Science.gov

Sample records for identification field test

  1. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  2. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification. PMID:6438051

  3. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  4. Female sex pheromone of oriental tobacco budworm,Helicoverpa assulta (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Identification and field testing.

    PubMed

    Cork, A; Boo, K S; Dunkelblum, E; Hall, D R; Jee-Rajunga, K; Kehat, M; Kong Jie, E; Park, K C; Tepgidagarn, P; Xun, L

    1992-03-01

    Analysis of ovipositor washings from virgin femaleHelicoverpa assulta (Guenée) (Lepidoptere: Noctuidae) from Korea by gas chromatography (GC) linked to electroantennography and GC linked to mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of nine compounds, hexadecanal, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, hexadecyl acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate, hexadecan-l-ol, (Z)-9-hexadecen-l-ol, and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol. However, ovipositor washings from females from Thailand contained mainly the 16-carbon aldehydes with very small amounts of (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate. Field tests conducted in Korea, China, and Thailand indicated that a binary blend of (Z)-9-hexadecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal was sufficient for attraction, although the most attractive ratio of compounds varied with location. In Korea a 20∶1 blend of compounds was the most attractive, while in Thailand a 7.5∶1 blend was most attractive. In China both blends of hexadecenal isomers were equally attractive. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 20∶1 blend of hexadecenals in the ratio of 1∶3.3 increased the trap catch of maleH. assulta compared to lures containing the aldehydes alone in Korea but reduced trap catch in China. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 7.5∶1 blend of hexadecenals had no significant effect on trap catch in Thailand or China compared to the aldehydes alone. The addition of the 16-carbon alcohols to the aldehydes had a significantly inhibitory effect in all three countries, suggesting they are not pheromone components. Taken together these results indicate thatH. assulta is polymorphic with at least two populations responding to different sex pheromones. PMID:24254945

  5. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  6. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  7. Gender Object Identification Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This test was designed primarily for the purpose of assisting social psychologists in researching sex roles and/or sex differences when a nonverbal instrument is desired. The hypothesis was that some objects would be easier for members of one gender to name. The subjects were 30 female and 20 male undergraduate students. Pictures of 65 commercial…

  8. The female sex pheromone of sugarcane stalk borer,Chilo auricilius identification of four components and field tests.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, B F; Beevor, P S; Cork, A; Hall, D R; David, H; Nandagopal, V

    1986-06-01

    Four pheromonal components have been detected in ovipositor washings and volatiles from female sugarcane stalk borers,Chilo auricilius Dudgeon (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), using combined gas chromatography-electroantennography. The components have been identified as (I) (Z)-7-do-decenyl acetate, (II) (Z)-8-tridecenyl acetate, (III) (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate, and (IV) (Z)-10-pentadecenyl acetate by comparison of their gas chromatographic behavior with that of synthetic standards. In field tests carried out in northern India during 1982-1984, a combination of II, III, and IV in their naturally occurring ratio (8∶4∶1) was shown to provide a highly attractive synthetic source for trap use. (Z)-7-Dodecenyl acetate was found to reduce catches of maleC. auricilius, both when dispensed with the other three components and when released from dispensers surrounding a trap baited with the other three components. PMID:24307117

  9. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1979-01-01

    Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

  10. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PR...

  11. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  12. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  13. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  14. Autonomous star field identification for robotic solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    A six-feature all-sky star field identification algorithm has been developed. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates and visual magnitudes. This algorithm has been integrated with a CCD-based imaging camera. The autonomous intelligent camera identifies in real time any star field without a priori knowledge. Observatory tests on star fields with this intelligent camera are described.

  15. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  16. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1980-01-01

    After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

  17. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  18. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  20. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PROCESS IN CONJUNCTION WITH EQUIVALENT LINEARCONVOLUTION ANALYSES FOR GENERATING A LARGE NUMBER OF SITE PROFILES FOR USE IN CONVOLUTION STUDIES FROM WHICH MEAN ESTIMATES OF RESPONSE CAN BE GENERATED. THE RANDOM VARIABLE SELECTED TO CHARACTERIZE THE SITE PROFILE IS THE SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY IN EACH SOIL LAYER OF THE SITE PROFILE. A LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION WAS ASSUMED WITH THE STANDARD DEVIATION DETERMINED FROM AVAILABLE SITE DATA AND APPLICABLE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS. THE CONVOLUTION ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED USING AN APPROPRIATE SOILDEGRADATION MODEL AN D THE OUTCROP INPUT MOTIONS GENERATED FROM THE RECORDED IN ROCK MOTIONS. THE BNL ANALYSIS PRODUCED RESULTS IN TERMS OF THE MEAN, MEDIAN AND VARIOUS FRACTILES OF FREE FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES AT THE TEST SITE, AND THE CORRESPONDING SURFACE RESPONSE SPECTRA, WHICH ARE PRESENTED IN THIS PAPER.

  1. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  2. Field Testing Mathematics Reform Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrfield, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the efforts of the Maricopa Mathematics Consortium, in Arizona, to develop a comprehensive mathematics curriculum focusing on application-driven materials at the precalculus level. Reviews the resulting three modules of sample course materials, and discusses three phases of field testing used to assess the modules. Summarizes results…

  3. Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

  4. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  5. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  6. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  7. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  8. Creating a Career: Field Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training Research and Development Station, Prince Albert (Saskatchewan).

    This booklet has been prepared to guide the implementation, operation, and evaluation of the field tests of the Creating a Career program. This field test guide describes the preparation needed for a field test, (acquiring materials, choosing the instructor, registration, scheduling the field test, preparing the classroom, orientation of other…

  9. Downhole steam generator: field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Eson, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Excessive air pollution and heat losses up to 32% in the surface lines and out the stacks of conventional generators are reasons why conventional steam generation is efficient. These problems are addressed and overcome through the use of a direct-fired down-hole steam generator (DSG). By performing the combustion process at high pressure, and then adding water, a mixture of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and steam is discharged directly into the heavy oil reservoir. This study documents a series of field tests of a direct-fired DSG showing its ability to produce and inject high quality steam into heavy oil reservoirs without the need for expensive stack scrubbers to remove sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), as well as sophisticated nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) control techniques. Results from the 6-in. diameter, 6-ft long, 7.1-mmBtu/hr DSG showed that corrosion can be controlled and production can be improved dramatically in actual field tests in California heavy oil reservoirs.

  10. 40 CFR 455.50 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identification of test procedures. 455.50 Section 455.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Test Methods for Pesticide Pollutants § 455.50 Identification of test procedures. The pesticide...

  11. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Identification of test procedures. 136.3 Section 136.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) GUIDELINES ESTABLISHING TEST PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS § 136.3 Identification of test procedures. (a) Parameters...

  12. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.428 Identification of sample for... Director. The original and first two copies shall accompany the sample to the designated testing...

  13. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.428 Identification of sample for... Director. The original and first two copies shall accompany the sample to the designated testing...

  14. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.428 Identification of sample for... Director. The original and first two copies shall accompany the sample to the designated testing...

  15. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.428 Identification of sample for... Director. The original and first two copies shall accompany the sample to the designated testing...

  16. Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

  17. Galaxy Merger Identification in the CANDELS GOODS-South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Erin M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed a catalog of 7,628 galaxies at 0field in order to identify a sample of galaxy mergers and interactions. Mergers are believed to play a fundamental role in galaxy evolution. Developing methods to robustly and efficiently identify mergers becomes vital as we look to higher redshifts. We explored merger identification based on visual morphology classification and preliminary attempts with automated methods. Using multiple detailed visual morphology classifications for each galaxy conducted by the CANDELS structure and morphology team, we created selection criteria to identify mergers from this visual classification catalog. We chose galaxies with high interaction classification and evidence of merger signatures (i.e. tidal features, double nuclei) to generate a catalog of 1051 galaxies we are confident are mergers. This represents a conservative sample of possible mergers. For comparison, we also tested automated merger identification techniques previously used for lower redshift (z<1) galaxies. This is one of the first large investigations of galaxy mergers at z>1. O’Leary was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  18. DISTANT GALAXY IDENTIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN HUBBLE FIELD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Series of four panels that illustrate the distant-galaxy identification technique. Four panels that show (top to bottom, or right to left when rotated correctly) F814W filter, F606W filter, F450W filter, and F300W filter images, or near-infrared through near-ultraviolet images. The identified galaxy is prominent in the near-infrared image but totally absent in any of the other images. It is this spectroscopic signature that identifies this galaxy as a very distant object. Credit: Ken Lanzetta and Amos Yahil (State University of New York at Stony Brook), and NASA

  19. Testing two-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Tegmark, Max

    2011-01-01

    We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and to constrain classes of two-field models using WMAP data. Using covariant formalism, we first develop a framework for understanding the background field kinematics and introduce a “slow-turn” approximation. Next, we find covariant expressions for the evolution of the adiabatic/curvature and entropy/isocurvature modes, and we discuss how the evolution of modes can be inferred mostly from the background kinematics and the geometry of the field manifold. From these expressions, we derive semianalytic formulas for the curvature, isocurvature, and cross spectra, and the standard spectral observables, all to second order in the slow-roll and slow-turn approximations. In tandem, we show how our covariant formalism provides useful intuition into how the general features of the inflationary Lagrangian translate into distinct features in the observable power spectra. In particular, we find that key features of the power spectra can be directly read off from the nature of the roll path, the curve the field vector rolls along with respect to the two-dimensional field manifold. For example, models whose roll path makes a sharp turn around 60 e-foldings before the end of inflation tend to be ruled out because they produce stronger departures from scale invariance than are allowed by the latest CMB observations. Finally, we apply our formalism to confront four classes of two-field models with WMAP data, including doubly quadratic and quartic potentials and nonstandard kinetic terms, showing how whether a model is ruled out or not depends not only on certain features of the inflationary Lagrangian, but also on the initial conditions. Ultimately, for a two-field model to be consistent with observations, we show that it must possess the right balance of

  20. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  1. TESTING BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational definition for success of in situ bioremediation at field scale includes meeting regulatory goals for ground water quality in a timely fashion at a predictable cost. urrent practice for site characterization does not adequately define the amount of contamination su...

  2. Analyzing Educational Testing Service Graduate Major Field Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) created the Graduate Major Field Test in Business (GMFT-B) for MBA students. This test is administered to all MBA classes at Jacksonville University for the purpose of measuring student academic achievement and growth, as well as to assess educational outcomes. The test is given in the capstone course,…

  3. Inertia Parameter Identification from Base Excitation Test Dat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuellekrug, U.; Schedlinski, C.

    2004-08-01

    With the purpose to further investigate and improve a method for the identification of inertia parameters, tests with flexible test structures have been carried out. Reference data for the inertia parameters were obtained from a Finite Element model and from conventional weighing and pendulum measurements. For the realization of the base excitation a six-axis vibration simulator was utilized. The base forces were recorded with a special Force Measurement Device (FMD), and the base accelerations of the test structures were measured by accelerometers. Each of the 3 translational and 3 rotational axes of the multi-axial test facility was driven by a sine sweep signal with an appropriate base acceleration input. The application of the identification algorithm to the measured data showed that an acceptable identification of mass and mass moments of inertia is possible. However, a highly accurate identification of the center of gravity location could not be achieved. The results of the analyses are discussed and the advantages and limits of the present method are pointed out. Recommendations for the practical application and improved center of gravity identification are given. Keywords: Inertia parameters, base excitation, multi- axial test facilities, vibration testing.

  4. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr–Newman or Kerr–Newman–anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  5. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  6. Direct structural parameter identification by modal test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-C.; Kuo, C.-P.; Garba, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A direct identification procedure is proposed to obtain the mass and stiffness matrices based on the test measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method is based on the theory of matrix perturbation in which the correct mass and stiffness matrices are expanded in terms of analytical values plus a modification matrix. The simplicity of the procedure enables real time operation during the structural testing.

  7. Proposed tests for the routine identification of Rochalimaea species.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, M; Raoult, D

    1993-09-01

    A study was conducted to establish tests for the routine identification of Rochalimaea species. Strains used were reference strains of Rochalimaea vinsonii and Rochalimaea quintana, and a type strain and six human isolates of Rochalimaea henselae. Rochalimaea species were confirmed to be gram-negative, oxidase-negative, non-motile, urease-negative, indole-negative, catalase-negative, glucose-nonfermenting organisms which failed to grow on MacConkey agar. Further testing of the organisms in a commercial identification system with the addition of hemin (100 micrograms/ml) to the medium revealed biochemical reactivity of the organisms not previously observed. The Voges-Proskauer reaction, tests for hydrolysis of hippurate and esculin, leucine arylamidase activity and the lactose test allowed identification and differentiation of the three species. Rochalimaea henselae was the only species with a positive lactose test and Rochalimaea quintana was the only species with a positive Voges-Proskauer reaction. Further studies are needed to confirm the validity of these tests for identification of Rochalimaea species. PMID:7694852

  8. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  9. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  10. 7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section 29.428 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...

  11. Use of Brief Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Eric E.; Kilmer, Lydia M.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools often administer brief intelligence tests as the first step in the identification of students who are cognitively gifted. However, brief measures are often used without consideration of underlying constructs or the psychometric properties of the measures and without regard to the links between screening decisions and educational…

  12. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  13. The "Sniffin' Kids" test--a 14-item odor identification test for children.

    PubMed

    Schriever, Valentin A; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified "Sniffin' Sticks" odor identification test, the "Sniffin' Kids" test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the "Sniffin' Sticks" 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item "Sniffin' Kids" odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the "Sniffin' Kids" test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ρ = 0.44. With the 14-item odor identification "Sniffin' Kids" test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6-17 years. PMID:24979650

  14. The “Sniffin' Kids” Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ρ = 0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years. PMID:24979650

  15. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  16. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  17. Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.

    PubMed

    1983-04-01

    The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

  18. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  19. Field tests prove radar tank gauge accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, S. )

    1990-04-23

    Radar tank gauging technology was recently field-tested on an asphalt tank at a marketing terminal in Bayonne, N.J. Results of the 3-month test demonstrate that the technology is comparable to, and most likely better than, manual gauging methods. Radar tank gauging technology provides a noncontact, noninvasive method of tank gauging. It lends itself for application to vertical, cylindrical, atmospheric storage tanks in asphalt, acid, wax, and heavy, viscous product service or other corrosive and high-temperature service.

  20. [Personality tests and gender identification in male transsexuals].

    PubMed

    Coussinoux, S; Gallarda, T; Smith, J; Bourdel, M C; Cordier, B; Brémont, C; Poirier, M F; Haddou, M; Olié, J P

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research project was to study gender identification in male transsexuals compared to male and female controls, using the Rorschach test and the MMPI. In the international literature, many researches have shown that the nature of the human response on Rorschach card III is linked to gender identification, as is the MMPI Mf scale. Ten untreated male homosexual transsexuals and 18 treated and operated male homosexual transsexuals were compared to 10 male and 12 female controls regarding verbal IQ, human content on Rorschach card III and the MMPI Mf scale. Absence of hormonal treatment for the first group of transsexuals was checked by a blood test at the time of the psychological testing. Responses on Rorschach card III were scored according to different kinds of human contents: male (M), female (F), gender-unidentified/neutral (N), bisexual (B), feminine then masculine or the opposite (M/F), and nonhuman (NH). N, B, M/F and NH responses were rare in all Rorschach protocols. As expected, responses given by participants in the control group were significantly more consistent with their anatomical sex than with the opposite sex. Untreated transsexuals do not differ from treated and operated transsexuals on Rorschach data, and both transsexual groups give significantly more female human representations than male controls. Transsexuals' results are similar to female controls. Untreated transsexuals' mean score on the MMPI Mf scale is significantly higher than that of treated and operated transsexuals' score, in the male profile (biological sex). Both groups of transsexuals score higher on the Mf scale in the male profile than in the female profile. The mean Mf score in the male profile is significantly higher than that of male controls, whereas, in the female profile, the mean Mf score is similar to that of female controls. This study shows that for both groups of transsexuals, results are homogenous in respect of Rorschach and MMPI, showing hyper

  1. Field Test of the Verbal Skills Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, J. Peter; And Others

    A verbal skills curriculum program, designed for use with United States Navy recruits with deficiencies in English language listening and speaking skills was field tested at a recruit training station in Florida. The curriculum was self-paced and was composed of three learning modules: Navy-related vocabulary, grammatical structures, and language…

  2. Visual field testing with red targets.

    PubMed

    Mindel, J S; Safir, A; Schare, P W

    1983-06-01

    Ten patients with partial temporal visual field defects were examined with a modified tangent screen projection perimeter (Auto-Plot). Defects demonstrated with an isopter for chromatic recognition of a 3-mm red stimulus could always be reproduced with an isopter for achromatic recognition of a dim, 3-mm white stimulus. The red-white intensity ratio producing equivalent fields remained constant for a given patient but varied from subject to subject (range, 3.0 to 7.5; mean, 5.7; SD, 1.8). Thus, red functioned as dim white, but no single fixed ratio of intensities was applicable to all subjects. Visual field testing with 1 foot-candle of tangent screen illumination permitted subjects to adapt to dark. As retinal sensitivities increased, the corresponding visual field steadily enlarged for 30 minutes. This effect was greater in the pathologic temporal fields, which increased relatively more than intact nasal fields. The result was poor visual field reproducibility with time. PMID:6860207

  3. VALT parameter identification flight test. [VTOL Approach and Landing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaine, R. L.; Bryant, W. H.; Hodge, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a method of establishing the accuracy of previously developed analytical models of research vehicles for a program for developing avionics technology for VTOL aircraft. The research vehicle is a Boeing-Vertol CH-47 tandem rotor transport helicopter equipped with a fly-by-wire control system. The specialized flight test was designed to take into account the presence of winds at flight conditions from hover through transition to cruise. The test provided data to obtain estimates of derivatives by parameter identification.

  4. An integrative test strategy for cancer hazard identification.

    PubMed

    Luijten, Mirjam; Olthof, Evelyn D; Hakkert, Betty C; Rorije, Emiel; van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Woutersen, Ruud A; van Benthem, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic potential is considered one of the basic requirements when evaluating possible human health risks associated with exposure to chemicals. Test strategies currently in place focus primarily on identifying genotoxic potential due to the strong association between the accumulation of genetic damage and cancer. Using genotoxicity assays to predict carcinogenic potential has the significant drawback that risks from non-genotoxic carcinogens remain largely undetected unless carcinogenicity studies are performed. Furthermore, test systems already developed to reduce animal use are not easily accepted and implemented by either industries or regulators. This manuscript reviews the test methods for cancer hazard identification that have been adopted by the regulatory authorities, and discusses the most promising alternative methods that have been developed to date. Based on these findings, a generally applicable tiered test strategy is proposed that can be considered capable of detecting both genotoxic as well as non-genotoxic carcinogens and will improve understanding of the underlying mode of action. Finally, strengths and weaknesses of this new integrative test strategy for cancer hazard identification are presented. PMID:27142259

  5. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  6. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Hietala, J.; Wendland, R.D.; Collins, F.

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  7. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E. ); Hietala, J. ); Wendland, R.D. ); Collins, F. )

    1992-01-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  8. Identification of heterogeneous elastic material characteristics by virtual fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuya; Arikawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Satoru

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a method for identifying the elastic material characteristics of a heterogeneous material from measured displacements is proposed. The virtual fields method is employed for determining the elastic material characteristics. The solid propellant is considered as heterogeneous materials for the test subject. An equation representing the distribution of the material properties of the solid propellant is obtained by Fick's law, and the distribution is applied to the virtual fields method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by applying to displacement fields obtained using finite element analysis. Results show that the heterogeneous material properties can be obtained by the proposed method.

  9. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  10. A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  11. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  12. A new method of field MRTD test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-09-01

    MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

  13. Field tests using radioactive matter 2.

    PubMed

    Rulik, P; Prouza, Z; Hovorka, J; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Fronka, A; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Skrkal, J

    2013-04-01

    Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within <1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. PMID:22923250

  14. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

  15. RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

  16. APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

  17. Identification of Algerian Field-Caught Phlebotomine Sand Fly Vectors by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Lafri, Ismail; Almeras, Lionel; Bitam, Idir; Caputo, Aurelia; Yssouf, Amina; Forestier, Claire-Lise; Izri, Arezki; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are known to transmit Leishmania parasites, bacteria and viruses that affect humans and animals in many countries worldwide. Precise sand fly identification is essential to prevent phlebotomine-borne diseases. Over the past two decades, progress in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as an accurate tool for arthropod identification. The objective of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a tool for identifying field-caught phlebotomine. Methodology/Principal Findings Sand flies were captured in four sites in north Algeria. A subset was morphologically and genetically identified. Six species were found in these areas and a total of 28 stored frozen specimens were used for the creation of the reference spectrum database. The relevance of this original method for sand fly identification was validated by two successive blind tests including the morphological identification of 80 new specimens which were stored at -80°C, and 292 unknown specimens, including engorged specimens, which were preserved under different conditions. Intra-species reproducibility and inter-species specificity of the protein profiles were obtained, allowing us to distinguish specimens at the gender level. Querying of the sand fly database using the MS spectra from the blind test groups revealed concordant results between morphological and MALDI-TOF MS identification. However, MS identification results were less efficient for specimens which were engorged or stored in alcohol. Identification of 362 phlebotomine sand flies, captured at four Algerian sites, by MALDI-TOF MS, revealed that the subgenus Larroussius was predominant at all the study sites, except for in M’sila where P. (Phlebotomus) papatasi was the only sand fly species detected. Conclusion The present study highlights the application of MALDI-TOF MS for monitoring sand fly fauna captured in the field

  18. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  19. Identification of suicidal ideations with the help of projective tests: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devvarta; Nizamie, S Haque; Abhishek, Priyadarshee; Prasanna, Lavanya Tumkur

    2014-12-01

    Identification of the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual is crucial for the timely intervention. However, these ideations may remain unidentified as an individual with serious intentions of self-harm may not express them explicitly. Various projective tests can provide crucial clues to clinicians about the presence of suicidal ideations in an individual's mind. The present review is intended to update clinicians working in the field of suicide prevention about salient findings on these tests which can serve as a ready reckoner for them. We also highlight the status of research in this domain. PMID:25153298

  20. Interactive ultrasonic field simulation for nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jason; Rougeron, Gilles; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lacassagne, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an ultrasonic field simulation software, dedicated to Non Destructive Testing, aiming at interactivity. This work relies on Civa Software semi-analytical model. By restricting its scope to homogeneous isotropic specimens with simple geometry and half-skip modes, an almost completely regular algorithm, well suited to modern hardware, can be derived. The performance of three implementations on multicore SIMD general purpose processors (GPP), manycore accelerators (MIC) and graphical processing units (GPU) over a set of 18 realistic configurations (a standard one plus 17 variations) are presented and analysed. For GPP and the GPU, interactive performances with almost 30 fps have been reached on the standard configuration. This is, to our knowledge, the very first time for a NDT ultrasonic field simulation software.

  1. Produced water treating equipment: Recent field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.R.; Choi, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    For several decades, flotation cells have been workhorses for treatment of oilfield produced water for disposal or reinjection. In the last few years several alternative devices which have come on the market for the removal of oil from water have been tested in the oil field. Some of these have distinct advantages over flotation cells in terms of space and weight, better oil-recovery efficiency, and lower operating costs. This paper summarizes the results of field trials of a passive hydrocyclone, in the Arabian Gulf and in the North Sea, a coalescer which uses a specially treated ion-exchange resin as a medium in the Gulf of Mexico, two somewhat similar filter-coalescers which use crushed nut shells as media, onshore in New Mexico, West Texas, and California, and an upflow sand coalescer system in New Mexico and West Texas.

  2. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  3. Research Based on Optical Non-Destructive Testing of Pigment Identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Hao, Shengcai; Zhou, Wenhua; Qi, Xiaokun; Shi, Jilong

    2016-04-01

    Optical Non-Destructive Testing (ONDT) can be applied as penetrating elemental and structure analysis technology in the Pigments identification field. Three-dimensional video microscopy, Raman microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are employed to measure the materials based on a Qing Dynasty meticulous painting. The results revealed that the dark yellow area within the decorative patterns was presented due to the interaction of Emerald green and hematite, and the bright yellow edge area was delineated by Cu-Zn-Pb composition. The interesting thing is that an artificial synthetic ultramarine blue was checked in the painting. According to the first synthesized time of ultramarine blue and Paris green, the time limit of the painting completion can be identified. The principle of Pigment subtractive colorant and nitikaset method were employed to interpreting the results. Optical testing combined with the area of cultural relic identification can be a potential method to build an expert identification system successfully. This work also help lay the optical method groundwork for further cultural relic identification, sterilization, and preservation. PMID:27451669

  4. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  5. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and

  6. Celebrity Influence and Identification: A Test of the Angelina Effect.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Kami A; Binder, Andrew R; Hurley, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Angelina Jolie's announcement that she is a BRCA1 carrier and has had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy was met with widespread support as well as speculation about its possible impact on the public. These speculations were the subject of a Time magazine cover story titled "The Angelina Effect" (Kluger et al., 2013 ). Although there is anecdotal evidence to support this hypothesized Angelina effect, empirical tests are lacking. To explore possible links between Angelina's announcement and public health, we surveyed 356 adults immediately after the announcement. Guided by a model of celebrity influence, the survey assessed participants' demographics and health history, identification and parasocial interaction with Jolie, and genetic testing intentions. Results supported the model's predictions and provided preliminary evidence of an Angelina effect. PMID:26192626

  7. Reliability of phenotypic tests for identification of Acinetobacter species.

    PubMed Central

    Gerner-Smidt, P; Tjernberg, I; Ursing, J

    1991-01-01

    A numerical approach was used for identification of 198 Acinetobacter strains assigned to DNA groups according to the classification of Tjernberg and Ursing (I. Tjernberg and J. Ursing, APMIS 97:595-605, 1989). The matrix used was constructed from data published by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 36:228-240, 1986) and Bouvet and Jeanjean (P.J.M. Bouvet and S. Jeanjean, Res. Microbiol. 140:291-299, 1989). The tests chosen were those of the simplified identification scheme for Acinetobacter species devised by Bouvet and Grimont (P.J.M. Bouvet and P.A.D. Grimont, Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol. 138:569-578, 1987), namely, growth at 37, 41, and 44 degrees C, oxidation of glucose, gelatin hydrolysis, and assimilation of 14 carbon sources. Of the strains tested, 181 represented 12 DNA groups in the matrix; at a probability level of greater than or equal to 0.95, 78% of them were correctly identified, 2.2% were misidentified, and 19.8% were not identified. Seventeen strains represented two DNA groups not included in the matrix; nine of them were incorrectly assigned to a DNA group by these phenotypic tests. Because of problems of separating strains belonging to DNA groups 1, 2, 3, and 13 by using the phenotypic tests proposed by Bouvet and Grimont (Ann. Inst. Pasteur/Microbiol.), we suggest that these groups should be referred to as the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID:2007635

  8. Modified visual field test for ptosis surgery (Leicester Peripheral Field Test)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S F; Morawski, A; Sampath, R; Burns, J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is lack of consensus among Primary Health Care Trusts (PCTs) and health insurers on how to reimburse ptosis surgery and upper lid blepharoplasty, as these procedures can be regarded as cosmetic. Standardised photographs are expensive and difficult to achieve, whilst the routine 24-2 visual field lacks the range to detect visually significant superior field defects. Aim To introduce a modified visual field designed to assess the functional disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis and to demonstrate the effectiveness of surgery in improving the visual field. Methods Patients who had surgery for ptosis or dermatochalasis between January 2006 and December 2009 were prospectively invited to perform a modified visual field test pre- and post-operatively. Results In total, 97 patients amounting to 194 eyes were included in the study. Ninety five eyes had aponeurotic repair with or without blepharoplasty and 77 eyes had blepharoplasty alone. This modified test has a sensitivity of 98.8% of detecting ptosis. For patients who underwent ptosis surgery with or without blepharoplasty, 84.2% recorded an improvement in points seen with the test and 81% recorded an improvement in visual field height. For those who had blepharoplasty alone, 90.9% recorded an improvement in points seen in the modified visual field test and 80.6% had improvement in visual field height. Conclusion Our modified visual field assessment is a quick and easy way to assess patient disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis. Surgery improves the demonstrated defect, confirming that ptosis and dermatochalasis can be considered a functional rather than cosmetic issue. PMID:21252946

  9. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, Andrew M; Butcher, Thomas; Troost, Henry

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel

  10. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  11. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, Anna; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2016-04-01

    Adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is commonly associated to heavy rains, large hail, strong winds, and/or tornados, all of them caused by thunderstorms. In most of the cases with adverse weather, thunderstorms vary sharply their trajectories in a concrete moment, changing completely the motion directions that have previously followed. Furthermore, it is possible that a breaking into several cells may be produced, or, in the opposite, it can be observed a joining of different thunderstorms into a bigger system. In order to identify the main features of the developing process of thunderstorms and the anomalous motions that these may follow in some cases, this contribution presents a classification of the events using daily rainfall fields, with the purpose of distinguishing quickly anomalous motion of thunderstorms. The methodology implemented allows classifying the daily rainfall fields in three categories by applying some thresholds related with the daily precipitation accumulated values and their extension: days with "no rain", days with "potentially convective" rain and days with "non-potentially convective" rain. Finally, for those "potentially convective" daily rainfall charts, it also allows a geometrical identification and classification of all the convective structures into "ellipse" and "non-ellipse", obtaining then the structures with "normal" or "anomalous" motion pattern, respectively. The work is focused on the period 2008-2015, and presents some characteristics of the rainfall behaviour in terms of the seasonal distribution of convective rainfall or the geographic variability. It shows that convective structures are mainly found during late spring and summer, even though they can be recorded in any time of the year. Consequently, the maximum number of convective structures with anomalous motion is recorded between July and November. Furthermore, the contribution shows the role of the orography of Catalonia in the

  12. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  13. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  14. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  15. Field testing of the Cobra Seal System

    SciTech Connect

    Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. ); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

  16. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  17. Development of HT-BP nueral network system for the identification of well test interpretation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, W.; Hanyang, U.; Yoo, I.

    1995-12-31

    The neural network technique that is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) has proved to be a good model classifier in all areas of engineering and especially, it has gained a considerable acceptance in well test interpretation model (WTIM) identification of petroleum engineering. Conventionally, identification of the WTIM has been approached by graphical analysis method that requires an experienced expert. Recently, neural network technique equipped with back propagation (BP) learning algorithm was presented and it differs from the AI technique such as symbolic approach that must be accompanied with the data preparation procedures such as smoothing, segmenting, and symbolic transformation. In this paper, we developed BP neural network with Hough transform (HT) technique to overcome data selection problem and to use single neural network rather sequential nets. The Hough transform method was proved to be a powerful tool for the shape detection in image processing and computer vision technologies. Along these lines, a number of exercises were conducted with the actual well test data in two steps. First, the newly developed AI model, namely, ANNIS (Artificial intelligence Neural Network Identification System) was utilized to identify WTIM. Secondly, we obtained reservoir characteristics with the well test model equipped with modified Levenberg-Marquart method. The results show that ANNIS was proved to be quite reliable model for the data having noisy, missing, and extraneous points. They also demonstrate that reservoir parameters were successfully estimated.

  18. 40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PEMS preparation for field testing. 1065.925 Section 1065.925 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.925 PEMS preparation for field testing....

  19. Field testing method for photovaltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gerber N.

    For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

  20. Helicopter derivative identification from analytic models and flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molusis, J. H.; Briczinski, S.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results of stability derivative identification from helicopter analytic models and flight test data are presented. Six and nine degree-of-freedom (DOF) linear models are identified from an analytic nonlinear helicopter simulation using a least square technique. The identified models are compared with the convectional partial differentiation method for obtaining derivatives to form the basis for interpretation of derivatives identified from flight data. Six degree-of-freedom models are identified from CH-53A and CH-54B flight data, using an extended Kalman filter modified to process several maneuvers simultaneously. The a priori derivative estimate is obtained by optimal filtering of the data and then using a least square method. The results demonstrate that a six DOF identified model is sufficient to determine the low frequency modes of motion, but a nine DOF rotor/body model is necessary for proper representation of short-term response.

  1. Interpretation of Redondo Creek Field pressure buildup tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent pressure buildup analyses of Redondo Creek Field wells have been facilitated by identification of wellbore storage. The wellbore storage coefficient observed immediately after shut-in is controlled by the compressibility of the two-phase wellbore fluid, but the coefficient decreases when the wellbore storage is controlled by a rising liquid level. Identification of such phenomena aids in defining the correct radial flow regime of the pressure buildup response.

  2. An Approach to Near Field Data Selection in Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkworth, Robert D.

    Personal identification is needed in many civil activities, and the common identification cards, such as a driver's license, have become the standard document de facto. Radio frequency identification has complicated this matter. Unlike their printed predecessors, contemporary RFID cards lack a practical way for users to control access to their individual fields of data. This leaves them more available to unauthorized parties, and more prone to abuse. Here, then was undertaken a means to test a novel RFID card technology that allows overlays to be used for reliable, reversible data access settings. Similar to other proposed switching mechanisms, it offers advantages that may greatly improve outcomes. RFID use is increasing in identity documents such as drivers' licenses and passports, and with it concern over the theft of personal information, which can enable unauthorized tracking or fraud. Effort put into designing a strong foundation technology now may allow for widespread development on them later. In this dissertation, such a technology was designed and constructed, to drive the central thesis that selective detuning could serve as a feasible, reliable mechanism. The concept had been illustrated effective in limiting access to all fields simultaneously before, and was here effective in limiting access to specific fields selectively. A novel card was produced in familiar dimensions, with an intuitive interface by which users may conceal the visible print of the card to conceal the wireless emissions it allows. A discussion was included of similar technologies, involving capacitive switching, that could further improve the outcomes if such a product were put to large-scale commercial fabrication. The card prototype was put to a battery of laboratory tests to measure the degree of independence between data fields and the reliability of the switching mechanism when used under realistically variable coverage, demonstrating statistically consistent performance in

  3. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  4. Optimizations for the EcoPod field identification tool

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Aswath; Stamberger, Jeannie; Yu, YuanYuan; Paepcke, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background We sketch our species identification tool for palm sized computers that helps knowledgeable observers with census activities. An algorithm turns an identification matrix into a minimal length series of questions that guide the operator towards identification. Historic observation data from the census geographic area helps minimize question volume. We explore how much historic data is required to boost performance, and whether the use of history negatively impacts identification of rare species. We also explore how characteristics of the matrix interact with the algorithm, and how best to predict the probability of observing a previously unseen species. Results Point counts of birds taken at Stanford University's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve between 2000 and 2005 were used to examine the algorithm. A computer identified species by correctly answering, and counting the algorithm's questions. We also explored how the character density of the key matrix and the theoretical minimum number of questions for each bird in the matrix influenced the algorithm. Our investigation of the required probability smoothing determined whether Laplace smoothing of observation probabilities was sufficient, or whether the more complex Good-Turing technique is required. Conclusion Historic data improved identification speed, but only impacted the top 25% most frequently observed birds. For rare birds the history based algorithms did not impose a noticeable penalty in the number of questions required for identification. For our dataset neither age of the historic data, nor the number of observation years impacted the algorithm. Density of characters for different taxa in the identification matrix did not impact the algorithms. Intrinsic differences in identifying different birds did affect the algorithm, but the differences affected the baseline method of not using historic data to exactly the same degree. We found that Laplace smoothing performed better for rare species

  5. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  6. Identification of latent faults using a radon test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díez, A.; Soto, J.; Gómez-Arozamena, J.; Bonachea, J.; Martínez-Díaz, J. J.; Cuesta, J. A.; Olague, I.; Remondo, J.; Fernández Maroto, G.; Díaz de Terán, J. R.

    2009-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of 222Rn concentrations in water of natural springs as a geomorphological method to identify latent faults in low-mid term activity areas. The identification of this type of active fault may be crucial in hazard analysis, structural geomorphology and in landscape evolution analysis. The test used to identify these faults is based on the measuring of 222Rn concentrations in water of springs linked to faults, and comparison with those obtained from springs which, although exactly the same lithological context, are not linked with faults (reference values). If the difference between the measured value and the reference value is positive then an anomaly is identified and that measurement indicates a spring linked to a latent fault. The test was applied and validated in springs linked to faults with a latent behaviour in Cantabria, Northern Spain. These faults have shown an intermittent movement over the last 50,000 years, and have contributed towards landslide processes playing a significant role in landscape evolution of the area.

  7. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... on-track equipment; (4) An analysis of the applicability of the requirements of subparts A through...

  8. Integrated approach to gas accumulation identification in Field M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshevskaya, K.; Rukavishnikov, V.; Belozerov, B.; Podnebesnikh, A.

    2015-02-01

    The given paper describes how the integration of different methods, such as core data, well logs, production logging, seismic data and well test analysis, was used to solve the problem of determining gas accumulation boundaries in sediment complex PK1-3 of Field M. This paper is devoted to the block with wells 2, 36, 49, 85, 127, 148 of the field, since it is characterized by high uncertainty, sc. recently drilled wells 1V, 2V and 120 have produced oil, although according to the present-day geological concept they were considered to be gas saturated in the intervals investigated with production logging. Besides, well 127 that was presumably oil saturated has produced gas. By accounting mismatching production data and the geological concept, the authors have supposed that PK1-3 gas accumulation is characterized by a more complex structure than it was supposed by the predecessors and it is represented by reservoir compartmentalization and high heterogeneity. Therefore, the main goal of the work was to revise the distribution of gas saturated reservoir within the PK1-3 sediment complex. To achieve this goal, the authors have set the following tasks: to revise the geological correlation and gas oil contact; to carry out fault interpretation by means of seismic and well test data; to determine areal facies distribution on the basis of integrated core, perform a log motifs and seismic facies analysis. Thus, the estimation of the gas saturated reservoir portion was implemented in two stages: defining the boundary of gas accumulation in depth on the basis of well logs, production data and fault interpretation; reservoir distribution determination on the basis of the seismic facies analysis within the derived gas accumulation boundary.

  9. Nanoscale Electric Field Sensor-Development and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brame, Jon; Woods, Nathan

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this project is to test a carbon nanotube based electric field sensing device. The device consists of a miniature gold needle suspended on a mat of carbon nanotubes over a trench on a Si/Si02 substrate. Field tests were made by recording the electric field inside dust devils in a Nevada desert, and those electric fields were simulated in a lab environment. Further tests to determine the device sensitivity were performed by manually manipulating the gold needle with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. We report on fabrication techniques, field and lab test results and AFM testing results.

  10. Field testing of a personal size-selective bioaerosol sampler.

    PubMed

    Kenny, L C; Bowry, A; Crook, B; Stancliffe, J D

    1999-08-01

    Existing samplers for the collection of bioaerosols have been designed with the aim of maintaining biological stability of the collected material, and in general do not select particles in accordance with international conventions for aerosol sampling. Many have uncharacterised sampling efficiencies and few are designed as personal samplers. If standard personal dust samplers are used for bioaerosols the viability of collected microorganisms may be compromised by dehydration. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel personal bioaerosol sampler designed to collect the inhalable dust fraction and further subdivide the sample into thoracic and respirable fractions. The new sampler was tested to see whether it enhanced the survival of the collected microorganisms, and was assessed for ease of use in the field and in subsequent laboratory analyses. A number of occupation-related field sites were selected where large concentrations of bioaerosols were to be expected. The prototype sampler was found to be simple to use. Analysis could be carried out with similar efficiency either with all three fractions together for a total count, or separately for size selective data. The sampler performed at least as well as the standard IOM filter method but with the added advantage of size fractionation. The field trials showed that for sampling periods lasting several hours, microorganism survival within the sampler was adequate for culture and identification of the organisms present. This new sampler is now commercially available. In addition to bioaerosol sampling, the principle of size selective sampling using porous foams can be applied to other occupational hygiene problems, and also to indoor air monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations. PMID:10518465

  11. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  12. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  13. Reliability and validity of a talent identification test battery for seated and standing Paralympic throws.

    PubMed

    Spathis, Jemima Grace; Connick, Mark James; Beckman, Emma Maree; Newcombe, Peter Anthony; Tweedy, Sean Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paralympic throwing events for athletes with physical impairments comprise seated and standing javelin, shot put, discus and seated club throwing. Identification of talented throwers would enable prediction of future success and promote participation; however, a valid and reliable talent identification battery for Paralympic throwing has not been reported. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of a talent identification battery for Paralympic throws. Participants were non-disabled so that impairment would not confound analyses, and results would provide an indication of normative performance. Twenty-eight non-disabled participants (13 M; 15 F) aged 23.6 years (±5.44) performed five kinematically distinct criterion throws (three seated, two standing) and nine talent identification tests (three anthropometric, six motor); 23 were tested a second time to evaluate test-retest reliability. Talent identification test-retest reliability was evaluated using Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots (Limits of Agreement). Spearman's correlation assessed strength of association between criterion throws and talent identification tests. Reliability was generally acceptable (mean ICC = 0.89), but two seated talent identification tests require more extensive familiarisation. Correlation strength (mean rs = 0.76) indicated that the talent identification tests can be used to validly identify individuals with competitively advantageous attributes for each of the five kinematically distinct throwing activities. Results facilitate further research in this understudied area. PMID:25371965

  14. Bootstrapping Dip Test for PIV Outlier Identification and Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Andree; Pun, Chan-Seng; Dabiri, Dana

    2007-11-01

    A PIV outlier detection and correction method is proposed that does not directly rely on local statistics. A bootstrapping method uses interpolation to generate a distribution of points for each vector component. Statistics are obtained by applying the Hartigan's dip test for bimodality on the distribution points to estimate the mode for each vector component. Significant difference between the estimated modes and outliers is observed; non-spurious vector components are close to the estimated modes. The bootstrapping dip test outlier detection scheme is then repeated until no more vector components are rejected. Two approaches to replace the detected vector components are considered. First, the corresponding mode values are replaced with the detected components, second the remaining vector components are used to re-interpolate the field. Validation includes parametric studies based on the number of undetections and overdetections on simulated fields to determine the optimal sets of parameters. Applications of the optimum parameters to a turbulent jet flow and a synthetic Rankine Vortex flow, both obtained from the PIV Challenge website are shown and details of this methodology is discussed.

  15. Germination and emergence tests for predicting switchgrass field establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) seed quality tests on field establishment has not been addressed. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of seed quality tests to predict field establishment. Standard Association of Official Seed Analysts (AOSA) tests are based on the percentage of...

  16. Identification of veterinary pathogens by use of commercial identification systems and new trends in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, J L; Yancey, R J

    1994-01-01

    Veterinary diagnostic microbiology is a unique specialty within microbiology. Although isolation and identification techniques are similar to those used for human pathogens, many veterinary pathogens require unique cultivation or identification procedures. Commercial identification systems provide rapid, accurate identification of human pathogens. However, the accuracy of these systems with veterinary pathogens varies widely depending on the bacterial species and the host animal from which it was isolated. Increased numbers of veterinary strains or species in the data bases of the various systems would improve their accuracy. Current procedures and interpretive criteria used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens are based on guidelines used for human pathogens. The validity of these guidelines for use with veterinary pathogens has not been established. As with fastidious human pathogens, standardized methodologies and quality control isolates are needed for tests of organisms such as Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus somnus. Furthermore, interpretive criteria for veterinary antimicrobial agents based on the MIC for veterinary pathogens, the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial agent in the host animal, and in vivo efficacy of the antimicrobial agent are needed. This article reviews both the commercial identification systems evaluated with veterinary pathogens and current methods for performing and interpreting antimicrobial susceptibility tests with veterinary pathogens. Recommendations for future improvements in both areas are discussed. PMID:7923054

  17. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  18. Test procedure for Hasselblad field irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, C.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure is defined for determining the uniformity of film plane illumination (field irradiance) of the Hasselblad cameras. The data source shall consist of photographs, with X-Y scans being taken for indication only. The accuracy requirement is 2.0%.

  19. Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

    2001-01-01

    Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

  20. Applying a Bayesian Approach to Identification of Orthotropic Elastic Constants from Full Field Displacement Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogu, C.; Yin, W.; Haftka, R.; Ifju, P.; Molimard, J.; Le Riche, R.; Vautrin, A.

    2010-06-01

    A major challenge in the identification of material properties is handling different sources of uncertainty in the experiment and the modelling of the experiment for estimating the resulting uncertainty in the identified properties. Numerous improvements in identification methods have provided increasingly accurate estimates of various material properties. However, characterizing the uncertainty in the identified properties is still relatively crude. Different material properties obtained from a single test are not obtained with the same confidence. Typically the highest uncertainty is associated with respect to properties to which the experiment is the most insensitive. In addition, the uncertainty in different properties can be strongly correlated, so that obtaining only variance estimates may be misleading. A possible approach for handling the different sources of uncertainty and estimating the uncertainty in the identified properties is the Bayesian method. This method was introduced in the late 1970s in the context of identification [1] and has been applied since to different problems, notably identification of elastic constants from plate vibration experiments [2]-[4]. The applications of the method to these classical pointwise tests involved only a small number of measurements (typically ten natural frequencies in the previously cited vibration test) which facilitated the application of the Bayesian approach. For identifying elastic constants, full field strain or displacement measurements provide a high number of measured quantities (one measurement per image pixel) and hence a promise of smaller uncertainties in the properties. However, the high number of measurements represents also a major computational challenge in applying the Bayesian approach to full field measurements. To address this challenge we propose an approach based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the full fields in order to drastically reduce their dimensionality. POD is

  1. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  2. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS FOR NEUROTOXICITY FIELD TESTING: PEARL II AND ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pearl II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. he battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event related slow brain potentials (CNV,P30O), and associated ...

  3. Identification of in-field defect development in digital image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudas, Jozsef; Wu, Linda M.; Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; Koren, Zahava; Koren, Israel

    2007-02-01

    Although solid-state image sensors are known to develop defects in the field, little information is available about the nature, quantity or development rate of these defects. We report on and algorithm and calibration tests, which confirmed the existence of significant quantities of in-field defects in 4 out of 5 high-end digital cameras. Standard hot pixels were identified in all 4 cameras. Stuck hot pixels, which have not been described previously, were identified in 2 cameras. Previously, hot-pixels were thought to have no impact at short exposure durations, but the large offset of stuck hot pixels will degrade almost any image and cannot be ignored. Fully-stuck and abnormal sensitivity defects were not found. Spatial investigation found no clustering. We tracked hot pixel growth over the lifetime of one camera, using only normal photographs. We show that defects develop continually over the lifetime of the sensor, starting within several months of first use, and do not heal over time. Our success in tracing the history of each defect confirms the feasibility of using automatic defect identification to analyze defect response and growth characteristics in a multitude of cameras already in the field, without performing additional experiments or requiring physical access to the cameras.

  4. An experimental modal testing/identification technique for personal computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roemer, Michael J.; Schlonski, Steven T.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A PC-based system for mode shape identification is evaluated. A time-domain modal identification procedure is utilized to identify the mode shapes of a beam apparatus from discrete time-domain measurements. The apparatus includes a cantilevered aluminum beam, four accelerometers, four low-pass filters, and the computer. The method's algorithm is comprised of an identification algorithm: the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and an estimation algorithm called Minimum Model Error (MME). The identification ability of this algorithm is compared with ERA alone, a frequency-response-function technique, and an Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Detection of modal parameters and mode shapes by the PC-based time-domain system is shown to be accurate in an application with an aluminum beam, while mode shapes identified by the frequency-domain technique are not as accurate as predicted. The new method is shown to be significantly less sensitive to noise and poorly excited modes than other leading methods. The results support the use of time-domain identification systems for mode shape prediction.

  5. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  6. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  7. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to

  8. Star Identification Without Attitude Knowledge: Testing with X-Ray Timing Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor

    1997-01-01

    As the budget for the scientific exploration of space shrinks, the need for more autonomous spacecraft increases. For a spacecraft with a star tracker, the ability to determinate attitude from a lost in space state autonomously requires the capability to identify the stars in the field of view of the tracker. Although there have been efforts to produce autonomous star trackers which perform this function internally, many programs cannot afford these sensors. The author previously presented a method for identifying stars without a priori attitude knowledge specifically targeted for onboard computers as it minimizes the necessary computer storage. The method has previously been tested with simulated data. This paper provides results of star identification without a priori attitude knowledge using flight data from two 8 by 8 degree charge coupled device star trackers onboard the X-Ray Timing Experiment.

  9. FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

  10. Goldstone field test activities: Sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The goals are to conduct a research and development program aimed at determining the most effective way to do SETI within the constraints of current technology and estimated budgets. The general search strategy adopted is that which is recommended by the SETI Science Working Group. The strategy for an all sky survey for SETI was further developed over the last year. Scan patterns, scan rates, and signal detection algorithms were developed. Spectral power measurement instrumentation was tested at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A specially designed radio frequency interference (RFI) measurement system was built and installed at the Venus Station. A data base management system for storage and retrieval of the RFI data was partially implemented on a VAX 750 computer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  12. Identification and Validation of a Brief Test Anxiety Screening Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Segool, Natasha; Putwain, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of test-based accountability policies around the world has increased the pressure placed on students to perform well on state achievement tests. Educational researchers have begun taking a closer look at the reciprocal effects of test anxiety and high-stakes testing. However, existing test anxiety assessments lack efficiency and…

  13. ROPS performance during field upset and static testing.

    PubMed

    Harris, J R; McKenzie, E A; Etherton, J R; Cantis, D M; Ronaghi, M

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture remains one of the most hazardous occupations in the U.S. By conservative estimates, tractor overturns alone claim 120 lives annually. A rollover protective structure (ROPS) and a seatbelt are a highly effective engineering safety control that can prevent many of these fatalities and reduce the severity of injuries associated with tractor overturn. SAE J2194 is a consensus performance standard established for agricultural ROPS. According to this standard, satisfactory ROPS performance can be demonstrated through static testing, field upset testing, or impact testing. A previous modeling study suggested that static testing may underpredict the strain induced in a ROPS during afield upset. In the current study, field upset testing and laboratory static testing results were compared. Field upset testing included six rear and six side upset tests performed according to SAE J2194 guidelines. Additionally, static testing was performed on a ROPS of the same model. The results support findings from the modeling study. Near the lowest sections of the ROPS, the plastic strain resulting from rear upset testing exceeded the plastic strain from static testing for 18 of 24 data points. Conversely, the ROPS plastic strain from side upset testing was typically less than plastic strain from laboratory static testing. However, data indicate that the side upset test may not be very repeatable. This study suggests that the longitudinal loading energy criterion for static testing might not be a conservative predictor of rear upset ROPS response. PMID:20222267

  14. Subcutaneous electronic identification in cattle: a field study.

    PubMed

    Løken, T; Vatn, G; Kummen, E

    2011-09-01

    The use of injectable transponders in cattle for identification purposes, for up to 30 months, was investigated. Passive electronic transponders, encapsulated in either polymer or glass, were injected subcutaneously into either the ear base or the earlobe of 652 calves in three populations. The animals were clinically examined weekly, and transponder signalling was checked immediately before and after injection, after two weeks and after about eight months. About 10 per cent of animals in one population were also checked after 20 and 30 months. No severe clinical or visible pathological changes were observed, and the calves' welfare was not apparently affected by the procedure. None of the transponders migrated from their injection sites. Eight months after injection, a signal was detected from 98.2 per cent of transponders injected in the ear base and from 90.5 per cent of those in the earlobe. At 20 and 30 months after injection, 10.4 per cent and 2.6 per cent of transponders, respectively, had ceased to signal. Thus, most transponders in the calves' ear base demonstrated functionality for up to 30 months. PMID:21813580

  15. Field tests of transgenic barley lines in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing transgenic barley lines for FHB in the greenhouse does not necessarily give the same results as field tests. The objective of this project was to test 18 transgenic lines in replicated trials in an inoculated FHB nursery. Several programs have developed barley lines expressing anti-fungal a...

  16. Designing an Online In-House Major Field Learning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilda, Agacer; Christofi, Andreas; Moliver, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Our paper provides some critical attributes of an online homegrown assessment test, which we labelled Major Field Learning Test (MFLT). These attributes are also valid for departmental tests, directly connected to coursework which makes up the MFLT. The paper provides helpful recommendations for online assessment of learning as well as retention…

  17. Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; McWilliams, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E. P.; Morehouse, M.; Slepchenkov, M.; Wessel, F.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ˜500 m2 s-1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport.

  18. Identification of wind fields for wave modeling near Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Sashikant; Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Due to the development of coastal and offshore infrastructure in and around the Arabian Gulf, a large semi-enclosed sea, knowledge of met-ocean factors like prevailing wind systems, wind generated waves, and currents etc. are of great importance. Primarily it is important to identify the wind fields that are used as forcing functions for wave and circulation models for hindcasting and forecasting purposes. The present study investigates the effects of using two sources of wind-fields on the modeling of wind-waves in the Arabian Gulf, in particular near the coastal regions of Qatar. Two wind sources are considered here, those obtained from ECMWF and those generated by us using the WRF model. The wave model SWAN was first forced with the 6 hourly ERA Interim daily winds (from ECMWF) having spatial resolution of 0.125°. For the second option, wind fields were generated by us using the mesoscale wind model (WRF) with a high spatial resolution (0.1°) at every 30 minute intervals. The simulations were carried out for a period of two months (7th October-7th December, 2015) during which measurements were available from two moored buoys (deployed and operated by the Qatar Meteorological Department), one in the north of Qatar ("Qatar North", in water depth of 58.7 m) and other in the south ("Shiraouh Island", in water depth of 16.64 m). This period included a high-sea event on 11-12th of October, recorded by the two buoys where the significant wave heights (Hs) reached as high as 2.9 m (i.e. max wave height H ~ 5.22 m) and 1.9 (max wave height H ~ 3.4 m) respectively. Model results were compared with the data for this period. The scatter index (SI) of the Hs simulated using the WRF wind fields and the observed Hs was found to be about 30% and 32% for the two buoys (total period). The observed Hs were generally reproduced but there was consistent underestimation. (Maximum 27% for the high-sea event). For the Hs obtained with ERA interim wind fields, the underestimation was

  19. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  20. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  1. Field test of two 16-element fiber optic seismometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Wanyu; Fu, Lixi; Zhang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Two 16-element fiber-optic seismometer arrays based on combined wavelength- and time domain multiplexing technology have been designed and investigated, followed by a field test, which is focused on the sensitivities of the sensors and correlation of the signal. The field test shows that the consistency of the sensitivities is pretty good, though the fluctuation of sensitivities at different frequencies should not be ignored. The method to calculate the correlation of two sensors is presented briefly and the results show an acceptable high level. The field test indicates that it's available to use the arrays in practical applications of micro-seismic.

  2. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; LaTorre, V.R.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Nitao, J.J.; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.; Wilder, D.

    1989-07-26

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Comparison of an Automated System with Conventional Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini; Gaind, Rajni; Tandon, Neha; Deb, Manorama; Chugh, Tulsi Das

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare a fully automated identification/antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) system BD Phoenix (BD) for its efficacy in rapid and accurate identification and AST with conventional manual methods and to determine if the errors reported in AST, such as the (very major errors) VME (false susceptibility), (major errors) ME (false resistance), and (minor errors) MiE (intermediate category interpretation) were within the range certified by FDA. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of eighty-five clinical isolates including both gram-positive and negative were compared on Phoenix considering the results obtained from conventional manual methods of identification and disc diffusion testing of antibiotics as standards for comparison. Phoenix performed favorably well. There was 100% concordance in identification for gram-negative isolates and 94.83% for gram-positive isolates. In seven cases, Phoenix proved better than conventional identification. For antibiotic results, categorical agreement was 98.02% for gram-positive and 95.7% for gram-negative isolates. VME was 0.33%, ME 0.66%, MiE 0.99% for gram-positive isolates and 1.23% VME, 1.23% ME, and 1.85% MiE for gram-negative isolates. Therefore, this automated system can be used as a tool to facilitate early identification and susceptibility pattern of aerobic bacteria in routine microbiology laboratories. PMID:23762748

  4. Methods Studies on System Identification from Transient Rotor Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.; Yin, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the more important methods are discussed that have been used or proposed for aircraft parameter identification. The methods are classified into two groups: Equation error or regression estimates and Bayesian estimates and their derivatives that are based on probabilistic concepts. In both of these two groups the cost function can be optimized either globally over the entire time span of the transient, or sequentially, leading to the formulation of optimum filters. Identifiability problems and the validation of the estimates are briefly outlined, and applications to lifting rotors are discussed.

  5. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  6. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  7. Separability of test fields equations on the C -metric background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KofroÅ, David

    2015-12-01

    In the Kerr-Newman spacetime the Teukolsky master equation, governing the fundamental test fields, is of great importance. We derive an analogous master equation for the nonrotating C -metric which encompasses a massless Klein-Gordon field, neutrino field, Maxwell field, Rarita-Schwinger field and gravitational perturbations. This equation is shown to be separable in terms of "accelerated spin-weighted spherical harmonics." It is shown that, contrary to ordinary spin-weighted spherical harmonics, the "accelerated" ones are different for different spins. In some cases, the equations for eigenfunctions and eigenvalues are explicitly solved.

  8. OPCW Proficiency Test: A Practical Approach Also for Interlaboratory Test on Detection and Identification of Pesticides in Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Śliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  9. OPCW Proficiency Test: a practical approach also for interlaboratory test on detection and identification of pesticides in environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Konopski, Leszek; Liu, Pingfeng; Wuryani, Wuri; Sliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  10. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  11. Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided.

  12. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  13. Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

  14. Children with Developmental Disabilities: The Effect of Sound Field Amplification on Word Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flexer, Carol; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Using sound field amplification which increased the intensity of the teacher's voice by 10 decibels, 9 primary-level children with developmental disabilities made fewer errors on a word identification task, were more relaxed, and responded more quickly than without amplification. (Author/JDD)

  15. Identification of Disciplines and Fields. Edis Task I Report, Work Unit 1.4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard Research Co., Arlington, VA.

    This report presents the identification and definitions of subject oriented engineering and scientific disciplines and fields which are included in the EDIS Subject Categories. The discussion is extended to include the mix of subjects with other orientations, such as Item, Mission-Project, Expertise and Data Bank Categories. Sample queries are…

  16. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

  17. Lacunarity Measures of Potential Fields in Covered Lithology Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettings, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Measure distributions, both multifractal and other kinds, are not unique, so spatial patterns with the same measure may have different appearances. Lacunarity analysis is a method of description of dispersion in spatial patterns across a range of scales, and is one way of descriminating clustering of similar values. Lacunarity of an image was calculated using a moving window across a range of scales as the ratio of the second moment divided by the square of the first moment for values within the window. This gives a curve of lacunarity versus resolution (scale); the curve is concave for highly clustered data, pseudolinear or convex for data with clusters at many scales such as multifractal simulations, and constant for uniformly spaced data. Breaks in slope of the curve indicate scales that are important in the structure of the spatial pattern. Gravity and magnetic field anomaly data are well known to be multifractal and thus calculated lacunarities of gridded datasets have been investigated to determine if the resulting curves are a useful measure of texture of the potential field data and helpful in identifying likely lithologies at depth beneath cover. Lacunarity is often calculated on binary data, but it can also be calculated using quantitative data. The quantitative data case lacunarity measure was computed for grids using a 25 by 25 km window moving over the grid, each window overlapping the previous one by 12.5 km. The data were the aeromagnetic and isostatic gravity anomaly grids for the state of Arizona at 0.5 km grid-interval, resulting in a lacunarity curves for gravity and aeromagnetic anomaly for each of approximately 2500 windows. The open-source software R was used for plotting a map of window center locations and lacunarity curves, and the map was loaded into Google Earth, together with maps of the gravity and magnetic field anomaly, porphyry copper deposit locations, and the geological map of Arizona. Windows were selected to compare lacunarity

  18. Influence of grid bar shape on field cleaner performance - field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A test was conducted to evaluate the influence of grid bar cross sectional shape on cotton stripper field cleaner performance in terms of cleaning efficiency, seed cotton loss, and fiber and yarn quality. Three field cleaner configurations were tested on a cotton stripper harvester operating under f...

  19. Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

  20. Geomagnetic field analysis. IV - Testing the frozen-flux hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxham, J.; Gubbins, D.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic field models at the core-mantle boundary are presented for three epochs: 1959.5, 1969.5, and 1980.0. The hypothesis that the field has been frozen into the core fluid throughout this 20-yr time span is tested by comparing the changes in the flux integrals over the three epochs with error estimates for the field at the core surface. It is found that the hypothesis can be rejected with 95 percent confidence.

  1. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  2. Identification of Streptococcus pyogenes – Phenotypic Tests vs Molecular Assay (spy1258PCR): A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tintu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is differentiated from other beta haemolytic streptococci (BHS) by certain presumptive tests such as bacitracin sensitivity and production of Pyrollidonyl Aryl Sulfatase (PYR). The phenotypic and genotypic confirmatory tests are Lancefield grouping for cell wall carbohydrate antigen and PCR for spy1258 gene respectively. Reliance on presumptive tests alone may lead to misidentification of isolates. Aim To compare the predictive values of routine phenotypic tests with spy1258 PCR for the identification of Streptococcus pyogenes. Materials and Methods This comparative analytical study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology, JIPMER, Puducherry, over a period of 18 months (1st November 2013 to 30th April 2015). Two hundred and six consecutive BHS isolates from various clinical samples were subjected to phenotypic tests such as bacitracin sensitivity, PYR test and Lancefield grouping. The results were compared with spy1258 PCR which was considered 95 the confirmatory test for identification. Results The sensitivity and specificity of phenotypic tests were as follows; Susceptibility to bacitracin – 95.42%, 70.96%, PYR test – 95.42%, 77.41%, Lancefield grouping- 97.71%, 80.64%. Conclusion Clinical laboratories should not depend on bacitracin sensitivity as a single presumptive test for the routine identification of GAS but should use supplemental tests such as PYR test or latex agglutination test and for best results use spy1258 PCR.

  3. Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

    2006-08-01

    Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed. PMID:16844415

  4. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  5. Identification of the Temperature Field in Pulsatile Impinging Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

    2010-09-01

    The presented paper shows the possibility of using holographic interferometry and hot-wire anemometry in the research of heat transfer from impingement pulsatile flow. The intensity of heat transfer in the case of impingement flow is often measured with glue-on heat flux sensors, or by indirect methods such as naphthalene sublimation. All these methods have a response time too long for measuring instant values of the heat transfer coefficient on a surface cooled/heated by impingement pulsatile flow. This shortcoming should be overcome by using CTA glue-on probes or, preferably, by using optical methods such as holographic interferometry. It is necessary to employ a special holographic setup with double sensitivity instead of the commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the Mach-Zehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the holographic interferometry experiments will be compared with the temperature field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  6. Rapid chemical test for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, John C

    1932-01-01

    This note describes a simple, rapid, qualitative test which can be applied to solutions of drilling or chips for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel. The test is based on the orange-red compound which is formed when thiocyanate and inequivalent molybdenum react. This test is much more reliable than the potassium ethylxanthate test which has been recommended for a like purpose. A list of the apparatus and reagents which are required, and a description of the procedure follows.

  7. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these

  8. Results of field tests of a transportable calorimeter assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakel, D.A.; Lemming, J.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Duff, M.F.; Jarvis, J.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A transportable calorimetric assay system, developed for use by US Department of Energy inspectors, is described. The results of field tests at three DOE sites are presented. The samples measured in these tests represent a variety of forms (ash, oxide, metal buttons), isotopic composition, and total plutonium content.

  9. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

  10. DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

  11. FIELD TESTING OF VOCS IN SOIL USING SENSIDYNE DETECTOR TUBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Present field testing for VOCs in soil and water involves sending samples to distant laboratories, waiting weeks for results, at a cost of 30 - 50 $ per sample. The goal of this science activity was to develop and test in the laboratory a methodology to detect VOCs in soil and w...

  12. Cervical adenocarcinoma identification by testing for chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dittus, Janet L; Dudley, Bunyan S; Upender, Madhvi; Endress, Gregory A

    2013-12-01

    We report on a case of cervical adenocarcinoma in situ in a 42-year-old woman with a history of human papillomavirus infection. Repeat cytology, human papillomavirus testing, and colposcopy failed to identify the lesion. Testing of the cervical cell DNA identified chromosomal abnormalities, prompting a cervical cone biopsy, which identified adenocarcinoma in situ. PMID:24283864

  13. Development of a field test for evaluating aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, K; Yano, Y; Senjyu, H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reproducibility and utility of a standardised and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15 mISWRT]) to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 14 middle-aged participants performed the 15-m ISWRT 3 times within one week (Test 1, Test 2, Test 3). Reproducibility of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed), HRmax, and VO 2max for each test. The utility of the 15-m ISWRT for evaluating VO 2max over a wide range in middle-aged adults was tested by comparing the range of VO 2max obtained from the portable expired gas analyzer with the VO 2max reference values and ranges for health promotion published by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. A multiple comparison of distance completed in the 15-m ISWRT Test 1, Test 2, and Test 3 found no significant difference between Test 2 and Test 3. The ICC was 0.99 for Test 2 vs. Test 3. VO 2max measured from the 15-m ISWRT in Test 3 had a minimum value of 22.8 ml/kg/min and a maximum value of 38.7 ml/kg/min. In conclusion, the 15-m ISWRT is reliable and useful for evaluating VO 2max in middle-aged adults. PMID:22377946

  14. Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

  15. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  16. Nondestructive identification of material properties of fibre concrete: A stationary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobst, L.; Bílek, P.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical properties of fibre concrete are determined by volume fraction and orientation of metal fibres in a cementitious matrix, thus nondestructive or (at least) low-invasive experimental testing and computational identification approaches are needed. This paper demonstrates the approach relying on the different magnetic permeability of fibres and a matrix, utilizing the Hall probe, as an alternative of results based image processing.

  17. Seismological identification of the 1998 May 28 Pakistan nuclear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D.; Douglas, A.; Selby, N. D.; Marshall, P. D.; Porter, D.; Wallis, N. J.

    2002-07-01

    On 1998 May 28 Pakistan announced that it had conducted an underground nuclear test. Here we assess whether seismological data, recorded by the International Monitoring System (IMS) being set up to help verify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), can be used to identify the Pakistani test as a possible underground explosion. The prototype International Data Centre (pIDC) automatically determined the network-averaged body wave and surface wave magnitudes to be 4.9 and 3.6, respectively. One of the most reliable methods of identifying possible underground explosions is the mb : Ms criterion. However, mb : Ms is calibrated using conventional magnitudes from historical earthquakes and explosions. We calculate , in the conventional way, using P waves from the Pakistani test recorded by a simulated standard short-period seismograph and read by an experienced analyst. We also analyse the three components of the surface waves from the Pakistani test to confirm that these are correctly associated, and calculate . On mb : Ms the Pakistani test falls between the historical Eurasian underground explosion and earthquake populations. Thus, while the source may arouse suspicion on mb : Ms, its signature is typical of both explosions and deep-lithospheric Eurasian earthquakes. The vast majority of the seismic P signals from the Pakistani test, recorded at long range, are complex. However, simple P seismograms are recorded by at least three of the IMS stations. Analysis, using the relative amplitude method, of three of the simple P seismograms suggests that the source is shallow (less than 5 km). We conclude that the combination of the mb : Ms signature and shallow depth are sufficient to classify the Pakistani test as a possible explosion. Under the CTBT an on-site inspection would be required to determine whether the explosion was nuclear.

  18. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil Ø.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain. PMID:26578887

  19. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  20. Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results

    SciTech Connect

    Temnykh A.; Babzien M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

    2010-11-10

    A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with {approx}60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

  1. Red square test for visual field screening. A sensitive and simple bedside test.

    PubMed

    Mandahl, A

    1994-12-01

    A reliable bedside test for screening of visual field defects is a valuable tool in the examination of patients with a putative disease affecting the sensory visual pathways. Conventional methods such as Donders' confrontation method, counting fingers in the visual field periphery, of two-hand confrontation are not sufficiently sensitive to detect minor but nevertheless serious visual field defects. More sensitive methods requiring only simple tools are also described. In this study, a test card with four red squares surrounding a fixation target, a black dot, with a total test area of about 11 x 12.5 degrees at a distance of 30 cm, was designed for testing experience of red colour saturation in four quadrants, red square test. The Goldmann visual field was used as reference. 125 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma (159 eyes), craniopharyngeoma (9 eyes), meningeoma (21 eyes), vascular hemisphere lesion (40 eyes), hemisphere tumour (10 eyes) and hemisphere abscess (2 eyes) were examined. The Goldmann visual field and red square test were pathological in pituitary adenomas in 35%, in craniopharyngeomas in 44%, in meningeomas in 52% and in hemisphere tumours or abscess in 100% of the eyes. Among these, no false-normal or false-pathological tests were found. However, in vascular hemisphere disease the corresponding figures were Goldmann visual field 90% and red square test 85%. The 5% difference (4 eyes) was due to Goldmann visual field defects strictly peripheral to the central 15 degrees. These defects were easily diagnosed with two-hand confrontation and PMID:7747575

  2. Clinical impact of rapid in vitro susceptibility testing and bacterial identification.

    PubMed Central

    Doern, G V; Vautour, R; Gaudet, M; Levy, B

    1994-01-01

    During the past decade, a variety of instrument-assisted bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test systems have been developed which permit provision of test results in a matter of hours rather than days, as has been the case with traditional overnight procedures. These newer rapid techniques are much more expensive than older methods. It has been presumed but not proven that the clinical benefits of rapid testing to patients with infection offset the added cost. The intent of this study was to objectively define the clinical impact of rapid bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A 1-year study was performed in which infected, hospitalized patients in a tertiary-care, teaching, medical center were randomly assigned to one of two groups: patients for whom identification and susceptibility testing was performed by using a semi-automated, rapid, same-day procedure and those for whom testing was accomplished by using traditional overnight techniques. The two groups were compared with respect to numerous demographic descriptors, and then patients were monitored prospectively through the end of their hospitalization with the aim of determining whether there existed objectively defineable differences in management and outcome between the two groups. The mean lengths of time to provision of susceptibility and identification test results in the rapid test group were 11.3 and 9.6 h, respectively. In the overnight test group, these values were 19.6 and 25.9 h, respectively (P < 0.0005). There were 273 evaluable patients in the first group and 300 in the second group. Other than the length of time required to provide susceptibility and identification test results, no significant differences were noted between the two groups with respect to > 100 demographic descriptors. With regard to measures of outcome, the mean lengths of hospitalization were also the same in both groups. Mortality rates were however, lower in the rapid test

  3. Flight test design for CH-47 parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Vincent, J.

    1978-01-01

    The VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program is a significant experimental research program aimed at establishing a data base for rotorcraft operation in a terminal area environment. Work was undertaken to determine helicopter math models suitable for analyzing maneuvers along a VTOL trajectory and to apply these math models to determine the flight test procedures of greatest effectiveness in establishing helicopter dynamic characteristics in this mode of operation. As the principal result of this investigation, a flight test specification is presented for the CH-47 VALT aircraft operating along the specified VTOL trajectory of the VALT program.

  4. Application of odor identification test in Parkinson's disease in China: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Kang, Wen-Yan; Li, Bo; Xu, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Qin; Liu, Jun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Gang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), hyposmia is of great importance in establishing the early diagnosis of PD. To date, there are still no studies on the application of the 16-item odor identification test from Sniffin' Sticks (SS-16) in Chinese patients with PD. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of SS-16 in Chinese PD patients (n=110) compared with age and gender matched controls (n=110), and to explore the associated factors with olfactory function in PD patients. The 16 odors in the original odor identification test were retained but some alternative descriptions were developed before applications. Mean identification scores in patients were significantly lower than in controls (7.3 ± 2.8 VS. 11.6 ± 2.0 P<0.01), with 66.4% of patients had an impairment of odor identification as evaluated by 95% confidential interval of the identification score of the control group. Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed 86% sensitivity and 81% specificity in separating PD and healthy controls with a cut-off value of 9.5. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that autonomic dysfunction was a significant influential factor of odor identification scores in patients with PD. In conclusion, SS-16 provides a valid instrument for olfactory assessment in Chinese PD patients, and hyposmia may correlate with autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD. PMID:22364958

  5. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

  6. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82) and bench press (rs = -0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83) and bench press (rs = -0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  7. Combing Visible and Infrared Spectral Tests for Dust Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Levy, Robert; Kleidman, Richard; Remer, Lorraine; Mattoo, Shana

    2016-01-01

    The MODIS Dark Target aerosol algorithm over Ocean (DT-O) uses spectral reflectance in the visible, near-IR and SWIR wavelengths to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom Exponent (AE). Even though DT-O does have "dust-like" models to choose from, dust is not identified a priori before inversion. The "dust-like" models are not true "dust models" as they are spherical and do not have enough absorption at short wavelengths, so retrieved AOD and AE for dusty regions tends to be biased. The inference of "dust" is based on postprocessing criteria for AOD and AE by users. Dust aerosol has known spectral signatures in the near-UV (Deep blue), visible, and thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength regions. Multiple dust detection algorithms have been developed over the years with varying detection capabilities. Here, we test a few of these dust detection algorithms, to determine whether they can be useful to help inform the choices made by the DT-O algorithm. We evaluate the following methods: The multichannel imager (MCI) algorithm uses spectral threshold tests in (0.47, 0.64, 0.86, 1.38, 2.26, 3.9, 11.0, 12.0 micrometer) channels and spatial uniformity test [Zhao et al., 2010]. The NOAA dust aerosol index (DAI) uses spectral contrast in the blue channels (412nm and 440nm) [Ciren and Kundragunta, 2014]. The MCI is already included as tests within the "Wisconsin" (MOD35) Cloud mask algorithm.

  8. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  9. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  10. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR Parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  11. Evaluating Gifted Identification Practice: Aptitude Testing and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael S.; Kirsch, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined individually administered IQ scores from an entire K-5 population (N = 432) of Limited English Proficient students referred for gifted program eligibility determination in a single large urban district in the southeastern United States. Of 8 IQ tests compared, only 1, the Stanford-Binet V, had scores appreciably lower than…

  12. Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2001-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

  13. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-12-01

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

  14. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  15. Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

  16. Field joint protection system rain qualification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report documents the procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) rain test. This test was performed to validate that the flight configuration FJPS prevents the accumulation of moisture in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joints when subjected to simulated prelaunch natural rain environments. The FJPS test article was exposed to rain simulation for approximately 50 minutes. During the test, water entered through the open upper end of the systems tunnel and was funneled down between the tunnel and case. A sealant void at the moisture seal butt splice allowed this water to flow underneath the FJPS. The most likely cause of voids was improper bondline preparation, particularly on the moisture seal surface. In total, water penetrated underneath approximately 60 percent of the FJPS circumference. Because the test article was substantially different from flight configuration (no systems tunnel closeout), results of this test will not affect current flight motors. Due to the omission of systems tunnel covers and systems tunnel floor plate closeout, the test assembly was not representative of flight hardware and resulted in a gross overtest. It is therefore recommended that the test be declared void. It is also recommended that the test be repeated with a complete closeout of the systems tunnel, sealed systems tunnel ends, and improved adhesive bondline preparation.

  17. Field test of microbend fiber sensor for hospital use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report a field test of a microbend fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate, breathing pattern, Ballistocardiogram and heart rate during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Comparative experiments conducted between our sensor and commercial physiologic device on a healthy male subject showed an accuracy of +/-2bpm for simultaneous measurement of both breathing rate and heart rate. Our preliminary field test on simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects in the 3.0 Tesla MRI environment showed very good agreement compared with measurements obtained from conventional MRcompatible devices.

  18. Field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Wang, Zhaogang; Huang, Wenzhu; Li, Li; Liu, Wenyi; Luo, Yingbo; Li, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report the field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph (OOBS) which can be used in the active source seismic research. There are three fiber laser accelerometers (FLAs) and one fiber laser hydrophone (FLH), which is wavelength division multiplexed, in the OOBS. The interrogation system is put on shore and is connected with the OOBS with optical fiber cable. The field test of using an air gun is carried out under water with a depth of 30 m. The results show that the OOBS has similar performance as conventional electric OBS.

  19. Development of a field test for upper-body power.

    PubMed

    Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

  20. Field identification of birdseye in sugar maple (acer saccharum marsh. ). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.C.; Stokke, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is critical for two principal reasons: (1) it allows for the enumeration of a valuable resource that may influence management decisions, and (2) it may prevent improper manufacturing of logs at the job site. Both factors should help increase overall timber sale return. The objective of the paper is to provide a background on birdseye sugar maples and a detailed sequential methodology for field identification of birdseye in standing trees.

  1. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  2. Project DEEP STEAM preliminary field test, Bakersfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, A.J.; Beyeler, J.A.; Clay, R.G.; Darnall, K.R.; Donaldson, A.B.; Donham, T.D.; Fox, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    A successful field test of the DEEP STEAM technology has been conducted. A direct contact steam generator was operated in the Kern River reservoir in cooperation with Chevron USA. The objectives of the test were demonstration of long term operation of a downhole steam generator, investigation of reservoir response, and the environmental consequences of the technology. The test was extensively instrumented to provide data on generator performance and reservoir response. The results show that the system is capable of long term operation in the oil field. It was demonstrated that substantial environmental improvements over surface steam production can be expected from injection of combustion products with steam in the downhole steam concept. The reservoir character was not altered by the test injection and appeared the same as that for pure steam injection.

  3. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  4. Star-field identification algorithm. [for implementation on CCD-based imaging camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    A description of a new star-field identification algorithm that is suitable for implementation on CCD-based imaging cameras is presented. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates, and their visual magnitudes. The algorithm incorporates tolerance to faulty input data, errors in the reference catalog, and instrument-induced systematic errors.

  5. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  6. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A.; Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management.

  7. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  8. A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anita; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G

    2007-05-15

    This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of oocyst suspensions of known number of oocysts from Eimeria mitis, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella were prepared and ground using glass beads or mini-pestle. DNA was extracted from ruptured oocysts using commercial systems (GeneReleaser, Qiagen Stoolkit and Prepman) or phenol-chloroform DNA extraction, followed by identification of species-specific ITS-1 sequences by optimised single species PCR assays. The Stoolkit and Prepman protocols showed insufficient repeatability, and the former was also expensive and relatively time-consuming. In contrast, both the GeneReleaser protocol and phenol-chloroform protocols were robust and sensitive, detecting less than 0.4 oocysts of each species per PCR. Finally, we evaluated our new protocol on 68 coccidia positive field samples. Our data suggests that rupturing the oocysts by mini-pestle grinding, preparing the DNA with GeneReleaser, followed by optimised single species PCR assays, makes a robust and sensitive procedure for identifying chicken Eimeria species in field samples. Importantly, it also provides minimal hands-on-time in the pre-PCR process, lower contamination risk and no handling of toxic chemicals. PMID:17386979

  9. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

    2007-04-07

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

  10. A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

    1977-01-01

    A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

  11. Evaluation Report: Early Childhood Education Program, 1969 Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    Reported are findings from the first year's field test of the home-oriented Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) Early Childhood Education Program for 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds. The program consists of a 30-minute daily television lesson, a weekly home visit by a paraprofessional, and group instruction once a week in a mobile classroom. The…

  12. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  13. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  14. Capacity degradation of field-tested silica gel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, T. R.; Pesaran, A. A.; Thomas, T. M.

    1985-06-01

    Researchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) have begun preliminary studies to quantify the effect of contamination of silica gel used in dehumidification processes of desiccant cooling systems. Sorption capacity degradation of field tested samples was measured, and the source of degradation was quantified using surface analysis experimental methods.

  15. Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1972-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, William E.; And Others

    The field test of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was conducted jointly by the Falconer Central School, St. Mary's Elementary School in Dunkirk, New York, and the Teacher Education Research Center at the State University College in Fredonia, New York. DMP is a research-based, innovative, process-oriented elementary mathematics…

  16. Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, William; And Others

    The Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was field-tested in the kindergarten and first three grades of one parochial and five public schools. DMP is an activity-based program developed around a comprehensive list of behavioral objectives. The program is concerned with the development of intuitive geometric concepts as well as…

  17. Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

  18. Design and testing of the LITE Variable Field Stop mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Field Stop (VFS) is a rotary mechanism that reliably positions any of four aperture plates in the optical path of a spaceflight experiment, limiting the amount of light reaching the detectors. This paper discusses the design, operation, and testing of the VFS.

  19. REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF WATTS NICKEL RINSE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a polyamide reverse-osmosis membrane in hollow fine fiber configuration for closed-loop treatment of rinse water from a Watts-type nickel bath. Performance of the membrane module was determined by measuring the prod...

  20. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  1. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262 Section 35.2262 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of...

  3. Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie

    This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

  4. Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field for Uav Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, R.; Jenerowicz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays the imagery data acquired from UAV sensors are the main source of all data used in various remote sensing applications, photogrammetry projects and in imagery intelligence (IMINT) as well as in other tasks as decision support. Therefore quality assessment of such imagery is an important task. The research team from Military University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy, Geodesy Institute, Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry has designed and prepared special test field- The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field (PIQuAT) that provides quality assessment in field conditions of images obtained with sensors mounted on UAVs. The PIQuAT consists of 6 individual segments, when combined allow for determine radiometric, spectral and spatial resolution of images acquired from UAVs. All segments of the PIQuAT can be used together in various configurations or independently. All elements of The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field were tested in laboratory conditions in terms of their radiometry and spectral reflectance characteristics.

  5. A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

  6. 29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Assessing the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test among Incarcerated Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Schilling, Robert; Ivanoff, Andre; Chen, Duan-Rung; Hanson, Meredith

    1998-01-01

    Describes the results of administering the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) to 400 incarcerated drug-using women. Reports on AUDIT's utility, validity, and reliability. Results demonstrate that AUDIT can be used to identify problem drinkers among incarcerated, drug-using women. (MKA)

  9. A Picture-Identification Test for Hearing-Impaired Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Mark; Lerman, Jay

    The Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification Test (WIPI) was developed to measure speech discrimination ability in hearing impaired children. In the first phase of development, the word stimuli were evaluated to determine whether they were within the recognition vocabulary of 15 hearing impaired children (aged 6 to 12) and whether the…

  10. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  11. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  12. Identification and susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus by direct inoculation from positive BACTEC blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Diederen, B M W; Zieltjens, M; Wetten, H; Buiting, A G M

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of combining direct inoculation of tube coagulase and DNase tests, and the VITEK2 system, from BACTEC blood culture bottles in order to achieve rapid identification and susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus. All isolates were identified correctly as S. aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing with the VITEK2 system gave 99.6% correct category agreement, with 0.1% very major errors and 0.3% minor errors among S. aureus isolates, and 97.4% correct category agreement, with 0.9% very major errors and 1.7% minor errors among CNS isolates. The results suggested that direct identification and susceptibility testing is sufficiently accurate for immediate reporting. PMID:16460552

  13. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  14. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

  15. High performance CLSM field mixing and pumping test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N.; Langton, C.A.

    1997-05-14

    An improved low bleed water CLSM mix was field tested on May 13, 1997 at the Throop portable auger batching plant. Production and pumping tests were very successful. The four cubic yards of material pumped into a ply wood form where it flowed 48 feet (the entire length of the form). The CLSM slurry was very uniform, self leveling, cohesive, showed no segregation, and had no bleed water. Properties of the High Performance CLSM were the same for material collected at the auger and at the end of the pipeline except for the air content which was 5.5% at the auger and 3.2% at the end of the pipeline. This is exactly what was expected and indicates that this CLSM is easy to mix and pump in the Throop/BSRI equipment. CLSM Mix TW-10 is recommended for Tank Closure based on the field batching and pumping tests.

  16. Test results of BM109 magnet field stability during ramping

    SciTech Connect

    Kristalinski, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents results of the measured lag between the current ramp and the following magnetic field rise in BM109 magnets. The purpose of these tests is to choose identical ramping programs for PC4AN1, PC4AN2 and PC4AN3 magnets. The lag occurs due to the large eddy currents in the magnets' solid iron cores. The experiment requires a magnetic field stability of 0.1% during beam presence. Using existing equipment and a program slope of 100 Amp/sec starting at Tl yields fields within the 0.05% of set value. Add to this 0.05% for P.S. regulation to meet the required field stability of 0.1%. This program yields annual savings of $200,000 (assuming 100% usage) . Additional savings can be made by using faster slopes, but this requires additional controls.

  17. Test results of BM109 magnet field stability during ramping

    SciTech Connect

    Kristalinski, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents results of the measured lag between the current ramp and the following magnetic field rise in BM109 magnets. The purpose of these tests is to choose identical ramping programs for PC4AN1, PC4AN2 and PC4AN3 magnets. The lag occurs due to the large eddy currents in the magnets` solid iron cores. The experiment requires a magnetic field stability of 0.1% during beam presence. Using existing equipment and a program slope of 100 Amp/sec starting at Tl yields fields within the 0.05% of set value. Add to this 0.05% for P.S. regulation to meet the required field stability of 0.1%. This program yields annual savings of $200,000 (assuming 100% usage) . Additional savings can be made by using faster slopes, but this requires additional controls.

  18. Innovative automatic resonant mode identification for nano-scale dynamic full-field characterization of MEMS using interferometric fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Huang, Yao-Ting; Lai, Huang-Wen; Chen, Jin-Liang; Chang, Calvin C.

    2008-12-01

    A dynamic 3D nano-scale surface profilometer was successfully developed for novel automatic resonant frequency identification using stroboscopic interferometric principle. With rapid increase in the application of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) to industries, the needs of accurate dynamic characterization have become a major challenge in design and fabrication. In view of such, an interferometric microscopy was developed using LED stroboscopic interferometry to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry and characterization of MEMS with a measurement bandwidth exceeding 1 MHz. Most importantly, a novel detection algorithm was also developed employing interferogram fringe density measure for automatic resonant frequency identification. Natural resonant modes of a series of microstructures can be accurately detected, giving values consistent with theoretical ones. To verify the effectiveness of the developed methodology, an AFM cantilever microbeam and a cross-bridge microbeam were measured to analyze their full-field resonant vibratory shapes. Our experimental results confirmed that the resonant vibration of the tested beams can be fully characterized while achieving an accuracy in vertical measurement of 3-5 nm with a vertical measurement range of tens of micrometers.

  19. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  20. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-01-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  1. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-12-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  2. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  3. Analysis of the intraseasonal stability of field test performances in young academy soccer players.

    PubMed

    Francioni, Fabio Massimo; Figueiredo, António José; Terribili, Marco; Tessitore, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the intraseasonal stability of anthropometric, technical and functional test results in academy soccer players of different age categories. In total, 103 participants (age range: 7.7-13.4 years) by 5 age categories of the same academy were recruited for this study. Players were submitted to a field-test battery comprising 3 anthropometric measurements (body mass, stature and body mass index), 6 soccer technical tests (to assess the ability of ball control, ball control with the head, pass accuracy, shooting accuracy, dribbling and dribbling with pass) and 3 functional tests (countermovement jump with the hands on the hip, countermovement jump with free hands and 15-m linear sprint) that was administered in 4 test sessions during the same season. Though anthropometric results showed a clear increment in each age category across the season, the fluctuation of technical test results depended on age category and test session. Moreover, a significant increase in the results of functional tests was observed in most of the age categories, in particular, for the assessment of lower power limb. In conclusion, collecting repeated intraseason measurements permits the identification of players' fluctuations of performance across the season and allows coaches to make frequent adjustments of their programmes. PMID:26334112

  4. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  9. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  10. HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...