the additional stored (blank, unsampled) filters after at least...

2009-07-01

349

Following Subsurface Water on Mars: First Field Tests with DAN/MSL Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This abstract contains description of DAN/MSL instrument first field tests. The primary goal of these field tests is to show how DAN instrument will able to detect subsurface water distribution along the path of Mars Science Laboratory rover.

Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Shvecov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.; Golovin, D.; Varenikov, A.

2008-03-01

350

An interlaboratory evaluation of the Buehler test for the identification and classification of skin sensitizers.  

PubMed

The correct identification of potential skin sensitizers is an essential first step in enabling a proper risk assessment to be made and to permit the implementation of appropriate risk management practices designed to avoid the induction of sensitization. Consequently, regulatory guidelines around the world demand that new substances are evaluated to assess their skin sensitization potential. There are two guinea pig test methods which are generally recognised, the guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT) and the occluded patch test described by Buehler. In different countries, one procedure seems to be more prevalent and acceptable to regulatory authorities than the other. Notably, in the European Union, the latest revision of the Annex V (Directive 92/32/EC) Test Method for skin sensitization asks that justification should be given in the situation where the notifier does not use the GPMT, which is the preferred method. Thus in this paper, the validity of the Buehler protocol in the context of European legislation is critically examined. Results from two laboratories are collated, showing that the method can identify significant contact allergens, particularly those which would be registered formally as such according to European legislation. It is demonstrated that minor methodological variations can be tolerated without compromising test sensitivity, but it is recommended that suitable positive control testing is the best way to ensure proper test conduct. PMID:8930474

Basketter, D A; Gerberick, G F

1996-09-01

351

Similitude, Manufacturing, Identification, and Instrumentation of Test Models Similitude, Realization, Identification, et Instrumentation des Maquettes d'Essais.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Several aspects of present aircraft model technology are surveyed. Similitude and practical choice rules are discussed as well as identification and instrumentation techniques. Specifications and manufacturing are illustrated with several practical exampl...

F. Dupriez

1977-01-01

352

TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

Kermis, William J.

353

Field testing of physiological responses associated with Nordic Walking.  

PubMed

This study compared the physiological responses (oxygen consumption and energy expenditure) of Nordic Walking to regular walking under field-testing conditions. Eleven women (M age = 27.1 years, SD = 6.4) and 11 men (M age = 33.8 years, SD = 9.0) walked 1,600 m with and without walking poles on a level, 200-m track. For women, Nordic Walking resulted in increased oxygen consumption (M = 14.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), SD = 3.2 vs. M = 1 7.9 ml x kg(-1) min(-1), SD = 3.5; p < .001), caloric expenditure (M = 4.6 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.2 vs. M = 5.4 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.2; p < .001), and heart rate (M = 113.7 bpm, SD = 12.0 vs. M = 118.7 bpm, SD = 14.8; p < .05) compared to regular walking. For men, Nordic Walking resulted in increased oxygen consumption (M = 12.8 ml x kg(-1) min(-1), SD = 1.8 vs. M = 15.5, SD =3.4 ml x kg(-1) min(-1); p < .01), caloric expenditure (M = 5.7 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.3 vs. M = 6.9 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.8; p < .001), and heart rate (M = 101.6 bpm, SD = 12.0 bpm vs. M = 109.8 bpm, SD = 14.7; p < .01) compared to regular walking. Nordic Walking, examined in the field, results in a significant increase in oxygen use and caloric expenditure compared to regular walking, without significantly increasing perceived exertion. PMID:12230336

Church, Timothy S; Earnest, Conrad P; Morss, Gina M

2002-09-01

354

Development and field-test validation of an assay for DNA repair in circulating human lymphocytes.  

PubMed

A method for measuring nucleotide excision repair in response to UV irradiation and chemical-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiological studies seeking to investigate associations between DNA repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the suggestion that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum is manifested as a result of the reduced capacity of patients' cells to repair DNA damaged by UV-mimetic agents. For the assay, damaged, nonreplicating, recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) reporter gene is introduced into lymphocytes by using a DEAE-dextran/DNA complex short-term transfection conditions. Excision repair of the damaged bacterial cat gene is monitored proportionately as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40-h repair/expression incubation period. The validity of the approach was indicated by the ability of the assay to discriminate xeroderma pigmentosum virus-transformed lymphocyte cell lines of both severe (complementation groups A and D) and moderate (complementation group C) excision repair deficiencies from repair-proficient cell lines. Similar results were observed when a mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocyte culture from an xeroderma pigmentosum A patient was assayed concurrently with mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from healthy individuals. Adaptation of this DNA repair assay as a field test in a pilot-tested select group of basal cell carcinoma patients and cancer-free controls led to the preliminary identification of a specific subset at risk for this disease as a consequence of significant reduction to the repair of photochemically (UV)-damaged plasmid DNA. PMID:1933849

Athas, W F; Hedayati, M A; Matanoski, G M; Farmer, E R; Grossman, L

1991-11-01

355

Identification of buried landmines using electromagnetic induction spectroscopy: evaluation of a blind test against ground truth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Geophex GEM-3 sensor was tested at a government test site comprised of 980 1-m squares containing buried landmines and clutter (metallic debris). Electromagnetic (EM) induction spectroscopy (EMIS) was used to discriminate between the landmines and clutter items. Receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) were constructed based on the results of the analysis. Approximately 92% of the landmines were correctly identified as such, with a false alarm rate of 12%. In this report, we present a comparison of our identification results against the ground truth. The EMIS method works well for high-metal mines for which the misfit threshold can be easily established, yielding a correct declaration in all cases without false alarms. For medium-metal mines, even though the misfit differences between the mines and clutter are not as clear as those for the high-metal mines, these mines were still identified at very low false alarm rates with the GEM-3 sensor. The low-metal mines may be discriminated from clutter if they yield reliable signals, but often at a much higher false alarm rate. The primary reason for this is that the EM signals from the low-metal mines are intrinsically weak and thus more subject to distortion by noise. There are several possibilities for improving the low-metal mine identification, including (1) increasing the upper limit of the frequency band to obtain a stronger signal and better defined spectra; (2) decreasing the size of the sensing head to further localize the region of sensitivity of the sensor; (3) displaying the spectral curves and performing the identification in real time to allow operator inspection of the spectral match; and (4) defining a generalized misfit that incorporates signal amplitude and possibly other spectral features such as the quadrature peak.

Huang, Haoping; San Filipo, Bill; Norton, Steve; Won, I. J.

2005-06-01

356

Comparison of SVM RBF-NN and DT for crop and weed identification based on spectral measurement over corn fields  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

It is important to find an appropriate pattern-recognition method for in-field plant identification based on spectral measurement in order to classify the crop and weeds accurately. In this study, the method of Support Vector Machine (SVM) was evaluated and compared with two other methods, Decision ...

357

Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs  

PubMed Central

Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs.

Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

2012-01-01

358

Corrosion experiences during the deep steam preliminary field test  

SciTech Connect

Rod specimens of 1018 carbon steel, 1095 carbon steel drill rod and 303 Se stainless steel were exposed to steam environments generated at test sites in Sandia's Area III and in the Kern River Field, Bakersfield, California, by prototype steam generators. The test environment was nominally steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide at 188/sup 0/C (370/sup 0/F) and 340 psia. It was found that in mildly basic steam all three materials performed adequately for substantial exposure times (approximately 25 days). An initial effort to introduce SO/sub 2/ gas into the generator feedwater (used as a marker gas) caused the steam discharge to become mildly acidic. During this exposure period the corrosion rates for the carbon steel and drill rod became unacceptably high. Rates were particularly high at the junction with the stainless steel specimen holder where galvanic effects (dissimilar metal couples) enhanced corrosion. The 303 Se stainless steel material did not suffer from this coupling in that the 304L stainless steel holder and 303 Se stainless steel specimen have similar electrochemical potentials. The results show that stainless steel does have adequate corrosion resistance in mildly acidic steam atmospheres. When SO/sub 2/ in high concentrations was added to the steam (for reservoir interaction determinations), the corrosive attack on all three materials became severe. Even after short exposure times (8 days steam, < 1 day steam plus SO/sub 2/), the carbon steels had disappeared and the stainless steel was severely pitted. Chromel-alumel thermocouples with stainless steel sheaths also were severely attacked by this high SO/sub 2/ environment.

Weirick, L.J.; Johnson, D.R.

1981-03-01

359

Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

2006-01-01

360

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to the CLSI guidelines, was the reference AST method. Essential and categorical agreements were determined. The overall levels of agreement for the genus- and species-level identifications were 95.6% and 94.4%, respectively. Fourteen isolates were incorrectly identified by the Phoenix system; 10 of these were incorrectly identified to the species level. Three of these were Enterobacter (Pantoea) species and four of these were Shigella spp. misidentified as Escherichia coli. For AST results, the essential and categorical agreements were 98.7% and 97.9%, respectively. The very major error, major error, and minor error rates were 0.38%, 0.33%, and 1.8%, respectively. Six isolates (three E. coli isolates and three Klebsiella isolates) were extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producers. All six were flagged by the Phoenix system expert rules. The Phoenix system compares favorably to traditional methods for ID and AST of Enterobacteriaceae.

Carroll, Karen C.; Glanz, Brian D.; Borek, Anita P.; Burger, Chad; Bhally, Hasan S.; Henciak, Susan; Flayhart, Diane

2006-01-01

361

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17

362

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Gavrus, Adinel; Duc Thien, Pham; Francillette, Henri

2011-01-01

363

A field test for the estimation of chloroquine in urine*  

PubMed Central

The use of antimalarial drugs is indissolubly linked with the use of insecticides in malaria eradication campaigns and is, indeed, of quite particular importance in areas in which insecticides have for various reasons—such as acquired resistance by anophelines—proved to be of limited value or in which residual spraying has ceased and potential foci of infection must be suppressed. With the increasing use of chloroquine for mass prophylaxis it has become desirable to develop a reasonably simple technique for ensuring that the drug distributed is in fact taken regularly. The author describes a modification of a method first developed by him in 1950, which, although simpler than the original method, nevertheless permits the estimation of chloroquine in urine in amounts of 0.25-0.95 mg per 100 ml of urine. The equipment required, including a colorimeter needing no electrical current, is suitable for use in relatively primitive working conditions, and the test is designed for field application. ImagesFIG. 2

Fuhrmann, Gerhard

1960-01-01

364

What predicts changes in useful field of view test performance?  

PubMed

The Useful Field of View Test (UFOV) has been used as an examination of age-related changes in visual processing and cognition and as an indicator of everyday performance outcomes, particularly driving, for over 20 years. How UFOV performance changes with age and what may impact such changes have not previously been investigated longitudinally. Predictors of change in UFOV performance over a 5-year period among control group participants (N=690) from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study were examined. Random effects models were estimated with 4-subtest-total UFOV as the outcome and with baseline age, education, gender, race, visual acuity, depressive symptoms, mental status, and self-rated health, as well as attrition, as predictors. UFOV performance generally followed a curvilinear pattern, improving and then declining over time. Only increased age was consistently related to greater declines in UFOV performance over time. UFOV and Digit Symbol Substitution subtest, a standard measure of cognitive speed, had similar trajectories of change. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19140660

Lunsman, Melissa; Edwards, Jerri D; Andel, Ross; Small, Brent J; Ball, Karlene K; Roenker, Daniel L

2008-12-01

365

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. The LBK tests consisted of five small scale experiments in which approximately 900 to 1800

R. W. Hill; C. B. Thorsness; R. J. Cena; D. R. Stephens

1984-01-01

366

Rapid biochemical tests for the identification of groups A, B, C, F, and G streptococci from throat cultures.  

PubMed Central

A test employing three fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferyl substrates and the lectin of Dolichos biflorus was developed for the identification of beta-hemolytic streptococcal colonies associated with throat cultures. This non-serological method is unique in that it permits the accurate identification of groups C, F, and G streptococci, as well as groups A and B streptococci. The method is rapid, simple, and specific and appears to be a useful means to identify groups A, B, C, F, and G streptococci.

Slifkin, M; Gil, G M

1983-01-01

367

Observational test of magnetospheric field models at geosynchronous orbit.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The configuration of the geomagnetic field is an indicator of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical magnetospheric field models are currently in use which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at an...

M. F. Thomsen L. A. Weiss D. J. McComas M. B. Moldwin G. D. Reeves

1994-01-01

368

Evaluation of the campyslide agglutination test for confirmatory identification of selected Campylobacter species.  

PubMed Central

The utility of a rapid latex slide agglutination test (Campyslide; BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) in detecting selected Campylobacter spp. was evaluated and compared with that of conventional identification methods. Isolated colonies suggestive of Campylobacter spp. were tested directly from primary selective media after incubation at 42 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Stock cultures of Campylobacter jejuni (n = 27) and C. coli (n = 3) were correctly confirmed to the genus level by latex agglutination when tested in pure cultures or isolated from seeded human feces. A total of 50 fresh clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp. (45 C. jejuni and 5 C. coli) were examined, with complete agreement observed between the latex test and conventional methods. Of 173 non-Campylobacter isolates tested from primary plates, only 1 rough strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced a false-positive result. Although the manufacturer recommends a 30-min antigen extraction, 1 or 5 min was found to be sufficient. Also, confirmation could be achieved within 24 h of inoculation of clinical specimens, 2 days earlier than with conventional methods.

Hodinka, R L; Gilligan, P H

1988-01-01

369

Study and development of near-field test methods for antennas  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental facility for near field testing of spacecraft antennas was planned. The facility is foreseen for the study and development of the so-called spherical test technique in which the radiation from the antenna under test is measured on a spherical surface in its near field. The associated radiation pattern of the test antenna is subsequently found by transforming the

H. Bach; E. Lintzchristensen; J. Hansen; F. Jensen; F. H. Larsen; O. Soerensen; J. Voldby

1978-01-01

370

STRESS GERMINATION RING TEST WITH IIRB AND FIELD VALIDATION IN MICHIGAN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This test was conducted to validate field emergence on lines selected by European breeding companies for a ‘ring test’ to evaluate the water germination stress test developed at East Lansing for predicting relative field emergence. Water and hydrogen peroxide germination tests were conducted prior t...

371

Factor structure and validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in a sample of mentally disordered offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations of the factor structure of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) have produced conflicting results. The current study assessed the factor structure of the AUDIT for a group of Mentally Disordered Offenders (MDOs) and examined the pattern of scoring in specific subgroups. The sample comprised 2005 MDOs who completed a battery of tests including the AUDIT. Confirmatory factor

Patrick Hallinan; Sinead McGilloway; Martin Dempster; Michael Donnelly

2011-01-01

372

THE FACTOR STRUCTURE AND CONCURRENT VALIDITY OF THE ALCOHOL USE DISORDER IDENTIFICATION TEST BASED ON A NATIONALLY REPRESENTATIVE UK SAMPLE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To assess the psychometric structure and construct validity of the alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) in a Great Britain population sample. Methods: A stratified multi-stage random sample of 7849 participants completed the AUDIT as part of a computer assisted interview. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted testing one to three factor models. The factors in these models were correlated

MARK SHEVLIN; GILLIAN W. SMITH

373

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

374

Results of the Centralia Underground Coal Gasification Field Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington...

C. B. Thorsness D. R. Stephens R. J. Cena R. W. Hill

1984-01-01

375

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Centralia Partial-Seam CRIP (controlled retracting injection point) test is described which herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981-82 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the

R. W. Hill; R. J. Cena; D. R. Stephens; C. B. Thorsness

1985-01-01

376

In silico and in vitro comparative analysis to select, validate and test SNPs for human identification  

PubMed Central

Background The recent advances in human genetics have recently provided new insights into phenotypic variation and genome variability. Current forensic DNA techniques involve the search for genetic similarities and differences between biological samples. Consequently the selection of ideal genomic biomarkers for human identification is crucial in order to ensure the highest stability and reproducibility of results. Results In the present study, we selected and validated 24 SNPs which are useful in human identification in 1,040 unrelated samples originating from three different populations (Italian, Benin Gulf and Mongolian). A Rigorous in silico selection of these markers provided a list of SNPs with very constant frequencies across the populations tested as demonstrated by the Fst values. Furthermore, these SNPs also showed a high specificity for the human genome (only 5 SNPs gave positive results when amplified in non-human DNA). Conclusion Comparison between in silico and in vitro analysis showed that current SNPs databases can efficiently improve and facilitate the selection of markers because most of the analyses performed (Fst, r2, heterozigosity) in more than 1,000 samples confirmed available population data.

Giardina, Emiliano; Pietrangeli, Ilenia; Martone, Claudia; Asili, Paola; Predazzi, Irene; Marsala, Patrizio; Gabriele, Luciano; Pipolo, Claudio; Ricci, Omero; Solla, Gianluca; Sineo, Luca; Spinella, Aldo; Novelli, Giuseppe

2007-01-01

377

An exoantigen test for the rapid identification of medically significant Fusarium species.  

PubMed

The accurate identification of Fusarium species can take 2-3 weeks. Preliminary exoantigen studies indicate that a mature culture suspected of being a Fusarium species may be immunologically identified 48 h after receipt. Exoantigen extracts of 10-day-old slant cultures of Fusarium chlamydosporum, Fusarium moniliforme (= Fusarium verticilloides), Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum and Fusarium solani and partially purified reference homologous and heterologous shake culture extracts (6-week-old) were reacted against rabbit anti-F. chlamydosporum, F. moniliforme, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum and F. solani sera, in a micro-immunodiffusion procedure. The results indicated that all the strains belonging to a given species produced 1-3 bands of identity only when tested against its homologous antiserum and reference antigen. No cross-reactions were observed with the heterologous antisera. Furthermore, extracts from isolates of Fusarium dimerum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium roseum complex, Acremonium species, Cylindrocarpon, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Trichoderma species did not react with any of the prepared Fusarium species' antisera. Our data suggest that the exoantigen procedure is a rapid and reliable tool for the accurate immuno-identification of the medically important Fusarium species studied. PMID:8544080

Sekhon, A S; Kaufman, L; Moledina, N; Summerbell, R C; Padhye, A A; Ambrosie, E A; Panter, T

378

Comparison of the MUREXC. albicans, Albicans-Sure, and BactiCard Candida Test Kits with the Germ Tube Test for Presumptive Identification ofCandida albicans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MUREXC. albicans(MC) (Murex Diagnostics), Albicans-Sure (AS) (Clinical Standards Laboratories), and BactiCard Candida (BC) (Remel) test kits were compared with the germ tube (GT) test for the rapid, presumptive identification ofCandida albicans. All three test kits detect the enzymes L-proline aminopeptidase and b-galactosaminidase in yeast cells grown on culture media and are based on the principle thatC. albicans produces both

ARTHUR E. CRIST; THERESA J. DIETZ

1996-01-01

379

Field comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction and bacterial culture for identification of bovine mastitis bacteria.  

PubMed

Fast and reliable identification of the microorganisms causing mastitis is important for management of the disease and for targeting antimicrobial treatment. Methods based on PCR are being used increasingly in mastitis diagnostics. Comprehensive field comparisons of PCR and traditional milk bacteriology have not been available. The results of a PCR kit capable of detecting 11 important etiological agents of mastitis directly from milk in 4h were compared with those of conventional bacterial culture (48h). In total, 1,000 quarter milk samples were taken from cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis, or from clinically healthy quarters with low somatic cell count (SCC). Bacterial culture identified udder pathogens in 600/780 (77%) of the clinical samples, whereas PCR identified bacteria in 691/780 (89%) of the clinical samples. The PCR analysis detected major pathogens in a large number of clinical samples that were negative for the species in culture. These included 53 samples positive for Staphylococcus aureus by PCR, but negative by culture. A total of 137 samples from clinical mastitis, 5 samples from subclinical mastitis, and 1 sample from a healthy quarter were positive for 3 or more bacterial species in PCR, whereas culture identified 3 or more species in 60 samples from clinical mastitis. Culture identified a species not targeted by the PCR test in 44 samples from clinical mastitis and in 9 samples from subclinical mastitis. Low SCC samples provided a small number of positive results both in culture (4/93; 4.3%) and by PCR (7/93; 7.5%). In conclusion, the PCR kit provided several benefits over conventional culture, including speed, automated interpretation of results, and increased sensitivity. This kit holds much promise as a tool to complement traditional methods in identification of pathogens. In conventional mastitis bacteriology, a sample with 3 or more species is considered contaminated, and resampling of the cow is recommended. Further study is required to investigate how high sensitivity of PCR and its quantitative features can be applied to improve separation of relevant udder pathogens from likely contaminants in samples where multiple species are detected. Furthermore, increasing the number of species targeted by the PCR test would be advantageous. PMID:21094742

Koskinen, M T; Wellenberg, G J; Sampimon, O C; Holopainen, J; Rothkamp, A; Salmikivi, L; van Haeringen, W A; Lam, T J G M; Pyörälä, S

2010-12-01

380

Rapid field identification of subjects involved in firearm-related crimes based on electroanalysis coupled with advanced chemometric data treatment.  

PubMed

We demonstrate a novel system for the detection and discrimination of varying levels of exposure to gunshot residue from subjects in various control scenarios. Our aim is to address the key challenge of minimizing the false positive identification of individuals suspected of discharging a firearm. The chemometric treatment of voltammetric data from different controls using Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) provides several distinct clusters for each scenario examined. Multiple samples were taken from subjects in controlled tests such as secondary contact with gunshot residue (GSR), loading a firearm, and postdischarge of a firearm. These controls were examined at both bare carbon and gold-modified screen-printed electrodes using different sampling methods: the 'swipe' method with integrated sampling and electroanalysis and a more traditional acid-assisted q-tip swabbing method. The electroanalytical fingerprint of each sample was examined using square-wave voltammetry; the resulting data were preprocessed with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), followed by CVA treatment. High levels of discrimination were thus achieved in each case over 3 classes of samples (reflecting different levels of involvement), achieving maximum accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 100% employing the leave-one-out validation method. Further validation with the 'jack-knife' technique was performed, and the resulting values were in good agreement with the former method. Additionally, samples from subjects in daily contact with relevant metallic constituents were analyzed to assess possible false positives. This system may serve as a potential method for a portable, field-deployable system aimed at rapidly identifying a subject who has loaded or discharged a firearm to verify involvement in a crime, hence providing law enforcement personnel with an invaluable forensic tool in the field. PMID:23121395

Cetó, Xavier; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Windmiller, Joshua R; del Valle, Manel; Wang, Joseph

2012-11-12

381

Prediction System for Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes Based on Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprints  

PubMed Central

A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as “unknown” by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available.

Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B.; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J.

2012-01-01

382

Prediction system for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints.  

PubMed

A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as "unknown" by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

Zou, Wen; Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J

2012-02-29

383

Frontal Eye Field Activity Enhances Object Identification During Covert Visual Search  

PubMed Central

We investigated the link between neuronal activity in the frontal eye field (FEF) and the enhancement of visual processing associated with covert spatial attention in the absence of eye movements. We correlated activity recorded in the FEF of monkeys manually reporting the identity of a visual search target to performance accuracy and reaction time. Monkeys were cued to the most probable target location with a cue array containing a popout color singleton. Neurons exhibited spatially selective responses for the popout cue stimulus and for the target of the search array. The magnitude of activity related to the location of the cue prior to the presentation of the search array was correlated with trends in behavioral performance across valid, invalid, and neutral cue trial conditions. However, the speed and accuracy of the behavioral report on individual trials were predicted by the magnitude of spatial selectivity related to the target to be identified, not for the spatial cue. A minimum level of selectivity was necessary for target detection and a higher level for target identification. Muscimol inactivation of FEF produced spatially selective perceptual deficits in the covert search task that were correlated with the effectiveness of the inactivation and were strongest on invalid cue trials that require an endogenous attention shift. These results demonstrate a strong functional link between FEF activity and covert spatial attention and suggest that spatial signals from FEF directly influence visual processing during the time that a stimulus to be identified is being processed by the visual system.

Monosov, Ilya E.

2009-01-01

384

Parameter identification for a local field potential driven model of the Parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus spike activity.  

PubMed

Several models, with various degrees of complexity have been proposed to model the neuronal activity from different parts of the human brain. We have shown before that various modeling approaches, including a Hammerstein-Wiener (H-W) model, can be used to predict the spike trains from a deep nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, using the underlying local field potentials. In this article, we present, in depth, the various choices one has to make, and the limitations that they introduce, during the H-W model parameter identification process. From a segment of the recorded data, which contains information about the spike times of a single neuron, we identify and extract the model parameters. We then use those parameters to numerically simulate the spike timing, the rhythm and the inter-spike intervals for the rest of the recording. To assess how well the model fits to the measured data we combine measures of spike train synchrony, namely the Victor-Purpura distance and the Gaussian similarity measure, with time-scale independent train distances. We show that a wise combination of metrics results in models that predict the spikes with temporal accuracy ranging, on average, from 53% to more than 80%, depending on the number of the neurons' spikes recorded. The model's prediction is adequate for estimating accurately the spike rhythm. Quantitative results establish the model's validity as a simple yet biologically plausible model of the spike activity recorded from a deep nucleus inside the human brain. PMID:23131592

Michmizos, Kostis P; Sakas, Damianos; Nikita, Konstantina S

2012-10-22

385

Field Test of Two Energetic Models for Yellow Perch  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-1–4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic

Jeffrey S. Schaeffer; Robert C. Haas; James S. Diana; James E. Breck

1999-01-01

386

Underground Test Sensor Development. Volume 2. Electric Field Sensor Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A concept for the nonperturbative measurement of electric fields in a plasma is described. The concept is based on laser-induced fluorescence from Stark-mixed states. This work reviews the electric field measurement concept, the choices of an active mediu...

J. Bahns

1990-01-01

387

[Studies on identification of drugs of abuse by diode array detection. I. Screening-test and identification of benzodiazepines by HPLC-DAD with ICOS software system].  

PubMed

For the establishment of screening-test and identification of 20 benzodiazepines (Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Clonazepam, Clotiazepam, Cloxazolam, Diazepam, Estazolam, Fludiazepam, Flunitrazepam, Flurazepam, Lorazepam, Lormetazepam, Medazolam, Midazepam, Nimetazepam, Nitrazepam, Oxazepam, Prazepam, Triazolam), the optimum separation condition on HPLC was investigated by using Interactive Computer Optimization for HPLC Separation (ICOS) software. The two eluent systems of 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.1)-methanol-acetonitrile (66.4:5.7:27.9) and 0.1% TFA-methanol-acetonitrile (61.6:16.1:22.3) were selected by HPLC analyses using ICOS. These optimum separation conditions enabled the screening test and identification of the 20 benzodiazepines on HPLC with photodiode array detection. PMID:7920567

Shimamine, M; Masunari, T; Nakahara, Y

1993-01-01

388

The effects of table material on radiated field strength measurement reproducibility at open area test sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiated field strength measurements at open area test sites (OATS) require a nonconductive table to support the equipment under test (EUT). Broadband field strength measurements were performed using tabletops of different materials and thicknesses to investigate the influence of the dielectric properties on the measured field strength. Differences of 10 dB were recorded between fibreglass and wood. Significant differences were

C. Zombolas

2001-01-01

389

Field vapor extraction test and long-term monitoring at a PCE contaminated site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a field investigation, vapor extraction tests, and long-term monitoring at a PCE-contaminated site in Saga, Japan, are reported. The field investigation indicated that PCE likely was trapped in a surface clayey sand layer (vadose zone), and soil vapor extraction (SVE) was adopted as the remediation approach. The field test results the effectiveness of SVE in removing volatile

J.-C. Chai; N. Miura

2004-01-01

390

Field test of the in situ permeable ground water flow sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two in situ permeable flow sensors, recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas, The flow sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to quantify the magnitude and direction of ground water flow in three dimensions. Two aquifer pumping tests lasting eight and 13 days were used to field

Andrew S. Alden; Clyde L. Munster

1997-01-01

391

Field evaluation of deformation characteristics of a lacustrine clay deposit using seismic piezocone tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of the seismic piezocone test (SCPTU) in geotechnical site investigation offers direct field measurement on stratigraphy and soil behaviour. Compared with some traditional investigation methods such as drilling, sampling and field inspecting method or laboratory test procedures, SCPTU can greatly accelerate the field work and hereby reduce corresponding operation cost. This paper presents the methods review to predict

Guojun Cai; Songyu Liu; Liyuan Tong

2010-01-01

392

Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as Pagers. ...

C. A. Hodge D. Yuan M. A. Krstich R. P. Keegan

2007-01-01

393

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect

The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. The LBK tests consisted of five small scale experiments in which approximately 900 to 1800 cubic feet (25 to 50 cubic meters) of coal were affected in each test. The LBK tests indicated that the Centralia site was a reasonable candidate for UCG. The PSC test was then conceived along with a third test, the Full Seam CRIP test, to provide the technical data needed to further evaluate the economic potential of UCG at the Centralia site, as well as enhance our general knowledge concerning the UCG process. The PSC test represents a 20 to 30 fold increase in scale over the LBK tests with the full-seam test representing another five fold increase in size. This series of three tests have become known as the Tono Basin Tests. During the active gasification phase, which lasted 30 days, 1400 cubic meters (2000 tons) of coal were affected. The test utilized primarily steam and oxygen as the injected reactants. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf). 7 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.

1984-08-01

394

Malaria diagnosis by field workers using an immunochromatographic test  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid immunodiagnostic test (ICT Malaria PfTestTM) has been developed by ICT Diagnostics (Sydney, Australia) for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection. The test is an antigen capture assay based on the detection of P. falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 in peripheral blood. This study was undertaken to assess the performance and usefulness of the test as a diagnostic method in

Neeru Singh; Neena Valecha; V. P. Sharma

1997-01-01

395

Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.  

PubMed

Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure. PMID:22822682

Tagler, Michael J

396

On-line identification, flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural mode parameters for V-22 tiltrotor aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

New algorithms and results are presented for flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural modes in V-22 tiltrotor aircraft\\u000a based on simulated and flight-test data from Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHTI). For flutter testing and the identification\\u000a of structural mode frequencies, dampings and mode shapes, time domain state space techniques based on Deterministic Stochastic\\u000a Realization Algorithms (DSRA) are used to

R. K. Mehra; P. O. ARambel; A. M. Sampath; R. K. Prasanth; T. C. Parham

2000-01-01

397

Use of the Coccidioides posadasii chs5 Strain for Quality Control in the ACCUPROBE Culture Identification Test for Coccidioides immitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coccidioides posadasii chs5 is a strain that is excluded from the select agent list. Sixteen assays using test reagents from three different ACCUPROBE Coccidioides immitis culture identification test lots had an average of 132,998 relative light units (RLU), which is well beyond the 50,000-RLU positive cutoff value for the test. Coccidioides posadasii chs5 is a satisfactory quality control isolate in

Michael R. McGinnis; Michael B. Smith; Elizabeth Hinson

398

A semi-field approach to testing effects of fresh pesticide residues on bees in multiple-rate test  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a semi-field cage test specifically designed to test effects of delayed exposure to plant protection products. The trial involved the use of standardised mini-beehives. The principle of the trial was to prepare two groups of potted test plants per treatment. The first group of plants remained untreated, while the second group was treated at the desired rate and

F. Bakker; J. N. M. Calis

2003-01-01

399

Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

2007-07-09

400

Identification of staphylococci with a self-educating system using fatty acid analysis and biochemical tests.  

PubMed Central

We characterized all of the 35 aerobic taxa of the genus Staphylococcus by using an objective, self-learning system combining both whole-cell fatty acid (FA) analysis and the results of 35 biochemical tests. Isolates were compared with the type strain for each taxon to generate an FA profile library and a biochemical table of test responses. Isolates were accepted into the system if they had a similarity index of > or = 0.6 for a taxon within the FA profile library and if they were identified as the same taxon by a computer program using a probability matrix constructed from the biochemical data. These stringent criteria led to acceptance of 1,117 strains assigned to legitimate taxa. Additional FA groups were assembled from selected strains that did not meet the inclusion criteria based on the type strains and were added to the system as separate entries. Currently, 1,512 isolates have bee accepted into the system. This approach has resulted in a comprehensive table of biochemical test results and a FA profile library, which together provide a practical system for valid identifications.

Behme, R J; Shuttleworth, R; McNabb, A; Colby, W D

1996-01-01

401

Cell balancing for vehicle identification perception experiments and correcting for cell imbalance in test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrections are given for cell imbalance in the design and analysis of twelve (12)-target identification (ID) perception tests. Such tests are an important tool in the development of the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) observer performance model used in NVThermIP to compare electro-optical systems. It is shown that the partitions of the 12-target set previously used in perception experiments exhibit statistically significant cell imbalance. Results from perception testing are used to determine the relative difficulty of identifying different images in the set. A program is presented to partition the set into lists that are balanced according to the collected observer data. The relative difficulty of image subsets is shown to be related to the best-fit V50 values for the subsets. The results of past perception experiments are adjusted to account for cell imbalance using the subset V50 terms. Under the proper conditions, the adjusted results are shown to better follow the TTP model for observer performance.

Moore, Richard K.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.

2007-05-01

402

Distribution and identification of proteolytic Bacillus spp. in paddy field soil under rice cultivation.  

PubMed

Proteolytic bacteria in paddy field soils under rice cultivation were characterized and enumerated using azocoll agar plates. Bacillus spp. were the proteolytic bacteria that were most frequently present, comprising 59% of the isolates. They were always the numerically dominant proteolytic bacteria isolated from three kinds of fertilizer treatments (yearly application of rice-straw compost and chemical fertilizer, yearly application of chemical fertilizer, and no fertilizer application) and at three different stages of rice development (vegetative growth stage, maximal tillering stage, and harvest stage). Of the 411 proteolytic bacteria isolated, 124 isolates had stronger proteolytic activity than others on the basis of gelatin liquefaction tests and most of them were Bacillus spp. (100% in 1989 and 92.4% in 1991). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus were the main bacteria of this group and Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus megaterium were also present. We conclude that these Bacillus spp. are the primary source of soil protease in these paddy fields. PMID:8364803

Watanabe, K; Hayano, K

1993-07-01

403

Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA)); Cooper, G.A. (Univ. of California, Berkley, CA (USA)); Curry, D.A. (International Drilling and Downhole Technology Centre in Aberdeen (Great Britian)); McCann, D. (Sedco-Forex Technical Centre (USA))

1989-12-01

404

A Study of Field Independent Biased Mental Ability Tests in Community College Science Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the use of mental ability tests for grouping science students. Describes a study which investigated the analytical skill items on the Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Test for field independent bias. Results indicated that the test is biased in favor of individuals with field independent perceptual orientation. (TW)|

Crow, Linda W.; Piper, Martha Kime

1986-01-01

405

Influence of calibration and measurement techniques on the inhomogeneity of electromagnetic fields for immunity tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of varying calibration procedures with different measurement hardware on the quality of electromagnetic test fields for immunity tests of electronic equipment is considered. Field variations up to 3 dB are quite common and in case of test hall resonances even more than 10 dB can occur. Reasons for these deviations can be found in the calibration procedure, the

J. Glimm; K. Munter; M. Spitzer; Th. Dotzer; Th. Schrader

1999-01-01

406

Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

2009-01-01

407

A field evaluation of the VIPER system: a new technique for eliciting eyewitness identification evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in technology have led to a new system for gathering facial identification evidence from eyewitnesses with accompanying changes in legislation in the UK. The current paper presents the responses of 1718 real witnesses and victims who attempted an identification from a video parade in Scotland in 2008. The witnesses comprised a large subset who were classified as ‘vulnerable’ due

Amina Memon; Catriona Havard; Brain Clifford; Fiona Gabbert; Moray Watt

2011-01-01

408

GUIDELINES FOR FIELD TESTING AQUATIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This guidance has been developed for those attempting to field validate aquatic fate and transport models. Included are discussions of the major steps in validating models and sections on the individual fate and transport processes: biodegradation, oxidation, hydrolysis, photolys...

409

Hydraulic Fracturing and Propping Tests at Yakedake Field in Japan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydraulic fracturing experiments have been conducted at Yakedake field in Gifu prefecture, Japan. From the data obtained during the fracturing operation, the open-hole section permeability was estimated of the wellbore, the minimum pressure required to pr...

T. Yamaguchi K. Seo S. Suga T. Itoh M. Kuriyagawa

1984-01-01

410

Test of the gravitomagnetic field via laser-ranged satellites  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a new experiment to measure the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth. This field, a consequence of the general relativistic formulation of Mach's principle (WEM—Wheeler-Einstein-Mach principle), has never been detected. The idea is to measure the Lense-Thirring precession of the nodal lines of two laser-ranged satellites with supplementary inclinations. In this way it is possible to separate the relativistic

Ignazio Ciufolini

1986-01-01

411

Predictors of eyewitness identification decisions from video lineups in England: a field study.  

PubMed

Eyewitness identification decisions from 1,039 real lineups in England were analysed. Identification procedures have undergone dramatic change in the United Kingdom over recent years. Video lineups are now standard procedure, in which each lineup member is seen sequentially. The whole lineup is seen twice before the witness can make a decision, and the witness can request additional viewings of the lineup. A key aim of this paper was to investigate the association between repeated viewing and eyewitness decisions. Repeated viewing was strongly associated with increased filler identification rates, suggesting that witnesses who requested additional viewings were more willing to guess. In addition, several other factors were associated with lineup outcomes, including the age difference between the suspect and the witness, the type of crime committed, and delay. Overall, the suspect identification rate was 39%, the filler identification rate was 26% and the lineup rejection rate was 35%. PMID:22849411

Horry, Ruth; Memon, Amina; Wright, Daniel B; Milne, Rebecca

2012-08-01

412

TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY  

SciTech Connect

This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F., E-mail: pavelmi@bu.edu, E-mail: clemens@bu.edu, E-mail: apinnick@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2012-04-10

413

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

414

Two succussful steam/form field tests, sections 15a and 26c, Midway-Sunset Field  

SciTech Connect

Two successful steam-diverting field tests were conducted at the Midway-Sunset Field in the San Joaquin Valley, California. A Chevron proprietary sulfonate was used as a steam-diverting agent to improve oil recovery. The results showed that, for the conditions of the field experiment, the sulfonate used is very economic, significantly increasing oil recovery. Also, there were no associated sulfonate-handling and produced oil-treating problems.

Ploeg, J.F.; Duerksen, J.H.

1985-03-01

415

Identification of field caught Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis by TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Identification of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis from field-collected Anopheles gambiae s.l. is often necessary in basic and applied research, and in operational control programmes. The currently accepted method involves use of standard polymerase chain reaction amplification of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from the 3' 28S to 5' intergenic spacer region of the genome, and visual confirmation of amplicons

Edward D Walker; Alisha R Thibault; Annette P Thelen; Blair A Bullard; Juan Huang; Maurice R Odiere; Nabie M Bayoh; Elizabeth E Wilkins; John M Vulule

2007-01-01

416

Evaluation of the Rapid MGIT TBc Identification Test for Culture Confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strain Detection?  

PubMed Central

A culture confirmation test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains that uses a lateral-flow immunochromatographic assay to detect the MPB64 antigen, the MGIT TBc identification (TBc ID) test, has been developed. We evaluated the performance of the TBc ID test in the detection of the M. tuberculosis complex in 222 primary-positive liquid cultures. We compared these results to those of nucleic acid-based identification and conventional biochemical tests. The validity of the TBc ID test was determined, and all of the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and Nocardia species tested were found to be negative. The detection limit of the TBc ID test was 5 × 105 CFU/ml, and for IS6110 real-time PCR it was 5 CFU/ml. All of the M. tuberculosis and M. africanum cultures were found to be positive, while M. bovis and M. bovis BCG cultures were negative. With the exception of 1 contaminated culture, the 221 culture-positive isolates contained 171 (77.5%) M. tuberculosis isolates, 39 (17.6%) NTM species, and 11 (5.0%) unidentified species. Two culture-positive isolates harbored a 63-bp deletion at position 196 of the mpb64 gene. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of the TBc ID test were 98.8, 100, 100, and 95.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the approximate turnaround time for real-time PCR was 4 h (including buffer and sample preparation), while for the TBc ID test it was less than 1 h. We suggest an algorithm for the primary identification of M. tuberculosis in liquid culture using the TBc ID test as an alternative to conventional subculture followed by identification using biochemical methods.

Yu, Ming-Chih; Chen, Huang-Yao; Wu, Mei-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Yuh-Min; Yu, Fang-Lan; Jou, Ruwen

2011-01-01

417

U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's results of the TG53 experiment and field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Herein is described the U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's purpose and series of activities conducted at the 2008 NATO SET-093 TG-53 experiment and field test. The overall purpose of the field test as stated by SET-093 panel was to provide a baseline test capable of providing relevant scenarios and data regarding a variety of impulsive generated acoustic events. As organized, the field

Sachi V. Desai; Amir Morcos

2009-01-01

418

Temperature measurements from the prototype engineered barrier system field test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The maximum temperature on the surface of th...

W. Lin A. L. Ramirez D. Watwood

1991-01-01

419

Putting Scholastic Aptitude Test Results on an Even Playing Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|It is very important, when considering how students from one area compare with those from another, to use similar student performance data. This is particularly evident when comparing the performance of students taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) from an area where many students take the test to the performance of students from an area…

Costello, Ronald W.; Cox, Marge

420

Testing symmetries in effective models of higher derivative field theories  

SciTech Connect

Higher derivative field theories with interactions raise serious doubts about their validity due to severe energy instabilities. In many cases the implementation of a direct perturbation treatment to excise the dangerous negative-energies from a higher derivative field theory may lead to violations of Lorentz and other symmetries. In this work we study a perturbative formulation for higher derivative field theories that allows the construction of a low-energy effective field theory being a genuine perturbations over the ordinary-derivative theory and having a positive-defined Hamiltonian. We show that some discrete symmetries are recovered in the low-energy effective theory when the perturbative method to reduce the negative-energy degrees of freedom from the higher derivative theory is applied. In particular, we focus on the higher derivative Maxwell-Chern-Simons model which is a Lorentz invariant and parity-odd theory in 2+1 dimensions. The parity violation arises in the effective action of QED{sub 3} as a quantum correction from the massive fermionic sector. We obtain the effective field theory which remains Lorentz invariant, but parity invariant to the order considered in the perturbative expansion.

Reyes, C. Marat [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2009-11-15

421

Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in the open water and during ice breaking. Continuous time-series of full mass spectra with a one minute time resolution were recorded throughout the campaign between August 2nd and September 7th 2008 running up to a net VOC data set of 745 hours. Over 370 mass peaks have been separated, about 340 show signal intensities above the 30 minute detection limit of ~3pptv. Additionally we analyzed samples from nine helicopter based soundings providing vertical VOC profiles up to 3000 m.a.s.l. The performance of the newly developed instrument will be discussed and ASCOS data will be shown. Acknowledgment: The ASCOS expedition was arranged by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and was an effort within the framework of SWEDARCTIC 2008. For more information on ASCOS see http://ascos.se/. We thank the ASCOS organizers - Caroline Leck and Michael Tjernström - all ASCOS participants, the SPRS and the Oden crew for the excellent team work and Armin Wisthaler for his assistance in planning and preparations. The TOF-MS system was funded by the University of Innsbruck (Uni Infrastruktur Programm). The development project was financially supported by the Austrian Research Funding Association (FFG). [1] Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes 1995, 149-150, 609-619. [2] Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A. Chemical Society Review 1998, 27, 347-375. [3] De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C. Mass Spectrometry Reviews 2007, 26, 223-257. [4] Goldstein, A. H.; Galbally, I. E. Environmental Science and Technology 2007, 41, 154-1521.

Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

2009-04-01

422

Automated field testing of a track-type tractor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the design process, earthmoving manufacturers routinely subject machines to rigorous, long-term tests to ensure quality. Automating portions of the testing process can potentially reduce the cost and time to complete these tests. We present a system that guides a 175 horsepower track-type tractor (Caterpillar Model D6R XL) along a prescribed route, allowing simple tasks to be completed by the automated machine while more complex tasks, such as site clean up, are handled by an operator. Additionally, the machine can be operated manually or via remote control and observed over the internet using a remote supervisor program. We envision that safety would be handled using work procedures, multiple over-ride methods and a GPS fence. The current system can follow turns within a half meter and straight sections within a quarter meter. The controller hardware and software are integrated with existing on-board electronic modules and allow for portability. The current system successfully handles the challenges of a clutch-brake drive train and has the potential to improve control over test variables, lower testing costs and enable testing at higher speeds allowing for higher impact tests than a human operator can tolerate.

Taylor, Michael A.; Lay, Keith; Struble, Joshua; Allen, William; Subrt, Michael

2003-09-01

423

Field Evaluation of a Rapid Immunochromatographic Test for Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Rapid diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) are needed to facilitate early treatment of TB and prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission. The ICT Tuberculosis test is a rapid, card-based immunochromatographic test for detection of antibodies directed against M. tuberculosis antigens. The objective of the study was to evaluate the performance of the ICT Tuberculosis test for the diagnosis of active pulmonary TB (PTB) with whole blood, plasma, and serum from patients suspected of having PTB and from asymptomatic controls in a setting with a high prevalence of PTB. Seventy patients suspected of having PTB (and who were later confirmed to have or not to have PTB by use of M. tuberculosis culture as the “gold standard”) and 42 controls were studied. Twenty-one controls were neither vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) nor tuberculin skin test (TST) positive (group A controls), and 21 controls were TST positive and/or had previously been vaccinated with BCG (group B controls). Study subjects were drawn from one hospital and one primary health care unit in Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil. One version of the test (ICT-1) was evaluated by using whole blood, plasma, and serum samples. Sera obtained for this study were frozen and later tested with a manufacturer-modified version of the test (ICT-2). Among the patients suspected of having PTB, the sensitivities of the ICT-1 with whole blood, serum, and plasma were 83, 65, and 70%, respectively, and the specificities were 46, 67, and 56%, respectively. Among the group A controls, the specificities of ICT-1 with the three specimen types were 95, 100, and 95%, respectively. Among the group B controls, the specificities of ICT-1 with the three specimen types were 71, 86, and 86%, respectively. Among the patients suspected of having PTB, the sensitivity of ICT-2 was 70% and the specificity was 65%. Among the group A controls, the specificity of ICT-2 was 95%, and among the group B controls, the specificity of ICT-2 was 81%. With a 29% observed prevalence of PTB among patients suspected of having PTB, the positive predictive values of the ICT tests ranged from 39 to 50% and the negative predictive values ranged from 82 to 87%. The ICT Tuberculosis tests were not sufficiently predictive to warrant their widespread use as routine diagnostic tests for PTB in this setting. However, further evaluation of these tests in specific epidemiologic settings may be warranted.

Gounder, Celine; de Queiroz Mello, Fernanda Carvalho; Conde, Marcus B.; Bishai, William R.; Kritski, Afranio L.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

2002-01-01

424

Urease Color Test Medium U-9 for the Detection and Identification of T Mycoplasmas in Clinical Material.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A urease color test fluid medium (U-9) for the detection and identification of T (T-strain) mycoplasmas in clinical material is described which is sensitive and specific for this group of mycoplasmas. The medium was prepared from commercially available co...

M. C. Shepard C. D. Lunceford

1970-01-01

425

An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

Twissell, Adrian

2011-01-01

426

Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor  

DOEpatents

A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

Smith, Desmond J. (Oakland, CA); Rubin, Edward M. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01

427

Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification  

PubMed Central

Background The use of radiofrequency identification (RFID) in healthcare is increasing and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have documented that RFID can interfere with medical devices. The majority of past studies have concentrated on implantable medical devices such as implantable pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study examined EMC between RFID systems and non-implantable medical devices. Methods Medical devices were exposed to 19 different RFID readers and one RFID active tag. The RFID systems used covered 5 different frequency bands: 125–134 kHz (low frequency (LF)); 13.56 MHz (high frequency (HF)); 433 MHz; 915 MHz (ultra high frequency (UHF])) and 2.4 GHz. We tested three syringe pumps, three infusion pumps, four automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), and one ventilator. The testing procedure is modified from American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C63.18, Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio-Frequency Transmitters. Results For syringe pumps, we observed electromagnetic interference (EMI) during 13 of 60 experiments (22%) at a maximum distance of 59 cm. For infusion pumps, we observed EMI during 10 of 60 experiments (17%) at a maximum distance of 136 cm. For AEDs, we observed EMI during 18 of 75 experiments (24%) at a maximum distance of 51 cm. The majority of the EMI observed was classified as probably clinically significant or left the device inoperable. No EMI was observed for all medical devices tested during exposure to 433 MHz (two readers, one active tag) or 2.4 GHz RFID (two readers). Conclusion Testing confirms that RFID has the ability to interfere with critical medical equipment. Hospital staff should be aware of the potential for medical device EMI caused by RFID systems and should be encouraged to perform on-site RF immunity tests prior to RFID system deployment or prior to placing new medical devices in an RFID environment. The methods presented in this paper are time-consuming and burdensome and suggest the need for standard test methods for assessing the immunity of medical devices to RFID systems.

2013-01-01

428

Field Test of On-Site drug Detection Devices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This NHTSA-sponsored study reports the findings of a field evaluation of five on-site drug screening devices used by law enforcement to screen for illicit drugs among drivers suspected of driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol or other drugs. In two...

R. K. Hersch D. J. Crouch R. F. Cook

2000-01-01

429

Field testing solar photocatalytic detoxification on TCE-contaminated groundwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Solar Detoxification Field Experiment was designed to investigate the photocatalytic decomposition of organic contaminants in groundwater at a Superfund site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy available in sunlight in conjunction with a photocatalyst, titanium dioxide, to decompose organic chemicals into nontoxic compounds. The destruction mechanism, as in many other advanced oxidation processes, involves

Mark S. Mehos; Craig S. Turchi

1993-01-01

430

Field Instructors' Commitment to Student Supervision: Testing the Investment Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to examine field instructors' commitment to student supervision, using an adapted form of the Investment Model, which consists of six components related to supervision: rewards (positive aspects of the job), costs (negative aspects of the job), degree of investment in the job, quality of alternative jobs, satisfaction of the job, and commitment to the

Mark J. Macgowan

2007-01-01

431

CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

432

Analysis of field test data on residential heating and cooling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computer program using field site data collected on 48 homes located in six cities in different climatic regions of the United States is discussed. In addition, a User's Guide was prepared for the computer program which is contained in a separate two-volume document entitled User's Guide for REAP: Residential Energy Analysis Program. Feasibility studies were conducted pertaining to potential

S. G. Talbert

1980-01-01

433

RF link power control with field test data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associated with the rapid concentration of forces there is the issue of EMC\\/EMI problems among various radios in a theater. The general issue is about how various narrow band radios can be brought to use in a battle field with automated RF power management. The study in this paper is restricted to point to point link power control. The concept

C. H. Lee

1996-01-01

434

Saccade testing to distinguish between non-organic and organic visual-field restriction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim:The authors described and tested a simple bedside procedure to detect non-organic visual-field loss.Methods:Prospective comparative observational case series of 16 patients with non-organic visual-field loss and 15 patients with organic visual-field loss were examined. Saccade patterns provoked by a stimulus outside the claimed visual field were assessed by a masked observer.Results:Whereas, in organic visual-field defects, eye movements as noted by

M S Zinkernagel; N Pellanda; A Kunz; D S Mojon

2009-01-01

435

Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applicatio...

J. Francfort J. Argueta M. Wehrey D. Karner L. Tyree

1999-01-01

436

Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing  

EPA Science Inventory

While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

437

Residual-Oil-Saturation-Technology Test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bel...

1981-01-01

438

Field tests of a circuit breaker synchronous control  

SciTech Connect

A circuit breaker synchronous control interface which controls the point-on-wave at which shunt reactor circuit breakers open or close has been developed and tested on Hydro-Quebec`s 735-kV power system. It takes into account the influence of outdoor temperature on the breaker closing and opening times. It is also equipped with a reignition and a high-inrush-current detection system. Opening tests at different preset arcing times were conducted and the arcing time range where there are no re-ignitions in air-blast breakers was established. The tests showed that the interface is a valuable device for the elimination of re-ignitions associated with the interruption of small inductive currents. Closing tests have shown that the interface is also useful for the limitation of high inrush currents by selecting an appropriate point-on-wave for circuit breaker closing.

Rajotte, R.J.; Charpentier, C.; Breault, S.; Le, H.H.; Huynh, H. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Desmarais, J. [Snemo Ltd., Brossard, Quebec (Canada)

1995-07-01

439

Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect

The Centralia Partial-Seam CRIP (controlled retracting injection point) test is described which herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981-82 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf).

Hill, R.W.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.; Thorsness, C.B.

1985-01-01

440

Temperature measurements from the prototype engineered barrier system field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The maximum temperature on the surface of the heater can was about 340°C; the maximum temperature at the bottom of the heater borehole wall was about

W. Lin; A. L. Ramirez; D. Watwood

1991-01-01

441

Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

Nigbor, R. L.; Evans, J. R.; Hutt, C. R.

2009-01-01

442

Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were