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1

Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

2007-08-01

2

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

3

Sorghum Ergot Field Identification  

E-print Network

Sorghum Ergot Field Identification Sorghum ergot is a disease that attacks unfertilized ovaries of the flowers of grain and forage sor- ghums and johnsongrass. Field identification of sorghum ergot is readily made by careful observa- tion of the following symptoms. Infected ovaries of sorghum are converted

Mukhtar, Saqib

4

Multi-level slug tests in highly permeable formations: 2. Hydraulic conductivity identification, method verification, and field applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.

Zlotnlk, Vitaly A.; McGuire, Virginia L.

1998-01-01

5

Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

1986-01-01

6

Identification and field testing of additional components of female sex pheromone of African armyworm,Spodoptera exempta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).  

PubMed

Ovipositor washings from virgin femaleSpodoptera exempta (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography (GC) linked to a male electroantennogram (EAG). GC retention times of the two major EAG responses observed were consistent with their assignment as (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate and (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate, as previously identified. However, three other EAG responses were also noted that had GC retention times consistent with (Z)-9-tetradecenal, (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-o 1, and (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate. The components were present in the ratio of 100?5?1.5?3.5?4, respectively. Further analysis of the ovipositor washings by GC linked to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) confirmed these findings and indicated the presence of a sixth component consistent with (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate present at 2 % of the major component. In field tests carried out in Kenya, (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate was the only newly identified component to enhance the catch of the original two-component mixture when presented in their natural ratio. The addition of (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol reduced catch, while (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate had no apparent effect. PMID:24272017

Cork, A; Murlis, J; Megenasa, T

1989-04-01

7

FIELD DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA's OHMSETT facility has developed a rapid field test that includes some of the theoretical aspects and conditions of dispersion at sea. This Field Dispersant Effectiveness Test (FDET) has been used to evaluate the dispersibility of various commonly-transported oils and mak...

8

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-print Network

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

9

Channel identification machines for multidimensional receptive fields.  

PubMed

We present algorithms for identifying multidimensional receptive fields directly from spike trains produced by biophysically-grounded neuron models. We demonstrate that only the projection of a receptive field onto the input stimulus space may be perfectly identified and derive conditions under which this identification is possible. We also provide detailed examples of identification of neural circuits incorporating spatiotemporal and spectrotemporal receptive fields. PMID:25309413

Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

2014-01-01

10

Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

2014-07-01

11

Identification of Blimp Dynamics via Flight Tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A blimp is introduced as a stable platform for remote-sensing instruments required for unmanned aerial observation and surveillance. In order to develop flight control systems for a blimp, two series of experiments were conducted to identify flight dynamics: constrained flight tests, and indoor free-flight tests. This paper addresses the blimp configuration, experimental set-up, method for identifying dynamics, and the results of identification in comparison with the analytical estimation for each experimental method. Both tests employed a full-scale blimp. The identification method for the constrained flight tests used the extended least-squares method involving the gradient algorithm, and the indoor free-flight tests, the eigen-system realization algorithm involving the autoregressive model fitting algorithm. The results suggest that analytical formulas for estimating the parameters, including added mass effects and stability derivatives, may yield values consistent with experimentally identified ones.

Yamasaki, Takeshi; Goto, Norihiro

12

Subcritical flutter testing and system identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

Houbolt, J. C.

1974-01-01

13

Repository data base, field tests  

SciTech Connect

Development of appropriate data that can be used to solidify the base of technology for repository development frequently requires field testing. This field testing is performed in a variety of test facilities both within the US and abroad. Papers presented in this session describe a variety of field test programs currently being conducted or planned as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program, including several geologic media. A subsequent companion session emphasizes results of both laboratory and field tests, as they relate to developing the repository data base. Titles of the papers presented are: (1) Near-Surface Test Facility - Update on Field Testing in Basalt; (2) Field Testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: Spent Fuel and Radionuclide Migration Experiments; (3) Field Experiment Program for Tuff in G Tunnel; (4) Stripa Project: An International Project in the Management of Radioactive Waste Storage; (5) Brine Migration Field Test Plans for Asse, West Germany; (6) Field Testing Activities in Dome Salt at Avery Island, Louisiana; (7) Experimental Studies at the Colorado School of Mines Hard Rock Test Site; (8) NWTS Field Testing - Forward Planning.

NONE

1980-12-08

14

Soil Sample Questionnaire --Field Crops Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres  

E-print Network

Soil Sample Questionnaire -- Field Crops Date Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres A completed questionnaire must accompany each sample. Retain a duplicate copy for your records. Number the samples and questionnaires for your own identification. Directions for obtaining soil samples

Norton, Jay B.

15

FSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

1981-01-01

16

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01

17

Olfactory Identification Test Using Familiar Distracters for Koreans  

PubMed Central

Objectives Odors used in an odor identification test should be familiar to the subject, but there are some unfamiliar distracters in Korean version of Sniffin' stick (KVSS) II identification test. In this study, we used the results of the original version of KVSS II identification to modify the KVSS II identification test. Methods Eighty-three participants took an original version of KVSS II identification test and a visual analogue scale of subjective odor function. KVSS II identification which has 16 items was performed to choose one out of four odors items. And visual analogue scale was checked from 0 to 10 points of their subjective olfactory function. Two weeks later they took the modified version of KVSS II identification test. Hyposmic or anosmic patients were excluded. Results The mean score of the original version of KVSS II identification and modified version of KVSS II identification were 11.3 and 12.5, respectively (P<0.05). The KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function were positively correlated (r=0.247, P<0.05), as were the modified KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function (r=0.329, P<0.05). Conclusion After modification of distracters, KVSS II identification test appears to be suited for assessment of olfactory function. PMID:24587876

Kim, Jae-Myung; Jeong, Mi Soon; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Seol, Jeong-Hun; Hong, Seok-Chan; Cho, Jae Hoon

2014-01-01

18

CLASSIFICATION TOOLS FOR EFFICIENT IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF IMPAIRMENT: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES  

EPA Science Inventory

Current monitoring strategies for iotic ecosystems have focused on identification of either specific impaired stream reaches or regional incidence of impaired stream reaches, with little or no ancillary data collected to facilitate diagnosis of impairment, or extrapolation of res...

19

Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

1983-01-01

20

Parameter identification of the fatigue-testing rig  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the dynamic parameter identification of the novel fatigue-testing rig is presented. The applied identification method assumes a priori a simple dynamical model for which parameters are identified through free and forced vibration tests. The rig is comprised of two base excited oscillators providing the dynamic excitation for a fatigue sample and two pneumatic actuators preventing a loss

Nikola Jakši?; Chee-Hoe Foong; Marian Wiercigroch; Miha Boltežar

2008-01-01

21

Useful field of view test.  

PubMed

The useful field of view test was developed to reflect the visual difficulties that older adults experience with everyday tasks. Importantly, the useful field of view test (UFOV) is one of the most extensively researched and promising predictor tests for a range of driving outcomes measures, including driving ability and crash risk as well as other everyday tasks. Currently available commercial versions of the test can be administered using personal computers; these measure the speed of visual processing for rapid detection and localization of targets under conditions of divided visual attention and in the presence and absence of visual clutter. The test is believed to assess higher-order cognitive abilities, but performance also relies on visual sensory function because in order for targets to be attended to, they must be visible. The format of the UFOV has been modified over the years; the original version estimated the spatial extent of useful field of view, while the latest version measures visual processing speed. While deficits in the useful field of view are associated with functional impairments in everyday activities in older adults, there is also emerging evidence from several research groups that improvements in visual processing speed can be achieved through training. These improvements have been shown to reduce crash risk, and can have a positive impact on health and functional well-being, with the potential to increase the mobility and hence the independence of older adults. PMID:24642933

Wood, Joanne M; Owsley, Cynthia

2014-01-01

22

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

23

Analysis and identification of multi-variate random pressure fields using covariance and spectral proper transformations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will present applications of the Proper Transformations based on both cross spectral matrix and covariance matrix branches to analysis and identification of multi-variate random pressure fields. The random pressure fields are determined due to the physical measurements on some typical rectangular models in the wind tunnel tests. The significant roles of the first covariance mode associated with the

Yukio Tamura; Cau Giay

24

Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2  

E-print Network

Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2 optical for the bi-axial characterization of in vitro human arteries10 and we prove its feasibility on an example in arterial segments. From the full-field experimental data12 obtained in inflation/extension tests

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Nondestructive spot tests allow rapid identification of metals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ordered qualitative test sequence, presented in flow chart form, permits identification of all common metallurgical elements and many high-temperature, stainless, high and low carbon, and tool steels within about 30 minutes. Identification is made from colors or specific reactions produced by the addition of standard chemical reagents.

Wilson, M. L.

1970-01-01

26

Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

2011-01-01

27

Digital Audio Radio Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

Hollansworth, James E.

1997-01-01

28

Galaxy Merger Identification in the CANDELS GOODS-South Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyzed a catalog of 7,628 galaxies at 0field in order to identify a sample of galaxy mergers and interactions. Mergers are believed to play a fundamental role in galaxy evolution. Developing methods to robustly and efficiently identify mergers becomes vital as we look to higher redshifts. We explored merger identification based on visual morphology classification and preliminary attempts with automated methods. Using multiple detailed visual morphology classifications for each galaxy conducted by the CANDELS structure and morphology team, we created selection criteria to identify mergers from this visual classification catalog. We chose galaxies with high interaction classification and evidence of merger signatures (i.e. tidal features, double nuclei) to generate a catalog of 1051 galaxies we are confident are mergers. This represents a conservative sample of possible mergers. For comparison, we also tested automated merger identification techniques previously used for lower redshift (z<1) galaxies. This is one of the first large investigations of galaxy mergers at z>1. O’Leary was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

O'Leary, Erin M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

2013-01-01

29

Direct structural parameter identification by modal test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A direct identification procedure is proposed to obtain the mass and stiffness matrices based on the test measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method is based on the theory of matrix perturbation in which the correct mass and stiffness matrices are expanded in terms of analytical values plus a modification matrix. The simplicity of the procedure enables real time operation during the structural testing.

Chen, J.-C.; Kuo, C.-P.; Garba, J. A.

1983-01-01

30

Identification of Rubber-like Behaviour from Non Homogeneous Multiaxial Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose an identification method for the determination of elastomer behaviour which combines strain field obtained by digital image analysis and the optimisation of an aproximated stress field adapted to the specimen geometry. The chosen loading test is a biaxial elongation performed on a cross specimen. In doing so, we turn the problem of heterogeneity into an advantage: it allows the simultaneous identification of several states of deformation: uni-axial, planar and biaxial tension. The stress field is approximated by the sum of a homogeneous field and an additional field. The latter satisfies the boundary conditions on the free edge and decreases when entering the sample. The characteristic decreasing length is optimized so that the approximate field globally verifies the momentum equation. It is then possible to identify the hyperelastic potential by calculating explicitly the two derivatives ƒ = ?W/?I1 and g = ?W/?I2

Idjeri, Mourad; Chevalier, Luc; Bechir, Hocine

2011-05-01

31

Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

1995-01-01

32

Identification of Blimp Dynamics via Flight Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A blimp is introduced as a stable platform for remote-sensing instruments required for unmanned aerial observation and surveillance. In order to develop flight control systems for a blimp, two series of experiments were conducted to identify flight dynamics: constrained flight tests, and indoor free-flight tests. This paper addresses the blimp configuration, experimental set-up, method for identifying dynamics, and the results

Takeshi Yamasaki; Norihiro Goto

2004-01-01

33

Spacecraft structural system identification by modal test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A structural parameter estimation procedure using the measured natural frequencies and kinetic energy distribution as observers is proposed. The theoretical derivation of the estimation procedure is described and its constraints and limitations are explained. This procedure is applied to a large complex spacecraft structural system to identify the inertia matrix using modal test results. The inertia matrix is chosen after the stiffness matrix has been updated by the static test results.

Chen, J.-C.; Peretti, L. F.; Garba, J. A.

1984-01-01

34

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-print Network

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

35

The "Sniffin' Kids" test--a 14-item odor identification test for children.  

PubMed

Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified "Sniffin' Sticks" odor identification test, the "Sniffin' Kids" test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the "Sniffin' Sticks" 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item "Sniffin' Kids" odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the "Sniffin' Kids" test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification "Sniffin' Kids" test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6-17 years. PMID:24979650

Schriever, Valentin A; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

2014-01-01

36

Testing two-field inflation  

E-print Network

We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and ...

Peterson, Courtney M.

37

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral...Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. An enclosure that meets all...

2011-07-01

38

[Personality tests and gender identification in male transsexuals].  

PubMed

The aim of this research project was to study gender identification in male transsexuals compared to male and female controls, using the Rorschach test and the MMPI. In the international literature, many researches have shown that the nature of the human response on Rorschach card III is linked to gender identification, as is the MMPI Mf scale. Ten untreated male homosexual transsexuals and 18 treated and operated male homosexual transsexuals were compared to 10 male and 12 female controls regarding verbal IQ, human content on Rorschach card III and the MMPI Mf scale. Absence of hormonal treatment for the first group of transsexuals was checked by a blood test at the time of the psychological testing. Responses on Rorschach card III were scored according to different kinds of human contents: male (M), female (F), gender-unidentified/neutral (N), bisexual (B), feminine then masculine or the opposite (M/F), and nonhuman (NH). N, B, M/F and NH responses were rare in all Rorschach protocols. As expected, responses given by participants in the control group were significantly more consistent with their anatomical sex than with the opposite sex. Untreated transsexuals do not differ from treated and operated transsexuals on Rorschach data, and both transsexual groups give significantly more female human representations than male controls. Transsexuals' results are similar to female controls. Untreated transsexuals' mean score on the MMPI Mf scale is significantly higher than that of treated and operated transsexuals' score, in the male profile (biological sex). Both groups of transsexuals score higher on the Mf scale in the male profile than in the female profile. The mean Mf score in the male profile is significantly higher than that of male controls, whereas, in the female profile, the mean Mf score is similar to that of female controls. This study shows that for both groups of transsexuals, results are homogenous in respect of Rorschach and MMPI, showing hyper-conformism to self-perceived gender. Results in both groups are similar to results of female controls, but tend to show even more feminine gender identification. The absence of any significant difference between untreated and treated and operated transsexuals seems surprising, suggesting that the hormonal treatment has not had a major impact on gender identification processes. It would doubtless be interesting to study gender identification using even more kinds of data: all human contents in the Rorschach protocol (not just the responses given to card III), MMPI Mf scale, Draw-A-Person Test and Animal-and-Opposite Drawing Test. This would enhance result liability and could provide useful information about how gendter identification processes evolve after surgical sex reassigment. PMID:15971637

Coussinoux, S; Gallarda, T; Smith, J; Bourdel, M C; Cordier, B; Brémont, C; Poirier, M F; Haddou, M; Olié, J P

2005-01-01

39

Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.  

PubMed

A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions. PMID:25151655

Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

2014-11-01

40

Stellar objects identification using wide-field camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with evaluation and processing of astronomical image data, which are obtained by a wide-field all-sky image analyzing monitoring system (WILLIAM). The WILLIAM is an additional experimental camera for project MAIA equipped with wide field lens. The system can detect stellar objects as faint as 6th magnitude. Acquired image data are processed by an algorithm for stellar object detection and identification which is based on coordinates transfer function. Cartesian coordinates at the image data are transformed to horizontal coordinate system. This coordinate system allows searching in astronomical catalogues of stellar objects. This paper presents the components of WILLIAM, its measured electro-optical characteristics and some results of identification.

Janout, Petr; Páta, Petr; Bedná?, Jan; Anisimova, Elena; Blažek, Martin; Skala, Petr

2015-01-01

41

Comparison of five agglutination tests for identification of Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed Central

Various commercially produced agglutination kits are widely used for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus. These kits detect the presence of protein A and/or clumping factor on S. aureus. The literature has shown that methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates which are deficient in both clumping factor and protein A may be misidentified. Two products, Slidex and Staphaurex Plus, utilize specific anti-S. aureus antibodies, potentially giving them greater sensitivity compared to products without these antibodies. We report a prospective study designed to compare the performance characteristics of Fastaph, Slidex, Staphaurex, Staphaurex Plus, Staphyloslide, and the tube coagulase test for the identification of staphylococcal isolates. All discrepant isolates were tested with the Gen-Probe AccuProbe S. aureus test and were identified to the species level with conventional reference biochemicals. A total of 1,193 isolates were tested, including 33 MRSA and 423 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates. The sensitivities and specificities of the tests, respectively, were as follows: Fastaph, 99.1 and 98.9%; Slidex, 99.6 and 96.4%; Staphaurex, 98.9 and 99.9%; Staphaurex Plus, 99.6 and 93.9%; Staphyloslide, 99.1 and 98.9%; and tube coagulase, 99.3 and 100%. Sensitivity was excellent for all of the products tested. The specificities of Fastaph, Staphaurex, and Staphyloslide were excellent, while Staphaurex Plus and Slidex demonstrated less optimal results. PMID:8968897

Wilkerson, M; McAllister, S; Miller, J M; Heiter, B J; Bourbeau, P P

1997-01-01

42

Identification of the mechanical behaviour of low density hyperelastic polymeric foams from full-field measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a methodology aimed at the identification of the mechanical behaviour of hyperelastic low density polymeric foams using digital image correlation and the Virtual Fields Method. First, a simple bending/shear test enables the identification of the elastic parameters at low strain levels. Then, a uniaxial compression test is performed to identify the parameters of an Ogden-type law (hyperelastic). The strain fields exhibit strong localization caused by the elastic collapse of the cells clearly indicating that an approach based on global force/displacement curves will fail to provide intrinsic material parameters (structural effect). This is still very much a preliminary study but it clearly shows the potential of the approach for this type of materials.

Pierron, F.; Guo, B.

2009-08-01

43

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1)  

E-print Network

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS II. - THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1) B. U. HOFSTRA D. MINKEMA Research Institute for Animal Husbandry « Schoonoovd », Dviebevgseweg IOd, Zeist, the Nethevlands SUMMARY The accuracy of the field test, for the individual selection of gilts and for the progeny tes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

[Clinical usefulness of smell identification test card: Open Essence].  

PubMed

Since the Odor Stick Identification Test for Japanese (OSIT-J) has proved clinically useful in Japan, the Open Essence (OE) smell identification test card has been developed to amend OSIT-J deficits. To determine its clinical effectiveness, we administered the OE to 93 Japanese subjects reporting olfactory dysfunction. They scored their olfactory dysfunction on levels one to five, i.e., normal to anosmic, using the Japan Rhinologic Society Self-Administered Odor Questionnaire (SAOQ) and the visual analog scale (VAS). They also took the Japanese standard olfactory test (T & T olfactometry) and intravenous olfactometry (Alinamin test). Opinions on the OE and OSIT-J were recorded from those previously administered the OSIT-J and testers familiar with OSIT-J administration. The OE took 5.1+/- 1.6 minutes to administer. Scores correlated significantly for the OE, self-reported olfactory function, SAOQ, VAS, T & T olfactometry recognition threshold, and Alinamin latency and duration time. Subjects and testers reported the OE to be easier, shorter, more interesting, and more convenient, indicating its utility in clinical olfactory dysfunction evaluation and its convenience for both subjects and testers. PMID:20954362

Nishida, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ogihara, Hitomi; Takeo, Tetsu; Kitano, Masako; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

2010-09-01

45

Field Testing Selected Micro Computer Software.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a study to test the feasibility of expanding computer use within the Montana business community, computer systems were field tested in four Montana small businesses. The four businesses were a newspaper, an advertising agency, a sheep and cattle ranch, and a private investment company. The companies employed from 3 to 20 persons. Three…

ECO Northwest, Ltd., Helena, MT.

46

Identification of suicidal ideations with the help of projective tests: A review.  

PubMed

Identification of the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual is crucial for the timely intervention. However, these ideations may remain unidentified as an individual with serious intentions of self-harm may not express them explicitly. Various projective tests can provide crucial clues to clinicians about the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual's mind. The present review is intended to update clinicians working in the field of suicide prevention about salient findings on these tests which can serve as a ready reckoner for them. We also highlight the status of research in this domain. PMID:25153298

Kumar, Devvarta; Nizamie, S Haque; Abhishek, Priyadarshee; Prasanna, Lavanya Tumkur

2014-12-01

47

SRS environmental technology development field test platform  

SciTech Connect

A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A. [and others

1995-09-01

48

Witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing  

SciTech Connect

It would seem with the advent of electronic measurement and electronic custody transfer of natural gas and other petroleum products that witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing would become an obsolete practice in the petroleum industry. This however, is not the case. Due to low volume measurement, remote locations, dollar cost of electronic measurement, and arrangements between companies regarding electronic custody, transfer, witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing will continue to be an integral part of the petroleum industry`s future. Even as technology moves forward and electronic measurement becomes common within the petroleum industry, electronic hardware used in measurement will, like the orifice recorder, only be a secondary measuring device. The meter tube and orifice plate will continue to be the primary measuring device. Due to these circumstances witnessing orifice meter calibration and field testing will also continue to be important even though some emphasis will be shifted to witnessing field testing of electronic equipment. The information in this paper is not meant to be an absolute, but, to be used as a guide in witnessing and field testing orifice meters. There are many variables in testing that. due to the length of this paper, will not be discussed.

Woods, D. [Tennessee Gas Pipeline, Cleveland, TX (United States)

1995-12-01

49

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25

50

Test of quantum nonlocality for cavity fields  

E-print Network

There have been studies on formation of quantum-nonlocal states in spatially separate two cavities. We suggest a nonlocal test for the field prepared in the two cavities. We couple classical driving fields with the cavities where a nonlocal state is prepared. Two independent two-level atoms are then sent through respective cavities to interact off-resonantly with the cavity fields. The atomic states are measured after the interaction. Bell's inequality can be tested by the joint probabilities of two-level atoms being in their excited or ground states. We find that quantum nonlocality can also be tested using a single atom sequentially interacting with the two cavities. Potential experimental errors are also considered. We show that with the present experimental condition of 5% error in the atomic velocity distribution, the violation of Bell's inequality can be measured.

M. S. Kim; Jinhyoung Lee

2000-02-25

51

Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.  

PubMed

The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

1983-04-01

52

Field Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Field Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) offers broadly applicable, self-contained modular classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and discipline-specific tools for science, technology, engineering, and math performance. Each has been developed, tested, and refined in real college and university classrooms. The FLAG also contains an assessment primer and a section to help teachers select the most appropriate assessment technique(s) for their course goals, and other resources.

53

Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation.

Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

1980-09-22

54

Teen Driver Support System Field Operational Test  

E-print Network

Teen Driver Support System Field Operational Test Preliminary Results (First 24 weeks) JanetFIRST Laboratory #12;Minnesota Department of Transportation Susan Sheehan MnDOT Technical Liaison #12;The U.S. Teen #12;Factors that Can Increase Teen Driver Fatality Risk · Speeding · Not Using Seat Belt · Teen

Minnesota, University of

55

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS  

E-print Network

: Greg Watson and Mark Lott · C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel · Chabot Space AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive

56

Identification of Significant Features by the Global Mean Rank Test  

PubMed Central

With the introduction of omics-technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, numerous methods for the reliable identification of significantly regulated features (genes, proteins, etc.) have been developed. Experimental practice requires these tests to successfully deal with conditions such as small numbers of replicates, missing values, non-normally distributed expression levels, and non-identical distributions of features. With the MeanRank test we aimed at developing a test that performs robustly under these conditions, while favorably scaling with the number of replicates. The test proposed here is a global one-sample location test, which is based on the mean ranks across replicates, and internally estimates and controls the false discovery rate. Furthermore, missing data is accounted for without the need of imputation. In extensive simulations comparing MeanRank to other frequently used methods, we found that it performs well with small and large numbers of replicates, feature dependent variance between replicates, and variable regulation across features on simulation data and a recent two-color microarray spike-in dataset. The tests were then used to identify significant changes in the phosphoproteomes of cancer cells induced by the kinase inhibitors erlotinib and 3-MB-PP1 in two independently published mass spectrometry-based studies. MeanRank outperformed the other global rank-based methods applied in this study. Compared to the popular Significance Analysis of Microarrays and Linear Models for Microarray methods, MeanRank performed similar or better. Furthermore, MeanRank exhibits more consistent behavior regarding the degree of regulation and is robust against the choice of preprocessing methods. MeanRank does not require any imputation of missing values, is easy to understand, and yields results that are easy to interpret. The software implementing the algorithm is freely available for academic and commercial use. PMID:25119995

Hoffmann, Daniel; Schaab, Christoph

2014-01-01

57

Asteroid Dynamical Families: a Reliability Test for Two Identification Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since a couple of years the asteroid families are under the light of a renewed interest. This is due to the simultaneous improvement of the techniques of proper elements computation and of the methods of classification. Recently, two different cluster analysis methods (Zappalà et al. 1990; Bendjoya et al. 1991) have provided two very similar lists of asteroid families. This has brought a renewed confidence on the reliability of asteroid families classification. Since a new set of improved proper elements is now available (Milani & Kneževi? 1992), the idea of the present work is to test the two identification methods by means of artificially generated families in order to gain an insight into their limitations and to possibly develop improved strategies for future analyses. Different cases have been envisaged in order to study the effectiveness of the methods as a function of increasing background densities and of the spread of the families. The ability of the methods to detect peculiar features such as filaments or to separate two close families has also been tested. The number of interlopers has been determined in each case in order to evaluate their relative amount. While some improvements to the adopted procedures are suggested by the numerical tests, the results presented in the present paper are encouraging and allow us to be confident about the reliability of our previous family lists, as well as about the expected performances of the methods in future applications.

Bendjoya, P.; Cellino, A.; Froeschle, C.; Zappala, V.

1993-05-01

58

A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

2000-05-01

59

Goldstone field test activities: Target search  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

Tarter, J.

1986-01-01

60

Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test) which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel) and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their dimensionality. POD is based on projecting the full field images on a modal basis, constructed from sample simulations, and which can account for the variations of the full field as the elastic constants and other parameters of interest are varied. The fidelity of the decomposition depends on the number of basis vectors used. Typically even complex fields can be accurately represented with no more than a few dozen modes and for our problem we showed that only four or five modes are sufficient [5]. To further reduce the computational cost of the Bayesian approach we use response surface approximations of the POD coefficients of the fields. We show that 3rd degree polynomial response surface approximations provide a satisfying accuracy. The combination of POD decomposition and response surface methodology allows to bring down the computational time of the Bayesian identification to a few days. The proposed approach is applied to Moiré interferometry full field displacement measurements from a traction experiment on a plate with a hole. The laminate with a layup of [45,- 45,0]s is made out of a Toray® T800/3631 graphite/epoxy prepreg. The measured displacement maps are provided in Figure 1. The mean values of the identified properties joint probability density function are in agreement with previous identifications carried out on the same material. Furthermore the probability density function also provides the coefficient of variation with which the properties are identified as well as the correlations between the various properties. We find that while the longitudinal Young’s modulus is identified with good accuracy (low standard deviation), the Poisson’s ration is identified with much higher uncertainty. Several of the properties are also found to be correlated. The identified uncertainty structure of the elastic constants (i.e. variance co-variance matrix) has potential benefits to reliability analyses, by allowing a more accurate description of the input uncertainty. An additional advantage of the Bayesian approach is that it provides a natural way (in the form of the prior probab

Gogu, C.; Yin, W.; Haftka, R.; Ifju, P.; Molimard, J.; Le Riche, R.; Vautrin, A.

2010-06-01

61

APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

62

RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

63

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hietala, J. (Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Wendland, R.D. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Collins, F. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01

64

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-07-01

65

Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

1975-01-01

66

Leak-detection tool undergoes field tests  

SciTech Connect

A new method of detecting pipeline leaks using pressure or velocity measurements has been successfully field tested. The method, based on ''point-analysis'' technology, operates on a small number of measurements with only typical industry instrumentation. Three western U.S. pipeline operating companies allowed the method to be tested on their systems, or with data from the systems, including a 450-mile crude-oil pipeline. Statistical properties. Point-analysis technology is a method rooted in statistics. It is based on the realization that the statistical properties of a series of pressure or velocity measurements taken on a pipeline are different before and after a leak occurs. The point analyzer accumulates a series of measurements. It then performs a series of mathematical test to prove or disprove the hypothesis that a leak has occurred.

Farmer, E. (Ed Farmer and Associates Inc., Sacramento, CA (US)); Kohlrust, R. (Union Pacific Resources Co., Wilmington, CA (US)); Myers, G. (Union Pacific Resources Co., Ft. Worth, TX (US)); Verduzco, G. (San Diego Gas and Electric Co., San Diego, CA (US))

1988-12-19

67

STATUS OF THE HARLAN'S HAWK IN WASHINGTON, AND NOTES ON ITS IDENTIFICATION IN THE FIELD  

Microsoft Academic Search

IDENTIFICATION IN THE FIELD It is first necessary to say something about the identification of barlani in the field, since this is a subject of much, perhaps unnecessary, mystification. I am writing this section not only because I hope it will be of help to others, but also to show how I am able to individualize birds confidently in the

NORMAN LAVERS

1975-01-01

68

A Lightweight Process for Change Identification and Regression Test Selection in Using COTS Components  

E-print Network

1 A Lightweight Process for Change Identification and Regression Test Selection in Using COTS techniques rely on access to source code for change identification. However, when new releases of COTS- BACCI) process for selection of regression tests for user/glue code that uses COTS components. I

Young, R. Michael

69

Efficacies of rapid agglutination tests for identification of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains as Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed Central

Four commercially available rapid agglutination tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus were compared with the tube coagulase test for the identification of 300 methicillin-resistant isolates of staphylococci. Isolates tested included 207 methicillin-resistant S. aureus and 93 coagulase-negative staphylococci, collected from five medical centers. Strain variability was documented by phage typing and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results of rapid identification tests ranged between 82 and 86% sensitivity, significantly poorer than the 98% sensitivity which the tube coagulase test provided. PMID:3183033

Piper, J; Hadfield, T; McCleskey, F; Evans, M; Friedstrom, S; Lauderdale, P; Winn, R

1988-01-01

70

Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

Deficits in odor identification have been the most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predict these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ. PMID:19819272

Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G.

2014-01-01

71

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

2013-07-01

72

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

2012-07-01

73

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

2014-07-01

74

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested...

2010-07-01

75

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01

76

Reliability and validity of a talent identification test battery for seated and standing Paralympic throws.  

PubMed

Abstract Paralympic throwing events for athletes with physical impairments comprise seated and standing javelin, shot put, discus and seated club throwing. Identification of talented throwers would enable prediction of future success and promote participation; however, a valid and reliable talent identification battery for Paralympic throwing has not been reported. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of a talent identification battery for Paralympic throws. Participants were non-disabled so that impairment would not confound analyses, and results would provide an indication of normative performance. Twenty-eight non-disabled participants (13 M; 15 F) aged 23.6 years (±5.44) performed five kinematically distinct criterion throws (three seated, two standing) and nine talent identification tests (three anthropometric, six motor); 23 were tested a second time to evaluate test-retest reliability. Talent identification test-retest reliability was evaluated using Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots (Limits of Agreement). Spearman's correlation assessed strength of association between criterion throws and talent identification tests. Reliability was generally acceptable (mean ICC = 0.89), but two seated talent identification tests require more extensive familiarisation. Correlation strength (mean rs = 0.76) indicated that the talent identification tests can be used to validly identify individuals with competitively advantageous attributes for each of the five kinematically distinct throwing activities. Results facilitate further research in this understudied area. PMID:25371965

Spathis, Jemima Grace; Connick, Mark James; Beckman, Emma Maree; Newcombe, Peter Anthony; Tweedy, Sean Michael

2015-04-01

77

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-06-23

78

Field tests of a small instrumented pile  

E-print Network

vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

Korb, Kenneth Wayne

2012-06-07

79

3X-100 blade field test.  

SciTech Connect

In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

2008-03-01

80

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2011-01-01

81

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2010-01-01

82

Identification of veterinary pathogens by use of commercial identification systems and new trends in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens.  

PubMed Central

Veterinary diagnostic microbiology is a unique specialty within microbiology. Although isolation and identification techniques are similar to those used for human pathogens, many veterinary pathogens require unique cultivation or identification procedures. Commercial identification systems provide rapid, accurate identification of human pathogens. However, the accuracy of these systems with veterinary pathogens varies widely depending on the bacterial species and the host animal from which it was isolated. Increased numbers of veterinary strains or species in the data bases of the various systems would improve their accuracy. Current procedures and interpretive criteria used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens are based on guidelines used for human pathogens. The validity of these guidelines for use with veterinary pathogens has not been established. As with fastidious human pathogens, standardized methodologies and quality control isolates are needed for tests of organisms such as Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus somnus. Furthermore, interpretive criteria for veterinary antimicrobial agents based on the MIC for veterinary pathogens, the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial agent in the host animal, and in vivo efficacy of the antimicrobial agent are needed. This article reviews both the commercial identification systems evaluated with veterinary pathogens and current methods for performing and interpreting antimicrobial susceptibility tests with veterinary pathogens. Recommendations for future improvements in both areas are discussed. PMID:7923054

Watts, J L; Yancey, R J

1994-01-01

83

Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

2001-01-01

84

Statistical estimation and testing for variation root-cause identification of multistage manufacturing Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Root-cause identification for quality-related problems is a key issue in quality and productivity improvement for a manufacturing process. Unfortunately, root-cause identification is also a very challenging engineering problem, particularly for a multistage manufacturing process. In this paper, root-cause identification is formulated as a problem of estimation and hypothesis testing of a general linear mixed model. First, a linear mixed fault-quality

Shiyu Zhou; Yong Chen; Jianjun Shi

2004-01-01

85

A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

1988-01-01

86

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04

87

Perceived discrimination, group identification, and life satisfaction among multiracial people: a test of the rejection-identification model.  

PubMed

Like other racial minority groups, multiracial people face discrimination as a function of their racial identity, and this discrimination represents a threat to psychological well-being. Following the Rejection-Identification Model (RIM; Branscombe, Schmitt, & Harvey, 1999), we argue that perceived discrimination will encourage multiracial people to identify more strongly with other multiracials, and that multiracial identification, in turn, fosters psychological well-being. Thus, multiracial identification is conceptualized as a coping response that reduces the overall costs of discrimination on well-being. This study is the first to test the RIM in a sample of multiracial people. Multiracial participants' perceptions of discrimination were negatively related to life satisfaction. Consistent with the RIM, perceived discrimination was positively related to three aspects of multiracial group identification: stereotyping the self as similar to other multiracial people, perceiving people within the multiracial category as more homogenous, and expressing solidarity with the multiracial category. Self-stereotyping was the only aspect of group identification that mediated a positive relationship between perceived discrimination and life satisfaction, suggesting that multiracial identification's protective properties rest in the fact that it provides an collective identity where one "fits." PMID:23066642

Giamo, Lisa S; Schmitt, Michael T; Outten, H Robert

2012-10-01

88

Presumptive identification of sulphonamide and antibiotic residues in milk by microbial inhibitor tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A microbial procedure is described for the presumptive identification of some antibiotic and sulphonamide residues in milk. Penicillins, cephalosporins, sulphonamides and streptomycin residues are tested using three different agar media and two microorganisms. The identification is reached by enclosing in the media four different substances to reverse the normal action of the antibiotics and sulphonamides under investigation.

P. Aureli; A. M. Ferrini; V. Mannoni

1996-01-01

89

Discrimination and Identification of UXO by Geophysical Inversion. Phase II: Inversion of Total-Field Magnetics  

E-print Network

Discrimination and Identification of UXO by Geophysical Inversion. Phase II: Inversion of Total to the discrimination and identification of unexploded ordnance using total-field magnetometry. A black in a predefined library. The discrimination method had the potential to reduce the number of excavations

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

90

Identification of anisotropic tensile strength of cortical bone using Brazilian test.  

PubMed

For a proper analysis of cortical bone behaviour, it is essential to take into account both the elastic stiffness and the failure criteria. While ultrasound methods allow complete identification of the elastic orthotropic coefficients, tests used to characterise the various failure mechanisms and to identify the brittle tensile strength in all directions are currently inadequate. In the present work we propose the Brazilian test as a complement to conventional tensile tests. In fact, this experimental technique, rarely employed in the biomechanics field, has the potential to provide an accurate description of the anisotropic strength of cortical bone. Additionally, it allows us to assess the scale influence on failure behaviour which may be attributed to an intrinsic length in correlation with the cortical bone microstructure. In order to correctly set up the Brazilian test, several aspects such as the machining, the geometrical parameters of the specimen and the loading conditions were determined. The finite element method was used to evaluate the maximal tensile stress at the centre of a 2D anisotropic elastic specimen as a simple function of the loading. To validate the protocol, the Brazilian test was carried out on 29 cortical bovine cylindrical specimens with diameters ranging from 10mm to 4mm. PMID:25051151

Allena, Rachele; Cluzel, Christophe

2014-10-01

91

Star Identification Without Attitude Knowledge: Testing with X-Ray Timing Experiment Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the budget for the scientific exploration of space shrinks, the need for more autonomous spacecraft increases. For a spacecraft with a star tracker, the ability to determinate attitude from a lost in space state autonomously requires the capability to identify the stars in the field of view of the tracker. Although there have been efforts to produce autonomous star trackers which perform this function internally, many programs cannot afford these sensors. The author previously presented a method for identifying stars without a priori attitude knowledge specifically targeted for onboard computers as it minimizes the necessary computer storage. The method has previously been tested with simulated data. This paper provides results of star identification without a priori attitude knowledge using flight data from two 8 by 8 degree charge coupled device star trackers onboard the X-Ray Timing Experiment.

Ketchum, Eleanor

1997-01-01

92

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for example, a substrate is used to detect the enzyme ?-glucuronidase produced by E. coli...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for...

2012-07-01

93

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for example, a substrate is used to detect the enzyme ?-glucuronidase produced by E. coli...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for...

2011-07-01

94

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for example, a substrate is used to detect the enzyme ?-glucuronidase produced by E. coli...tests are collectively known as defined enzyme substrate tests, where, for...

2013-07-01

95

A closed-field intelligence test for rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description, photograph, training and testing procedure for the closed-field test are presented. In the standardization study the test was found to discriminate between groups of animals with cortical damage, normals, and rats raised in a \\

M. S. Rabinovitch; H. Enger Rosvold

1951-01-01

96

A Lightweight Process for Change Identification and Regression Test Selection in Using COTS Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various regression test selection techniques have been developed and have shown fault detection effectiveness. The majority of these test selection techniques rely on access to source code for change identification. However, when new releases of COTS components are made available for integration and testing, source code is often not available. In this paper we present a lightweight Integrated - Black-box

Jiang Zheng; Brian Robinson; Laurie Williams; Karen Smiley

2006-01-01

97

Automatic Identification of Common and Special Object-Oriented Unit Tests  

E-print Network

, the executions of these test inputs can be automatically verified. In addition, among generated tests, commonAutomatic Identification of Common and Special Object-Oriented Unit Tests Tao Xie taoxie, intuitively a bounded- stack class exhibits common behavior when the stack is nei- ther empty nor full

Xie, Tao

98

Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

1981-09-01

99

Testing General Relativity in the Strong-Field Dynamical Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General relativity has been well tested in the weak-field slow-motion regime of the solar system. In binary pulsar systems, tests of strong-field aspects of the theory have been carried out and will continue to improve. Testing GR in the strong-field, highly dynamical regime is becoming a dominant theme in experimental relativity. We describe a number of tests that can be carried out, including tests using astrophysical phenomena around black holes, tests using gravitational waves, and tests of black hole no-hair theorems using observations of stars orbiting our galactic center black hole.

Will, Clifford M.

2015-01-01

100

The Mehrum Coalfire Test Field (MCTF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spontaneous self ignition of coal causes an immense emission of climate relevant gases and affects regional groundwater conditions in such a large scale, that it could not be even rough estimated. This problem occurs all over the world where coal is mined, stored or processed. Keeping these things and also global warming problems in mind, the extinction of such fires becomes a significant task for future climate and environmental protection. In the big arid coal mining belt of the northwest PR China the necessity of environmental as well as resource protection is now realized, leading to increased fire fighting activities. Mostly, the burning coal is partially removed, the surface is insufficiently sealed from oxygen and fire-zones are cooled with valuable fresh water. Such cooling of fire centers is often not sustainable because oxygen rich air may keep on penetrating through the soil surface and reach the cooled down coal which subsequently starts to burn again. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" numerical models are developed to simulate the propagation of underground coal fires in realistic scenarios. These models will be adapted to new data from lab and field experiments including multiphase transport and phase transition processes. The Mehrum test site is used to set up a small scale in situ coal fire experiment in order to validate and verify the codes as well as to better understand the coal fire genesis. The experiment will be carried out under usage of two coal heaps with a total volume of about 1 m3. At the bottom, a layer of hydraulic conductive coarse gravel has been built in. Within this layer, a special ventilation system for air supplying has been embedded. The exact amount of led in air is measured by high resolution flow rate devices. The coal lies directly above the coarse gravel layer. The heating source is located in the lower forth of the coal layer. Positions of other sensors (temperature sensors, electrodes for geoelectrical measurements, gas probing tubes) are based on first numerical results. The coverage consists of a 10 cm to 15 cm strong layer of sand (middle to fine sand). Extinction of the fire by application of water with additives (e. g. salt) and its implication for the underground convection can finally be tested with these installations.

Halisch, M.; Wuttke, M. W.; Hesse, Ph.; Han, J.; Kessels, W.

2009-04-01

101

[The NEFERM-Test for identification of psychrotrophic bacteria in food].  

PubMed

Identification of gramnegative nonfermentative bacteria by traditional methods requires much labor and time consumption. Therefore in this study we tested the use of an available commercial diagnostic kit and processing of its results by computerized numerical identification systems. Identification involved 83 gramnegative, psychotrophic, nonfermentative, oxidase-positive bacteria isolated from just slaughtered and deep-frozen chickens. The strains were isolated from primary cultures in Psedomonas F and Endo agar, Violet Red Bile agar (IMUNA, OXOID) and King B agar (King et al., 1954), under two cultivation regimes (room temperature for three days and 7 degrees C for 10 days). A commercial kit for diagnostics of nonfermentative bacteria in clinical microbiology under the name NEFERM-test (Lachema a.s., Brno) containing 12 biochemical assays was used for strain identification: GLU, AGR, IND, ESL, SCI, PHS, URE, MAN, XYL, MLT, LAC, NIT. All these assays were conducted parallelly by traditional methods. Additional tests involved the use of OXI and ONPG commercial strips (Lachema a.s., Brno), gelatin and Tween 80 hydrolysis (Pácová and Kocur, 1984) and fluorescein production (King et al., 1954). These identification systems were used to process the results of tests; index and differentiation table (Lachema a.s., Brno) and numerical computerized systems TNW (Czech Collection (Z. Svoboda, Jihlava). Various shortened procedures, identification keys and systems are used to speed up identification of gramnegative nonfermentative bacteria. Available commercial identification kits (API NE20) in form of microassay have been developed particularly for diagnostics of bacteria from clinica materials, which applies to NEFERM-test of the Czech make.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793017

Urbanová, E; Pácová, Z

1995-05-01

102

Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure  

PubMed Central

Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

2014-01-01

103

CALIPERS. Planning the Systems Approach to Field Testing Educational Products.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field testing, the last step in the developmental cycle for educational products, must ascertain whether the test product, placed in a natural environment, will actually elicit the behavioral changes it was designed to effect. A systems approach to field testing requires that certain basic areas of investigation first be established. Specific…

Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

104

Rapid chemical test for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This note describes a simple, rapid, qualitative test which can be applied to solutions of drilling or chips for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel. The test is based on the orange-red compound which is formed when thiocyanate and inequivalent molybdenum react. This test is much more reliable than the potassium ethylxanthate test which has been recommended for a like purpose. A list of the apparatus and reagents which are required, and a description of the procedure follows.

Redmond, John C

1932-01-01

105

Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.  

PubMed

Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed. PMID:16844415

Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

2006-08-01

106

Modeling and identification investigation of multi-field hysteretic dynamics in flexure-guided piezo platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The completely modeling and comprehensive identification approaches of the multi-field hysteretic dynamics in the flexure-guided piezo stage are proposed in this paper. First, the system description and the experimental setup are proposed. Next, the hysteretic dynamics is completely modeled in which the static Preisach hysteresis, creep, electrical and vibration dynamics are derived from the material, electrical and mechanical fields, respectively. Then, according to the model characteristics, a comprehensive identification approach is presented. A novel technique is provided to identify the electrical and vibration dynamics. Special inputs and sampling are proposed to identify the Preisach hysteresis. Finally, the experimental study is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and identification approaches. The modeling and identification approaches in this paper will be beneficial to further developments and high-performance control of the flexure-guided piezo systems.

Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yanbin; Tang, Liang; Xu, Yufei; Bai, Yu-guang; Liao, He

2015-01-01

107

The resolution of field identification fixed points in diagonal coset theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fixed point resolution problem is solved for diagonal coset theories. The primary fields into which the fixed points are resolved are described by submodules of the branching spaces, obtained as eigenspaces of the automorphisms that implement field identification. To compute the characters and the modular S-matrix we use ‘orbit Lie algebras’ and ‘twining characters’, which were introduced in a

Jürgen Fuchs; Bert Schellekens; Christoph Schweigert

1996-01-01

108

Development of a polymerase chain reaction-probe test for identification of Alloiococcus otitis.  

PubMed

A rapid polymerase chain reaction test was developed for specific identification of the human middle ear pathogen Alloiococcus otitis. Primers for the enzymatic amplification reaction were designed from highly specific sequences within the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, a confirmatory test based on hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction products to a specific internal probe was developed. PMID:1380011

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1992-08-01

109

Development of a polymerase chain reaction-probe test for identification of Alloiococcus otitis.  

PubMed Central

A rapid polymerase chain reaction test was developed for specific identification of the human middle ear pathogen Alloiococcus otitis. Primers for the enzymatic amplification reaction were designed from highly specific sequences within the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, a confirmatory test based on hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction products to a specific internal probe was developed. Images PMID:1380011

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1992-01-01

110

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial suscep- tibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to

Karen C. Carroll; Brian D. Glanz; Anita P. Borek; Chad Burger; Hasan S. Bhally; Susan Henciak; Diane Flayhart; Merab Kekelidze; Chythanya Rajanna; Arnold Kreger; Alexander Sulakvelidze; Maryvonne Moulin-Schouleur; Catherine Schouler; Patrick Tailliez; Mu-Rong Kao; Eric Oswald; Jacques Mainil; Miguel Blanco; Roger E. Morey; Renee L. Galloway; Sandra L. Bragg; Arnold G. Steigerwalt; Leonard W. Mayer; Paul N. Levett

2006-01-01

111

A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.  

PubMed

The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol. PMID:24237835

Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

2013-11-01

112

Identification of Radioactive Pilot-Plant test requirements  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive Pilot-Plant testing needs and alternatives are evaluated for enhanced Sludge Washing and High and Low-Level Vitrification efforts. Also investigated was instrument and equipment testing needs associated with the vitrification and retrieval process. The scope of this document is to record the existing March 1994 letter report for future use. A structured Kepner-Trego{trademark} decision analysis process was used to assist analysis of the testing needs. This analysis provided various combinations of laboratory and radioactive (hot) and cold pilot testing options associated with the above need areas. Recommendations for testing requirements were made.

Powell, W.J.; Riebling, E.F.

1995-05-09

113

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23

114

Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

2011-06-01

115

Instrumental variables algorithm for modal parameter identification in flutter testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper is concerned with the task of estimating modal parameters from system response measurement in aircraft flutter testing. A frequency-domain derivation of an instrumental-variables algorithm is presented for a linear time-invariant dynamic system of order n. Basically, this algorithm fits a set of poles and zeros to the measured transfer function. An illustrative example is provided regarding the application of the algorithm to aeroelasticity testing. It is shown that the algorithm can be implemented for on-line data reduction with a microcomputer-based analysis system. By using instrumental variables the sensitivity of the modal parameter estimates to noise in the system-response measurements is reduced greatly. The algorithm is expected to be a powerful and valuable tool for on-line estimation of modal parameters in flutter testing and should be useful in control system and structural dynamics tests.

Johnson, W.; Gupta, N. K.

1978-01-01

116

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

117

FIELD-TESTING DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This article briefly reviews an extensive field study by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Penn Water Authority, which resulted in the development of a series of models to investigate contaminant propagation in a water distribution system. The application of on...

118

Design for Field Testing of Mountain-Plains Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field test design information packet was devised for use by persons representing institutions using the Mountain-Plains curriculum products. The primary purpose of field testing the curriculum is to get third party profession and student reaction to what has proved to be successful with students and instructors at Mountain-Plains. The…

England, Robert G.; Pollack, Robert M.

119

A simple, low cost application of a flight test parameter identification system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flight test system combines state-of-the-art microprocessor technology and high accuracy instrumentation with parameter identification technology which minimize data and flight time requirements. The system was designed to avoid permanent modifications of the test airplane and allow quick installation. It is capable of longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control derivative estimation. This paper presents details of this system, calibration and flight test procedures, and the results of the Cessna 172 flight test program. The system has proven easy to install, simple to operate, and capable of accurate estimation of stability and control parameters in the Cessna 172 flight tests.

Clarke, R.; Roskam, J.

1982-01-01

120

Flight test design for CH-47 parameter identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program is a significant experimental research program aimed at establishing a data base for rotorcraft operation in a terminal area environment. Work was undertaken to determine helicopter math models suitable for analyzing maneuvers along a VTOL trajectory and to apply these math models to determine the flight test procedures of greatest effectiveness in establishing helicopter dynamic characteristics in this mode of operation. As the principal result of this investigation, a flight test specification is presented for the CH-47 VALT aircraft operating along the specified VTOL trajectory of the VALT program.

Hall, W. E., Jr.; Vincent, J.

1978-01-01

121

Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory  

E-print Network

It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

2008-07-26

122

Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test  

SciTech Connect

The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

Giangiacomo, L.A.

1999-05-28

123

Genetic algorithms for nondestructive testing in crack identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method to identify the nature of a crack on the surface of a region using nondestructive testing (NDT) and inverse problem methodology is presented. A genetic algorithm (GA) based approach, which involves a global search to avoid local minima, is presented and applied to solve the inverse problem of identifying the position, shape and the orientation of a surface

A. A. Arkadan; T. Sareen; S. Subramaniam

1994-01-01

124

Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program  

EPA Science Inventory

As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a ?Toxicity Identification Evaluation? (TIE), which is the focus of this...

125

Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor  

DOEpatents

A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

Smith, Desmond J. (Oakland, CA); Rubin, Edward M. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01

126

FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

1983-01-01

127

Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ˜500 m2 s-1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport.

Roche, T.; McWilliams, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E. P.; Morehouse, M.; Slepchenkov, M.; Wessel, F.

2014-08-01

128

Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

1973-01-01

129

Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

2006-01-01

130

Identification of Brucella abortus, B. canis, B. melitensis, and B. suis by carbon substrate assimilation tests.  

PubMed

By using the results of seven carbon substrate assimilation tests from the Biotype 100 system (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Etoile, France), we correctly identified 79 (85.9%) of 92 Brucella strains tested. The specificity of the method varied from 97.4 to 100% depending on the species. Although a biological safety cabinet must be used, this method represents an easy and fast alternative for the identification of Brucella species. PMID:11348772

López-Merino, A; Monnet, D L; Hernández, I; Sánchez, N L; Boeufgras, J M; Sandoval, H; Freney, J

2001-06-22

131

Internal consistency reliability of the fractionated and whole University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal consistency reliability (ICR) of the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and\\u000a its 10-, 20-, and 30-item fractions was explored, as well as the relationships between the fractions and the entire 40-item\\u000a test. Pearson correlation coefficients (rs) were computed among all independent combinations and permutations of the four 10-item UPSIT booklets using data from 774\\u000a subjects.

Richard L. Doty; Richard E. Frye; Udayan Agrawal

1989-01-01

132

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

133

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1997-01-01

134

X-ray identifications of FIRST radio sources in the XBoötes field  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the goal of investigating the nature and the environment of the faint radio sources (at mJy level), here are presented results of X-ray identifications of Faint Imaging Radio Survey at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) in the 9 deg2 Boötes field of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS), using data from the Chandra XBoötes survey. A

K. El Bouchefry

2009-01-01

135

Field tests assess novel air-injection EOR processes  

SciTech Connect

Two ongoing field tests are assessing novel air-injection processes, in situ combustion, for enhancing oil recovery from light and heavy oil fields. Amoco Producing Co. operates the light oil test in the West Hackberry field in Cameron Parish, La. This test combines air injection with the double-displacement process. The other test is Amoco Canada Petroleum Co.`s air-injection project that involves a variation on steam-assisted gravity drainage in horizontal wells. The test is in a thin pay zone containing heavy oil in the Wabasca area, about 250 km north of Edmonton. Also in its research facility in Tulsa, Amoco is conducting laboratory tests to develop ways for mitigating the risks of air injection.

Fassihi, M.R.; Gillham, T.H. [Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States); Yannimaras, D.V. [Amoco E and P Technology Group, Tulsa, OK (United States); Hassan, D. [Amoco Canada Petroleum Co., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-05-20

136

Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

2002-01-01

137

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

SciTech Connect

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

2011-01-17

138

Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In today's educational system, most science and engineering graduate students enter teaching careers with little or no teaching experience, and then are buried with so many competing responsibilities that their teaching skills take many years to improve. At the same time, incoming college students bring years of accumulated learning experiences (and attitudes) to their learning expectations. This Website offers classroom-tested methods for assessing the learning environment in college classrooms -- the first step to better teaching AND learning. Provided by the National Institute for Science Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the FLAG Website is intended for college and university instructors in the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) disciplines. The Guide offers up-to-date assessment tools "for instructors who have an interest in sharing and implementing new approaches to evaluating student learning, attitudes and performance." Four main sections encompass the site's main objectives and resources. For an explanation of why assessment is useful and necessary, see Getting Started. Setting course goals and matching those goals with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT)s are described in the subsequent sections; discipline-specific assessment techniques are contained in Searchable Tools; and the Resources section provides additional materials on assessment. This Website offers excellent and much-needed material, and will be useful to any educators (new or seasoned) who wish to improve their class learning levels.

139

Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.  

PubMed

The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

2013-02-01

140

Full-Field Strain Measurement and Identification of Composites Moduli at High Strain Rate with the Virtual Fields Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper deals with full-field strain measurement on glass\\/epoxy composite tensile specimens submitted to high strain\\u000a rate loading through a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device and with the identification of their mechanical properties.\\u000a First, the adopted methodology is presented: the device, including an Ultra-High Speed camera, and the experimental procedure\\u000a to obtain relevant displacement maps are described. The

R. Moulart; F. Pierron; S. R. Hallett; M. R. Wisnom

2011-01-01

141

Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

142

Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests  

SciTech Connect

This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided.

Webb, R.H.

1994-10-01

143

Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

Ratajczak, A. F.

1985-01-01

144

Reservoir Characterization Constrained to Well Test Data: A Field Example  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a method to integrate well test,production, shut-in pressure, log, core, and geological data toobtain a reservoir description for the Pagerungan Field,offshore Indonesia. The method computes spatialdistributions of permeability and porosity and generates apressure response for comparison to field data. This techniqueproduced a good match with well test data from three wellsand seven shut-in pressures. The permeability and

J. L. Landa; M. M. Kamal; C. D. Jenkins; R. N. Horne

1996-01-01

145

Comparison of modal parameter identification algorithms based on shaking table model test data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modal parameter identification is the critical component for structural damage detection and structural health monitoring. Although a lot of identification algorithms have been developed, there are still some problems in terms of their accuracy and effectiveness. For example, for rational fractional polynomial method and orthogonal polynomial method, which are based on fitting measured frequency response functions, the former is disturbed by ill-conditioned solution and misfit while the latter is obsessed by precision loss with transformation of base function. On the other hand, for algorithms in time domain, such as eigensystem realization algorithm and stochastic subspace identification, construction of Henkel matrix and determination of system order are the main issues with which no general methods to deal up to now. In order to compare the similarities and discrepancies of different modal identification algorithms, the data taken from a shaking table test on a 12-storey reinforced concrete frame model are processed using selected rational fraction polynomial method in frequency domain and eigensystem realization algorithm in time domain. The comparison of the identification results is further discussed.

Han, Jianping; Lu, Xilin; Wang, Feixing

2008-11-01

146

Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

2013-01-01

147

A test pattern identification algorithm and its application to CINRAD/SA(B) data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A variety of faulty radar echoes may cause serious problems with radar data applications, especially radar data assimilation and quantitative precipitation estimates. In this study, "test pattern" caused by test signal or radar hardware failures in CINRAD (China New Generation Weather Radar) SA and SB radar operational observations are investigated. In order to distinguish the test pattern from other types of radar echoes, such as precipitation, clear air and other non-meteorological echoes, five feature parameters including the effective reflectivity data percentage ( R Z), velocity RF (range folding) data percentage ( R RF), missing velocity data percentage ( R M), averaged along-azimuth reflectivity fluctuation and averaged along-beam reflectivity fluctuation are proposed. Based on the fuzzy logic method, a test pattern identification algorithm is developed, and the statistical results from all the different kinds of radar echoes indicate the performance of the algorithm. Analysis of two typical cases with heavy precipitation echoes located inside the test pattern are performed. The statistical results show that the test pattern identification algorithm performs well, since the test pattern is recognized in most cases. Besides, the algorithm can effectively remove the test pattern signal and retain strong precipitation echoes in heavy rainfall events.

Jiang, Yuan; Liu, Liping

2014-03-01

148

The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

1995-01-01

149

Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

1998-01-01

150

Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

2013-01-01

151

DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

152

Staphylococcus aureus identification: thermonuclease agar for direct testing of blood isolates and a new slide agglutination test.  

PubMed

Simulated blood cultures were used to evaluate Thermonuclease agar (Remel) for distinguishing Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) without subculture to agar media, and a new slide agglutination test (Staphylochrome; Innovative Diagnostic Systems) was evaluated for its ability to distinguish S. aureus from CNS after growth on blood agar. A total of 125 S. aureus and 124 CNS isolates were tested by each method. Reference identification methods included tube coagulase, thermonuclease detection from solid media, and biochemical characterization. Direct thermonuclease testing with simulated blood cultures correctly identified all 249 isolates. Staphylochrome correctly identified 121 of 125 S. aureus and all CNS isolates. S. aureus was reliably distinguished from CNS by both tests evaluated in this study. PMID:10149420

McDowell, B; Papasian, C J

1991-01-01

153

A COMMON COIL MAGNET FOR TESTING HIGH FIELD SUPERCONDUCTORS.  

SciTech Connect

A one-meter long magnet has been fabricated to provide background field for testing racetrack shaped coils made from high field materials such as Nb{sub 3}Sn, Nb{sub 3}Al and the new high temperature superconductors, BSCCO and YBCO. The magnet is of the double aperture common coil type and uses high current Nb-Ti main coils to produce an applied field of approximately 7T on inner coils fabricated from pre-reacted tape conductors. The performance of the magnet is summarized along with test results from insert coils wound from Nb{sub 3}Sn ribbon conductor.

GHOSH,A.K.; COZZOLINO,J.P.; HARRISON,M.A.; SAMPSON,W.B.; WANDERER,P.J.

1999-03-29

154

An observational test of magnetospheric field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

The configuration of the geomagnetic field is an indicator of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical magnetospheric field models are currently in use which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. Here, the global nature of the Tsyganenko 89 [Tsyganenko, 1989] magnetospheric magnetic field model is tested by comparison of the model-predicted field orientations with the field orientations derived simultaneously at two different locations in geosynchronous orbit from the axis of symmetry of the plasma electron distribution function (30 eV--40 keV). The results for the particular time interval studied are inconclusive because the Tsyganenko 89 model does not describe the field at one of the satellites well enough, but the procedure itself appears promising.

Thomsen, M.F.; Weiss, L.A.; McComas, D.J.; Moldwin, M.B.; Reeves, G.D.

1994-07-01

155

Identification of diffusive transport properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels from reservoir test.  

PubMed

In this paper the identification of diffusion coefficient, retardation factor and surface distribution coefficient for selected salts in poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels is performed. The identification of the transport parameters is based on the previously developed inverse problem technique using experimental data from the reservoir test and the solution of the diffusive transport equation with linear equilibrium sorption. The estimated values of diffusion coefficient are: for physiological fluid (6.30±0.10)×10(-10) m(2)/s, for 1 M NaCl (6.42±0.39)×10(-10) m(2)/s, and for 1 M KCl (7.94±0.38)×10(-10) m(2)/s. The retardation factor for all tested materials and salts is equal or close to one. The average value of the effective surface distribution coefficient is equal to 0.5. PMID:24094156

Kazimierska-Drobny, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Mariusz

2013-12-01

156

Ambient vibration testing of historic masonry towers for structural identification and damage assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of the ambient-vibration based investigations carried out to assess the structural conditions of a masonry bell-tower are presented. The tower, dating back to the XVII century and about 74m high, is characterised by the presence of major cracks on the western and eastern load-bearing walls.The assessment procedure includes full-scale ambient vibration testing, modal identification from ambient vibration responses,

C. Gentile; A. Saisi

2007-01-01

157

Validation Studies of an Immunochromatographic 1Step Test for the Forensic Identification of Human Blood  

Microsoft Academic Search

An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the de- tection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The fol- lowing experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensi- tivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extrac- tion media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in

Manfred N. Hochmeister; Bruce Budowle; Rebecca Sparkes; Oskar Rudin; Christian Gehrig; Michael Thali; Lars Schmidt; Adrien Cordier; Richard Dirnhofer

158

Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS™) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D®).

Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

2007-04-01

159

Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D sonic anemometer  

E-print Network

Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D: Measurements with three 1D sonics and one azimuth sensor Advantage: Pure virginal wind in front of wind turbine purely on "CFD calibration" Comparison Spinner Anemometer with 3D sonic Scalar Vector Wind Speed 0 2 4 6

160

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

161

Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

1983-12-01

162

Field testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: spent fuel test and radionuclide migration experiments  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests in the Climax Stock are being conducted. The Climax Stock, a granitic instrusive, has been administratively excluded from consideration as a full-scale repository site. However, it provides a readily available facility for field testing with high-level radioactive materials at a depth (420 m) approaching that of a repository. The major test activity in the 1980 fiscal year has been initiation of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). This test, which was authorized in June 1978, is designed to evaluate the generic feasibility of geologic storage and retrievability of commercial power reactor spent fuel assemblies in a granitic medium. In addition, the test is configured and instrumented to provide thermal and thermomechanical response data that will be relevant to the design of a repository in hard crystalline rock. The other field activity in the Climax Stock is a radionuclide migration test. It combines a series of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of existing hydrologic models for pretest predictions and data interpretation. Goals of this project are to develop: (1) field measurement techniques for radionuclide migration studies in a hydrologic regime where the controlling mechanism is fracture permeability; (2) field test data on radionuclide migration; and (3) a comparison of laboratory- and field-measured retardation factors. This radionuclide migration test, which was authorized in the middle of the 1980 fiscal year, is in the preliminary design phase. The detailed program plan was prepared and subjected to formal peer review in August. In September/October researchers conducted preliminary flow tests with water in selected near-vertical fractures intersected by small horizontal boreholes. These tests were needed to establish the range of pressures, flow rates, and other operating parameters to be used in conducting the nuclide migration tests. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

Ballou, L.B.; Isherwood, D.J.; Patrick, W.C.

1982-12-31

163

Field joint protection system rain qualification test report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) rain test. This test was performed to validate that the flight configuration FJPS prevents the accumulation of moisture in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joints when subjected to simulated prelaunch natural rain environments. The FJPS test article was exposed to rain simulation for approximately 50 minutes. During the test, water entered through the open upper end of the systems tunnel and was funneled down between the tunnel and case. A sealant void at the moisture seal butt splice allowed this water to flow underneath the FJPS. The most likely cause of voids was improper bondline preparation, particularly on the moisture seal surface. In total, water penetrated underneath approximately 60 percent of the FJPS circumference. Because the test article was substantially different from flight configuration (no systems tunnel closeout), results of this test will not affect current flight motors. Due to the omission of systems tunnel covers and systems tunnel floor plate closeout, the test assembly was not representative of flight hardware and resulted in a gross overtest. It is therefore recommended that the test be declared void. It is also recommended that the test be repeated with a complete closeout of the systems tunnel, sealed systems tunnel ends, and improved adhesive bondline preparation.

Cook, M.

1989-01-01

164

Chromogenic Tube Test for Presumptive Identification or Confirmation of Isolates as Candida albicans  

PubMed Central

This report describes a new, modified, simple, and cost-effective method for the use of CHROMagar Candida (CHROMagar Company, Paris, France) for the presumptive identification of isolates as Candida albicans after preliminary growth. Sixty randomly selected clinical isolates were evaluated, including 38 of C. albicans. With incubation at 37°C for 24 h, the sensitivity and specificity appeared to be excellent and the test performed better than the traditional germ tube test. However, at earlier times, C. tropicalis isolates gave false-positive results. PMID:9542961

Merlino, John; Tambosis, Evanthia; Veal, Duncan

1998-01-01

165

Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects  

SciTech Connect

In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

NONE

1999-07-01

166

Development of normative data for the brazilian adaptation of the university of pennsylvania smell identification test.  

PubMed

It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms. PMID:25547105

Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; Santos, Clayson Alan Dos; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

2015-02-01

167

Development of a field test for upper-body power.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

2001-05-01

168

Dielectric EM Field Probes for HPM Test & Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

To meet test and evaluation needs for high power microwave (HPM), we describe developments on miniature all-dielectric optical E-field sensors with flat RF sensing response from ~ MHz to 12 GHz, with negligible field perturbation, good sensitivity (~2V\\/m), and >100dB dynamic range. Initial devices use a 20 mm long sensing region in an integrated optical (IO) waveguide Mach- Zehnder interferometer

Richard Forber; W. C. Wang; De-Yu Zang; Stephen Schultz; Richard Selfridge

169

I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays  

E-print Network

Subject: Computer Science forint TESTING OF FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS A Thesis by LAN ZHAO Submitted to Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...: Fabrizio Lombardi (Co-Chair o Committee) Duncan M. Walker (Co-Chair of Committee) J. Pineda a Gyvez (Memberg. -. Richard A. Volz (Head of Department) August 1997 Major Subject: Computer Science ABSTRACT I~~q Testing of Field Programmable Gate...

Zhao, Lan

2012-06-07

170

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

171

U.S. field testing programs and results  

SciTech Connect

The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

Wicks, G.G.

2000-06-09

172

Identification of 22 Legionella species and 33 serogroups with the slide agglutination test.  

PubMed Central

We used the slide agglutination test to determine the serologic relationships of 22 Legionella spp. representing 33 serogroups. Antisera prepared against 14 of the Legionella spp. contained cross-reactive antibodies (1+ or greater) at their working dilutions. Numerous cross-reactions were observed for the blue-white fluorescing Legionella spp. With only three exceptions in the latter group, cross-reactive antibodies were removed by absorption, thereby producing serogroup-specific antisera. For screening tests or for identification only to the genus level, nine polyvalent antiserum pools were prepared. Routine use of slide agglutination test reagents should expand the number of Legionella spp. that can be identified in the clinical laboratory and, at the same time, provide a simpler, less costly test procedure. PMID:3998110

Thacker, W L; Plikaytis, B B; Wilkinson, H W

1985-01-01

173

Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

1999-01-01

174

78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant AGENCY: Animal and Plant...and then to field test, an unlicensed DNA Immunostimulant recommended for reduction...LLC, Animal Health Division. Product: DNA Immunostimulant. Possible Field Test...

2013-09-24

175

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor (K); L Production Reactor (L); N Production Reactor (N); Oak Ridge...

2014-01-01

176

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II); Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor (K); L Production Reactor (L); N Production Reactor (N); Oak Ridge...

2011-01-01

177

Development of an anaerobic capacity test for field sport athletes.  

PubMed

Maximally accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) has been argued to be currently the best non-invasive method for estimating anaerobic capacity (Medbø et al., 1988, Ramsbottom et al., 1997). An easy to administer field test that could accurately predict MAOD, would be of great use to many field sport athletes and coaches. Fifteen male rugby union players undertook MAOD testing (99.4 +/- 16.9ml x kg(-1)) on a treadmill using a modification of procedure 3 as described by Medbø et al. (1988). All subjects also performed a 300m Shuttle Run Test (66.7 +/- 2.2s), run over a 20m distance. Analysis of the MAOD and 300m Shuttle Run Test time relationship revealed a significant correlation of r = -0.69 [p<0.01). Furthermore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that when subjects were split into 'good' and 'poor' groups based on 300m Shuttle Run Test times, the times distinguished between 'good' and 'poor' MAOD values (P<0.05). The findings of the present study support the validity of the 300m Shuttle Run Test as a useful estimate of anaerobic capacity in football athletes. Unexplained variance could be due to speed and agility factors associated with the 300m Shuttle Run Test. Methodological issues pertaining to the accurate assessment of MAOD are also discussed. PMID:14609144

Moore, A; Murphy, A

2003-09-01

178

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF COPPER CYANIDE RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field tests of reverse osmosis (RO) were conducted on copper cyanide rinse waters at two different sites: Whyco Chromium Co. and New England Plating Co. At both sites, closed-loop treatment was used with plating chemicals recycled to the bath and purified water recycled to the ri...

179

Infrared smoke field testing system based on computer calculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to study the infrared smoke interference performance in the field experiment, a set of infrared smoke testing system is introduced and discussed. The System works during the whole process of observation, from the smoke formation to its dissipation. According to the thermal image, the system could evaluate the interference performance of smoke screen to the target through computer calculation on Matlab program.

Tang, Runze; Li, Shichuan; Cui, Yuling; Dong, Ningyu; Zhang, Tonglai; Zhou, Zunning

2014-02-01

180

MISSISSIPPI COTTON YIELD MONITOR: THREE YEARS OF FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mississippi cotton yield monitor, which is based on an optical cotton-flow sensor comprised of emitters and detectors in one unit that can be affixed to only one side of a pneumatic duct, has been under development at Mississippi State University since 1999. One prototype of the yield monitor was field tested that year in Mississippi. In 2000, three prototypes

J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui

181

Field test and data analysis for PII IMU gyrocompassing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PERSHING PII Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a new IMU for PERSHING missiles, features the capability of automatic azimuth determination. This mode of operation, often referred to as gyrocompassing, allows determination of the heading azimuth of the down-range accelerometer's input axis for targeting without using external reference equipment or operating personnel. The PII IMU field gyrocompassing test is described, which

H. V. White; J. C. Hung

1978-01-01

182

Testing of uncustomized segmented channel field programmable gate arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a methodology for production-time testing of (uncustomized) segmented channel field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) such as those manufactured by Actel. The principles of this methodology are based on configuring the uncommitted modules (made of sequential and combinational logic circuits) of the FPGA as a set of disjoint one-dimensional arrays similar to iterative logic arrays (ILAs). These arrays

Tong Liu; Wei-Kang Huang; Fabrizio Lombardi

1995-01-01

183

Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of

Timothy J. O'gorman; John M. Ross; Allen H. Taber; James F. Ziegler; Hans P. Muhlfeld; Charles J. Montrose; Huntington W. Curtis; James L. Walsh

1996-01-01

184

Enhancing Building Operations through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of HVAC systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set

Srinivas Katipamula; Michael R. Brambley; Nathan N. Bauman; Robert G. Pratt

2003-01-01

185

FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

186

Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

Ramirez, A.L. [ed.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

1991-08-01

187

Lorentz breaking Effective Field Theory and observational tests  

E-print Network

Analogue models of gravity have provided an experimentally realizable test field for our ideas on quantum field theory in curved spacetimes but they have also inspired the investigation of possible departures from exact Lorentz invariance at microscopic scales. In this role they have joined, and sometime anticipated, several quantum gravity models characterized by Lorentz breaking phenomenology. A crucial difference between these speculations and other ones associated to quantum gravity scenarios, is the possibility to carry out observational and experimental tests which have nowadays led to a broad range of constraints on departures from Lorentz invariance. We shall review here the effective field theory approach to Lorentz breaking in the matter sector, present the constraints provided by the available observations and finally discuss the implications of the persisting uncertainty on the composition of the ultra high energy cosmic rays for the constraints on the higher order, analogue gravity inspired, Lorentz violations.

Stefano Liberati

2012-03-19

188

Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2-4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells' cultures margins).

Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanis?aw; Siero?, Aleksander; Paw?owska–Góral, Katarzyna; Cie?lar, Grzegorz; Siero?–Sto?tny, Karolina

2013-04-01

189

Field test of a high efficiency, automatic defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the market evaluation and field test portion of a program to design, develop, and demonstrate a high efficiency, automatic defrosting refrigerator-freezer for the residential market. After the successful completion of Phase I of the program, which concentrated on the design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) high-efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, Phase II was initiated in February 1979 to evaluate the sales potential and performance of the high-efficiency refrigerator concept under field conditions, as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. In Phase I, a survey of food consumption and storage trends, family size, and consumer buying habits led to a sales-weighted average-capacity forecast for 1985 of approximately 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) and identification of the top-mount, automatic defrosting refrigerator as the projected sales leader. To meet this market demand, a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) top-mount was selected as the baseline for the Phase I design and development. In Phase II, a 509 1 (18 ft/sup 3/) unit using Phase I technology was chosen for the field test, since the slightly larger model better fit the participating manufacturer's new product development efforts and market.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01

190

Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

2014-11-01

191

The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation  

E-print Network

We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The test is particularly suitable to recognise non-statistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events which would not be expected if all events evolve according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

Ivan Melo; Boris Tomasik; Giorgio Torrieri; Sascha Vogel; Marcus Bleicher; Samuel Korony; Mikulas Gintner

2009-02-10

192

Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation  

SciTech Connect

We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The test is particularly suited to recognizing nonstatistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events that would not be expected if all events evolved according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

Melo, Ivan [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physics Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 11, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Torrieri, Giorgio [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogel, Sascha; Bleicher, Marcus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Korony, Samuel [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Gintner, Mikulas [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)

2009-08-15

193

Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

Littell, Justin D.

2010-01-01

194

A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. Abstract: The Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique (Latham et al 2008) hypothesizes that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre seawater particles can enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and increase cloud albedo. Here, we propose a set of field tests to critically assess the efficacy of the MCB geoengineering proposal over a limited area. The tests are de minimus with respect to their climate effects. The tests involve three phases, with increasing logistical complexity, each of which is designed to test one or more important components of the cloud brightening scheme. Each involves the introduction and monitoring of controlled aerosol perturbations from one or more ship-based seeding platforms up to a limited area of 100x100 km2. A suite of observational platforms of increasing number and complexity, including aircraft, ships and satellites, will observe the aerosol plume and in the later experiments the cloud and albedo responses to the aerosol perturbations. These responses must include the necessary cloud physical and chemical processes which determine the efficacy of the cloud brightening scheme. Since these processes are also central to the broader problem of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, such field tests would have significant benefits for climate science in addition to providing a critical test of the MCB hypothesis. Such field experiments should be designed and conducted in an objective manner within the framework of emerging geoengineering research governance structures. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137

Gadian, A.; Wood, R.; Coe, H.; Latham, J.

2011-12-01

195

System Identification and Signal Processing for PID Control of B0 Shim Systems in Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Applications  

E-print Network

System Identification and Signal Processing for PID Control of B0 Shim Systems in Ultra-High Field identification; parameter optimization; smoothing filters; phase-locked loop; Hurwitz criterion; PID controllers

196

Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

Burke, Edmund J.

197

Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal  

PubMed Central

Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as “retests,” beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

2013-01-01

198

Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

1996-09-01

199

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01

200

Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters  

PubMed Central

Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs?=??0.65 and ?0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min?1) and relative (mL·kg?1·min?1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs?=??0.79 to 0.55 and ?0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg?1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

2013-01-01

201

Field and laboratory test plan for improving refrigerator/freezer energy testing procedures  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the Phase I tasks of ASHRAE Research Project, RP-427, ''Determination of Validity of Refrigerator/Freezer Energy Testing.'' Refrigerators, refrigerator/freezers, and freezers sold in the United States are currently required to display a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) label that lists the estimated yearly energy cost of operating the appliance, determined from a Department of Energy (DOE) defined laboratory test standard procedure. As design features for refrigerator/freezeres have been improved to increase energy efficiency, the present DOE test procedure has not been evaluated to determine the effect on energy consumption experienced in the field. The relative change in field energy consumption due to these changes in design parameters, such as insulation thickness or compressor efficiencies, may not be reflected in DOE test results. As new design features are added to the appliances, a determination must be made as to their benefit to the consumer. It was concluded that the validity of the present test procedure could not be characterized. To determine whether the present procedure is valid, a field test program and a modified laboratory experimental program were developed to determine the expected ''average'' field (household) energy consumption as a function of physical and design parameters.

Stewart, W.E.

1987-06-01

202

Blind Field Test Evaluation of Raman Spectroscopy as a Forensic Tool  

SciTech Connect

Analytical instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy has advanced rapidly in recent years to the point where commercial field-portable instruments are available. Raman analysis with portable instrumentation is a new capability that can provide emergency response teams with on-site evaluation of hazardous materials. Before Raman analysis is accepted and implemented in the field, realistic studies applied to unknown samples need to be performed to define the reliability of this technique. Studies described herein provide a rigorous blind field test that utilizes 2 instruments and 2 operators to analyze a matrix that consists of 58 unknown samples. Samples were searched against a custom hazardous materials reference library[Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) Spectral Library Database]. Experimental design included a number of intentionally difficult situations including binary solvent mixtures and a variety of compounds that yield medium quality spectra that were not contained in the HMRU library. Results showed that over 97% of the samples were correctly identified with no occurrences of false positive identifications (compounds that were not in the library were never identified as library constituents). Statistical analysis indicated equivalent performance for both the operators and instruments. These results indicate a high level of performance that should extrapolate to actual field situations. Implementation of Raman techniques to emergency field situations should proceed with a corresponding level of confidence.

Harvey, Scott D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E. (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Lee, Richard N. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Bob W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2001-12-01

203

Corrosion inhibitor screening tests and selection for field applications  

SciTech Connect

Organic corrosion inhibitors have been widely used in oil and gas wells, pipelines, gathering lines and process facilities to inhibit corrosion for quite some time. This paper describes and discusses laboratory screening test parameters and methods for evaluating and selecting corrosion inhibitors for use in downhole and pipeline corrosion inhibitions or mitigations. Field application results of the laboratory selected inhibitors are presented to illustrate the consistency of the selected inhibitor in field applications. The inhibitor adverse effect in various conditions and environments are also discussed.

Wu, Y. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-12-31

204

Chameleon fields: awaiting surprises for tests of gravity in space.  

PubMed

We present a novel scenario where a scalar field acquires a mass which depends on the local matter density: the field is massive on Earth, where the density is high, but is essentially free in the solar system, where the density is low. All existing tests of gravity are satisfied. We predict that near-future satellite experiments could measure an effective Newton's constant in space different from that on Earth, as well as violations of the equivalence principle stronger than currently allowed by laboratory experiments. PMID:15525066

Khoury, Justin; Weltman, Amanda

2004-10-22

205

A new integrated neutron/gamma radioisotope identification device evaluated under mixed radiation fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hand-Held RadioIsotope Identification Devices (HHRIID) are defined as a new class of portable neutron/gamma radiation detectors with specifications presented in the ANSI Standards N42.33 and N42.34. We have proposed a novel HHRIID design concept which uses a single photosensor to detect light emitted by two optically separated scintillator materials, one optimized for gamma detection and the other optimized for neutron detection. This work describes the performance of a modified charge integration discrimination method developed to test the viability of the new design. The scintillators chosen for the experiment were LYSO and ZnS:Ag/LiF.

Ivan, Adrian; Clothier, Brent A.; McDevitt, Daniel B.; Williams, James

2008-04-01

206

Testing numerical implementations of strong-field electrodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We test current numerical implementations of laser-matter interactions by comparison with exact analytical results. Focusing on photon emission processes, it is found that the numerics accurately reproduce analytical emission spectra in all considered regimes, except for the harmonic structures often singled out as the most significant high-intensity (multiphoton) effects. We find that this discrepancy originates in the use of the locally constant field approximation.

Harvey, C. N.; Ilderton, A.; King, B.

2015-01-01

207

Several field tests of Abate larvicides for Aedes control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In preliminary field tests in woodlands swamps of southern Morava, ?SSR, it was found that Abate 500E at the rate 0.1 g\\/m of water surfaces killed Aëdes vexans, A. cinereus and A. sticticus larvae 3 instar during 24 hours, but in other case at the rate 0.05 g\\/m of water surfaces killed not the A. vexans pupae.In southern Morava, CSSR

Dušan Novák

1971-01-01

208

Spatial memory in rufous hummingbirds ( Selasphorus rufus ): A field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial memory abilities of free-ranging rufous hummingbirds were tested in an “open-field” analogue of a radial maze.\\u000a Eight artificial “flowers” filled with sucrose solution and arranged in a circle were placed within each bird’s feeding territory.\\u000a The birds were given two types of trial: in “free” trials, birds could choose which four of eight flowers to feed from before

S. D. Healy; T. A. Hurly

1995-01-01

209

The development and field testing of a passive mercury dosimeter  

E-print Network

performance (14, 22) under laboratory conditions. The Sipin-Environmetrics mercury dosimeter badge is a second device (10) intended to monitor exposures to mercury vapor. The working mechanism of this device is similar to that of the other commercially... for analysis will tend to increase the effects of con- tamination upon the final results. The Sipin Environmetrics mercury dosimeter badge was field-tested more extensively by Olin Corporation. Only one problem was associated with this device. Under...

Zahray, Robert Karl

1982-01-01

210

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01

211

Progressive Aerodynamic Model Identification From Dynamic Water Tunnel Test of the F-16XL Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of a general aerodynamic model that is adequate for predicting the forces and moments in the nonlinear and unsteady portions of the flight envelope has not been accomplished to a satisfactory degree. Predicting aerodynamic response during arbitrary motion of an aircraft over the complete flight envelope requires further development of the mathematical model and the associated methods for ground-based testing in order to allow identification of the model. In this study, a general nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model is presented, followed by a summary of a linear modeling methodology that includes test and identification methods, and then a progressive series of steps suggesting a roadmap to develop a general nonlinear methodology that defines modeling, testing, and identification methods. Initial steps of the general methodology were applied to static and oscillatory test data to identify rolling-moment coefficient. Static measurements uncovered complicated dependencies of the aerodynamic coefficient on angle of attack and sideslip in the stall region making it difficult to find a simple analytical expression for the measurement data. In order to assess the effect of sideslip on the damping and unsteady terms, oscillatory tests in roll were conducted at different values of an initial offset in sideslip. Candidate runs for analyses were selected where higher order harmonics were required for the model and where in-phase and out-of-phase components varied with frequency. From these results it was found that only data in the angle-of-attack range of 35 degrees to 37.5 degrees met these requirements. From the limited results it was observed that the identified models fit the data well and both the damping-in-roll and the unsteady term gain are decreasing with increasing sideslip and motion amplitude. Limited similarity between parameter values in the nonlinear model and the linear model suggest that identifiability of parameters in both terms may be a problem. However, the proposed methodology can still be used with careful experiment design and carefully selected values of angle of attack, sideslip, amplitude, and frequency of the oscillatory data.

Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Szyba, Nathan M.

2004-01-01

212

Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

1997-09-01

213

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17

214

A generalized method for the identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives from flight test data.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the application of a generalized identification method for flight test data analysis. The method is based on the maximum likelihood (ML) criterion and includes output error and equation error methods as special cases. Both the linear and nonlinear models with and without process noise are considered. The flight test data from lateral maneuvers of HL-10 and M2/F3 lifting bodies are processed to determine the lateral stability and control derivatives, instrumentation accuracies and biases. A comparison is made between the results of the output error method and the generalized ML method for M2/F3 data containing gusts. It is shown that better fits to time histories are obtained by using the generalized ML method.

Mehra, R. K.; Stepner, D. E.; Tyler, J. S., Jr.

1972-01-01

215

Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

2000-01-01

216

Choking Under the Pressure of a Positive Stereotype: Gender Identification and Self-Consciousness Moderate Men's Math Test Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly

Michael J. Tagler

2012-01-01

217

Choking Under the Pressure of a Positive Stereotype: Gender Identification and Self-Consciousness Moderate Men's Math Test Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly

Michael J. Tagler

2011-01-01

218

Normal Visual Field Tests Following Glaucomatous Visual Field Endpoints in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS)*  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare the occurrence of normal visual field (VF) tests following 2 versus 3 consecutive, abnormal reliable tests in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS). Methods: The OHTS is a prospective, multicenter, follow-up study as part of a longitudinal randomized clinical trial. Sixty-four participants (68 eyes) developed a VF primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) endpoint from 1,636 participants. We compared the proportion of normal VF tests after a VF POAG endpoint among eyes whose VF abnormality was confirmed by 2 (n=9 eyes) vs. 3 (n=59 eyes) consecutive, abnormal reliable VF tests. Results: The proportion of VF tests that were normal subsequent to a VF POAG endpoint in eyes whose abnormality was confirmed by 2 consecutive, abnormal reliable tests was significantly higher (73 [66%] of 110) compared to eyes whose abnormality was confirmed by 3 consecutive, abnormal reliable tests (46 [12%] of 381) (P = 0.013). Conclusion: A VF POAG endpoint confirmed by 3 consecutive, abnormal reliable VF tests appears to have greater specificity and stability than either 1 or 2 consecutive, abnormal reliable VF tests. However, some eyes whose VF POAG endpoint was confirmed by 3 consecutive, abnormal reliable tests nonetheless had one or more normal tests on follow-up. PMID:16157799

Keltner, John L.; Johnson, Chris A.; Levine, Richard A.; Fan, Juanjuan; Cello, Kimberly E.; Kass, Michael A.; Gordon, Mae O.

2006-01-01

219

A controlled field test of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation  

SciTech Connect

The presence of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is one of the principal problems associated with current ground-water remediation efforts. Standard pump-and-treat methods are ineffective largely because of the low aqueous solubilities of DNAPL components. Surfactants can increase DNAPL solubility and hence have the potential for increasing the rate of DNAPL dissolution in pump-and-treat systems. To test the effectiveness of surfactants under field conditions, a controlled field test at Canadian Forces Base Borden was undertaken. Results indicate surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation can rapidly remove the majority of DNAPL using simple modifications of a pump-and-treat system. As in all pump-and-treat systems, the efficiency is a function of the hydraulic conductivity. The persistence of high DNAPL concentrations at specific elevations within the aquifer throughout the test indicates that little vertical movement of DNAPL occurred as a result of the introduction of the surfactant. Since the test was stopped when small amounts of DNAPL still remained, the limit of removal was not investigated.

Fountain, J.C.; Middleton, T.; Beikirch, M.; Taylor, C.; Hodge, D. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Geology; Starr, R.C. [EG and G Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-09-01

220

Field test comparison of natural gas engine exhaust valves  

SciTech Connect

As part of a product improvement program, an extensive spark-ignited, turbocharged, natural gas engine exhaust valve test program was conducted using laboratory and field engines. Program objectives were to identify a valve and seat insert combination that increased mean time between overhauls (MTBO) while reducing the risk of premature valve cracking and failure. Following a thorough design review, a large number of valve and seat insert configurations were tested in a popular 900 RPM, 166 BHP (0.123 Mw) per cylinder industrial gas engine series. Material, head geometry, seat angle and other parameters were compared. Careful in-place measurements and post-test inspections compared various configurations and identified optimal exhaust valving for deployment in new units and upgrades of existing engines.

Bicknell, W.B.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N.; Statler, G.R. [Cooper Cameron Corp., Springfield, OH (United States)

1996-12-31

221

Identification of dynamic loading on a bending plate using the Virtual Fields Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper aims at identifying local dynamic transverse forces and distributed pressures acting on the surface of a thin plate, from its measured vibration response. It is related to previous work by other authors on the so-called Force Analysis Technique but uses a different formulation. The paper first presents the theoretical developments based on the Virtual Fields Method and then, numerically simulated data are processed to validate the identification algorithm. Finally, experimental data are used. Both mechanical point load excitation, and distributed acoustic excitation of a bending panel are considered. The force reconstruction results are very satisfactory and the low computational times together with the simple implementation make the Virtual Fields technique attractive for this type of problem.

Berry, Alain; Robin, Olivier; Pierron, Fabrice

2014-12-01

222

Bayes' Theorem to estimate population prevalence from Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores  

PubMed Central

Aim The aim in this methodological paper is to demonstrate, using Bayes' Theorem, an approach to estimating the difference in prevalence of a disorder in two groups whose test scores are obtained, illustrated with data from a college student trial where 12-month outcomes are reported for the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Method Using known population prevalence as a background probability and diagnostic accuracy information for the AUDIT scale, we calculated the post-test probability of alcohol abuse or dependence for study participants. The difference in post-test probability between the study intervention and control groups indicates the effectiveness of the intervention to reduce alcohol use disorder rates. Findings In the illustrative analysis, at 12-month follow-up there was a mean AUDIT score difference of 2.2 points between the intervention and control groups: an effect size of unclear policy relevance. Using Bayes' Theorem, the post-test probability mean difference between the two groups was 9% (95% confidence interval 3–14%). Interpreted as a prevalence reduction, this is evaluated more easily by policy makers and clinicians. Conclusion Important information on the probable differences in real world prevalence and impact of prevention and treatment programmes can be produced by applying Bayes' Theorem to studies where diagnostic outcome measures are used. However, the usefulness of this approach relies upon good information on the accuracy of such diagnostic measures for target conditions. PMID:19438421

Foxcroft, David R; Kypri, Kypros; Simonite, Vanessa

2009-01-01

223

Evaluation of three disk tests for identification of enterococci, leuconostocs, and pediococci.  

PubMed Central

Simple rapid tests for presumptive identification of catalase-negative non-beta-hemolytic cocci (i.e., enterococci, leuconostocs, and pediococci) have not previously been available. Seven hundred thirty-four strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic, catalase-negative, non-beta-hemolytic gram-positive cocci were tested for susceptibility to vancomycin (Vans) by a screening procedure and production of leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) and pyrrolidonylarylamidase (PYRase) in disk tests. Three unique patterns of activity in response to the three disks (30 micrograms of vancomycin, PYRase, and LAPase) can be used to presumptively identify the vancomycin-resistant (Vanr) enterococci (Vanr and PYRase and LAPase positive), leuconostocs (Vanr and PYRase and LAPase negative), and pediococci (Vanr, PYRase negative, and LAPase positive). The results indicate that, together with Gram stain characteristics and the catalase test, the vancomycin, LAPase, and PYRase disk tests can be used to presumptively identify Vanr strains of enterococci as well as Leuconostoc and Pediococcus strains from human infections. PMID:7790454

Facklam, R; Pigott, N; Franklin, R; Elliott, J

1995-01-01

224

A pilot study comparing two field tests with the treadmill run test in soccer players.  

PubMed

This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered) in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Players' performance in the YIET was not significantly correlated with the measured VO2max obtained in the same YIET nor with the measured VO2max obtained in the MST and in the TRT (all p > 0.05). In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05); and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06). The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance. Key PointsBoth the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test and 20m multistage shuttle run test are valid measures of aerobic exertion in soccer playersMeasured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance.In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance. PMID:24431967

Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Frankie H Y; Teh, Kong Chuan

2005-06-01

225

Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measurements were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy`s) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Darcy`s).

Zimmerman, R.M.; Vollendorf, W.C.

1982-05-01

226

Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada test site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measures were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy's) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Dracy's).

Zimmerman, R. M.; Vollendorf, W. C.

1982-05-01

227

Dark Ages Radio Explorer - Field Tests of a Prototype Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept designed to measure the sky-averaged redshifted HI 21-cm signal from the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization between 40 - 120 MHz (z = 11 - 35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the intense human-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) found on Earth. The science objectives of DARE include charting the history of the formation of the first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization, and end of the Dark Ages. A prototype science instrument has been constructed, consisting of bi-conical dipole antennas and a differential amplifier balun followed by a receiver and JPL-Caltech designed digital spectrometer. Extensive tests with this instrument are underway in order to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the overall DARE instrument. Here, we present results from preliminary field tests at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site in Green Bank, West Virginia. Further field tests will be performed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. This research has been supported by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR), headquartered at the University of Colorado Boulder and funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A. Part of this research was conducted at that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J. J.

2012-05-01

228

IDENTIFICATION OF FREE-FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES USING NUPEC RECORDED GROUND MOTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past twenty years, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to investigate various aspects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects on nuclear power plant structures, including embedment and dynamic structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI) effects. As part of a collaborative agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NUPEC, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a numerical analysis to predict the free field soil profile using industry standard methods and the recorded free field responses to actual earthquake events. This paper describes the BNL free-field analyses, including the methods and the analysis results and their comparison to recorded data in the free field. The free-field soil profiles determined from the BNL analyses are being used for both the embedment and SSSI studies, the results of which will be made available upon their completion.

Xu, J.; Costantino, C.; Hofmayer, C.; Murphy, A.; Chokshi, N.; Kitada, Y.

2001-03-22

229

Optical cross beam field tests at ESSA Haswell Field site, October 1969  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests with both the visible and IR optical cross beam systems was made at the Haswell, Colorado, Field Site of ESSA. This memorandum covers only the details of the test setup and runs. A joint field test program was undertaken by ESSA at a 164 meter (500 foot) meteorological tower. The tower was instrumented with wind sensors, temperature sensors, temperature sensors, fluctuating wind and temperature sensors and humidity sensors. The sensors were located at three elevations: 42, 192 and 162 meters. A movable elevator was also instrumented and could be positioned at any desired location along the tower height. The main object of the cross beam studies was to compare the visible and IR systems. The instruments were also arranged so that direct comparison with the sensors on the tower can be made.

Sandborn, V. A.

1974-01-01

230

Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution  

E-print Network

A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

2014-08-11

231

Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2012-01-01

232

Lessons Learnt from the Dynamic Identification / Qualification Tests on the ESC-A Upper stage Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modelling approach made at the beginning of the development. The upper composite of the ARIANE 5, consisting of upper stage, vehicle equipment bay, payload carrying structures, payload dummies and fairing, was modal tested to validate the mathematical model of the launcher. Additionally, transfer functions were measured for Pogo investigations. Validated mathematical launcher models are the basis to predict the launcher global responses in the low frequency domain with sufficient confidence. The predicted global axial and lateral responses for selected sections at the stage represent the flight loads for these sections. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. The verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro shock) a stage separation test was performed. All the equipment was qualified separately for its dynamic (sine, random and shock excitation) and thermal environment to proof its structural and functional integrity. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine-vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electrodynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 150 Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experiences which were made - the comparison between prediction and test results shows the ability and good quality of analysis but - the advantage of combined analysis of shaker table and stage model for test prediction - local effects observed in test - the dependency of damping on the load level - the efficiency of the so called SARO-Damping Device

Rittweger, A.; Beuchel, W.; Eckhardt, K.

2002-01-01

233

Identification of in-field defect development in digital image sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although solid-state image sensors are known to develop defects in the field, little information is available about the nature, quantity or development rate of these defects. We report on and algorithm and calibration tests, which confirmed the existence of significant quantities of in-field defects in 4 out of 5 high-end digital cameras. Standard hot pixels were identified in all 4

Jozsef Dudas; Linda M. Wu; Cory Jung; Glenn H. Chapman; Zahava Koren; Israel Koren

2007-01-01

234

Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

2008-01-01

235

Dynamical properties of test particles in stochastic electromagnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we studied the 2D dynamics of test particles in electromagnetic fields generated by a random distribution of oscillating "clouds" located in the (x,y) plane. Owing to a non-stationarity of the system, we investigated the relationship between the diffusion in the real space and in the velocity space when some parameters of the model are changed, as for example the oscillation frequency and the typical extension of the clouds. We found that for some values of these parameters particles increase their energy and undergo superdiffusion in the real space.

Perri, S.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V.; Vulpiani, A.

2009-05-01

236

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

237

Test Observations and Plans For the Hubble Deep Field - South  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will discuss the planning process, scheduling constraints, and scientific considerations which we have studied and undertaken thus far for the southern Hubble Deep Field observations which are to be performed in October of 1998. Observations from a 3-orbit test program taken in October 1997 at the same position angle and with the same guide stars will be presented to the community for comment and for informational purposes. Planning is constrained in part by CVZ passages, by solar avoidance, zodiacal light, effective use of filters and gratings minimizing effects of scattered earthshine, SAA avoidance, avoidance of bright stars, and availability of suitable guide stars. In particular, it is crucial to test the same guide stars that will be used for the full set of observations. This preview of science data on the field will also allow us to fine-tune any other aspects of the program which may be better optimized scientifically. The HDF-S test observations will consist of one orbit of STIS 50CCD clear aperture imaging to image the field around the QSO, and two orbits of STIS NUV-MAMA G230L spectroscopy on the QSO to obtain a low resolution spectrum. In addition, three orbits of WFPC2 F606W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 6.2 arc minutes from the QSO, and three orbits of NIC3 F160W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 8.7 arc minutes from the QSO. The actual HDF-S observations next October are currently planned to include the same complement of filters for WFPC2 as was used in the original HDF-N ( F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W ). Other options yet to be determined will be pursued for STIS and NICMOS for the full campaign. For more information, see our HDF-South Web site at the URL http://www.stsci.edu/ftp/science/hdf/hdfsouth/hdfs.html.

Williams, R. E.; Baum, S. A.; Blacker, B. S.; Carollo, M.; Casertano, S.; Dickinson, M. E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Madau, P.; Postman, M.; Stiavelli, M.

1997-12-01

238

The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

1989-02-01

239

Testing An Identification Algorithm for Extragalactic OB Associations Using a Galactic Sample  

E-print Network

We have used a Galactic sample of OB stars and associations to test the performance of an automatic grouping algorithm designed to identify extragalactic OB associations. The algorithm identifies the known Galactic OB associations correctly when the search radius (78 pc) is defined by the observed stellar surface density. Galactic OB associations identified with a 78 pc search radius have diameters that are $\\sim$3 times larger than OB associations identified with a 22 pc search radius in M33. Applying the smaller search radius to the Galactic data matches both the sizes and the number of member stars between the two galaxies quite well. Thus, we argue that this and similar algorithms should be used with a constant physical search radius, rather than one which varies with the stellar surface density. Such an approach would allow the identification of differences in the giant molecular cloud populations and star formation efficiency under most circumstances.

Christine D. Wilson; Karen J. Bakker

1996-06-28

240

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1991-01-01

241

Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors.  

PubMed

The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case. PMID:20370296

Olcay, Ali B; Pottebaum, Tait S; Krueger, Paul S

2010-03-01

242

Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-08-01

243

Cultivar Evaluation and Essential Test Locations Identification for Sugarcane Breeding in China  

PubMed Central

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

Luo, Jun; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai

2014-01-01

244

Optimizing Field Campaigns Using A Hypothesis Testing Framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field campaigns in hydrogeology often aim to characterize aquifers for modeling and predicting flow and transport of contaminants to facilitate in some objective related to environmental protection or public health and safety. Many times these objectives depend on predicting the answer to a yes/no question, such as: will contaminant concentration in an aquifer surpass a threshold value? Will a contaminant reach a river outflow before it degrades? Is water from an extraction well safe for consumption? It remains difficult, however, to predict the extent to which a field campaign will improve modeling and prediction efforts or the chance of success in the original objective. Presented here is a method for designing field campaigns around the original objective by posing it in a hypothesis testing framework and optimizing campaigns with minimizing probability of error as the goal. The first step in this process is to formulate the null and alternative hypotheses, which represent the two possible outcomes of the yes/no question in the objective. The alternative hypothesis is the desirable outcome which requires a specified level of certainty to be accepted. The null hypothesis, on the other hand, is the "safe" fallback assumption, which is accepted if the alternative hypothesis lacks sufficient supporting evidence. Of key concern in designing field campaigns is the probability of making an error (Type I or Type II). A level of significance is chosen based on the severity of each type of error and the level of risk that is considered acceptable for each case. A field campaign can then be designed to gain enough information to reduce the probability of error to the acceptable level while expending as few resources as possible. A case study examined here is attempting to predict the arrival time of a contaminant in an aquifer. A scenario is first established in which a contaminant is travelling from a point source to a control plane, which could represent, for example, a water supply well or an environmentally sensitive area. In this case, the null hypothesis is that this arrival time is less than or equal to a specified critical value, while the alternative hypothesis is that the arrival time is greater than the critical value. In this case, the field campaign involves measuring conductivity at various locations throughout the aquifer. The campaign could vary both in the number of measurements and the location of the measurements. Estimating the probability of error resulting from a field campaign involves numerical simulations in which travel time is calculated on numerous fields that are physically and statistically plausible. The calculated travel time for each field is then compared to the hypothesis that would have been accepted via an analysis using only information ascertained by the field campaign in question. The result from each field falls into one of four categories: correctly accepting the null hypothesis, correctly accepting the alternative hypothesis, error of Type I, and error of Type II. Differing field campaign strategies can then be compared based on the frequency of errors resulting from each strategy.

Harken, B. J.; Over, M. W.; Rubin, Y.

2012-12-01

245

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

2002-09-30

246

Incorporating conditional random fields and active learning to improve sentiment identification.  

PubMed

Many machine learning, statistical, and computational linguistic methods have been developed to identify sentiment of sentences in documents, yielding promising results. However, most of state-of-the-art methods focus on individual sentences and ignore the impact of context on the meaning of a sentence. In this paper, we propose a method based on conditional random fields to incorporate sentence structure and context information in addition to syntactic information for improving sentiment identification. We also investigate how human interaction affects the accuracy of sentiment labeling using limited training data. We propose and evaluate two different active learning strategies for labeling sentiment data. Our experiments with the proposed approach demonstrate a 5%-15% improvement in accuracy on Amazon customer reviews compared to existing supervised learning and rule-based methods. PMID:24856246

Zhang, Kunpeng; Xie, Yusheng; Yang, Yi; Sun, Aaron; Liu, Hengchang; Choudhary, Alok

2014-10-01

247

Interlaboratory Agreement of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Identification of Leptospira Serovars  

PubMed Central

Leptospirosis may be caused by > 250 Leptospira serovars. Serovar classification is a complex task that most laboratories cannot perform. We assessed the interlaboratory reproducibility of a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identification technique developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Blinded exchange of 93 Leptospiraceae strains occurred between San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the CDC. PFGE was performed and gel images were analyzed and compared with patterns present in each laboratory's database (CDC database: > 800 strain patterns; SAMMC database: > 300 strain patterns). Overall, 93.7% (74 of 79) of strains present in each receiving laboratory's database were correctly identified. Five isolates were misidentified, and two isolates did not match serovar PFGE patterns in the receiving laboratory's database. Patterns for these seven isolates were identical between laboratories; four serovars represented misidentified reference strains. The PFGE methodology studied showed excellent interlaboratory reproducibility, enabling standardization and data sharing between laboratories. PMID:23817329

Mende, Katrin; Galloway, Renee L.; Becker, Sara J.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Murray, Clinton K.; Hospenthal, Duane R.

2013-01-01

248

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01

249

Microseismic Monitoring of a Carbon Sequestration Field Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microseismic monitoring was implemented as part of a comprehensive carbon sequestration monitoring program at the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's geologic field test site in Otsego County, Michigan. The field test itself consisted of the injection of ~10,000 tonnes of CO2 over 31 days. The intent of the microseismic monitoring program was to understand its potential for verifying cap rock integrity and for identifying the position of the CO2 plume. Microseismic monitoring was achieved using two downhole geophone arrays located in observation wells within 750m of the injection well. One event was recorded during a period of higher relative injection rate and located at the base of the cap rock within the permitted injection interval, suggesting a possible linkage with pressure change or fluid mobilization caused by the CO2 injection processes. The full seismic moment tensor was determined for the injection related event revealing a complex failure mechanism that is consistent with a fracture initiation. The orientation of the fracture is consistant with the maximum horizontal stress in the region. In this context, failure mechanism is taken to be the description of the movement of the rocks. Microseismic monitoring has proved to be a valuable tool for monitoring cap rock integrity.

Urbancic, T. I.; Daugherty, J.; Baig, A. M.

2009-12-01

250

An integrated approach to monitoring a field test of in situ contaminant destruction  

SciTech Connect

The development of in situ thermal remediation techniques requires parallel development of techniques capable of monitoring the physical and chemical changes for purposes of process control. Recent research indicates that many common contaminants can be destroyed in situ by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), eliminating the need for costly surface treatment and disposal. Steam injection, combined with supplemental air, can create the conditions in which HP0 occurs. Field testing of this process, conducted in the summer of 1997, indicates rapid destruction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previous work established a suite of underground geophysical imaging techniques capable of providing sufficient knowledge of the physical changes in the subsurface during thermal treatment at sufficient frequencies to be used to monitor and guide the heating and extraction processes. In this field test, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) and temperature measurements provided the primary information regarding the temporal and spatial distribution of the heated zones. Verifying the in situ chemical destruction posed new challenges. We developed field methods for sampling and analyzing hot water for contaminants, oxygen, intermediates and products of reaction. Since the addition of air or oxygen to the contaminated region is a critical aspect of HPO, noble gas tracers were used to identify fluids from different sources. The combination of physical monitoring with noble gas identification of the native and injected fluids and accurate fluid sampling resulted in an excellent temporal and spatial evaluation of the subsurface processes, from which the amount of in situ destruction occurring in the treated region could be quantified. The experimental field results constrain the destruction rates throughout the site, and enable site management to make accurate estimates of total in situ destruction based on the recovered carbon. As of October, 1998, over 400,000 kg (900,000 lb) of contaminant have been removed from the site; about 18% of this has been destroyed in situ.

Aines, R D; Carrigan, C; Chiarappa, M; Eaker, C; Elsholtz, A; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

1998-12-01

251

Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) field test installations  

SciTech Connect

The MIMS program is funded by the Department of Energy under the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The program objective is to develop cost effective, modular, multi-sensor monitoring systems. Both in-plant and ground based sensors are envisioned. It is also desirable to develop sensors/systems that can be fielded/deployed in a rapid fashion. A MIMS architecture was selected to allow modular integration of sensors and systems and is based on LonWorks technology, commercially developed by Echelon Corporation. The first MIMS fieldable hardware was demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The field test, known within the DOE as the Item Tracking and Transparency (IT&I) demonstration, involved the collaboration and cooperation of five DOE laboratories (Sandia (SNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Pacific Northwest (PNL), Los Alamos (LANL), and Oak Ridge (ORNL)). The IT&T demonstration involved the monitoring of special nuclear material as it was transported around the facility utilizing sensors from the participating labs. The scenario was programmed to ignore normal activity in the facility until entry into the room where the material was stored. A second demonstration, which involved three separate scenarios, was conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The participants included representatives from SNL, LLNL, PNL, and INEL. DOE has selected INEL as the long term testbed for MIMS developed sensors, systems, and scenarios. This paper will describe the installation, intended purpose, and results of the field demonstrations at LLNL and INEL under the MIMS program.

Martinez, R.L.; Waymire, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fuess, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-07-01

252

The identification and characteristics of field resistance to lettuce downy mildew (Bremia lactucae Regel)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-one accessions of three Lactuca species which showed no recognisable race specific resistance to Bremia lactucae when tested in the laboratory as seedlings, exhibited different degrees of susceptibility when exposed to natural field infection. As a group, crisp genotypes had less mildew and a slower rate of disease development than other types of lettuce. Wild forms of Lactuca sativa and

I. R. Crute; Judith M. Norwood

1981-01-01

253

Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

2002-11-08

254

Stability of Hybridization Activity ofCoccidioides immitisin Live and Heat-Killed Frozen Cultures Tested by AccuProbe Coccidioides immitisCulture Identification Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frozen hyphal suspensions ofCoccidioides immitiswere evaluated for suitability as positive control cultures in the AccuProbeC. immitisculture identification test. The genetic probe hybridization activity of heat-killed and viable frozen cultures, stored at 220 and 270&C and tested over a 10-month period, was compared to that of a freshly grown culture, and the results were evaluated based upon the manufacturer's established positive

MIRIAM VALESCO; ANDKAREN JOHNSTON

1997-01-01

255

Benchmarking Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of the study was to benchmark the geometric accuracy of mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems using a permanent test field under good coverage of GNSS. Mobile laser scanning, also called mobile terrestrial laser scanning, is currently a rapidly developing area in laser scanning where laser scanners, GNSS and IMU are mounted onboard a moving vehicle. MLS can be considered to fill the gap between airborne and terrestrial laser scanning. Data provided by MLS systems can be characterized with the following technical parameters: a) point density in the range of 100-1000 points per m2 at 10 m distance, b) distance measurement accuracy of 2-5 cm, and c) operational scanning range from 1 to 100 m. Several commercial, including e.g. Riegl, Optech and others, and some research mobile laser scanning systems surveyed the test field using predefined driving speed and directions. The acquired georeferenced point clouds were delivered for analyzing. The geometric accuracy of the point clouds was determined using the reference targets that could be identified and measured from the point cloud. Results show that in good GNSS conditions most systems can reach an accuracy of 2 cm both in plane and elevation. The accuracy of a low cost system, the price of which is less than tenth of the other systems, seems to be within a few centimetres at least in ground elevation determination. Inaccuracies in the relative orientation of the instruments lead to systematic errors and when several scanners are used, in multiple reproductions of the objects. Mobile laser scanning systems can collect high density point cloud data with high accuracy. A permanent test field suits well for verifying and comparing the performance of different mobile laser scanning systems. The accuracy of the relative orientation between the mapping instruments needs more attention. For example, if the object is seen double in the point cloud due to imperfect boresight calibration between two scanners, this will make especially the automatic modelling of the object much more challenging.

Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Hyyppä, J.; Jaakkola, A.

2012-07-01

256

Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

1996-12-01

257

Comparative evaluation of three immunochromatographic identification tests for culture confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex  

PubMed Central

Background The rapid identification of acid-fast bacilli recovered from patient specimens as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) is critically important for accurate diagnosis and treatment. A thin-layer immunochromatographic (TLC) assay using anti-MPB64 or anti-MPT64 monoclonal antibodies was developed to discriminate between MTC and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM). Capilia TB-Neo, which is the improved version of Capilia TB, is recently developed and needs to be evaluated. Methods Capilia TB-Neo was evaluated by using reference strains including 96 Mycobacterium species (4 MTC and 92 NTM) and 3 other bacterial genera, and clinical isolates (500 MTC and 90 NTM isolates). M. tuberculosis isolates tested negative by Capilia TB-Neo were sequenced for mpt64 gene. Results Capilia TB-Neo showed 100% agreement to a subset of reference strains. Non-specific reaction to M. marinum was not observed. The sensitivity and specificity of Capilia TB-Neo to the clinical isolates were 99.4% (99.6% for M. tuberculosis, excluding M. bovis BCG) for clinical MTC isolates and 100% for NTM isolates tested, respectively. Two M. tuberculosis isolates tested negative by Capilia TB-Neo: one harbored a 63-bp deletion in the mpt64 gene and the other possessed a 3,659-bp deletion from Rv1977 to Rv1981c, a region including the entire mpt64 gene. Conclusions Capilia TB-Neo is a simple, rapid and highly sensitive test for identifying MTC, and showed better specificity than Capilia TB. However, Capilia TB-Neo still showed false-negative results with mpt64 mutations. The limitation should be recognized for clinical use. PMID:24484470

2014-01-01

258

Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is…

Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

2012-01-01

259

The alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT): validation of an instrument for enhancing nursing practice in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the psychometric analysis of the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) after it was modified for use in Hong Kong and administered to examine the patterns of hazardous and harmful drinking. The modified version of AUDIT was an 18-item instrument in which 10 items were completely adopted from the original version and 8 items were added to

Sau Fong Leung; David Arthur

2000-01-01

260

Automation of gas chromatography instruments. Part I. Automated peak identification in the chromatograms of standard test mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of the chromatogram recorded during the gas chromatographic analysis of a standard test mixture is of importance in the assessment of the performance of the underlying GC system. Automated evaluation is essential in the development of software that can be used in systems that can perform totally automated analysis. In this study, an algorithm for automated peak identification

Hai Du; Martin J. Stillman

1997-01-01

261

An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

Twissell, Adrian

2011-01-01

262

Identification of oil film coefficients of large journal bearings on a full scale journal bearing test rig  

Microsoft Academic Search

An attempt of adding a facility of investigating dynamic characteristics of oil film to a large full scale journal bearing test rig which was designed with only the function of static measurement is implemented. The considerations of impulse excitation, vibration measurement, data log and process, and dynamic characteristics identification are presented. The measured results are compared with theoretical data and

G. D. Jiang; H. Hu; W. Xu; Z. W. Jin; Y. B. Xie

1997-01-01

263

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31

264

Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.  

PubMed

Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application. PMID:25446515

Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

2015-02-01

265

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31

266

Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

2012-01-01

267

Depositional environment of Hosston sandstones (lower cretaceous), Bogalusa Field, Washington Parish, Louisiana (identification of deltaic and fluvial sequences in logs)  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF HOSSTON SANDSTONES (LOWER CRETACEOUS), BOGALUSA FIELD, WASHINGTON PARISH, LOUISIANA (IDENTIFICATION OF DELTAIC AND FLUVIAL SEQUENCES IN LOGS) A thesis by CATHERINE COX STRONG Submitted to the Graduate College... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF HOSSTON SANDSTONES (LOWER CRETACEOUS), BOGALUSA FIELD, WASHINGTON PARISH, LOUISIANA...

Strong, Catherine Cox

2012-06-07

268

Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs  

PubMed Central

Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

2012-01-01

269

78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment, which is...Inc. Product: Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations:...

2013-05-21

270

Modeling unsaturated flow and transport processes at the Busted Butte Field Test Site, Nevada  

E-print Network

Modeling unsaturated flow and transport processes at the Busted Butte Field Test Site, Nevada P at the Busted Butte Field Test Site for the purpose of quantifying the effects of hydrogeologic conditions

Gable, Carl W.

271

Field test of a novel detection device for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen in cough  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis is a highly infectious disease that is spread from person to person by infected aerosols emitted by patients with respiratory forms of the disease. We describe a novel device that utilizes immunosensor and bio-optical technology to detect M. tuberculosis antigen (Ag85B) in cough and demonstrate its use under field conditions during a pilot study in an area of high TB incidence. Methods The TB Breathalyzer device (Rapid Biosensor Systems Ltd) was field tested in the outpatient clinic of Adama Hospital, Ethiopia. Adults seeking diagnosis for respiratory complaints were tested. Following nebulization with 0.9% saline patients were asked to cough into a disposable collection device where cough aerosols were deposited. Devices were then inserted into a portable instrument to assess whether antigen was present in the sample. Demographic and clinical data were recorded and all patients were subjected to chest radiogram and examination of sputum by Ziehl-Nielsen microscopy. In the absence of culture treatment decisions were based on smear microscopy, chest x-ray and clinical assessment. Breathalyzer testing was undertaken by a separate physician to triage and diagnostic assessment. Results Sixty individuals were each subjected to a breathalyzer test. The procedure was well tolerated and for each patient the testing was completed in less than 10 min. Positive breath test results were recorded for 29 (48%) patients. Of 31 patients with a diagnosis of tuberculosis 23 (74%; 95% CI 55-87) were found positive for antigen in their breath and 20 (64%; 95% CI 45-80) were smear positive for acid fast bacilli in their sputum. Six patients provided apparent false positive breathalyzer results that did not correlate with a diagnosis of tuberculosis. Conclusions We propose that the breathalyzer device described warrants further investigation as a tool for studying exhalation of M. tuberculosis. The portability, simplicity of use and speed of the test device suggest it may also find use as a tool to aid early identification of infectious cases. We recommend studies be undertaken to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the device when compared to microbiological and clinical indicators of tuberculosis disease. PMID:20529335

2010-01-01

272

Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

1997-02-01

273

Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

Montgomery, Jim

2012-01-01

274

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01

275

Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

1993-10-01

276

Vowel and consonant identification tests can be used to compare performances in a multilingual group of cochlear implant patients.  

PubMed

Vowel and consonant identification tests were conducted in the sound-only condition in a multilingual group of 13 totally deaf patients who are users of the Ineraid multichannel cochlear implant. Native languages ranged across French, German, Italian, Spanish, Albanian and Swahili. We found high correlations (r > -0.83) among vowel or consonant identification scores and 'subjective ranking' scores established on the basis of a subjective evaluation of the patient's speech reception abilities in the sound-only condition. Detailed analysis demonstrates that the identification of vowel and consonant is dominated by the perception of acoustic cues characteristic of the set of stimuli used as well as by the strengths and weaknesses of the speech processing of the cochlear implant system. We did not find any systematic pattern in the results that could be related to the native language of the patients. These results suggest that vowel as well as consonant identification tests are effective means to compare the performance of cochlear implant patients even across different native languages. They also indicate that, in the future, one can conduct a fewer number of the many different (e.g. nonsense-syllable, word, sentence, speech-tracking) tests when evaluating the speech recognition abilities of patients with the implant. PMID:8265119

Pelizzone, M; Boëx, C; Montandon, P

1993-01-01

277

76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a risk analysis prepared to assess the risks associated with the field testing of this vaccine,......

2011-12-28

278

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2012-07-01

279

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2013-07-01

280

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2010-07-01

281

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2014-07-01

282

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection...demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing...covering only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility...

2011-07-01

283

Evaluation of the Rapid Mastitis Test for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from bovine mammary glands.  

PubMed

A latex agglutination test system (Rapid Mastitis Test [RMT]; Immucell, Portland, Maine) containing reagents for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae from bovine intramammary infections was evaluated with 527 staphylococcal and 267 streptococcal isolates. The RMT Staphylococcus aureus reagent detected 94.2% of 242 Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 80% of 25 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates, and 42.8% of 21 tube coagulase-positive Staphylococcus hyicus isolates. All Streptococcus agalactiae isolates were correctly identified by the RMT Streptococcus agalactiae reagent. Cross-reactions were observed with one Streptococcus dysgalactiae and three Streptococcus uberis strains. The RMT was found to be an acceptable method for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from bovine mammary glands. The occurrence of coagulase-positive staphylococci other than Staphylococcus aureus requires biochemical testing for species level identification. PMID:3284897

Watts, J L; Owens, W E

1988-04-01

284

STRESS GERMINATION RING TEST WITH IIRB AND FIELD VALIDATION IN MICHIGAN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This test was conducted to validate field emergence on lines selected by European breeding companies for a ‘ring test’ to evaluate the water germination stress test developed at East Lansing for predicting relative field emergence. Water and hydrogen peroxide germination tests were conducted prior t...

285

Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

2002-03-01

286

Comparison of new alcohol use test, the Helsinki Alcohol Use Test questionnaire, and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and laboratory markers serum ?-glutamyl transferase and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the new Helsinki Alcohol Use Test (HAUT) and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) as screening instrument in the general working population. The relationship between the HAUT and serum ?-glutamyl transferase (GGT), and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) was also evaluated. Our results seem to indicate that the HAUT has good

Annukka Merikallio-Pajunen; Nuria Strid; Antti Suokas; Irina Podlketnova; Hannu Alho

2004-01-01

287

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

288

Field tests of X-ray backscatter mine detection  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of a backscattered X-ray landmine detection system has been demonstrated in laboratories at both Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Florida (UF). To assess the system`s response to a variety of objects, buried plastic and metal antitank landmines, surface plastic antipersonnel landmines, and surface metal fragments were used as targets. The X-ray machine used for the field test system was an industrial X-ray machine which was operated at 150 kV and 5 mZ and collimated to create a 2 cm diameter X-ray spot on the soil. The detectors used were two plastic scintillation detectors: one collimated to respond primarily to photons that have undergone multiple collision and the other uncollimated to respond primarily to photons that have had only one collision. To provide motion, the system was mounted on a gantry and rastered side-to-side using a computer-controlled stepper motor with a come-along providing the forward movement. Data generated from the detector responses were then analyzed to provide the images and locations of landmines. A new analysis method that increases resolution was used. Changing from the lab environment to the field did not decrease the system`s ability to detect buried or obscured landmines. The addition of rain, blowing dust, rocky soil and native plant-life did not lower the system`s resolution or contrast for the plastic or the metal landmines. Concepts for a civilian mine detection system based on this work using commercial off the shelf (COTS) equipment were developed.

Lockwood, G.J.; Shope, S.L.; Wehlburg, J.C.; Selph, M.M.; Jojola, J.M.; Turman, B.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jacobs, J.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1998-08-01

289

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31

290

An Explication and Test of Communication Network Content and Multiplexity as Predictors of Organizational Identification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between identification and communication using organizational identification (OI) as a theoretical framework for studying communication networks among incoming graduate students in three university departments of communication. Concludes that, irrespective of initial OI, stronger initial multiplexity predicts the growth…

Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

1991-01-01

291

Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

2006-01-01

292

An automatic test approach for field programmable gate array (FPGA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test for a FPGA is supposed to consist of two steps, namely configuration and fault scan. The process of configuration and fault scan is required to be repeated many times before all resources of a FPGA-under-test are covered. Traditional test schemes for a FPGA-under-test involve a large amount of manual work. An automatic test approach for a FPGA-under-test implemented by

A. W. Ruan; Y. B. Liao; P. Li; W. Li

2009-01-01

293

Evaluation of new agglutination test for identification of oxacillin-susceptible and oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed Central

A new agglutination test (Monostaph +; Bionor, Skien, Norway) has been developed. This new agglutination test has been compared with two other agglutination tests for the identification of 128 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and 82 coagulase-negative staphylococci. The sensitivities of both Monostaph + and Pastorex Staph-Plus were excellent (98.7 and 97.4%, respectively) in detection of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The specificity was 96.4% (two Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates and one Staphylococcus hominis isolate were false positive). PMID:7615750

Tveten, Y

1995-01-01

294

Frontal eye field activity enhances object identification during covert visual search.  

PubMed

We investigated the link between neuronal activity in the frontal eye field (FEF) and the enhancement of visual processing associated with covert spatial attention in the absence of eye movements. We correlated activity recorded in the FEF of monkeys manually reporting the identity of a visual search target to performance accuracy and reaction time. Monkeys were cued to the most probable target location with a cue array containing a popout color singleton. Neurons exhibited spatially selective responses for the popout cue stimulus and for the target of the search array. The magnitude of activity related to the location of the cue prior to the presentation of the search array was correlated with trends in behavioral performance across valid, invalid, and neutral cue trial conditions. However, the speed and accuracy of the behavioral report on individual trials were predicted by the magnitude of spatial selectivity related to the target to be identified, not for the spatial cue. A minimum level of selectivity was necessary for target detection and a higher level for target identification. Muscimol inactivation of FEF produced spatially selective perceptual deficits in the covert search task that were correlated with the effectiveness of the inactivation and were strongest on invalid cue trials that require an endogenous attention shift. These results demonstrate a strong functional link between FEF activity and covert spatial attention and suggest that spatial signals from FEF directly influence visual processing during the time that a stimulus to be identified is being processed by the visual system. PMID:19828723

Monosov, Ilya E; Thompson, Kirk G

2009-12-01

295

Improved adaptive Markov random field based super-resolution mapping for mangrove tree identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditionally, forest tree crowns are extracted using airborne or spaceborne hyper-/multi-spectral remotely sensed images or pansharpened images. However, these medium/low spatial resolution images suffer from the mixed pixel problem, and the cost to collect very high resolution image collection is high. Moreover, existing feature extraction techniques cannot extract local patterns from medium/low resolution images. Therefore, super-resolution mapping (SRM) techniques, which generate land-cover maps with finer spatial resolution than the original remotely sensed image, can be beneficial for the extraction of forest trees. The SRM methods can improve the quality of information extraction by combining spectral information and spatial context into image classification problems. In this paper we have improved an adaptive Markov random field approach for super-resolution mapping (MRF-SRM) based on spatially adaptive MRF-SPM to overcome the limitation of equal covariance matrices assumption for all classes. We applied the developed method for mangrove tree identification from multispectral image recorded by QuickBird satellite, where we generated a super-resolution map with the panchromatic image spatial resolution of 0.6 m. Moreover, the performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by employing the simulated image with different covariance matrices for each class. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the new adaptive MRF-SRM method has increased the overall accuracy by 5.1% and the termination conditions of this method were satisfied three times faster when compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

Aghighi, H.; Trinder, J.; Lim, S.; Tarabalka, Y.

2014-11-01

296

[Pilot test on oil field wastewater biotreatment with thermophilic microorganisms].  

PubMed

The thermophilic microorganisms (50-60 degrees C) are introduced and the contact oxidation technology is adopted to treat with the high temperature effluents from an oil field in this paper, which solves a problem that the effluents need to be cooled in routine biotreatment. The results of the pilot test show that the HRT of the biotreatment system adjusted to 8-18h can make CODCr of the effluents stable at 175-263mg/L and oil content under 10mg/L on condition that the temperature of the influents keeps at 60-65 degrees C, CODCr 300-590mg/L and the quality of the oil wastewater is greatly fluctuant. Flocculating process, then, can effectively flocculate and precipitate the suspending and residual chroma pollutant from the effluents of biotreatment and CODCr in the effluents of flocculating process can reduce to 136-229mg/L. And CODCr even reduces to under 150mg/L after flowing by sand and activated carbon filtration equipments. Under the high temperature condition, furthermore, combined stuffing is an ideal carrier for the thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:15515943

Li, Da-ping; He, Xiao-hong; Tian, Chong-min; Wang, Xiao-mei; Peng, Shi-qun; Wang, Chun-ming

2004-07-01

297

Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

2009-01-01

298

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

299

Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing the thickness of the failure layer and the width of the possible failure are essential for the required barrier design parameter height and width. First results of the calculated drag coefficients of dynamic impact pressure measurements showed that the dynamic coefficient cw is much lower than 1.0 which is contradictory to most of existing dimensioning property protection guidelines. It appears to us that special adaptation to the system like smaller mesh sizes and special ground-barrier interface compared to normal rock-fall barriers and channelised debris flow barriers are necessary to improve the retention behavior of shallow landslide barriers. Detailed analysis of the friction coefficient in relationship with pore water pressure measurements gives interesting insights into the dynamic of fluid-solid mixed flows. Impact pressures dependencies on flow features are analyzed and discussed with respect to existing models and guidelines for shallow landslides.

Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

2010-05-01

300

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification  

PubMed Central

Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-01-01

301

The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

1998-01-01

302

June 23, 1998 A Test for Coronal Magnetic Field Extrapolations  

E-print Network

The determination of the magnetic field structure of the solar corona is a goal being pursued by a number are sensitive to both the strength and direction of the coronal magnetic field. The three techniques each have of high magnetic field strength are generally optically thick due to gyroresonant opacity at frequencies

White, Stephen

303

Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia  

PubMed Central

Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D’Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

2014-01-01

304

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01

305

Uncertainty law in ambient modal identification---Part II: Implication and field verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a qualitative analysis of the uncertainty laws for the modal parameters identified in a Bayesian approach using ambient vibration data, based on the theory developed in the companion paper. The uncertainty laws are also appraised using field test data. The paper intends to provide insights for planning ambient vibration tests and managing the uncertainties of the identified modal parameters. Some typical questions that shall be addressed are: to estimate the damping ratio to within 30% of posterior coefficient of variation (c.o.v), what is the minimum data duration? Will deploying an additional accelerometer significantly improve the accuracy in damping (or frequency)? Answers to these questions based on this work can be found in the Conclusions. As the Bayesian approach allows full use of information in the data for given modeling assumptions, the uncertainty laws obtained in this work represent the lower limit of uncertainty (estimation error) that can be achieved by any method (Bayesian or non-Bayesian).

Au, Siu-Kui

2014-10-01

306

Rapid Immunochromatographic Test for the Identification and Discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates from Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria  

PubMed Central

Background: A new rapid Immunochromatographic test (ICT) kit (SDBioline TB Ag MPT64RAPID®) developed by Standard Diagnostics, South Korea was evaluated for rapid differentiation of M. tuberculosis from non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It detects MPT 64 antigen in M. tuberculosis isolates using mouse monoclonal MPT 64 antibody. The kit was assessed for routine identification of the Acid Fast Bacilli(AFB) isolated in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: Two hundred eight culture isolates of Mycobacteria were tested using ICT test kit for detection of MPT 64 antigen from liquid and solid culture. H37Rv strain was employed as the positive reference control. Any negative result was referred for confirmation by Gen Probe Accu Probe assay for MTB Complex (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.). Speciation of NTM was performed using genotypic Mycobacterium CM assay (Hain’s life sciences, Germany). Results: Of the 208 culture positive isolates tested, 182 (87.5%) were found positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and remaining 26 (12.5%) were considered as NTM. These results were further confirmed by Gen Probe Accu probe assay that served as the reference method for detection of MTBC. H37Rv reference strain was taken as a control for ICT test and molecular tests. The reference strain showed the presence of MPT64 antigen band in the ICT test. Similar bands were formed in all MTBC (182) isolates tested, proving 100 per cent sensitivity and no bands were detected in 48 (100%) NTM isolates tested, proving 100 per cent specificity of the ICT kit. Conclusion: Tuberculosis is a global pandemic. Rapid identification of Mycobacteria as MTB complex or non-tuberculous Mycobacteria from culture is important for treatment of infected cases and drug susceptibility testing of the culture isolate. MPT 64 TB antgen detection using SD Bioline Immunochromatographic test is a simple and cost effective method for differentiation of Mycobacterial cultures as MTB complex from non- tuberculous Mycobacteria. PMID:24959442

Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

2014-01-01

307

Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).  

PubMed

In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (? ? or ? ?) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

2014-07-01

308

47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...necessary for the purposes of the test. (2) The carriers will be...except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for hourly...not exceed those specified in the test authorization and the...

2010-10-01

309

COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF A FIELD TEST KIT FOR LEAD  

EPA Science Inventory

The Hach Lead-Trak(R) test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. onsidered were: perator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. nterferences tested were realistic levels off: a, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, C...

310

Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

1983-01-01

311

Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

312

Interpreting the behaviour of calves in an open-field test: a factor analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The open-field test is commonly used but has been interpreted as indicating both fear in response to novelty, and locomotory motivation. To clarify the interpretation of the test, 16 female Holstein calves were tested alone in an open-field to determine how their behavioural and heart rate responses were affected by: (1) the novelty of the enclosure (5 and 15 weeks

Anne Marie de Passillé; Jeffrey Rushen; François Martin

1995-01-01

313

Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in the open water and during ice breaking. Continuous time-series of full mass spectra with a one minute time resolution were recorded throughout the campaign between August 2nd and September 7th 2008 running up to a net VOC data set of 745 hours. Over 370 mass peaks have been separated, about 340 show signal intensities above the 30 minute detection limit of ~3pptv. Additionally we analyzed samples from nine helicopter based soundings providing vertical VOC profiles up to 3000 m.a.s.l. The performance of the newly developed instrument will be discussed and ASCOS data will be shown. Acknowledgment: The ASCOS expedition was arranged by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and was an effort within the framework of SWEDARCTIC 2008. For more information on ASCOS see http://ascos.se/. We thank the ASCOS organizers - Caroline Leck and Michael Tjernström - all ASCOS participants, the SPRS and the Oden crew for the excellent team work and Armin Wisthaler for his assistance in planning and preparations. The TOF-MS system was funded by the University of Innsbruck (Uni Infrastruktur Programm). The development project was financially supported by the Austrian Research Funding Association (FFG). [1] Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes 1995, 149-150, 609-619. [2] Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A. Chemical Society Review 1998, 27, 347-375. [3] De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C. Mass Spectrometry Reviews 2007, 26, 223-257. [4] Goldstein, A. H.; Galbally, I. E. Environmental Science and Technology 2007, 41, 154-1521.

Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

2009-04-01

314

Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

2007-07-09

315

BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris Hodge

2008-03-01

316

Unambiguous identification of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles through quantitative susceptibility mapping of the nonlinear response to magnetic fields  

PubMed Central

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles generate signal void regions on gradient echo images due to their strong magnetization. In practice, the signal void region might be indistinguishable from that generated by air. However, the response of SPIO to an externally applied magnetic field is non-linear. Magnetization of SPIO saturates at around 1 Tesla while magnetization of water and air increase linearly with field strength. Phantom experiment and mice experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a non-ambiguous identification of superparamagnetic contrast agents. PMID:20688448

Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Wong, Richard; Prince, Martin; Wang, Yi

2010-01-01

317

Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?  

EPA Science Inventory

Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

318

The Canada-UK Deep Submillimeter Survey VII: Optical and near-infrared identifications for the 14h field  

E-print Network

We present the multi-wavelength identifications for 23 sources in the Canada-UK Deep Submillimeter Survey (CUDSS) 14h field. The identifications have been selected on the basis of radio and near-infrared data and we argue that, to our observational limits, both are effective at selecting the correct counterparts of the SCUBA sources. We discuss the properties of these identifications and find that they are very red in near-infrared color, with many classified as Extremely Red Objects, and show disturbed morphologies. Using the entire CUDSS catalogue of 50 sources we use a combination of spectroscopic redshifts (4 objects), 1.4GHz-to-850um flux ratio redshift estimates (10 objects), and redshift lower-limits based on non-detections at 1.4GHz (the rest of the sample) to estimate a lower-limit on the median redshift of the population of z_med > 1.4. Working from simple models and using the properties of the secure identifications, we discuss general and tentative constraints on the redshift distribution and the expected colors and magnitudes of the entire population.

Tracy Webb; Simon Lilly; David Clements; Steve Eales; Min Yun; Mark Brodwin; Loretta Dunne; Walter Gear

2003-08-25

319

Field trial of six serological tests for bovine brucellosis.  

PubMed

Serum agglutination (SAT), complement fixation (CFT), indirect ELISA (iELISA), competitive ELISA (cELISA), Rose Bengal (RBT) and EDTA-modified agglutination (EDTA) tests were used in parallel on serological samples from 19,935 cattle in 301 herds. The study herds were selected according to putative exposure to Brucellaabortus with cases defined by bacteriological culture or test agreement. No single test identified all infected cattle and, at diagnostic thresholds, relative sensitivity was highest in the iELISA (67.9%) or RBT (78.1%), using bacteriological culture or test agreement, respectively, to define cases. As screening tests, the relative sensitivity of the SAT was highest (75.9% by culture or 84.9% by test agreement), with an optimal threshold of 31 IU. The relative specificity of the diagnostic tests ranged from 99.6% (SAT 31IU) to 100% (iELISA, RBT and CFT). The trial confirmed the value of the SAT as a screening test and the value of parallel testing. PMID:21550272

Abernethy, D A; Menzies, F D; McCullough, S J; McDowell, S W J; Burns, K E; Watt, R; Gordon, A W; Greiner, M; Pfeiffer, D U

2012-03-01

320

Normative Performance on the Brief Smell Identification Test (BSIT) in a Multi-Ethnic Bilingual Cohort: A Project FRONTIER Study  

PubMed Central

The Brief Smell Identification Test (BSIT) is a commonly used measure of olfactory functioning in elderly populations. Few studies have provided normative data for this measure, and minimal data are available regarding the impact of sociodemographic factors on test scores. This study presents normative data for the BSIT in a sample of English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanic and non-Hispanic Whites. A Rasch analysis was also conducted to identify the items that best discriminated between varying levels of olfactory functioning, as measured by the BSIT. The total sample included 302 older adults seen as part of an ongoing study of rural cognitive aging, Project FRONTIER. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that BSIT scores require adjustment by age and gender, but years of education, ethnicity, and language did not significantly influence BSIT performance. Four items best discriminated between varying levels of smell identification, accounting for 59.44% of total information provided by the measure. However, items did not represent a continuum of difficulty on the BSIT. The results of this study indicate that the BSIT appears to be well-suited for assessing odor identification deficits in older adults of diverse backgrounds, but that fine-tuning of this instrument may be recommended in light of its items’ difficulty and discrimination parameters. Clinical and empirical implications are discussed. PMID:23634698

Menon, Chloe; Westervelt, Holly James; Jahn, Danielle R.; Dressel, Jeffrey A.; O’Bryant, Sid E.

2013-01-01

321

A new impact test for the identification of a dynamic crack propagation criterion using a gas-gun device  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The modelling of damage and fracture behaviour under high rates of loadings for metallic structures presents the more and more interests for engineering design, especially for crash phenomena. In order to perform a numerical simulation of such phenomena a crack propagation criterion must be identified using adapted laboratory tests. The objective of this paper is to present a new impact test intended for the identification of a cohesive crack criterion implemented into a home-made FEM code based on Extended Finite Element Method. Therefore, a double-notched specimen is impacted using a gas-gun device in order to obtain different crack paths depending on projectile speed. A post-impact macro-photographic observation allows to measure the crack path, the angles and the advancing length. These experimental results are used as input responses in the identification procedure for determining the crack cohesive criterion parameters. Some experimental results, for an aluminium alloy crack criterion identification, are presented to illustrate the proposed approach.

Nistor, I.; Pantalé, O.; Caperaa, S.

2006-08-01

322

Recent field test results using OMEGA transmissions for clock synchronization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented of clock synchronization experiments using OMEGA transmissions from North Dakota on 13.10 kHz and 12.85 kHz. The OMEGA transmissions were monitored during April 1974 from NASA tracking sites located at Madrid, Spain; Canary Island; and Winkfield, England. The sites are located at distances between 6600 kilometers (22,100 microseconds) to 7300 kilometers (24,400 microseconds) from North Dakota. The data shows that cycle identification of the received signals was accomplished. There are, however, discrepancies between the measured and calculated propagation delay values which have not been explained, but seem to increase with distance between the receiver and the transmitter. The data also indicates that three strategically located OMEGA transmitting stations may be adequate to provide worldwide coverage for clock synchronization to within plus or minus two (2) microseconds.

Chi, A. R.; Wardrip, S. C.

1974-01-01

323

Development of the computerized Mandarin pediatric lexical tone and disyllabic-word picture identification test in noise (MAPPID-N).  

PubMed

MAPPID-N was developed to assess the speech-recognition abilities in noise of Mandarin-speaking children on disyllabic words, and lexical tones in monosyllabic words, in a picture-identification test format. Twenty-six normal-hearing children aged four to nine years listened repeatedly to the test materials where noise was spatially mixed with or separated from speech, in different signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios, to obtain performance-SNR functions and SNR for 50% correct scores (SNR-50%). SNR-50% improved with age only when noise was spatially separated from speech but not when noise was mixed with speech, suggesting the improvement with age in the use of intensity and timing cues differences between the two ears. The homogeneity of the test items was improved by adjusting the intensity levels of individual test items to align their SNR-50% to the mean SNR-50% level. PMID:19195001

Yuen, Kevin C P; Luan, Lan; Li, Huan; Wei, Cao-Gang; Cao, Ke-Li; Yuan, Meng; Lee, Tan

2009-01-01

324

[Influence of the mixed inoculum on the species-identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test results by the automated microbial systems].  

PubMed

The influence of the mixed inoculum on the species-identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test results was evaluated for the three automated microbial systems, WalkAway-40 (Dade MicroScan, West Sacramento, CA, USA), VITEK 2 Compact (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) and RAISUS (Nissui Pharmaceutical, Tokyo). In the evaluation, two different species or two different strains were mixed in serial ratios and adjusted to the inoculum cell suspension for the respective systems, and then tested for the species-identification and antimicrobial susceptibility. For the species-identification, all the three automated systems experienced incorrect identifications others from the species inoculated with higher likelihoods (> 90%), e.g. Enterobacter cloacae plus Klebsiella pneumoniae resulted in K. ornithinolytica or E. aerogenes with 93% to 97% likelihoods at the mixing ratio 9 to 1. Whereas, the mixings extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli, methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant (VR) and vancomycin-susceptible (VS) Enterococcus faecalis, always resulted in correct detection of a small portion of resistant cells. However, minimum ratios of resistant cells for the correct detection varied by the systems, that is, RAISUS required 70% of MRSA, VITEK 2 Compact was 8%, and the WalkAway-40 was 1%. Also, when the cell suspension of VS E. faecalis spiked with Proteus mirabilis was tested, the WalkAway-40 reported as being very rare biotype, but both VITEK 2 Compact and RAISUS reported as the test inoculum being VR E. faecalis. With these results, it can be concluded that: First, incorrect species-identifications others from the inoculated species easily occur when the inoculum contains different species even at the ratio visibly indiscernible on the primary isolation agar plate. Secondly, the automated microbial systems always intend to detect antimicrobial resistant cells in the inoculum rather than to detect major susceptible cells to prevent us from reporting very major error interpretation. PMID:18516962

Higa, Miyako; Kisanuki, Kyoko; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu

2008-04-01

325

Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing  

EPA Science Inventory

While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

326

A Field Test for Upper Body Strength and Endurance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers studied the reliability of the modified push-up test in measuring upper body strength and endurance in elementary through college students. It also examined the accuracy of partner scoring. The test proved much easier to administer than the regular floor push-up. It was valid and reliable for all students and suitable for partner…

Nelson, Jack K.; And Others

1991-01-01

327

Communication equipment evaluation and functional field tests for AHS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automated highway system (AHS) is designed to offer vehicle control assistance by conducting continuous data transmission from roadside instrumentation to vehicles, and the eventual aim is to achieve fully automated vehicle operation. Aggressive research focusing on AHS is a major program of the intelligent transport system project. A test operation system was constructed and installed along the 3 km test

M. Nakamura; S. Ueda; K. Kimura; N. Imacho

1996-01-01

328

Efficacy of the alcohol use disorders identification test as a screening tool for hazardous alcohol intake and related disorders in primary care: a validity study  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractObjective: To determine the properties of the alcohol use disorders identification test in screening primary care attenders for alcohol problems.Design: A validity study among consecutive primary care attenders aged 18-65 years. Every third subject completed the alcohol use disorders identification test (a 10 item self report questionnaire on alcohol intake and related problems) and was interviewed by an investigator with

Marco Piccinelli; Elisabetta Tessari; Marco Bortolomasi; Orazio Piasere; Massimo Semenzin; Nicola Garzotto; Michele Tansella

1997-01-01

329

Engineering test plan for field radionuclide migration experiments in climax granite  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Engineering Test Plan (ETP) describes field studies of radionuclide migration in fractured rock designed for the Climax grainite at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the ETP is to provide a detailed written document of the method of accomplishing these studies. The ETP contains the experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan, system schematics, a description of the test

D. Isherwood; E. Raber; R. Stone; D. Lord; N. Rector; R. Failor

1982-01-01

330

Automated field testing of a track-type tractor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the design process, earthmoving manufacturers routinely subject machines to rigorous, long-term tests to ensure quality. Automating portions of the testing process can potentially reduce the cost and time to complete these tests. We present a system that guides a 175 horsepower track-type tractor (Caterpillar Model D6R XL) along a prescribed route, allowing simple tasks to be completed by the automated machine while more complex tasks, such as site clean up, are handled by an operator. Additionally, the machine can be operated manually or via remote control and observed over the internet using a remote supervisor program. We envision that safety would be handled using work procedures, multiple over-ride methods and a GPS fence. The current system can follow turns within a half meter and straight sections within a quarter meter. The controller hardware and software are integrated with existing on-board electronic modules and allow for portability. The current system successfully handles the challenges of a clutch-brake drive train and has the potential to improve control over test variables, lower testing costs and enable testing at higher speeds allowing for higher impact tests than a human operator can tolerate.

Taylor, Michael A.; Lay, Keith; Struble, Joshua; Allen, William; Subrt, Michael

2003-09-01

331

Introduction to Analog Field Testing - Duration: 9:10.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

332

40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...sampling PEMS instruments with ambient air until sampling begins to prevent...analyzers using a zero gas or ambient air introduced at the analyzer...

2010-07-01

333

Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

1977-01-01

334

DNA BASED SPECIES IDENTIFICATION TEST FOR PARASITIC WASPS OF THE WHITEFLY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A significant problem in using parasitic wasp species in biological control of the whitefly is identification of the individual wasp species parasitizing the nymph. This is particularly important in areas where imported foreign species are released It is necessary to follow these releases to deter...

335

Testing the Utility of Dental Morphological Traits Commonly Used in the Forensic Identification of Ancestry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few human variants are truly population specific, with 100% frequency in one group and 0% in others. However, for traits to be of use in forensic identification they must be as specific to a population as possible. Forensically, several dental morphological traits have been described as useful for determining an unknown individual’s ancestry. For these traits to be of value,

Heather J. H. Edgar

2009-01-01

336

Modal analysis of notched bars: tests and comments on the sensitivity of an identification technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of most diagnostic techniques based on modal analysis strictly depend on the accuracy of the structural analytical model that one uses, on the measurement errors and on the severeness of the damage to be identified. The sensitivity of a particular damage identification technique is discussed and it is shown that the above aspects are crucial even when dealing

C. Davini; A. Morassi; N. Rovere

1995-01-01

337

Identification and field evaluation of pear fruit volatiles attractive to the oriental fruit moth, Cydia molesta.  

PubMed

Plant volatiles play a key role in host plant location of phytophagous insects. Cydia molesta is an important pest of pear fruit late in the growing season. We identified and quantified volatiles from immature and mature fruits of six pear varieties by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Attractiveness of synthetic blends to adults based on gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) activity was investigated in both field and laboratory. Consistent electroantennographic activity was obtained for 12 compounds from headspace collections of the mature fruits of the six pear varieties. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among six odor profiles. Among the six mixtures, the mixture of 1-hexanol, nonanal, ethyl butanoate, butyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, hexyl butanoate, and farnesene (different isomers) with a 1:1:100:70:7:5:1:4 ratio from the variety Jimi and the mixture of nonanal, ethyl butanoate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, and farnesene with a 1:100:1:32:1:2 ratio from the variety Huangjin were highly attractive to both sexes in the field. However, male captures were much higher than those of females. Further wind tunnel tests proved that both sexes exhibited upwind flight to the lures, but only males landed on the source. Our finding indicates that mixtures mimicking Jimi and Huangjin volatiles attract both females and males of C. molesta, and these host volatiles may be involved in mate finding behavior. PMID:22730107

Lu, Peng-Fei; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

2012-08-01

338

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

2011-02-27

339

FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER  

EPA Science Inventory

This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

340

Vegetative propagation of kura clover: a field-scale test  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Kura clover is a potentially valuable forage legume, but it has been underutilized. A major reason is the difficulty of establishing it from seed. Since kura is rhizomatous, there have been attempts to propagate it vegetatively, but no reports of success at the field scale. Two harvesting methods we...

341

A test rig for the identification of rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film bearings  

E-print Network

A test rig and measurement procedure to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of generic fluid film bearing elements are described. The test apparatus allows the exchange of test articles without modifications to the basic design of the machine...

Robison, Lewis Miller

2012-06-07

342

OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS  

E-print Network

of seedlings colonizing experimental gaps in a grazed grassland community. In small gaps (3 cm diameterOIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS

Silvertown, Jonathan

343

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-print Network

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic .............................................................................14 3.4. KNMI wind tunnel

Stoffelen, Ad

344

Bayesian sparse regularization in near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging for wind tunnel test  

E-print Network

Bayesian sparse regularization in near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging for wind tunnel test N. On simulated and wind tunnel data, proposed approach is compared with the beamforming, DAMAS, Diagonal Remove to investigate near-field wideband aeroacoustic imaging on vehicle surface in wind tunnel test based on the 2D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

Wireless GPS system for module fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer's farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

346

Wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer’s farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

347

VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX  

E-print Network

323 CHAPTER 17 VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX \\B E Van D A The Tennessee Energy Conservation In Housing (TECH) complex has been utilized since 1977 as a field test site Conservation in Housing (TECH) program, initiated in 1975 as a joint venture of the Energy Research

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

348

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud brightening2  

E-print Network

to short-term, regional experiments to long-term, global43 experiments. In this article, we are primarilyDefining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud global warming. We discuss the utility of field experiments to test MCB.11 These experiments

Wood, Robert

349

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering by marine cloud brightening  

E-print Network

experiments to long-term, global experiments. This article is primarily concerned with the transition fromDefining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering by marine cloud brightening warming. We discuss the utility of field experiments to test MCB. These experiments, if appropriately

Wood, Robert

350

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2012-07-01

351

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2014-07-01

352

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2011-07-01

353

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2013-07-01

354

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2010-07-01

355

QUIET HOUR 1 A field test of the quiet hour as a time management technique  

E-print Network

QUIET HOUR 1 A field test of the quiet hour as a time management technique Cornelius J. König at European Review of Applied Psychology #12;QUIET HOUR 2 A field test of the quiet hour as a time management and on a behavioral decision-making approach to time management, we argue that establishing quiet hours

Mayberry, Marty

356

Test plan for the field evaluation and demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit  

SciTech Connect

This report describes test details of a full demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a mobile trailer capable of employing the use of soil fixatives, dust suppression agents, misting, and vacuum systems. These systems can perform a large number of contamination control functions to support the Office of Waste Technology Development (OTD) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) projects, transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, and emergency response for hazardous and radioactive materials incidents. The demonstration will include both performance testing at the North Holmes Laboratory Facility (NHLF) and field testing in conjunction with the Remote Excavation System Demonstration at the Cold Test Pit. The NHLF will test operational parameters using water only, and the field demonstration at the Cold Test Pit involves full scale operation of vacuum, fixant, misting, and dust suppression systems. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the field demonstration are included in this test plan.

Winberg, M.R.; Thompson, D.N.

1993-06-01

357

Piloted Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5, 20, 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the NASA 1A control law. Each maneuver is to be realized by the pilot applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls. Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

Morelli, Eugene A.

1996-01-01

358

Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5,20,30,45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) control law in Thrust Vectoring (TV) mode. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time / amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

Batterson, James G. (Technical Monitor); Morelli, E. A.

1996-01-01

359

Lessons learned from the dynamic identification/qualification tests on the ESC-A upper stage model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modeling approach made at the beginning of the development. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. For the low frequency domain the verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro-shock) a stage separation test was performed. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electro-dynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 100÷150Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach of how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experience accomplished.

Rittweger, Andreas; Beuchel, Werner; Andersen, Martin G.; Albus, Jochen

2005-12-01

360

47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...the operating power must be maintained at a constant value for each phase of the tests. (4) The input power to the final amplifier stage, and the AM antenna current or the FM or TV transmitter output power must be observed and recorded at half hour...

2014-10-01

361

EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application  

EPA Science Inventory

Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station?s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology?s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

362

TESTS OF THE DUAL DIFFERENTIAL RADIOMETER UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A dual differential radiometer was tested on numerous eastern United States lakes and reservoirs. Remotely sensed data were compared with ground-truth chlorophyll a values. Results indicate that the instrument has only limited application in the remote sensing of chlorophyll a in...

363

Field Testing Stand-Alone Courseware: A Proven Practical Procedure.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes procedure to measure a new course's ability to meet standards in three areas: student acceptance, student gains, and student comprehension. It has been used over three years to test the acceptability of 31 courses which contain more than 200 videotape presentations, and thousands of pages of print materials. (Author/JEG)

Westgaard, Odin

1979-01-01

364

Leprosy diagnosis: a device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions in the field.  

PubMed Central

A handy device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions has been developed and field tested in various centres in Africa and India. The instrument performed satisfactorily and its use made testing for thermal sensibility in the field practicable and straightforward. Analysis of the results of testing 260 persons, most of whom exhibited a few lesions that were characteristic of early leprosy, showed that the rate of diagnosis of sensory impairment of such skin lesions, and hence the diagnosis of leprosy, would be about 15-25% more if thermal sensibility testing using this device were added to the other tests of sensibility routinely carried out in the field. Regular use of the device in the field would help to bring more leprosy patients under treatment than at present. Images Fig. 5 PMID:2699276

Srinivasan, H.; Stumpe, B.

1989-01-01

365

Field Hydraulic Tests Improve HPHT Drilling Safety and Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the Elgin-Franklin UKCS fields, drilling of the high pressure\\/high temperature (HPHT) phase is critical due to the narrow margin between formation pore and fracturation pressures. This problem is accentuated by the extreme temperature (up to 205 C--400 F) and pressure (up to 1,200 bar--17,400 psi). A new generation of down-hole pressure while drilling (PWD) tools allows a better real-time

Patrick Isambourg; D. L. Bertin; Martial Brangetto

1999-01-01

366

A Remote Monitoring System of Environmental Electromagnetic Field in Magnetic Confinement Fusion Test Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A remote, continuous environmental electromagnetic field monitoring system for use in magnetic confinement fusion test facilities is developed. Using this system, both the static magnetic field and the high frequency electromagnetic field could be measured. The required frequency range of the measurement system is from 25 to 100 MHz for the ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) heating system. The

Masahiro Tanaka; Shigeyuki Takami; Tatsuhiko Uda; Jianqing Wang; Osamu Fujiwara

2010-01-01

367

Identification and field evaluation of grape shoot volatiles attractive to female grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana).  

PubMed

Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography coupled with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) were used to identify volatile compounds from shoots of riverbank grape (Vitis riparia) that attract the female grape berry moth (GBM, Paralobesia viteana). Consistent EAD activity was obtained for 11 chemicals: (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate, (E)-linalool oxide, (Z)-linalool oxide, nonanal, linalool, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, methyl salicylate, decanal, beta-caryophyllene, germacrene-D, and alpha-farnesene. In flight-tunnel tests that involved female GBM and rubber septa loaded with subsets of these 11 compounds, we found that both the 11-component blend and a seven-component blend, composed of (E)-linalool oxide, (Z)-linalool oxide, nonanal, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, decanal, beta-caryophyllene and germacrene-D, elicited equivalent levels of upwind flight as freshly cut grape shoots. The removal of any of the seven compounds from the seven-component blend resulted in a significant decrease in female upwind flight responses. In a field trial with these two synthetic blends, traps equipped with either blend captured more female GBM compared to traps baited with hexane only (control), although the number of females caught was generally low. There were no differences in the number of males captured among treatments. Although in flight-tunnel trials, moths readily flew upwind to both grape shoots and rubber septa loaded with the best lures, they landed on shoots but not on rubber septa. Coupled with relatively low field catches, this suggests that additional host finding cues need to be identified to improve trap efficacy. PMID:18649104

Cha, Dong H; Nojima, Satoshi; Hesler, Stephen P; Zhang, Aijun; Linn, Charles E; Roelofs, Wendell L; Loeb, Gregory M

2008-09-01

368

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01

369

Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

Wilson, A. H.

1979-01-01

370

Pressure-interference testing of the Sumikawa geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

Pressure interference tests have been used to determine the permeability structure of the Sumikawa reservoir. Interference tests between wells S-4 and KY-1 have indicated the presence of a very high permeability (140 md) north-south channel in the altered andesite layer. Pressure buildup data from well SN-7D have provided indications of a high transmissivity (kh {approx} 18 darcy-meters) reservoir located in the granodiorite layer, lack of pressure response in nearby shutin Sumikawa wells implies that the reservoir penetrated by SN-7D is isolated from the shallower reservoir in the altered andesites. The ''altered andesite'' and the ''granodiorite'' formations constitute the principal geothermal aquifers at Sumikawa. Pressure interference tests (wells KY-1 and SB-2, and wells KY-2 and SB-3) have also confirmed the presence of moderately high transmissivity ({approx} 2 darcy-meters) dacitic layers in the ''marine-volcanic complex'' formation. Because of its low vertical permeability, the ''marine volcanic complex'' formation constitutes an attractive target for the reinjection of waste geothermal fluids.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Ariki, K.; Kawano, Y.

1991-01-01

371

Results from the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers-CATSI and AIRIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the U.S (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

2002-02-01

372

Results of the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers: CATSI and AIRIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the US (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

2002-08-01

373

FIELD TEST KIT FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL-BRINE EFFLUENTS FROM OFFSHORE DRILLING PLATFORMS  

EPA Science Inventory

This research program was initiated to evaluate test methods for characterizing oil-brine effluents from offshore oil production platforms and to package and deliver a field test kit for on-site oil-brine analyses. After an initial laboratory evaluation and selection of test meth...

374

WIND TUNNEL AND FIELD TEST OF THREE 2D SONIC ANEMOMETERS Wiel M.F. Wauben,  

E-print Network

WIND TUNNEL AND FIELD TEST OF THREE 2D SONIC ANEMOMETERS Wiel M.F. Wauben, Instrumental Department upgraded and the tests commenced. Wind tunnel tests were performed for wind speeds up to 75m/s. Overall and the Vaisala WAS425. The sonics have been compared to the KNMI cup anemometer and wind vane that are used

Wauben, Wiel

375

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

376

Wireless tracking of cotton modules. Part 2: Automatic machine identification and system testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to map profit across a cotton field would enable producers to determine where money is being made or lost on their farms and to implement precise field management practices to facilitate the highest return possible on each portion of a field. Mapping profit requires knowledge of site-specific costs and revenues, including yield and price. Price varies site-specifically because

A. J. Sjolander; J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui; Y. Ge

2011-01-01

377

Detection and Identification of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Shigella spp. via PCR-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Isolate Testing and Analysis of Food Samples  

PubMed Central

An assay to identify the common food-borne pathogens Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Listeria monocytogenes was developed in collaboration with Ibis Biosciences (a division of Abbott Molecular) for the Plex-ID biosensor system, a platform that uses electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) to detect the base composition of short PCR amplicons. The new food-borne pathogen (FBP) plate has been experimentally designed using four gene segments for a total of eight amplicon targets. Initial work built a DNA base count database that contains more than 140 Salmonella enterica, 139 E. coli, 11 Shigella, and 36 Listeria patterns and 18 other Enterobacteriaceae organisms. This assay was tested to determine the scope of the assay's ability to detect and differentiate the enteric pathogens and to improve the reference database associated with the assay. More than 800 bacterial isolates of S. enterica, E. coli, and Shigella species were analyzed. Overall, 100% of S. enterica, 99% of E. coli, and 73% of Shigella spp. were detected using this assay. The assay was also able to identify 30% of the S. enterica serovars to the serovar level. To further characterize the assay, spiked food matrices and food samples collected during regulatory field work were also studied. While analysis of preenrichment media was inconsistent, identification of S. enterica from selective enrichment media resulted in serovar-level identifications for 8 of 10 regulatory samples. The results of this study suggest that this high-throughput method may be useful in clinical and regulatory laboratories testing for these pathogens. PMID:23001674

Bell, Rebecca L.; Hellberg, Rosalee S.; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Chen, Kai-Shun; Williams-Hill, Donna M.; Martin, William B.; Allard, Marc W.

2012-01-01

378

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

2003-01-01

379

SEURAT: Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-Recommendations for future research in the field of predictive toxicology.  

PubMed

The development of non-animal methodology to evaluate the potential for a chemical to cause systemic toxicity is one of the grand challenges of modern science. The European research programme SEURAT is active in this field and will conclude its first phase, SEURAT-1, in December 2015. Drawing on the experience gained in SEURAT-1 and appreciating international advancement in both basic and regulatory science, we reflect here on how SEURAT should evolve and propose that further research and development should be directed along two complementary and interconnecting work streams. The first work stream would focus on developing new 'paradigm' approaches for regulatory science. The goal here is the identification of 'critical biological targets' relevant for toxicity and to test their suitability to be used as anchors for predicting toxicity. The second work stream would focus on integration and application of new approach methods for hazard (and risk) assessment within the current regulatory 'paradigm', aiming for acceptance of animal-free testing strategies by regulatory authorities (i.e. translating scientific achievements into regulation). Components for both work streams are discussed and may provide a structure for a future research programme in the field of predictive toxicology. PMID:25433540

Daston, George; Knight, Derek J; Schwarz, Michael; Gocht, Tilman; Thomas, Russell S; Mahony, Catherine; Whelan, Maurice

2015-01-01

380

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results  

SciTech Connect

California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-04-06

381

An Alternative to the Physiological Psychology Laboratory: Identification of an Unknown Drug Through Behavioral Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory project introduced physiological psychology students to research by requiring them to identify an unknown drug given to laboratory animals. Students read material about drugs and animal drug studies, designed behavioral tests, constructed the testing apparatus, conducted the tests, and wrote progress reports. (SR)

Schumacher, Susan J.

1982-01-01

382

Genetic Tests for Ability?: Talent Identification and the Value of an Open Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the prospect of genetic tests for performance in physical activity and sports practices. It investigates the terminology associated with genetics, testing, selection and ability as a means towards a socio-ethical analysis of its value within sport, education and society. Our argument suggests that genetic tests need not even be…

Miah, Andy; Rich, Emma

2006-01-01

383

Identification of Pseudomonas pseudomallei in clinical practice: use of simple screening tests and API 20NE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The API 20NE kit and a simple screening system involving Gram's stain, the oxidase reaction, colistin and gentamicin resistance, and colonial characteristics on a differential agar medium, were used to test 400 strains of Pseudomonas pseudomallei. The API kit identified 390 (97.5%) strains correctly on first testing and all but one of the remainder on second testing. Only one strain

D A Dance; V Wuthiekanun; P Naigowit; N J White

1989-01-01

384

EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

385

EMISSION TEST REPORT - FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL - CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

386

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. ...the PEMS during a test, or you may operate...criterion, correct those test intervals for drift...using an inertial PM balance, place any used...

2014-07-01

387

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. ...the PEMS during a test, or you may operate...criterion, correct those test intervals for drift...using an inertial PM balance, place any used...

2012-07-01

388

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. ...the PEMS during a test, or you may operate...criterion, correct those test intervals for drift...using an inertial PM balance, place any used...

2011-07-01

389

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. ...the PEMS during a test, or you may operate...criterion, correct those test intervals for drift...using an inertial PM balance, place any used...

2013-07-01

390

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...condition an inertial PM balance substrate if you use an inertial balance to measure PM. ...the PEMS during a test, or you may operate...criterion, correct those test intervals for drift...using an inertial PM balance, place any used...

2010-07-01

391

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

SciTech Connect

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01

392

Wind-Tunnel Survey of an Oscillating Flow Field for Application to Model Helicopter Rotor Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey was conducted of the flow field produced by the Airstream Oscillator System (AOS) in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The magnitude of a simulated gust field was measured at 15 locations in the plane of a typical model helicopter rotor when tested in the TDT using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) model. These measurements were made over a range of tunnel dynamic pressures typical of those used for an ARES test. The data indicate that the gust field produced by the AOS is non-uniform across the tunnel test section, but should be sufficient to excite a model rotor.

Mirick, Paul H.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

1990-01-01

393

Construction of a BAC library and identification of Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel, Monopterus albus  

SciTech Connect

A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed using nuclear DNA from the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). The BAC library consists of a total of 33,000 clones with an average insert size of 115 kb. Based on the rice field eel haploid genome size of 600 Mb, the BAC library is estimated to contain approximately 6.3 genome equivalents and represents 99.8% of the genome of the rice field eel. This is first BAC library constructed from this species. To estimate the possibility of isolating a specific clone, high-density colony hybridization-based library screening was performed using Dmrt1 cDNA of the rice field eel as a probe. Both library screening and PCR identification results revealed three positive BAC clones which were overlapped, and formed a contig covering the Dmrt1 gene of 195 kb. By sequence comparisons with the Dmrt1 cDNA and sequencing of first four intron-exon junctions, Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel was predicted to contain four introns and five exons. The sizes of first and second intron are 1.5 and 2.6 kb, respectively, and the sizes of last two introns were predicted to be about 20 kb. The Dmrt1 gene structure was conserved in evolution. These results also indicate that the BAC library is a useful resource for BAC contig construction and molecular isolation of functional genes.

Jang Songhun [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou Fang [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xia Laixin [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhao Wei [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng Hanhua [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: hhcheng@whu.edu.cn; Zhou Rongjia [Department of Genetics and Center for Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: rjzhou@whu.edu.cn

2006-09-22

394

Field-Configurable Test Structure Array (FC-TSA): Enabling Design for Monitor, Model, and Manufacturability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a common framework of test chip design for logic technology development and routine process monitoring, referred to as a field-configurable test structure array (FC-TSA), which can accommodate and test various types of test structures including transistors, diodes, and resistors. To minimize the number of probe pads and maximize area utilization efficiency, a memory-addressing design scheme is implemented

Kelvin Yih-Yuh Doong; Terry James Bordelon; Lien-Jung Hung; Chien-Chih Liao; Sheng-Che Lin; Susan Pei-Shan Ho; Sunnys Hsieh; Konrad L. Young

2008-01-01

395

Environmental qualification and field test results for the SONAbeam 155-M  

Microsoft Academic Search

The test methods and results are discussed for fSONA Communications SONAbeam 155-M product - a free-space-optics system that operates at 1550 nm. Results include environmental qualification testing and field testing of system performance over test ranges of 450 and 5000 meters. The SONAbeam 155-M is representative of a family of products that range from 34 to 1244 Mbps. This product

Robert T. Carlson; Slawomir Paciorek

2001-01-01

396

The Savannah River Environmental Technology Field Test Platform: Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal in the development of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is transferring them to organizations and individuals for use in site assessment and compliance monitoring. The DOE complex has devised several strategies to facilitate this transfer including joint research projects between private industries and government laboratories or universities (CRADAs) and streamlined licensing procedures. One strategy that has been under-utilized is a planned sequence gradually moving from laboratory development and field demonstration to long term evaluation and onsite use. Industrial partnership and commercial production can be initiated at any step based on the performance, market, user needs, and costs associated with the technology. This approach allows use of the technology by onsite groups for compliance monitoring tasks (e.g. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management), while following parallel research and development organizations the opportunity to evaluate the long term performance and to make modifications or improvements to the technology. This probationary period also provides regulatory organizations, potential industrial partners, and potential users with the opportunity to evaluate the technology`s performance and its utility for implementation in environmental characterization and monitoring programs.

Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Jarosch, T.R.; Looney, B.B.; Raymond, R.

1995-03-14

397

Testing a Stakeholder Participation Framework for Fielding Bioremediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This research is investigating stakeholder attitudes about the use of bioremediation technologies with the objective of reducing conflict among stakeholders. The research protocol includes four closely related components. First, we are testing a framework for stakeholder participation that prescribes appropriate stakeholder involvement strategies based on stakeholders trust of the other parties involved in technology deployment decision-making. Second, we are assessing conflict among stakeholders regarding the acceptability of in situ bioremediation as a means to reduce risks posed by radionuclides and metals in the environment. Third, we are assessing the role that awareness of risk exposure plays in the willingness of stakeholders to engage in problem-solving and making risk tradeoffs. Fourth, we are assessing the potential of using the results of these first three components to forge consensus among stakeholders regarding the use and oversight of bioremediation technologies and stakeholder involvement in the decision process. This poster presents preliminary results of a Q methodological survey of stakeholders who are familiar with radionuclide and heavy metal contamination and DOE efforts to remediate that contamination at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Hanford reservations. The Q study allows the research team to diagnose conflict among stakeholders and discover opportunities for consensus.

Anex, Robert P.; Focht, Will

2004-03-17

398

Identification of Possible Artifacts in the Association of Official Analytical Chemists Sporicidal Test  

PubMed Central

Two laboratories tested four different brands of alkaline 2% glutaraldehyde sterilants by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists sporicidal test. Each laboratory found survival of Clostridium sporogenes spores on spore-labeled unglazed porcelain penicylinders (cylinders) to vary from test to test, and survival did not always correlate with increasing sterilant exposure time. These results were consistent with a theory that there may be random conditions within the test that prevent the sterilant from contacting all spores. Further studies indicated that the prior history of the unglazed porcelain cylinders and whether the C. sporogenes culture grown in egg-meat media had been processed (homogenized) to eliminate visible pieces of egg-meat media were important factors affecting the results and repeatability of this test. PMID:16535009

Miner, N. A.; Mulberry, G. K.; Starks, A. N.; Powers-Prather, A.; Entrup, M.; Armstrong, M.; Maida, B.

1995-01-01

399

Universal immuno-stick test for direct rapid identification of microbial antigens within 5 minutes. Preliminary report.  

PubMed

Based on experiences with ELISA and biochemical fluorescence assays we have developed a new serologic identification system for detecting all conceivable particle and soluble antigens within 5 min using a very simple, sensitive procedure. This assay represents a sandwich ELISA that has been modified with regard to the sorbent, the enzyme substrate and the identification step. The test is performed as follows: 10 microliter aliquots of antigen dilution, specific or control antibody, respectively, and a phosphatase-conjugated anti-antibody are consecutively mixed. A small strip of special indicator sorbent paper (test stick) is moistened with this mixture for one minute. Subsequently it is dipped 3-5 times alternately in 0.1 M NaOH and a solution of the enzyme-substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate and immediately evaluated under a UV lamp. Positive samples instantaneously show brilliant light blue fluorescence and decolorization from dark red to white. Although the principle behind the reaction is not yet fully understood, the test works specifically and sensitively within a pg range. Thus far, for example, we have been able to identify Salmonella from suspended milk powder and streptococci from milk (3-5 cells/ml) without previous incubation, enterotoxins from staphylococcal colonies, Aflatoxin M1 and organ-phosphates. Results from examinations of staphylococcal enterotoxins are presented in more detail. Moreover, using a defined antigen, antibodies from different sera could be identified in the same rapid, sensitive and specific manner. Thus, we are convinced that the usual time-consuming enrichment methods for isolating pathogenic bacteria and other immunogenic substances as also current serologic assays will turn out to be superfluous. PMID:3381599

Hahn, G; Bransch, B

1988-03-01

400

12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) AT FACE "A" - VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH 20° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

401

Officer competency in the Texas Standardized Field Sobriety Testing Program: a quantitative study  

E-print Network

Many law enforcement officers (LEOs) have successfully completed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Standardized Field Sobriety Testing (SFST) course to enhance their ability to detect impaired drivers. However, in recent...

Merkley, Rodney Joseph

2002-01-01

402

LITTORAL ENCLOSURES FOR AQUATIC FIELD TESTING OF PESTICIDES: THE EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS ON A NATURAL SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

A littoral enclosure protocol designed for aquatic field testing of pesticides is described. he enclosures are replicated, relatively economical, and incorporates all trophic levels, the natural shoreline, and undisturbed bottom sediments. he results of using this protocol to stu...

403

Automated water monitor system field demonstration test report. Volume 2: Technical summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Automatic Water Monitor System was installed in a water reclamation facility to evaluate the technical and cost feasibility of producing high quality reclaimed water. Data gathered during this field demonstration test are reported.

Brooks, R. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Perreira, J.; Poel, J. D.; Nibley, D.; Nuss, R. H.

1981-01-01

404

Field Testing of New Interference-Free Ambient Ozone Monitors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multibillion-dollar strategies control ambient air ozone (O3) levels in the U.S. so it is essential that the O3 measurements made for developing state implementation plans, assessing population risks, and determining compliance with regulations be accurate. The predominant U.S. regulatory method employed to monitor ambient O3 is ultraviolet (254 nm) photometry and many previous studies have demonstrated positive interferences associated with this technology. We evaluate two new humidity-controlled commercial instruments - a 2B Technology Model 211 ultraviolet O3 photometer that replaces its conventional MnO2 scrubber with gas-phase NO titration and a Teledyne-API Model 265E NO-O3 chemiluminescence monitor - both designed to minimize the aromatic organic, mercury, and water vapor interferences common to O3 photometers. New units were paired with conventional photometers sampling indoor, outdoor, and in-vehicle environments where populations spend most of their time. Overall, during the fixed-site monitor comparisons in Houston, TX, the three instruments were highly correlated (r2 ? 0.99) with regression slopes of 1.00 ± 0.01, and O3 averaged over the study period agreed within 1 ppb; however, U.S. O3 standard compliance depends on fourth highest annual daily maximum 8-hour O3 values, so urban monitors must measure accurately during typically hot, humid, and stagnant O3-conducive day conditions. Conventional photometers reported the highest values for the four highest 8-hour daily maxima during our three month late summer test period, with 8-hour average differences between the new and conventional monitors ranging up to 4 ppb. In paired 10-minute average sampling with a Model 211 in Durham, NC, conventional photometers generally exhibited modest positive interference bias (under 5 ppb) in 176 sampled residences, shops, malls, restaurants, offices, parks, roadways, and vehicles; however, in six percent of our samples indoor differences exceeded 10 ppb and in two 64 ppb and 174 ppb cases exceeded outdoor ambient O3 levels several-fold.

Ollison, W. M.; Capel, J.; Crow, W.; Johnson, T.; Spicer, C. W.

2013-05-01

405

Identification of wind turbine testing practices and investigation of the performance benefits of closely-spaced lateral wind farm configurations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current thesis investigates the development of guidelines for testing small-scale wind turbines and identifies a method that can be used to increase the performance of wind farms. The research was conducted using two scaled wind turbine designs. The first design was a three-bladed wind turbine designed in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAAE) to operate in a low Reynolds number regime and to generate a thrust coefficient representative of commercial-scale wind turbines. An Eppler E387 airfoil was selected for the wind turbine due to its behaviour at low Reynolds numbers and the chord of the turbine was increased relative to full-scale designs in order to increase the range of Reynolds numbers that could be attained. The second design was a geometrically-scaled version of an existing two-bladed wind turbine with a NACA 0012 airfoil that was originally designed at the Delft University of Technology. Experiments were conducted in a 0.61 m x 0.81 m water channel in order to independently evaluate the effects of increasing blockage and Reynolds number on the development of the wind turbine wake. Quantitative dye visualisation was used to identify the position of tip vortex cores relative to the blade tip in order to assess how blockage and Reynolds number effects modified the initial expansion in the near wake. Blockage effects on the wake development were assessed using five wind turbines with diameters ranging from 20 cm to 40 cm, corresponding to blockage of 6.3% to 25.4%. The rotors were all operated at a similar tip speed ratio of 6 and a Reynolds number of 23,000 based on the blade tip speed and tip chord. One Outcome of the research was the identification of a limit beyond which blockage narrowed the expansion in the near wake of a wind turbine. It was observed that blockage should be maintained at less than 10% in order to prevent the wake from narrowing artificially due to the flow acceleration around the turbine caused by excessive blockage. The experimental results were compared to a freestream computational simulation of the same turbine using the vortex particle method code GENUVP. The magnitude of the wake expansion in the freestream computation was similar to the experimental wake expansion observed with 6.3% and 9.9% blockage. Following the identification of testing practices related to blockage, the effect of the Reynolds number on the development of the initial wake expansion was investigated using two different rotors. The wake expansion downstream of a 25 cm diameter, three-bladed MAAE wind turbine became less sensitive to the Reynolds number above a Reynolds number of 20,000. This behaviour may be related to the laminar-to-turbulent transition behaviour of the E387 airfoil on the rotor blades. The wake downstream of the geometrically-scaled rotor was found to be 40% to 60% narrower than the initial wake expansion downstream of the corresponding medium-scale rotor. The work identified the need to develop a wind turbine design for a particular Reynolds number regime as opposed to merely geometrically-scaling a turbine. The performance of scaled wind farm configurations was then evaluated using 20 cm diameter MAAE wind turbines installed in the 1.68 m x 1.12 m atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at Carleton University. A scaled boundary layer was generated using triangular boundary layer spires and roughness elements installed along the upstream fetch of the tunnel. Each wind turbine was outfitted with a DC generator and the power output generated by the scaled turbines was used to characterise their performance. A single-normal hot-wire probe was used to determine the mean speed profiles in the fiowfield. Two laterally-aligned wind turbines were separated by a gap and it was observed that when the gap was less than 3 diameters (D), the speed of the flow between the rotors was increased from the rotor plane to approximately 2.5D downstream. This behaviour was identified as an in-field blockage effect and is analogous to the increase in wind speed caused by blockage in a closed

McTavish, Sean

406

Evaluation of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) membrane test assays for the forensic identification of seminal fluid.  

PubMed

Prostate specific antigen (PSA, also known as p30), a glycoprotein produced by the prostatic gland and secreted into seminal plasma, is a marker used for demonstrating the presence of seminal fluid. Methods for the detection of PSA include Ouchterlony double diffusion, crossover electrophoresis, rocket immuno-electrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion, and ELISA. The extremely sensitive ELISA technique can detect PSA in concentrations as low as approximately 4 ng/mL. However, all these techniques are cumbersome and time consuming to perform in forensic laboratories, especially when only a few samples per week are processed. Various membrane tests are currently used in clinical settings to screen a patient's serum for the presence of PSA at levels greater than 4 ng/mL. In this study we evaluated three immunochromatographic PSA membrane tests by analyzing semen stains stored at room temperature for up to 30 years, post-coital vaginal swabs taken at different time after intercourse, semen-free vaginal swabs, and various female and male body fluids, including urine. The data demonstrate that PSA membrane test assays offer the same sensitivity as ELISA-based tests and provide a rapid approach for the forensic identification of seminal fluid. Furthermore, when the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no DNA consumption for determining the presence of PSA in a forensic sample. PMID:10486959

Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Borer, U; Thali, M; Dirnhofer, R

1999-09-01

407

MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063. I. Data products and redshift identifications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the first observations of the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 taken with the newly commissioned Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. Because of the relatively large field of view (1 arcmin2), MUSE is ideal to simultaneously target multiple galaxies in blank and cluster fields over the full optical spectrum. We analysed the four hours of data obtained in the science verification phase on this cluster and measured redshifts for 53 galaxies. We confirm the redshift of five cluster galaxies, and determine the redshift of 29 other cluster members. Behind the cluster, we find 17 galaxies at higher redshift, including three previously unknown Lyman-? emitters at z> 3, and five multiply-lensed galaxies. We report the detection of a new z = 4.113 multiply lensed galaxy, with images that are consistent with lensing model predictions derived for the Frontier Fields. We detect C iii], C iv, and He ii emission in a multiply lensed galaxy at z = 3.116, suggesting the likely presence of an active galactic nucleus. We also created narrow-band images from the MUSE datacube to automatically search for additional line emitters corresponding to high-redshift candidates, but we could not identify any significant detections other than those found by visual inspection. With the new redshifts, it will become possible to obtain an accurate mass reconstruction in the core of Abell S1063 through refined strong lensing modelling. Overall, our results illustrate the breadth of scientific topics that can be addressed with a single MUSE pointing. We conclude that MUSE is a very efficient instrument to observe galaxy clusters, enabling their mass modelling, and to perform a blind search for high-redshift galaxies.

Karman, W.; Caputi, K. I.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Coe, D.; Christensen, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Krühler, T.; Lombardi, M.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; van der Wel, A.

2015-02-01

408

Optimizing of the basophil activation test: Comparison of different basophil identification markers.  

PubMed

Background Flowcytometric identification of basophils is a prerequisite for measuring activation of basophils with IgE-dependent or IgE-independent stimuli. Aim of this study was to compare different marker combinations in a simultaneous multicolor flowcytometric measurement. Methods Ten patients with a grass pollen allergy and 3 controls were included in the study. Basophilic cells were gated by using anti-CCR3647, anti-IgE, anti-CRTH2, anti-CD203c und anti-CD3. Cells were activated by a monoclonal anti-Fc?RI antibody, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and the allergen extract Phleum pratense. The activation marker anti-CD63 was used. Results The highest relative number of basophils was found with anti-CCR3(+) cells, anti-IgE(+) and anti-IgE(+) /anti-CD203c(+) cells, the lowest with CRTH2(+) /CD203c(+) /CD3(-) cells. A very good and good concordance of CCR3(+) cells was seen with CCR3(+) /CD3(-) cells and CRTH2(+) /CD203c(+) /CD3(-) cells in all experiments. The contamination of the CCR3(+) population with CD3(+) cells and the contamination of the IgE(+) -population with CCR3(-) cells and CD203(-) cells were the lowest compared to all other marker combinations. Conclusions As the highest relative number of basophils was identified by anti-CD193 (CCR3) followed by the anti-IgE and anti-IgE/antiCD203c positive population in most cases, these markers can generally be recommended for identification of basophils. If a basophil population with very high purity is needed, anti-IgE should be chosen. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:25382789

Eberlein, Bernadette; Hann, Rebekka; Eyerich, Stefanie; Pennino, Davide; Ring, Johannes; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Buters, Jeroen

2014-11-01

409

Field test of acoustic logs for measuring porosity and oil saturation in a mature waterflood in the Wilmington field, CA  

SciTech Connect

A field test was carried out in the Wilmington Field, CA to assess the effectiveness of multi-pole acoustic logs to measure porosity and oil saturation through casing in sands waterflooded for over 40 years. The field test was also designed to assess the production potential of selectively recompleting wells in high water cut areas. The multi-pole acoustic logs offer a promising new method for reservoir characterization, depletion monitoring, and optimizing the recomplete and redrill potential of existing wells. The Department of Energy (DOE) is co-funding a multi-year study to refine the acoustic log analyses, to improve reservoir characterization, and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various recomplete methods.

Moos, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hara, S.; Phillips, C.; Hooks, A.; Tagbor, K.

1995-12-31

410

Environmental Indication: A Field Test of an Ecosystem Approach to Quantify Biological Self-Organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we take an ecosystem approach to examine the degree of biological self-organization at the ecosystem level.\\u000a An integrated set of indicators is derived from a theoretical framework and tested by field data from an ecosystem research\\u000a project focusing on the Bornh?ved Lake district in northern Germany. This field test is based on a comparison of the self-organized

Werner L. Kutsch; Wolf Steinborn; Mathias Herbst; Rainer Baumann; Jan Barkmann; Ludger Kappen

2001-01-01

411

Challenges for mining explosion identification under a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty: Quantification of the problem and discussion of synergetic solutions  

SciTech Connect

Seismic networks provide the primary technology for monitoring compliance with a comprehensive test ban treaty. The design goal of the network is the identification of possibly clandestine explosions detonated below the earth`s surface and possible in the oceans. Complementary technologies such as infrasonic, hydroacoustic and radionuclide monitoring supplement the seismic monitoring covering explosions in the atmosphere and oceans. This paper will focus on the problems or ambiguities that can arise in the identification process for chemical explosions. Key questions addressed include: How many mining explosions produce seismograms at regional distances that will have to be detected, located and ultimately identified by the National Data Center? What are the waveform characteristics of these particular mining explosions? Can discrimination techniques based on empirical studies be placed on a firm physical basis so that they can be applied to other regions where we have little monitoring experience? With this information, can evasion capabilities be assessed in a region? Can large scale chemical explosions be used to calibrate source and propagation path effects to regional stations? Can source depth of burial and decoupling effects be studied in such a controlled environment?

Stump, B.W.

1994-11-01

412

Identification of Sensorimotor Components Accounting for Individual Variability in Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) represents a highly feasible measure of information-processing speed that correlates quite highly with standard psychometric tests of intelligence. The present study was designed to identify specific stages of the sensorimotor processing system that may account for individual differences in overall variability of…

Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Stahl, Jutta

2007-01-01

413

Critical Evaluation of Animal Alternative Tests for the Identification of Endocrine Active Substances  

EPA Science Inventory

A significant amount of research is currently targeted to evaluate alternative test methods that may reduce, refine, or replace the use of animals, while ensuring human and environmental health and safety. It is important that the information gained from the alternative tests pr...

414

Identification of a coupled flapping/inflow model for the PUMA helicopter from flight test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model validation procedure is applied to a coupled flapping/inflow model of a PUMA helicopter blade. The structure of the baseline model is first established. Model structure and flight test data are checked for consistency. Parameters of the model are then identified from the flight test data.

Du Val, Ronald; Bruhis, Ofer; Green, John

1989-01-01

415

Operation of agricultural test fields for study of stressed crops by remote sensing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test site for the study of winter wheat development and collection of ERTS data was established in September of 1973. The test site is a 10 mile square area located 12.5 miles west of Amarillo, Texas on Interstate Hwy. 40, in Randall and Potter counties. The center of the area is the Southwestern Great Plains Research Center at Bushland, Texas. Within the test area all wheat fields were identified by ground truth and designated irrigated or dryland. The fields in the test area other than wheat were identified as to pasture or the crop that was grown. A ground truth area of hard red winter wheat was established west of Hale Center, Texas. Maps showing the location of winter wheat fields in excess of 40 acres in size within a 10 mile radius were supplied NASA. Satellite data was collected for this test site (ERTS-1).

Toler, R. W.

1974-01-01

416

FIELD TESTING PESTICIDE TRANSPORT MODELS AT A COOPERATIVE TEST SITE NEAR PLAINS, GEORGIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. DePartment of Agriculture, the U.S. eological survey, and The University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station developed a joint research effort to investigate and to model pesticide movement at a field site. he participants...

417

EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT&E HPM methodology testing  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DOD LFT&E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT&E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for ?bird health? purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

Anderson, R. A.; Nelson, S. D.

1997-09-04

418

EM field and instrumentation diagnostics in support of the LFT E HPM methodology testing  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, under the direction of the DOD LFT E Office performed a series of HPM tests for the purpose of exercising the HPM methodology for LFT E applications. An AH-1S Cobra helicopter was used as the canonical test bed. The Air Force Research Lab (formally Phillips Lab) provided the wide-band source and the Army Research Lab provided the narrow-band used in the tests. LLNL provided the EM diagnostics used at the site for both test series. Our mission was to measure the radiated field from the sources, measure the fields inside the helicopter and the coupling onto various signal lines inside the helicopter, and to monitor the various system signal levels for bird health purposes. These experiments were performed during June of 1997 and consisted of exposing the test bed to a series of narrow-band and wide-band pulses from HPM sources. This report covers the measured radiated fields, the fields inside the helicopter, and the coupled signal levels. The radiated fields were measured over a region which spans the physical body of the helicopter. The fields inside the helicopter and the coupled fields were measured using a series of probes inside the helicopter and connected to the outside measurement system using fiber-optic cables. The helicopter effects data are presented in the main China Lake report.

Anderson, R. A.; Nelson, S. D.

1997-09-04

419

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

SciTech Connect

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25

420

A comparison of the sniff magnitude test and the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test in children and nonnative English speakers.  

PubMed

The sniff magnitude test (SMT) is a reliable and rapid clinical test of olfactory function that is minimally dependent on cognitive and linguistic abilities. In this study, we compared performance on the SMT and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) in samples of children and nonnative English speakers. Previous research has shown that these populations perform poorly on the UPSIT as compared with young, healthy U.S. adults. Such performance differences may reflect variations in memory/cognition and language/culture rather than olfactory abilities. The UPSIT scores of children and of Indian and Chinese graduate students were found to be lower than those of young U.S. adults. By contrast, these groups did not perform more poorly than U.S. adults did on the SMT. The results are consistent with findings from our studies, with the elderly showing that performance on the UPSIT, but not the SMT, is significantly correlated with measures of memory, language and other cognitive abilities. The findings highlight the utility of the SMT when evaluating the olfactory ability of the very young, older adults and people with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. PMID:15135019

Frank, Robert A; Dulay, Mario F; Niergarth, Kristine A; Gesteland, Robert C

2004-05-01

421

Field Test Experience of an Underwater Wireless Network in the Atlantic Ocean  

E-print Network

Field Test Experience of an Underwater Wireless Network in the Atlantic Ocean Zheng Peng*, Son Le share our experience from a recent field experiment in the Atlantic Ocean, in which we have deployed of 2012, we spent 7 days and deployed an underwater wireless network on the Atlantic Ocean, as shown

Zhou, Shengli

422

Field-induced charged device model testing of magnetoresistive recording heads  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the behavior of a magnetoresistive (MR) recording head in external electric fields for the first time. Both energy and voltage failure thresholds during field-induced charged device model (CDM) testing are measured. An equivalent circuit model for the MR head is constructed and used in PSPICE circuit simulations. The first atomic force microscope (AFM) data and SEM

Albert J. Wallash

1996-01-01

423

Identification of electromagnetic field parameters assuring the cancer destruction during hyperthermia treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electromagnetic field induced by two external electrodes and temperature field resulting from electrode action in the domain of biological tissue being a composition of healthy region and a tumour is considered. To warrant the optimum conditions of tumour destruction, the magnetic nanoparticles are embedded in this region. It is assumed that the temperature which assures an effect of destruction should

E. Majchrzak; M. Paruch

2011-01-01

424

IDENTIFICATION OF TECHNOLOGY TREND ON INDONESIAN PATENT DOCUMENTS AND RESEARCH REPORTS ON CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY FIELDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of this study are: to identify technology trends by identifying core topics, promi- nence topics, and emerging topics; and to assess the overlap between research and development and pat- ents on chemistry and metallurgy fields in Indonesia during 1993-1997. The technology trends are de- termined by measuring subject and keyword development on those fields. Co-words analysis is em-

ENDANG SRI; RUSMIYATI RAHAYU; ZAINAL A. HASIBUAN

2006-01-01

425

EMISSION TEST REPORT, OMSS FIELD TEST ON CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

The report discusses results of a parametric evaluation of powdered activated carbon for control of mercury (Hg) emission from a municipal waste combustion (MWC) equipped with a lime spray spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SD/FF). he primary test objectives were to evaluat the ...

426

EMISSION TEST REPORT, OMSS FIELD TEST ON CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

EPA Science Inventory

The report discusses results of a parametric evaluation of powdered activated carbon for control of mercury (Hg) emission from a municipal waste cornbustor (MWC) equipped with a lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SD/FF). The primary test objectives were to evaluate the effe...

427

Atmospheric corrosion tests in Brazilian Legal Amazon - field and laboratory tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the first results concerning tests carried out to evaluate the atmospheric corrosion in Brazilian Legal Amazon, as part of the SIVAM - Amazon Surveillance System. The aim of the present work is to determine and select materials as well as anti-rust paints, which will be employed to protect metallic structures of radar towers, equipment and buildings. Five

L. R. M. Miranda; L. Sathler; R. Nogueira; S. L. D. C. Brasil

2000-01-01

428

MODE IDENTIFICATION OF AN ARCH DAM BY A DYNAMIC AIR-GUN TEST.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thirteen natural frequencies of a concrete arch dam (Monticello Dam near Sacramento, California) have been identified by using a dynamic testing method which employs an air gun firing in the reservoir as the excitation source. These vibrations modes are determined from the peak responses in the Fourier amplitude spectra of the free-vibration data recorded at three crest locations using three-component geophones. Comparisons of the first five natural frequencies with results obtained by forced vibration tests using rotating mass shakers show good agreement. The next eight higher-frequency modes, not previously identified, are determined from data of the present tests.

Liu, Hsi-Ping; Fedock, Joseph J.; Fletcher, Jon B.

1986-01-01

429

“Taste Strips” – A rapid, lateralized, gustatory bedside identification test based on impregnated filter papers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective\\u000a   To elaborate normative values for a clinical psychophysical taste test (“Taste Strips”).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background\\u000a   The “Taste Strips” are a psychophysical chemical taste test. So far, no definitive normative data had been published and only\\u000a a fairly small sample size has been investigated. In light of this shortcoming for this easy, reliable and quick taste testing\\u000a device, we attempted to provide

Basile Nicolas Landis; Antje Welge-Luessen; Annika Brämerson; Mats Bende; Christian Albert Mueller; Steven Nordin; Thomas Hummel

2009-01-01

430

Identification and purity test of heparin by NMR - a summary of two years' experience at the Medical Products Agency.  

PubMed

This paper is a review of published and unpublished results on heparin during the last two years. Results and experiences gathered in our laboratory at MPA in Sweden, from the collaborative NMR study on heparin in Europe (coordinated by EDQM), and from the process of drafting heparin Ph. Eur. monograph texts where new ideas and experiments have been performed. Explanations and guidelines are also presented to clarify the NMR identification test introduced in the sodium and calcium heparin monographs. NMR, strong anion exchange-LC (SAX-LC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) have been compared in the quantification of over-sulphated chondroitin sulphate (OSCS) and dermatan sulphate (DS) in heparin. In this paper, the term heparin will stand for unfractionated porcine heparin sodium. When other heparin types are mentioned, they will be explicitly named. PMID:20223191

McEwen, I; Amini, A; Olofsson, I M

2010-04-01

431

Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

1977-01-01

432

Identification of Metals (Heavy and Radioactive) in Drinking Water by an Indirect Analysis Method Based on Scale Tests  

PubMed Central

The analysis of water quality, regarding the content of metals, especially heavy and radioactive ones, has been carried out in an indirect way, by testing scale formed in a hot-water heater, using water from the water-supply network of the city of Belgrade – the district of New Belgrade. The determination of the composition and the structure of the scale has resulted in its complete identification, and its crystallochemical formula has been defined. It has unequivocally been established that the obtained results are within the tolerance boundary with the results acquired by a conventional analysis of water, when it is a matter of very low concentrations. The presence of radioactive elements of uranium and strontium in a scale sample has been found and the way of their penetrating its composition and structure has been explained. Applying the fractional extraction method, uranium has been established to be of an anthropogenic origin.

Rajkovic, Miloš B.; Lacnjevac, Caslav M.; Ralevic, Nebojsa R.; Stojanovi?, Mirjana D.; Toskovi?, Dragan V.; Pantelic, Gordana K.; Ristic, Nikola M.; Jovanic, Sasa

2008-01-01

433

Alcohol use and sexual risks: use of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) among female sex workers in China.  

PubMed

The association between alcohol use and sexual risks among female sex workers (FSWs) has been insufficiently studied. This article reports a cross-sectional study of the relationship between alcohol use risk, measured by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and sexual risk behaviors among 1,022 FSWs in Guangxi, China. Bivariate analysis showed that FSWs at higher AUDIT levels tended to have earlier sexual initiation, became involved in the sex trade at a younger age, and were more vulnerable to sex under the influence of alcohol. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent association of problem drinking with both unprotected sex and a history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Alcohol use in commercial sex shall be considered as an occupational hazard that requires immediate intervention. Future longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the association between alcohol use and sexual risks among this most-at-risk population. PMID:23311906

Chen, Yiyun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chen; Hong, Yan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Liu, Wei

2013-01-01

434

Early aetiological agent identification of osteomyelitis with the Light Cycler SeptiFast test from peripheral blood.  

PubMed

The commercial real-time PCR SeptiFast test allows identification of 25 bacterial and fungal species directly from peripheral blood in patients with bloodstream infections. A 22-year-old Caucasian woman reported an open femur fracture requiring a two step surgical procedure. After the second procedure the patient manifested sepsis and Enterobacter cloacae/aerogenes DNA was detected in the peripheral blood with the SeptiFast. Thereafter, femur osteomyelitis was diagnosed and E cloacae was cultured from intraoperative bone samples. The patient completed a 3-month course of antimicrobial therapy. Five months after therapy was discontinued, the patient remained symptom free, but delayed bone consolidation occurs. Molecular methods to identify aetiological agents in blood, in addition to conventional cultures, could represent an advantageous tool in clinical practice also in patients with post-traumatic bone infections. PMID:24287480

Pasticci, Maria Bruna; Rinonapoli, Giuseppe; Leli, Christian; Mencacci, Antonella

2013-01-01

435

Field testing and survey evaluation of household biomass cookstoves in rural sub-Saharan Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of two studies conducted to evaluate the performance and usability of household biomass cookstoves under field conditions in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Cooking tests and qualitative surveys compared improved, manufactured stove models based on the ‘rocket’ design with the traditional three-stone fire. All tests and interviews took place in household kitchens in two village areas in

Edwin Adkins; Erika Tyler; Jin Wang; David Siriri; Vijay Modi

2010-01-01

436

Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil

G. K. Kanemoto; M. J. Sherick; D. C. Sparks

1990-01-01

437

A Field Test of Power Swing Damping by Static Var Compensator  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a field test conducted for a static var compensator installed at a 500 kV substation. The static var compensator with a damping control function improved power system damping performance significantly by increasing the synchronizing and damping torques. Frequency response analysis was employed for examining the synchronizing and damping torques. Simulations of the test cases

T. Sawa; Y. Shirai; T. Michigami; Y. Sakanaka; Y. Uemura

1989-01-01

438

Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet  

SciTech Connect

The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

2001-06-15

439

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS (1) DESCRIPTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PERFORMANCE INDEX  

E-print Network

animals have been tested. The method performed has been the usual one, weighing the animals and measuringFIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS (1) 1. - DESCRIPTION OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PERFORMANCE INDEX D. MINKEMA Research Institute for Animal Husbandry a Schoonoord », Driebergseweg 10d, Zeist

Boyer, Edmond

440

Field-testing a portable wind tunnel for fine dust emissions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A protable wind tunnel has been developed to allow erodibility and dust emissions testing of soil surfaces with the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study we report on the field-testing ...

441

Field test of electric vehicle battery chargers: Customer and utility acceptance: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field test was implemented to evaluate the electrical system and customer impacts of recharging up to 10 electric cars. The test was performed in a suburban community during an off-peak electricity demand period. The electrical service in this community is representative of the type of service found throughout the country. The predominant load - electric vehicle battery chargers -

R. A. Popeck; K. Tolios

1987-01-01

442

Paradigms of Evaluation in Natural Language Processing: Field Linguistics for Glass Box Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although software testing has been well-studied in computer science, it has received little attention in natural language processing. Nonetheless, a fully developed methodology for glass box evaluation and testing of language processing applications already exists in the field methods of descriptive linguistics. This work lays out a number of…

Cohen, Kevin Bretonnel

2010-01-01

443

An approach for testing programmable\\/configurable field programmable gate arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new general technique for testing field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) by fully exploiting their programmable and configurable characteristics. A hybrid fault model is introduced based on a physical and behavioral characterization; this permits the detection of a single fault, as either a stuck-at or a functional fault. A general approach which regards testing as can application

Wei-kang Huang; Fabrizio Lombardi

1996-01-01

444

Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

2013-01-01

445

Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite . a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

Trout, Dawn; Burford, Janessa

2012-01-01

446

Fractured Shale Gas Reservoir Performance Study-An Offset Well Interference Field Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas-production characteristics of naturally fractured Devonian shale have been quantified through a three-well interference field test by use of an established producing well and two offsets placed on the primary and secondary regional fracture trends relative to the producer. Three individual shale zones were evaluated simultaneously by buildup, drawdown, and pulse tests to investigate reservoir gas flow characteristics, natural fracture

Karl-Heinz Frohne; James Mercer

1984-01-01

447

Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Field-Scale Test Facility for Addressing Fundamental Questions of Environmental Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting (a) development of cost-effective, non- invasive methods for quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories

W. Barrash; P. S. Routh

2006-01-01

448

Water Quality: A Field-Based Quality Testing Program for Middle Schools and High Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual contains background information, lesson ideas, procedures, data collection and reporting forms, suggestions for interpreting results, and extension activities to complement a water quality field testing program. Information on testing water temperature, water pH, dissolved oxygen content, biochemical oxygen demand, nitrates, total…

Massachusetts State Water Resources Authority, Boston.

449

Engineering test plan for field radionuclide migration experiments in climax granite  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Test Plan (ETP) describes field studies of radionuclide migration in fractured rock designed for the Climax grainite at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the ETP is to provide a detailed written document of the method of accomplishing these studies. The ETP contains the experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan, system schematics, a description of the test facility, and a brief outline of the laboratory support studies needed to understand the chemistry of the rock/water/radionuclide interactions. Results of our initial hydrologic investigations are presented along with pretest predictions based on the hydrologic test results.

Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Stone, R.; Lord, D.; Rector, N.; Failor, R.

1982-05-01

450

Variance reduction and outlier identification for IDDQ testing of integrated chips using principal component analysis  

E-print Network

variations, which have increased the variation in good-chip quiescent current and consequently reduced the effectiveness of IDDQ testing. This research proposes the use of a multivariate statistical technique known as principal component analysis...

Balasubramanian, Vijay

2007-04-25

451

Identification of Brucella abortus, B. canis, B. melitensis, and B. suis by carbon substrate assimilation tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

By using the results of seven carbon substrate assimilation tests from the Biotype 100 system (bioMérieux, Marcy-l’Etoile, France), we correctly identified 79 (85.9%) of 92 Brucella strains tested. The specificity of the method varied from 97.4 to 100% depending on the species. Although a biological safety cabinet must be used, this method represents an easy and fast alternative for the

Ahidé López-Merino; Dominique L Monnet; Irma Hernández; Nora L Sánchez; Jean-Marc Boeufgras; Horacio Sandoval; Jean Freney

2001-01-01

452

Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that their details can be seen. PMID:22476475

Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

2011-01-01

453

Prediction of maximal lactate steady state in runners with an incremental test on the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a maximal incremental ergocycle test, the power output associated with Respiratory Exchange Ratio equal to 1.00 (RER = 1.00) predicts maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). We hypothesised that these results are transferable for runners on the field. Fourteen runners performed a maximal progressive test, to assess the speed associated with RER = 1.00, and several 30 minutes constant velocity tests to determine the

Thomas Leti; Monique Mendelson; David Laplaud; Patrice Flore

2012-01-01