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1

Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

2007-08-01

2

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

3

Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

2015-03-01

4

Field identification in coset conformal field theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fields appearing in G\\/H coset conformal field theories are shown to obey certain relations. These relations, in conjunction with the modular transformations imply a certain identification of fields. The use of these relations and identifications leads to the correct modular invariant spectrum of the theories. The consistency of this spectrum with the operator product algebra is discussed.

Doron Gepner

1989-01-01

5

Color identification testing device  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

1970-01-01

6

Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

1986-01-01

7

Gender Object Identification Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This test was designed primarily for the purpose of assisting social psychologists in researching sex roles and/or sex differences when a nonverbal instrument is desired. The hypothesis was that some objects would be easier for members of one gender to name. The subjects were 30 female and 20 male undergraduate students. Pictures of 65 commercial…

Sigmon, Scott B.

8

Field theory of pattern identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ?[?] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern ? is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern ? with the modified pattern ?+?? is assumed to be such that their images ?[?] and ?[?+??] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ?[?] and ?[?+??] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ?[?] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern ? leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

Agu, Masahiro

1988-06-01

9

PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PR...

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2002-08-04

10

FIELD DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA's OHMSETT facility has developed a rapid field test that includes some of the theoretical aspects and conditions of dispersion at sea. This Field Dispersant Effectiveness Test (FDET) has been used to evaluate the dispersibility of various commonly-transported oils and mak...

11

LSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

Jaffe, P.

1979-01-01

12

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-print Network

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

13

Japanese refrigerators field testing  

SciTech Connect

Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual operation. The units have also undergone laboratory testing sponsored by BPA at ETL Testing Laboratories, Inc. in Cortland, New York. A final report of the project -- due at the end of 1989 -- will correlate in detail the results of field and laboratory tests in comparison to performance ratings determined by the manufacturer.

Lou, A.T.

1989-03-01

14

Japanese Refrigerators Field Testing.  

SciTech Connect

Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual operation. The units have also undergone laboratory testing sponsored by BPA at ETL Testing Laboratories, Inc. in Cortland, New York. A final report of the project -- due at the end of 1989 -- will correlate in detail the results of field and laboratory tests in comparison to performance ratings determined by the manufacturer.

Lou, Albert T.

1989-03-01

15

Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

2009-01-01

16

Field test collimators for testing FLIR systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that returns to depot by the use of a field test collimator may be reduced significantly. Furthermore, if the field test collimator is made to be universal so that it can be used to test multiple forward looking infrared (FLIR) systems, it can result in further cost savings in the maintenance of FLIRs. The field test collimator

Todd Johnson; Simon Sharon

1990-01-01

17

Finite State Machines Final State Identification Initial State Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-print Network

Finite State Machines Final State Identification Initial State Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part I #12;Finite State Machines Final State Identification Initial State Identification Outline Finite State Machines Final State Identification Initial State Identification Mousavi: FSM

Mousavi, Mohammad

18

Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

2014-07-01

19

A Baseline Evaluation Procedure for Federal Standards on the Prevention, Identification and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect. Volume I: Development, Field Testing and Recommended Procedure. Volume II: State of Washington Field Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect funded a project to develop and field-test an evaluation procedure that could be used by interested states or communities to determine the extent of congruity between (1) their provisions for responding to the problems of child abuse and neglect, and (2) provisions prescribed in the Federal Standards…

Seaberg, James R.; And Others

20

RESOLVE 2010 Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

2010-01-01

21

Subcritical flutter testing and system identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

Houbolt, J. C.

1974-01-01

22

Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection  

SciTech Connect

One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

2002-01-01

23

Automated bacterial identification by angle resolved dark-field imaging  

PubMed Central

We propose and demonstrate a dark-field imaging technique capable of automated identification of individual bacteria. An 87-channel multispectral system capable of angular and spectral resolution was used to measure the scattering spectrum of various bacteria in culture smears. Spectra were compared between various species and between various preparations of the same species. A 15-channel system was then used to prove the viability of bacterial identification with a relatively simple microscope system. A simple classifier was able to identify four of six bacterial species with greater than 90% accuracy in bacteria-by-bacteria testing. PMID:24049690

Wilson, Benjamin K.; Vigil, Genevieve D.

2013-01-01

24

7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Identification of sample for testing. 29.428 Section...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION...29.428 Identification of sample for testing. Samples of imported tobacco...

2010-01-01

25

Identification of Aircraft by Rockwell Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large number of tests were made on tubes of 1025 and 4130X steel, in various diameters and wall thicknesses, and after diverse heat treatments. The Rockwell B scale was employed, as being the best suited to the ranges of hardness encountered. Only satisfactory chrome molybdenum tubes were found to show a hardness in excess of 90-B after normalizing. The method therefore provided the desired means of identification of chrome molybdenum steel. It is a qualitative test only. The conditions of a satisfactory test are as follows. 1) The tubing must be normalized. 2) It must be clean inside and out at the point where the test is to be made. 3) The tube must be held in correct alignment with the penetrator and must not move during the test. 4) For thin-walled tubes, the anvil must extend within the tube so as to support the wall.

Knerr, Horace

1930-01-01

26

Bayesian multiple testing procedures for hotspot identification.  

PubMed

Ranking a group of candidate sites and selecting from it the high-risk locations or hotspots for detailed engineering study and countermeasure evaluation is the first step in a transport safety improvement program. Past studies have however mainly focused on the task of applying appropriate methods for ranking locations, with few focusing on the issue of how to define selection methods or threshold rules for hotspot identification. The primary goal of this paper is to introduce a multiple testing-based approach to the problem of selecting hotspots. Following the recent developments in the literature, two testing procedures are studied under a Bayesian framework: Bayesian test with weights (BTW) and a Bayesian test controlling for the posterior false discovery rate (FDR) or false negative rate (FNR). The hypotheses tests are implemented on the basis of two random effect or Bayesian models, namely, the hierarchical Poisson/Gamma or Negative Binomial model and the hierarchical Poisson/Lognormal model. A dataset of highway-railway grade crossings is used as an application example to illustrate the proposed procedures incorporating both the posterior distribution of accident frequency and the posterior distribution of ranks. Results on the effects of various decision parameters used in hotspot identification procedures are discussed. PMID:17920843

Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Labbe, Aurélie; Fu, Liping

2007-11-01

27

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01

28

Olfactory Identification Test Using Familiar Distracters for Koreans  

PubMed Central

Objectives Odors used in an odor identification test should be familiar to the subject, but there are some unfamiliar distracters in Korean version of Sniffin' stick (KVSS) II identification test. In this study, we used the results of the original version of KVSS II identification to modify the KVSS II identification test. Methods Eighty-three participants took an original version of KVSS II identification test and a visual analogue scale of subjective odor function. KVSS II identification which has 16 items was performed to choose one out of four odors items. And visual analogue scale was checked from 0 to 10 points of their subjective olfactory function. Two weeks later they took the modified version of KVSS II identification test. Hyposmic or anosmic patients were excluded. Results The mean score of the original version of KVSS II identification and modified version of KVSS II identification were 11.3 and 12.5, respectively (P<0.05). The KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function were positively correlated (r=0.247, P<0.05), as were the modified KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function (r=0.329, P<0.05). Conclusion After modification of distracters, KVSS II identification test appears to be suited for assessment of olfactory function. PMID:24587876

Kim, Jae-Myung; Jeong, Mi Soon; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Seol, Jeong-Hun; Hong, Seok-Chan; Cho, Jae Hoon

2014-01-01

29

CLASSIFICATION TOOLS FOR EFFICIENT IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF IMPAIRMENT: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES  

EPA Science Inventory

Current monitoring strategies for iotic ecosystems have focused on identification of either specific impaired stream reaches or regional incidence of impaired stream reaches, with little or no ancillary data collected to facilitate diagnosis of impairment, or extrapolation of res...

30

LSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

Jaffe, P.

1980-01-01

31

PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PROCESS IN CONJUNCTION WITH EQUIVALENT LINEARCONVOLUTION ANALYSES FOR GENERATING A LARGE NUMBER OF SITE PROFILES FOR USE IN CONVOLUTION STUDIES FROM WHICH MEAN ESTIMATES OF RESPONSE CAN BE GENERATED. THE RANDOM VARIABLE SELECTED TO CHARACTERIZE THE SITE PROFILE IS THE SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY IN EACH SOIL LAYER OF THE SITE PROFILE. A LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION WAS ASSUMED WITH THE STANDARD DEVIATION DETERMINED FROM AVAILABLE SITE DATA AND APPLICABLE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS. THE CONVOLUTION ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED USING AN APPROPRIATE SOILDEGRADATION MODEL AN D THE OUTCROP INPUT MOTIONS GENERATED FROM THE RECORDED IN ROCK MOTIONS. THE BNL ANALYSIS PRODUCED RESULTS IN TERMS OF THE MEAN, MEDIAN AND VARIOUS FRACTILES OF FREE FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES AT THE TEST SITE, AND THE CORRESPONDING SURFACE RESPONSE SPECTRA, WHICH ARE PRESENTED IN THIS PAPER.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2002-08-04

32

Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

1983-01-01

33

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

34

Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

1995-01-01

35

Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2  

E-print Network

Anisotropic and hyperelastic identification1 of in vitro human arteries from full-field2 optical for the bi-axial characterization of in vitro human arteries10 and we prove its feasibility on an example in arterial segments. From the full-field experimental data12 obtained in inflation/extension tests

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

STATISTICAL ISSUES IN DNA IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING SAUNAK SEN  

E-print Network

science, as well as medical testing. Although the objective of DNA forensic analysis ("DNA fingerprinting will then apply those concepts in the context of DNA fingerprinting and genetic testing. ANATOMY OF A DIAGNOSTICSTATISTICAL ISSUES IN DNA IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING ´SAUNAK SEN UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN

Sen, Saunak

37

The strain field method for structural damage identification using Brillouin optical fiber sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The theory of the strain field (SF) method using Brillouin optical fiber sensing (BOFS) is proposed for structural damage identification in this paper. Field test verification of this method was carried out by implementing a destructive loading test to an existing prestressed concrete bridge. A series of structural damage scenarios were thus produced for identification. A sub-matrix featuring the damage scenarios was first extracted from the space-time matrix to obtain the strain field distribution in space-time coordinates. Furthermore, other feature extraction operations, including row vector extraction, column vector extraction and boundary extraction, were performed to characterize the structural damage behavior and damage evolution patterns. Finally, damage localization and quantification were successfully implemented in both space and time domains in terms of a damage index vector array. The investigation results demonstrated the SF method using BOFS is a feasible and efficient approach for structural damage identification.

Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Liu, Jie; Zhu, You-Qun

2007-06-01

38

Direct structural parameter identification by modal test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A direct identification procedure is proposed to obtain the mass and stiffness matrices based on the test measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method is based on the theory of matrix perturbation in which the correct mass and stiffness matrices are expanded in terms of analytical values plus a modification matrix. The simplicity of the procedure enables real time operation during the structural testing.

Chen, J.-C.; Kuo, C.-P.; Garba, J. A.

1983-01-01

39

Automatic system identification based on coevolution of models and tests  

E-print Network

. Experiments conducted with a simulated quadrotor helicopter show promising initial results about test learning identification approach is difficult to use due to costly and time consuming experiments. An automatic. This paper deals with such an approach that is based on coevolution of models and tests. It aims at improving

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Identification of damage fields using kinematic measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is proposed to determine damage fields on the surface of a material by using only full-field displacement measurements. A finite element approach is developed for which the unknown damage field is assumed to be piece-wise constant. Two examples are discussed in which the displacement field is either obtained by finite element analyses or measured by digital image correlation. To cite this article: D. Claire et al., C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 729-734.

Claire, Damien; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

2002-11-01

41

NEES@UCLA:NEES@UCLA: Field Testing for StructuralField Testing for Structural  

E-print Network

(2005-6) Other Projects ANSS Sensor Testing (ongoing) Caltrans Pile Testing (ongoing) Shear Wall Tests1 NEES@UCLA:NEES@UCLA: Field Testing for StructuralField Testing for Structural and Geotechnical Researchand Geotechnical Research Concept: Advanced Dynamic Field Testing of Civil Structures #12;2 NEES

Grether, Gregory

42

Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

1995-01-01

43

Spacecraft structural system identification by modal test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A structural parameter estimation procedure using the measured natural frequencies and kinetic energy distribution as observers is proposed. The theoretical derivation of the estimation procedure is described and its constraints and limitations are explained. This procedure is applied to a large complex spacecraft structural system to identify the inertia matrix using modal test results. The inertia matrix is chosen after the stiffness matrix has been updated by the static test results.

Chen, J.-C.; Peretti, L. F.; Garba, J. A.

1984-01-01

44

CDMA digital cellular: field test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents results from field tests of the CDMA system developed by Qualcomm, Incorporated. The CDMA system, now EIA\\/TIA digital standard IS-95, has undergone extensive field tests since its early inception. The latest series of technical tests was conducted in San Diego, California by Qualcomm in cooperation with several cellular carriers and equipment manufacturers during the month of August

Roberto Padovani; Brian Butler; Robert Boesel

1994-01-01

45

The “Sniffin' Kids” Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children  

PubMed Central

Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years. PMID:24979650

Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

2014-01-01

46

7 CFR 29.428 - Identification of sample for testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

Samples of imported tobacco shall be identified by the inspector on a form approved by the Director. The original and first two copies shall accompany the sample to the designated testing facility. The remaining copy of the identification form will be sent to the...

2012-01-01

47

Field Project: Fossil Collection, Identification, and Report Writing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The primary purposes of this exercise are to assemble a collection of fossils in the field, to gain experience in fossil identification, to interpret the mode of life and environment in which the organisms lived, and to present this in a written format . This exercise is designed to sharpen the observational skills that are steadily developed during lab and integrate them with lecture concepts.

Steve Leslie

48

TESTING BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD  

EPA Science Inventory

An operational definition for success of in situ bioremediation at field scale includes meeting regulatory goals for ground water quality in a timely fashion at a predictable cost. urrent practice for site characterization does not adequately define the amount of contamination su...

49

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1)  

E-print Network

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS II. - THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1) B. U. HOFSTRA D. MINKEMA Research Institute for Animal Husbandry « Schoonoovd », Dviebevgseweg IOd, Zeist, the Nethevlands SUMMARY The accuracy of the field test, for the individual selection of gilts and for the progeny tes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.  

PubMed

A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions. PMID:25151655

Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

2014-11-01

51

Stellar objects identification using wide-field camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with evaluation and processing of astronomical image data, which are obtained by a wide-field all-sky image analyzing monitoring system (WILLIAM). The WILLIAM is an additional experimental camera for project MAIA equipped with wide field lens. The system can detect stellar objects as faint as 6th magnitude. Acquired image data are processed by an algorithm for stellar object detection and identification which is based on coordinates transfer function. Cartesian coordinates at the image data are transformed to horizontal coordinate system. This coordinate system allows searching in astronomical catalogues of stellar objects. This paper presents the components of WILLIAM, its measured electro-optical characteristics and some results of identification.

Janout, Petr; Páta, Petr; Bedná?, Jan; Anisimova, Elena; Blažek, Martin; Skala, Petr

2015-01-01

52

Field tests of timber railroad bridge piles  

E-print Network

FIELD TESTS OF TIMBER RAILROAD BRIDGE PILES A Thesis by KENDRA ANN DONOVAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD TESTS OF TIMBER RAILROAD BRIDGE PILES A Thesis by KENDRA ANN DONOVAN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Donovan, Kendra Ann

2005-02-17

53

Testing Large Structures in the Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

2009-01-01

54

Techniques for implementing structural model identification using test data  

SciTech Connect

Structural system identification methods are analytical techniques for reconciling test data with analytical models. However, for system identification to become a practical tool for engineering analysis, the estimation techniques/codes must communicate with finite element software packages without intensive analyst intervention and supervision. This paper presents a technique used to integrate commercial software packages for finite element modeling (MSC/NASTRAN), mathematical programming techniques (ADS), and linear system analysis (PRO-MATLAB). The parameter estimation techniques and the software for controlling the overall system were programmed in PRO-MATLAB. Two examples of application of this software using measured data are presented. The examples consist of a truss structure in which the model form is well defined, and an electronics package whose model form is ill-defined since it is difficult to model with finite elements. A comparison of the resulting updated models with the experimental data showed significant improvement. 22 refs.

Allen, J.J.; Martinez, D.R.

1990-06-01

55

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25

56

Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.  

PubMed

The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

1983-04-01

57

Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR  

PubMed Central

The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans. PMID:24031493

Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otávio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

2010-01-01

58

40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...925 PEMS preparation for field testing. Take the following steps to prepare PEMS for field testing: (a) Verify...accessories needed to conduct a field test. (c) Power the PEMS...continuous sampling, record the mean HC concentration as...

2010-07-01

59

Electronic identification with injectable transponders in pig production: Results of a field trail on commercial farms and slaughterhouses concerning injectability and retrievability  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nationwide electronic system for the identification of all pigs is a means to achieve a tighter control of livestock and meat in the Netherlands. In order to examine the use of electronic identification transponders, two field trails were performed. Transponders supplied by three separate companies were tested on pigs on commercial farms. In phase 1, each device was examined

E. Lamboolj; N. G. Langeveld; G. H. Lammers; J. H. Huiskes

1995-01-01

60

Curriculum Field Testing in Architectural Gerontology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The source book, "Environments and Aging: Concepts and Issues," was field tested at the University of Florida College in a project for architectural students. Results indicated that it lacks clarity and interpretive graphics, and that students generally did not utilize information from any readings as effective inputs into their design process.…

McRae, John

1977-01-01

61

Teen Driver Support System Field Operational Test  

E-print Network

, such as texting #12;The Teen Driver Support System · A comprehensive technology application that employs ­ RealTeen Driver Support System Field Operational Test Preliminary Results (First 24 weeks) JanetFIRST Laboratory #12;Minnesota Department of Transportation Susan Sheehan MnDOT Technical Liaison #12;The U.S. Teen

Minnesota, University of

62

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as follows: ...temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min...of this section. Start the field test within 20 min of...

2010-07-01

63

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as follows: ...temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min...of this section. Start the field test within 20 min of...

2011-07-01

64

Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers  

PubMed Central

Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

2015-01-01

65

Identification of Pedestrian Bridge Dynamic Response trough Field Measurements and Numerical Modelling: Case Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we develop a technique for performing system identification in typical pedestrian bridges, using routine equipment at a minimal configuration, and for cases where actual structural data are either sparse or absent. To this end, two pedestrian bridges were examined, modelled and finally instrumented so as to record their dynamic response under operational conditions. More specifically, the bridges were numerically modelled using the finite element method (FEM) according to what was deduced to be their current operating status, while rational assumptions were made with respect to uncertain structural properties. Next, results from field testing using a portable accelerometer unit were processed to produce response spectra that were used as input to a structural identification software program, which in turn yielded the excited natural frequencies and mode shapes of the bridges. The low level of discrepancy is given between analytical and experimental results, the latter are used for a final calibration of the numerical models.

Manolis, George D.; Athanatopoulou-Kyriakou, Asimina; Dragos, Kosmas D.; Arabatzis, Argyris; Lavdas, Alexandros; Karakostas, Christos Z.

2014-06-01

66

Identification of an elasticity-tensor random field at mesoscopic scale using experimental measurements at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales for  

E-print Network

Identification of an elasticity-tensor random field at mesoscopic scale using experimental.soize@univ-paris-est.fr Key words: Elasticity tensor, random field, mesoscopic, experimental identification, microstructure, stochastic homogenization, image field, statistical inverse method. Biomechanical materials are among

Boyer, Edmond

67

Asteroid Dynamical Families: a Reliability Test for Two Identification Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since a couple of years the asteroid families are under the light of a renewed interest. This is due to the simultaneous improvement of the techniques of proper elements computation and of the methods of classification. Recently, two different cluster analysis methods (Zappalà et al. 1990; Bendjoya et al. 1991) have provided two very similar lists of asteroid families. This has brought a renewed confidence on the reliability of asteroid families classification. Since a new set of improved proper elements is now available (Milani & Kneževi? 1992), the idea of the present work is to test the two identification methods by means of artificially generated families in order to gain an insight into their limitations and to possibly develop improved strategies for future analyses. Different cases have been envisaged in order to study the effectiveness of the methods as a function of increasing background densities and of the spread of the families. The ability of the methods to detect peculiar features such as filaments or to separate two close families has also been tested. The number of interlopers has been determined in each case in order to evaluate their relative amount. While some improvements to the adopted procedures are suggested by the numerical tests, the results presented in the present paper are encouraging and allow us to be confident about the reliability of our previous family lists, as well as about the expected performances of the methods in future applications.

Bendjoya, P.; Cellino, A.; Froeschle, C.; Zappala, V.

1993-05-01

68

Field trip to Nevada test site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two road logs guide the reader through the geologic scene from Las Vegas to Mercury and from Mercury through eight stops on the Nevada Test Site. Maps and cross sections depict the geology and hydrology of the area. Included among the tables is one showing the stratigraphic units in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and another that lists the geologic maps covering the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. The relation of the geologic environment to nuclear-explosion effects is alluded to in brief discussions of collapse, surface subsidence, and cratering resulting from underground nuclear explosions.

U.S. Geological Survey

1976-01-01

69

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hietala, J. (Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Wendland, R.D. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Collins, F. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01

70

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-07-01

71

APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

72

RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

73

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned

1992-01-01

74

Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

1975-01-01

75

A new method of field MRTD test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

2014-09-01

76

Comparison of Cross-Field Matching and Forced-Choice Identification in Hemispatial Neglect  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of patients with neglect to process information in the contralateral field was examined by comparing performance on a cross-field matching and a forced-choice identification task. The matching task required participants to judge whether 2 laterally presented pictures were the same or different. The identification task required selection of 1 of 2 centrally presented pictures that were identical to

M. Verfaellie; W. P. Milberg; R. McGlinchey-Berroth; L. Grande

1995-01-01

77

Biometric Animal Databases from Field Photographs: Identification of Individual Zebra in the Wild  

E-print Network

Biometric Animal Databases from Field Photographs: Identification of Individual Zebra in the Wild University of Illinois at Chicago tanyabw@uic.edu ABSTRACT We describe an algorithmic and experimental approach to a fundamental problem in field ecology: computer-assisted individual animal identification. We

Rubenstein, Daniel I.

78

Germination test for identification of gamma-irradiated wheat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The germination of wheat provides a reliable test for the identification of wheat that has been subjected to irradiation. Germination success of non-irradiated wheat is not affected by storage time and temperature. Root and shoot lengths are more sensitive to ?-irradiation than the germination percentages. The critical dose that inhibits root elongation varies from 0.15 to 0.5 kGy for imported cultivars and from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy for domestic cultivars. Germination percentage is reduced above 5.0 kGy. The difference in radiosensitivity between imported and domestic cultivars may be the result of differences in moisture content. In addition, storage periods of up to 12 months have little effect on irradiation-induced reduction of root length. Fumigation with methyl bromide inhibits root growth, but this inhibition can be distinguished from ?-irradiation effects by the germination pattern. Most imported wheat samples that were irradiated above 0.5 kGy exhibit root growths of less than 20 mm after 4 days of culturing under the specified conditions. The same behavior was noted in domestic wheat samples that were irradiated at or above 1.0 kGy. This test can thus discriminate between irradiated and non-irradiated wheat even 12 months after ?-irradiation.

Kawamura, Yoko; Suzuki, Naomi; Uchiyama, Sadao; Saito, Yukio

79

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01

80

EVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK  

E-print Network

EVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK Reproduction, 3738n Nouzilly, France Résumé VALEUR DE TROIS TESTS RAPIDES D'IDENTIFICATION DE STAPHYLOCOCCUS rapide des souches bovines de Staphylococcus aureus isolées du lait, nous avons cherché à établir la

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

81

Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

2001-01-01

82

In Situ Field Testing of Processes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

J. Wang

2001-12-14

83

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-06-23

84

Field tests of a small instrumented pile  

E-print Network

vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

Korb, Kenneth Wayne

1969-01-01

85

3X-100 blade field test.  

SciTech Connect

In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

2008-03-01

86

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08

87

Development of toxicant identification procedures for whole sediment toxicity tests  

SciTech Connect

To effectively assess and manage contaminated sediments, identifying the specific contaminants responsible for sediment toxicity is highly desirable. Though effective toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods are well established for water column toxicity, new TIE methodologies are needed that address the special characteristics of whole sediment toxicity tests. Much of the effort to date has focused on the assessment of ammonia toxicity. Whereas pH manipulation is a key tool used to characterize ammonia toxicity in water column TIE, control of pH in interstitial water is much more challenging. Direct addition of hard acid has shown undesirable side effects (e.g., liberation and oxidation of iron), while CO{sub 2}-enrichment is limited in penetration of fine-grained sediments. Biological buffers (MES and POPSO) incorporated into the sediment are effective at altering interstitial pH without causing direct toxicity to Chironomus tentans, Lumbriculus variegatus, and to a lesser extent Hyalella azteca, but the range of pH control achieved has been small ({+-} 0.5 units). Introduction of aquatic plants reduces ammonia concentrations in the water column, but may not provide sufficient control of interstitial water. To date, the most promising results have been achieved using zeolite; adding zeolite to sediment produces moderate reductions in interstitial ammonia concentrations and is non-toxic to the organisms referenced above. Attempts to induce microbial removal of ammonia have been unsuccessful thus far. This presentation will review these and other sediment TIE methods currently under development in laboratories.

Mount, D.R.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Besser, J.M. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States); Ankley, G.T.; Norberg-King, T.J.; West, C.W. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States)

1995-12-31

88

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2014-01-01

89

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2012-01-01

90

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2013-01-01

91

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2011-01-01

92

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2010-01-01

93

Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

2001-01-01

94

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04

95

Cooperative field test program for wind systems  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01

96

Identification of veterinary pathogens by use of commercial identification systems and new trends in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens.  

PubMed Central

Veterinary diagnostic microbiology is a unique specialty within microbiology. Although isolation and identification techniques are similar to those used for human pathogens, many veterinary pathogens require unique cultivation or identification procedures. Commercial identification systems provide rapid, accurate identification of human pathogens. However, the accuracy of these systems with veterinary pathogens varies widely depending on the bacterial species and the host animal from which it was isolated. Increased numbers of veterinary strains or species in the data bases of the various systems would improve their accuracy. Current procedures and interpretive criteria used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of veterinary pathogens are based on guidelines used for human pathogens. The validity of these guidelines for use with veterinary pathogens has not been established. As with fastidious human pathogens, standardized methodologies and quality control isolates are needed for tests of organisms such as Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus somnus. Furthermore, interpretive criteria for veterinary antimicrobial agents based on the MIC for veterinary pathogens, the pharmacokinetics of the antimicrobial agent in the host animal, and in vivo efficacy of the antimicrobial agent are needed. This article reviews both the commercial identification systems evaluated with veterinary pathogens and current methods for performing and interpreting antimicrobial susceptibility tests with veterinary pathogens. Recommendations for future improvements in both areas are discussed. PMID:7923054

Watts, J L; Yancey, R J

1994-01-01

97

A standard test protocol for evaluation of radio frequency identification systems for supply chain applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research, a test protocol was developed and validated with eight different radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. These systems were evaluated with respect to basic performance parameters in their abilities to carry out shipping and receiving operations in the warehouse receiving process. Two major categories of tests were administered: laboratory baseline performance tests and warehouse passive interference tests. The

Marlin H. Mickle

2004-01-01

98

Field testing of the Cobra Seal System  

SciTech Connect

The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01

99

Discrimination and Identification of UXO by Geophysical Inversion. Phase II: Inversion of Total-Field Magnetics  

E-print Network

Discrimination and Identification of UXO by Geophysical Inversion. Phase II: Inversion of Total to the discrimination and identification of unexploded ordnance using total-field magnetometry. A black in a predefined library. The discrimination method had the potential to reduce the number of excavations

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

100

Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap  

PubMed Central

Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

2014-01-01

101

Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap.  

PubMed

Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25230130

Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

2014-09-01

102

Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap.  

PubMed

Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

2014-09-01

103

Identification of the random wander parameters of a gyroplatform during bench testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A solution is presented for the problem of the identification of the random wander velocity parameters of a gyroplatform from the measured wander angles during bench testing. The solution presented here is obtained using the general methods of parametric identification theory.

Matasov, A. I.

1985-04-01

104

Do toxicity identification and evaluation laboratory-based methods reflect causes of field impairment?  

PubMed

Sediment toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) methods are relatively simple laboratory methods designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question of whether the same toxicant identified in the laboratory is causing effects in the field remains unanswered. The objective of our study was to determine if laboratory TIE methods accurately reflect field effects. A TIE performed on sediments collected from the Elizabeth River (ER) in Virginia identified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the major toxicants. Several lines of evidence indicated PAHs were the major toxic agents in the field, including elevated PAH concentrations in ER sediments, comet assay results from in situ caged Merceneria merceneria, and chemical analyses of exposed M. merceneria, which indicated high PAH concentrations in the bivalve tissue. Our final evidence was the response from test organisms exposed to ER sediment extracts and then ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV radiation caused a toxic diagnostic response unique to PAHs. The aggregation of these various lines of evidence supports the conclusion that PAHs were the likely cause of effects in laboratory- and field-exposed organisms, and that laboratory-based TIE findings reflect causes of field impairment PMID:19764260

Ho, Kay T; Gielazyn, Michel L; Pelletier, Marguerite C; Burgess, Robert M; Cantwell, Mark C; Perron, Monique M; Serbst, Jonathan R; Johnson, Roxanne L

2009-09-01

105

40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...following steps to prepare PEMS for field testing: (a) Verify...accessories needed to conduct a field test. (c) Power the PEMS...system before the start of the field test as follows: (1) Select...continuous sampling, record the mean HC concentration as...

2011-07-01

106

Development of Teaching Materials for Field Identification of Plants and Analysis of Their Effectiveness in Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces teaching materials developed for field identification of plants with synoptical keys, identification tables, cards, and programs. Selects approximately 2000 seed plants and uses visibly identifiable characteristics for classification. Recommends using the methodology of identification in other areas for biological identification. (YDS)

Ohkawa, Chizuru

2000-01-01

107

Overview of Identification Methods of Mechanical Parameters Based on Full-field Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews recently developed methods for constitutive parameter identification based on kinematic full-field measurements,\\u000a namely the finite element model updating method (FEMU), the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM), the virtual fields method\\u000a (VFM), the equilibrium gap method (EGM) and the reciprocity gap method (RGM). Their formulation and underlying principles\\u000a are presented and discussed. These identification techniques are then applied to

Stéphane Avril; Marc Bonnet; Anne-Sophie Bretelle; Michel Grédiac; François Hild; Patrick Ienny; Félix Latourte; Didier Lemosse; Stéphane Pagano; Emmanuel Pagnacco; Fabrice Pierron

2008-01-01

108

Identification of Armillaria field isolates using isozymes and mycelial growth characteristics.  

PubMed

This research was conducted to develop procedures based on mycelial growth characteristics and patterns of esterase (EST) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) production by diffuse mycelia for identification of Armillaria field isolates from Quercus-Carya-Pinus forests in the Ozark Mountains (central USA). The 285 isolates collected were first identified by standard diploid-haploid pairing tests as A. gallica, A. mellea, or A. tabescens. A strong PPO band was diagnostic for A. gallica. All A. mellea isolates tested and 91% of the A. tabescens isolates tested were distinguished based on production of EST bands in three standardized R f ranges. A procedure based on mycelial growth and morphology on tannic acid medium (TA) at 24 degrees C and on malt extract medium (ME) at 33 degrees C correctly identified 98% of A. gallica isolates and all A. mellea and A. tabescens isolates. On TA, A. gallica grew slowest. On ME, A. mellea grew slowest: mycelial morphology differed among species; A. gallica typically stained the agar and produced an appressed/submerged growth pattern with concentric bands of decreasing hyphal density, A. mellea typically did not stain the agar and produced round mycelia with smooth margins and abundant aerial hyphae, A. tabescens typically stained the agar and grew appressed/submerged with very irregular margins and patchy hyphal density. These are the first published systems evaluating the potential for identifying Armillaria field isolates based on their mycelial growth characteristics and EST and PPO complements. PMID:16284853

Bruhn, J N; Johnson, T E; Karr, A L; Wetteroff, J J; Leininger, T D

1998-01-01

109

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Identification and Susceptibility Testing System in Clinical Microbiology Laboratory Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Biosciences, USA) is a new, fully automated system for the rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of performance of the Phoenix system in the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 260 gram-negative ( n=174) and gram-positive ( n=86) isolates

E. Stefaniuk; A. Baraniak; M. Gniadkowski; W. Hryniewicz

2003-01-01

110

Integrated approach to gas accumulation identification in Field M  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The given paper describes how the integration of different methods, such as core data, well logs, production logging, seismic data and well test analysis, was used to solve the problem of determining gas accumulation boundaries in sediment complex PK1-3 of Field M. This paper is devoted to the block with wells 2, 36, 49, 85, 127, 148 of the field, since it is characterized by high uncertainty, sc. recently drilled wells 1V, 2V and 120 have produced oil, although according to the present-day geological concept they were considered to be gas saturated in the intervals investigated with production logging. Besides, well 127 that was presumably oil saturated has produced gas. By accounting mismatching production data and the geological concept, the authors have supposed that PK1-3 gas accumulation is characterized by a more complex structure than it was supposed by the predecessors and it is represented by reservoir compartmentalization and high heterogeneity. Therefore, the main goal of the work was to revise the distribution of gas saturated reservoir within the PK1-3 sediment complex. To achieve this goal, the authors have set the following tasks: to revise the geological correlation and gas oil contact; to carry out fault interpretation by means of seismic and well test data; to determine areal facies distribution on the basis of integrated core, perform a log motifs and seismic facies analysis. Thus, the estimation of the gas saturated reservoir portion was implemented in two stages: defining the boundary of gas accumulation in depth on the basis of well logs, production data and fault interpretation; reservoir distribution determination on the basis of the seismic facies analysis within the derived gas accumulation boundary.

Malyshevskaya, K.; Rukavishnikov, V.; Belozerov, B.; Podnebesnikh, A.

2015-02-01

111

Development of a Smell Identification Test Using a Novel Stick-Type Odor Presentation Kit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The odor identification is strongly influenced by the social and cultural factors; therefore, the odorants used in a smell iden- tification test should be familiar to the test population. In addition, the device used in the test is desired to be simply handled and retain odor quality over time. We developed a novel stick-type odor presentation kit that consists of

S. Saito; Miyako Mise; Yuichi Deguchi; Tatsu Kobayakawa; Saito Sachiko Taste

2006-01-01

112

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31

113

Testing General Relativity in the Strong-Field Dynamical Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General relativity has been well tested in the weak-field slow-motion regime of the solar system. In binary pulsar systems, tests of strong-field aspects of the theory have been carried out and will continue to improve. Testing GR in the strong-field, highly dynamical regime is becoming a dominant theme in experimental relativity. We describe a number of tests that can be carried out, including tests using astrophysical phenomena around black holes, tests using gravitational waves, and tests of black hole no-hair theorems using observations of stars orbiting our galactic center black hole.

Will, Clifford M.

2015-01-01

114

The Mehrum Coalfire Test Field (MCTF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spontaneous self ignition of coal causes an immense emission of climate relevant gases and affects regional groundwater conditions in such a large scale, that it could not be even rough estimated. This problem occurs all over the world where coal is mined, stored or processed. Keeping these things and also global warming problems in mind, the extinction of such fires becomes a significant task for future climate and environmental protection. In the big arid coal mining belt of the northwest PR China the necessity of environmental as well as resource protection is now realized, leading to increased fire fighting activities. Mostly, the burning coal is partially removed, the surface is insufficiently sealed from oxygen and fire-zones are cooled with valuable fresh water. Such cooling of fire centers is often not sustainable because oxygen rich air may keep on penetrating through the soil surface and reach the cooled down coal which subsequently starts to burn again. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" numerical models are developed to simulate the propagation of underground coal fires in realistic scenarios. These models will be adapted to new data from lab and field experiments including multiphase transport and phase transition processes. The Mehrum test site is used to set up a small scale in situ coal fire experiment in order to validate and verify the codes as well as to better understand the coal fire genesis. The experiment will be carried out under usage of two coal heaps with a total volume of about 1 m3. At the bottom, a layer of hydraulic conductive coarse gravel has been built in. Within this layer, a special ventilation system for air supplying has been embedded. The exact amount of led in air is measured by high resolution flow rate devices. The coal lies directly above the coarse gravel layer. The heating source is located in the lower forth of the coal layer. Positions of other sensors (temperature sensors, electrodes for geoelectrical measurements, gas probing tubes) are based on first numerical results. The coverage consists of a 10 cm to 15 cm strong layer of sand (middle to fine sand). Extinction of the fire by application of water with additives (e. g. salt) and its implication for the underground convection can finally be tested with these installations.

Halisch, M.; Wuttke, M. W.; Hesse, Ph.; Han, J.; Kessels, W.

2009-04-01

115

Reservoir description through pulse testing in a mature field  

SciTech Connect

Pulse testing was used in the Fortescue field to clarify reservoir geometries and fluid communication pathways. The high communication levels demonstrated in the test data required a nonstandard analysis of the pressure responses. In addition, proper attention to test planning, data acquisition, and data processing allowed valuable insights into reservoir limits. Most of the structural implications derived from the pulse tests have been supported subsequently by a recent 3D seismic survey of the area. The results and insights gained from these tests are being incorporated into a full-field simulation model of the Fortescue field, which is an integral part of a continuing depletion field study.

Braisted, D.M.; Spengler, R.M. (Esso Australia Ltd., Sydney (Australia)); Youie, R.A.

1993-06-01

116

Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure  

PubMed Central

Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

2014-01-01

117

OPCW Proficiency Test: A Practical Approach Also for Interlaboratory Test on Detection and Identification of Pesticides in Environmental Matrices  

PubMed Central

An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

?liwakowski, Maciej

2014-01-01

118

Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown that XYZ data derived from UAV photogrammetry has a similar practical accuracy to RTK GPS, which is commonly used for cadastral, topographic and engineering survey work. This means that UAV photogrammetry can, for the most part, replace GPS surveying as the main method of data capture for engineering projects, boundary mapping and topographical surveying. Aerial Photogrammetry, in conjunction with RTK GPS, can now be used for projects with a 1:200 map scale accuracy requirement.

Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

2013-08-01

119

Genetic Analyses of Juvenile Steelhead, Coastal Cutthroat Trout, and Their Hybrids Differ Substantially from Field Identifications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of their similar appearance and frequent hybridization, juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii are difficult to distinguish visually. Nevertheless, field biologists often use visual methods to classify juvenile individuals. This study investigated hybridization between these species and determined the accuracy of field identification where hybridization occurred. Using a five-point classification system, two evaluators identified

Jason Baumsteiger; David Hankin; Eric J. Loudenslager

2005-01-01

120

Identification of electron field-aligned current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere  

E-print Network

Identification of electron field-aligned current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere P. Schippers,1-aligned current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A05204, doi:10.1029/2011JA017352. 1. Introduction [2] In planetary magnetospheres, field-aligned currents are associated with the transfer

Gurnett, Donald A.

121

STATE-OF-THE-ART FOR FIELD PERMEABILITY TESTING PROCEDURES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents the available technical information on field hydraulic conductivity test methods for soil liners. he methods discussed are currently used and readily available for determining the hydraulic conductivity of soils compacted ill the field. Hydraulic conductivit...

122

Modeling and identification investigation of multi-field hysteretic dynamics in flexure-guided piezo platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The completely modeling and comprehensive identification approaches of the multi-field hysteretic dynamics in the flexure-guided piezo stage are proposed in this paper. First, the system description and the experimental setup are proposed. Next, the hysteretic dynamics is completely modeled in which the static Preisach hysteresis, creep, electrical and vibration dynamics are derived from the material, electrical and mechanical fields, respectively. Then, according to the model characteristics, a comprehensive identification approach is presented. A novel technique is provided to identify the electrical and vibration dynamics. Special inputs and sampling are proposed to identify the Preisach hysteresis. Finally, the experimental study is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and identification approaches. The modeling and identification approaches in this paper will be beneficial to further developments and high-performance control of the flexure-guided piezo systems.

Liu, Lei; Zhao, Yanbin; Tang, Liang; Xu, Yufei; Bai, Yu-guang; Liao, He

2015-01-01

123

Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.  

PubMed

Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed. PMID:16844415

Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

2006-08-01

124

ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS FOR NEUROTOXICITY FIELD TESTING: PEARL II AND ALTERNATIVES  

EPA Science Inventory

Pearl II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. he battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event related slow brain potentials (CNV,P30O), and associated ...

125

A Mixture Rasch Model-Based Computerized Adaptive Test for Latent Class Identification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored a computerized adaptive test delivery algorithm for latent class identification based on the mixture Rasch model. Four item selection methods based on the Kullback-Leibler (KL) information were proposed and compared with the reversed and the adaptive KL information under simulated testing conditions. When item separation was…

Jiao, Hong; Macready, George; Liu, Junhui; Cho, Youngmi

2012-01-01

126

Rapid testing and identification of actuator using dSPACE real-time emulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

To solve the problem of model identification of actuator in control system design of aerocraft, testing system based on dSPACE emulator is established, sending testing signal and receiving feedback voltage are realized using dSPACE interactive cards, communication between signal generating equipment and feedback voltage acquisition equipment is synchronized. This paper introduces the hardware architecture and key technologies of the simulation

Daocheng Xie; Zhongwei Wang; Qinghua Zeng

2011-01-01

127

A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.  

PubMed

The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol. PMID:24237835

Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

2013-11-01

128

An Identification of Program Factors that Impact Crossover Performance in Evolutionary Test Input Generation  

E-print Network

that crossover plays an increasingly important role for programs with large, multi- dimensional input spaces scores inputs on the basis of how close they were to fulfilling the test goal currently underAn Identification of Program Factors that Impact Crossover Performance in Evolutionary Test Input

McMinn, Phil

129

Biochemical and Susceptibility Tests Useful for Identification of Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Rods  

PubMed Central

Six hundred nineteen strains of nonfermenting gram-negative rods were tested for alkaline phosphatase, benzyl-arginine arylamidase, pyrrolidonyl arylamidase, ethylene glycol acidification, and susceptibility to desferrioxamine and colistin. The results were highly discriminant. Therefore, the proposed tests may be helpful for the identification of this group of organisms. PMID:11880447

Laffineur, Kim; Janssens, Michèle; Charlier, Jacqueline; Avesani, Véronique; Wauters, Georges; Delmée, Michel

2002-01-01

130

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23

131

Clinical impact of rapid in vitro susceptibility testing and bacterial identification.  

PubMed Central

During the past decade, a variety of instrument-assisted bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test systems have been developed which permit provision of test results in a matter of hours rather than days, as has been the case with traditional overnight procedures. These newer rapid techniques are much more expensive than older methods. It has been presumed but not proven that the clinical benefits of rapid testing to patients with infection offset the added cost. The intent of this study was to objectively define the clinical impact of rapid bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A 1-year study was performed in which infected, hospitalized patients in a tertiary-care, teaching, medical center were randomly assigned to one of two groups: patients for whom identification and susceptibility testing was performed by using a semi-automated, rapid, same-day procedure and those for whom testing was accomplished by using traditional overnight techniques. The two groups were compared with respect to numerous demographic descriptors, and then patients were monitored prospectively through the end of their hospitalization with the aim of determining whether there existed objectively defineable differences in management and outcome between the two groups. The mean lengths of time to provision of susceptibility and identification test results in the rapid test group were 11.3 and 9.6 h, respectively. In the overnight test group, these values were 19.6 and 25.9 h, respectively (P < 0.0005). There were 273 evaluable patients in the first group and 300 in the second group. Other than the length of time required to provide susceptibility and identification test results, no significant differences were noted between the two groups with respect to > 100 demographic descriptors. With regard to measures of outcome, the mean lengths of hospitalization were also the same in both groups. Mortality rates were however, lower in the rapid test group (i.e., 8.8% versus 15.3%). Similarly, statistically significantly fewer laboratory studies, imaging procedures, days of intubation, and days in an intensive or intermediate-care area were observed with patients in the rapid test group. Rapid testing was also associated with significantly shortened lengths of elapsed time prior to alterations in antimicrobial therapy. Lastly, patient costs for hospitalization were significantly lower in the rapid test group. The results of this study indicate the rapid same-day bacterial identification and susceptibility testing in the microbiology laboratory can have a major impact on the care and outcome of hospitalized patients with infection. PMID:7929770

Doern, G V; Vautour, R; Gaudet, M; Levy, B

1994-01-01

132

Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

1999-01-01

133

Cervical adenocarcinoma identification by testing for chromosomal abnormalities.  

PubMed

We report on a case of cervical adenocarcinoma in situ in a 42-year-old woman with a history of human papillomavirus infection. Repeat cytology, human papillomavirus testing, and colposcopy failed to identify the lesion. Testing of the cervical cell DNA identified chromosomal abnormalities, prompting a cervical cone biopsy, which identified adenocarcinoma in situ. PMID:24283864

Dittus, Janet L; Dudley, Bunyan S; Upender, Madhvi; Endress, Gregory A

2013-12-01

134

Design for Field Testing of Mountain-Plains Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field test design information packet was devised for use by persons representing institutions using the Mountain-Plains curriculum products. The primary purpose of field testing the curriculum is to get third party profession and student reaction to what has proved to be successful with students and instructors at Mountain-Plains. The…

England, Robert G.; Pollack, Robert M.

135

Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

2011-06-01

136

Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

1990-04-01

137

Field testing of a crossflow water turbine  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to design, construct and test a small low-cost crossflow water turbine with the possibility of introducing a similar design to rural villages in the tropics. The turbine was constructed out of discarded aluminum plates. It was designed with an interchangeable runner. Four 6-inch runners with 10, 15, 20 and 30 blades each were constructed. The study sought to evaluate the performance of the turbine using each of the 4 runners. A fifth runner was added later to the tests by cutting down the number of blades in the 30-blade runner to 6. The turbine and the runners were subjected to various levels of flow rates. Further, each runner was tested over a wide range of rotational speeds. Optimum power or efficiency and rotational speed were determined for each runner. An output power and efficiency prediction equation was developed using dimensional analysis. The aluminum-constructed turbine performed most efficiently with the 20-blade runner. A maximum efficiency of about 47% was attained at a rotational speed of 330 rpm. The deprived prediction equation for power and efficiency yielded values that were only half of the values from theoretical efficiency equations developed by previous authors. The derived equation is limited only to the same turbine size as the one tested.

Tongco, A.F.

1988-01-01

138

Instrumental variables algorithm for modal parameter identification in flutter testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper is concerned with the task of estimating modal parameters from system response measurement in aircraft flutter testing. A frequency-domain derivation of an instrumental-variables algorithm is presented for a linear time-invariant dynamic system of order n. Basically, this algorithm fits a set of poles and zeros to the measured transfer function. An illustrative example is provided regarding the application of the algorithm to aeroelasticity testing. It is shown that the algorithm can be implemented for on-line data reduction with a microcomputer-based analysis system. By using instrumental variables the sensitivity of the modal parameter estimates to noise in the system-response measurements is reduced greatly. The algorithm is expected to be a powerful and valuable tool for on-line estimation of modal parameters in flutter testing and should be useful in control system and structural dynamics tests.

Johnson, W.; Gupta, N. K.

1978-01-01

139

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

140

Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory  

E-print Network

It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

2008-07-26

141

SOLERAS solar active cooling field test operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four small-scale commercial size solar cooling systems being tested in Arizona as part of the SOLERAS program are described, together with 1981 performance summaries. A 63 kW air-cooled Rankine cycle system powered by parabolic troughs is used to cool a one-story office building. The system has both hot and cold storage tanks and uses R-11 fluid. A 49 kW Rankine

J. Williamson; R. Martin

1982-01-01

142

Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test  

SciTech Connect

The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

Giangiacomo, L.A.

1999-05-28

143

Field tests of transgenic barley lines in North Dakota  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Testing transgenic barley lines for FHB in the greenhouse does not necessarily give the same results as field tests. The objective of this project was to test 18 transgenic lines in replicated trials in an inoculated FHB nursery. Several programs have developed barley lines expressing anti-fungal a...

144

Radio Identification of Sub-mm Sources in the Hubble Deep Field  

E-print Network

Determination of the epoch dependent star-formation rate of field galaxies is one of the principal goals of modern observational cosmology. Recently, Hughes et al. (1998) using the SCUBA instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, report the detection of a new population of heavily dust enshrouded, star-forming galaxies at high redshifts (z > 2), dramatically altering the picture of galaxy evolution. However, we show that this interpretation must be treated with caution because of ambiguities in the identification of the host galaxies. Based on our deep, high resolution 1.4 GHz obervations of the Hubble Deep Field, we suggest alternate identifications to the sub-mm detections. These identifications argue for a substantially lower redshift to the sub-mm population with a consequential lowering of the z > 2 sub-mm/far infrared luminosity density and global star-formation rate.

Eric. A. Richards

1998-11-06

145

Test ion transport in a collisional, field-reversed configuration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion of test-ions in a flux-coil generated, collisional, field-reversed configuration is measured via time-resolved tomographic reconstruction of Ar+ optical emission in the predominantly nitrogen plasma. Azimuthal test ion diffusion across magnetic field lines is found to be classical during the stable period of the discharge. Test ion radial confinement is enhanced by a radial electric field, reducing the observed outward radial transport rate below predictions based solely on classical cross-field diffusion rates. Test ion diffusion is ˜500 m2 s-1 during the stable period of the discharge. The electric field inferred from plasma potential measurements and from equilibrium calculations is consistent with the observed reduction in argon transport.

Roche, T.; McWilliams, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E. P.; Morehouse, M.; Slepchenkov, M.; Wessel, F.

2014-08-01

146

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Table IB. (xl) 4500-F?, Fluoride. 1997. Table IB.(xli) 4500-H...D1179-04, Standard Test Methods for Fluoride Ion in Water. July 2004. Table IB...if oxidizer present 14 days.25. FluoridePNone required 28...

2013-07-01

147

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Table IB. (xl) 4500-F?, Fluoride. 1997. Table IB.(xli) 4500-H...D1179-04, Standard Test Methods for Fluoride Ion in Water. July 2004. Table IB...if oxidizer present 14 days.25. FluoridePNone required 28...

2012-07-01

148

40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Table IB.(xl) 4500-F? , Fluoride. 1997. Table IB.(xli) 4500-H...D1179-04, Standard Test Methods for Fluoride Ion in Water. July 2004. Table IB...if oxidizer present 14 days.25. FluoridePNone required 28...

2014-07-01

149

Genetic algorithms for nondestructive testing in crack identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method to identify the nature of a crack on the surface of a region using nondestructive testing (NDT) and inverse problem methodology is presented. A genetic algorithm (GA) based approach, which involves a global search to avoid local minima, is presented and applied to solve the inverse problem of identifying the position, shape and the orientation of a surface

A. A. Arkadan; T. Sareen; S. Subramaniam

1994-01-01

150

Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

2006-01-01

151

[Establishment of an algorithm for serological testing of syphilis identification].  

PubMed

Serological methods are widely used for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis or for screening purposes. The aim of this study was to determine an algorithm for the application of laboratory tests that will provide accurate diagnosis of syphilis in a cheap, fast and practical way. A total of 162 serum samples were evaluated by the following tests: VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory; Omega Diagnostic, UK), TPHA (Treponema pallidum Hemagglutination Test; Omega Diagnostic, UK), ELISA IgG + IgM (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay; DiaPro Diagnostic Bioprobes, Italy), FTA-ABS (Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption; IgG, Euroimmun, Germany) and WB (Western Blot; IgG Euroimmun, Germany). When the gold standard was considered as FTA-ABS test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for VDRL were 77.1%, 100% 100% an 80.6%; for TPHA were 92.8%, 98.7%, 98.7% and 92.9%, for ELISA 98.8%, 98.7%, 98.8% and 98.7%, and for WB 98.8%, 100%, 100% and 98.7%, respectively. When the results of screening with VDRL together with TPHA were compared with FTA-ABS, it was observed that if both VDRL and TPHA results were positive, then there was 100% concordance between the tests. However, when both of the test results were negative, 1.3% of them yielded positive result with FTA-ABS. If either one of VDRL or TPHA results were positive (n = 24), 95.8% (n = 23) was positive with FTA-ABS. Therefore, inconsistent results obtained by VDRL and TPHA requires verification by another method. When ELISA or WB tests were used, the borderline results need verification, however, positive or negative results would be reported. The determination of an algorithm for laboratory tests also depend on the number of patients, cost, cost per positive patient and workload of the laboratory. Thus, ELISA could be selected when the number of cases is high and the results should be reported unless they are suspicious. When the number of cases is low, VDRL/TPHA should be selected, and the results should be verified if they are inconsistent. However, the demographic characteristics of patient groups are also important in test selection and work flow. False positive results are troublesome in case of marriage pre-screening and false negative results in sex workers. When all these factors are taken into consideration it may be suggested that either ELISA or VDRL together with TPHA should be performed and the results should be confirmed by a reference test in case of borderline results in ELISA or inconsistency between VDRL and TPHA results. Although screening for syphilis in the setting of blood banking is a matter of debate, if it is to be performed, then ELISA would be better since the work load is high. In case of pregnancy inconsistent VDRL and TPHA results should be verified since no risk could be afforded. PMID:20455397

Karaca, Yilmaz; Cöplü, Nilay; Gözalan, Ay?egül; Oncül, Ozgür; Akin, Levent; Esen, Berrin

2010-01-01

152

Field tests on CPV ISFOC plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to generate key knowledge on CPV technology, ISFOC has already installed 1,4MW of CPV and is executing 3MW of power plants incorporating seven different technologies which will be finished in 2009. The objective of these pilot plants is to assist the industries in the setting up of pilot production lines and to obtain very valuable information such as reliability, suitability and production. In collaboration with the various suppliers, ISFOC has followed in detail all the qualification tests and their results. Therefore a great body of knowledge and experience is being built up. After the completion of the plants, ISFOC has started the campaign of measurements, following its own methodology. It is based on the equations of the Shockley model and only one measurement is needed to establish the nominal power of the CPV system. Heat-sink temperature to calculate the cell temperature through the thermal resistance, DNI with a pyrheliometer and the I-V Curve are measured in this procedure. But, ISFOC will also test other rating procedures, like the ASTM 2527-E or the IEC draft for CPV modules. The results will be shown in this paper.

Rubio, F.; Martínez, M.; Perea, J.; Sánchez, D.; Banda, P.

2009-08-01

153

FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

1983-01-01

154

Exact model identification for magnetic suspension system via magnetic field measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In magnetic suspension analysis, a simplified model of the current-to-distance relationship is not sufficient to design an optimal controller. Due to the nonlinearity of the magnetic field, an accurate model is difficult to obtain. The authors present an improved model identification method for a magnetic suspension system so as to establish reliable and exact parameters to describe the dynamic motion

C. E. Lin; H. L. Jou; Y. R. Sheu

1992-01-01

155

Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

1973-01-01

156

DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

157

Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program  

EPA Science Inventory

As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a ?Toxicity Identification Evaluation? (TIE), which is the focus of this...

158

Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor  

DOEpatents

A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

Smith, Desmond J. (Oakland, CA); Rubin, Edward M. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01

159

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1997-01-01

160

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which

K. Sheppard; R. Weil; A. Desjarlais

1988-01-01

161

Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

2002-01-01

162

Internal consistency reliability of the fractionated and whole University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal consistency reliability (ICR) of the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and\\u000a its 10-, 20-, and 30-item fractions was explored, as well as the relationships between the fractions and the entire 40-item\\u000a test. Pearson correlation coefficients (rs) were computed among all independent combinations and permutations of the four 10-item UPSIT booklets using data from 774\\u000a subjects.

Richard L. Doty; Richard E. Frye; Udayan Agrawal

1989-01-01

163

Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.  

PubMed

The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

2013-02-01

164

Utility of the Germ Tube Test for Direct Identification of Candida albicans from Positive Blood Culture Bottles  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the germ tube test for the direct identification of Candida albicans from positive blood culture bottles, with results obtained from subcultured colonies. The direct germ tube test was 87.1% sensitive and 100% specific for the identification of C. albicans when the results obtained from fungal colonies were compared. Recent evidence has suggested that early institution of ap- propriate

Donald C. Sheppard; Marie-Claude Locas; Christiane Restieri; Michel Laverdiere

165

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

166

Performance of the MGIT TBc identification test and meta-analysis of MPT64 assays for identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid culture.  

PubMed

Rapid MPT64-based immunochromatographic tests (MPT64 ICTs) have been developed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in culture. We demonstrated the noninferiority of one commercial MTP64 ICT, the MGIT TBc identification (TBcID) test, to GenoType line probe assays for MTBC identification in positive MGIT cultures. Meta-analysis of MPT64 ICT performance for identification of MTBC in liquid culture confirmed similar very high sensitivities and specificities for all three commercial MPT64 assays for which sufficient data were available. PMID:21998426

Brent, Andrew J; Mugo, Daisy; Musyimi, Robert; Mutiso, Agnes; Morpeth, Susan; Levin, Michael; Scott, J Anthony G

2011-12-01

167

SOLERAS solar active cooling field test operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four small-scale commercial size solar cooling systems being tested in Arizona as part of the SOLERAS program are described, together with 1981 performance summaries. A 63 kW air-cooled Rankine cycle system powered by parabolic troughs is used to cool a one-story office building. The system has both hot and cold storage tanks and uses R-11 fluid. A 49 kW Rankine cycle system driven by 218.5 sq m of evacuated tube collectors features direct expansion cooling of part of an office building, as well as part-time electrical generation for the grid. A water-absorption cycle system with 53 kW of power from 133.8 sq m of tracking parabolic trough receivers is employed to cool a warehouse office area. The system includes a hot storage tank and ground-mounted solar energy collection. Computer room cooling is provided by the fourth system, a 35 kW air-cooled absorption system system featuring 89.2 sq m of Fresnel lens collectors mounted roof-top. Design simplicity has been found to be mandatory for performance optimization, thereby ruling out cogeneration. Alsi, the use of both hot and cold storage has proven beneficial from cost and operational points of view

Williamson, J.; Martin, R.

168

Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In today's educational system, most science and engineering graduate students enter teaching careers with little or no teaching experience, and then are buried with so many competing responsibilities that their teaching skills take many years to improve. At the same time, incoming college students bring years of accumulated learning experiences (and attitudes) to their learning expectations. This Website offers classroom-tested methods for assessing the learning environment in college classrooms -- the first step to better teaching AND learning. Provided by the National Institute for Science Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the FLAG Website is intended for college and university instructors in the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) disciplines. The Guide offers up-to-date assessment tools "for instructors who have an interest in sharing and implementing new approaches to evaluating student learning, attitudes and performance." Four main sections encompass the site's main objectives and resources. For an explanation of why assessment is useful and necessary, see Getting Started. Setting course goals and matching those goals with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT)s are described in the subsequent sections; discipline-specific assessment techniques are contained in Searchable Tools; and the Resources section provides additional materials on assessment. This Website offers excellent and much-needed material, and will be useful to any educators (new or seasoned) who wish to improve their class learning levels.

169

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

SciTech Connect

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

2011-01-17

170

Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

171

Rapid Ornithine Decarboxylase Test for the Identification of Enterobacteriaceae  

PubMed Central

Conventional methods for detecting ornithine decarboxylase activity require an extended period of incubation. However, with a few simple modifications, accurate results were obtained within a few hours rather than several days. The broth medium was modified, primarily by omitting glucose and by decreasing the pH to 5.5. A 1-ml amount of this broth was inoculated with one colony and then overlaid with sterile mineral oil. Within 2 to 4 hr, the pH increased if ornithine was decarboxylated, thus changing the color of the internal pH indicator to a dark purple. If the amino acid was not decarboxylated, the pH decreased to pH 5.0 to 5.2, enough to give a definite yellow color. With 347 selected clinical isolates, the rapid test gave results identical to those obtained in 1 to 4 days with Moeller's decarboxylase medium. Less reliable results were obtained with Difco's decarboxylase medium with 0.3% agar which was stabinoculated and read after 18 to 24 hr without a mineral oil seal. The rapid ornithine decarboxylase test represents a simple, accurate technique which is well suited for the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:4553140

Fay, Gunnar D.; Barry, Arthur L.

1972-01-01

172

Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes  

E-print Network

We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'{o}n-Beato-Garc\\'{i}a regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

Toshmatov, Bobir; Stuchlík, Zden?k; Ahmedov, Bobomurat

2015-01-01

173

Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

Ratajczak, A. F.

1985-08-01

174

Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes  

E-print Network

We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'{o}n-Beato-Garc\\'{i}a regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

2015-03-19

175

Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

Ratajczak, A. F.

1985-01-01

176

STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 11}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CTE measurements are made using the "internal sparse field test", along the parallel axis. The new "POS=" optional parameter is used to provide off-center MSM positionings of some slits. All exposures are internals.

Goudfrooij, Paul

2002-07-01

177

Full-Field Strain Measurement and Identification of Composites Moduli at High Strain Rate with the Virtual Fields Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper deals with full-field strain measurement on glass\\/epoxy composite tensile specimens submitted to high strain\\u000a rate loading through a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device and with the identification of their mechanical properties.\\u000a First, the adopted methodology is presented: the device, including an Ultra-High Speed camera, and the experimental procedure\\u000a to obtain relevant displacement maps are described. The

R. Moulart; F. Pierron; S. R. Hallett; M. R. Wisnom

2011-01-01

178

Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Test for Simultaneous Identification and Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotypes 2, 5, and 6  

PubMed Central

Serotype-specific DNA regions involved in the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides (cps region) were used to develop a multiplex PCR test for the simultaneous species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6. Primers specific for serotypes 2, 5, and 6 were combined with the already existing species-specific primers used in a PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with serotype reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 182 Danish field isolates previously serotyped by latex agglutination or immunodiffusion. For all serologically typeable strains, a complete correspondence was found between the results obtained by the multiplex PCR test and the results obtained by the traditional serotyping methods. Six of eight serologically nontypeable strains could be allocated to a serotype on the basis of the multiplex PCR results. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated with a collection of 93 strains representing 29 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as species normally found in the respiratory tracts of swine. All of these strains were negative by the multiplex PCR test, including 50 field isolates of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii. When the multiplex PCR test was used to test Danish field strains, it was able to identify the serotypes of approximately 94% of all strains isolated from swine with clinical disease. More than 90% of the isolates that cross-reacted by the latex agglutination test were of serotype 2, 5, or 6. Determination of the serotype by PCR represents a convenient and specific method for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:12958231

Jessing, Stine G.; Angen, Øystein; Inzana, Tomas J.

2003-01-01

179

Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips  

E-print Network

FABRICATION AND TESTING OF OXIDIZED POROUS SILICON FIELD EM11TER STRIPS A Thesis by VASANTA BHANU MADDURI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering TEXAS ASM UNlvERSITY LIBRARY FABRICATION AND TESTING OF OXIDIZED POROUS SILICON FIELD EMITTER STRIPS A Thesis by VASANTA BHANU MADDURI Approved as to style and content by Mark H. Weichold...

Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

1992-01-01

180

The development and field testing of a passive mercury dosimeter  

E-print Network

THE DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD TESTING OF A PASSIVE MERCURY DOSIMETER A Thesis by ROBERT KARL ZAHRAY Submitted to t. he Graduate College of Texas AddS University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree o' f MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD TESTING OF A PASSIVE MERCURY DOSIMETER A Thesis by ROBERT KARL ZAHRAY Approved as to style and content by: R. J. mon (Chairman of . Committee) J. Su (Member K. Irgolic...

Zahray, Robert Karl

1982-01-01

181

Wind tunnel test of 1\\/30 scale heliostat field array model. Test report  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 9 January through 20 January 1978, Honeywell conducted a wind tunnel test on a 1\\/30 scale partial heliostat field. The heliostats were per Honeywell's design developed under the 10 megawatt central receiver pilot electrical power plant subsystem research experiment contract. Likewise, the scaled section of the field geometry duplicated the proposed circular layout. Testing was conducted at the Georgia

1978-01-01

182

SMALL HYBRID SOLAR POWER SYSTEM: FIRST FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents field tests of an original concept of a small hybrid solar power plant integrating three technologies: hermetic volumetric scroll expander- generators installed in two superposed Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC), a (bio-)Diesel engine with heat recovery exchangers and a solar field made of two rows of sun following flat plate concentrators with vacuumed isolated collector tubes. The basic

Samuel Martin; Malick Kane; Daniel Favrat

183

Flight test validation of a frequency-based system identification method on an F-15 aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A frequency-based performance identification approach was evaluated using flight data from the NASA F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control aircraft. The approach used frequency separation to identify the effectiveness of multiple controls simultaneously as an alternative to independent control identification methods. Fourier transformations converted measured control and response data into frequency domain representations. Performance gradients were formed using multiterm frequency matching of control and response frequency domain models. An objective function was generated using these performance gradients. This function was formally optimized to produce a coordinated control trim set. This algorithm was applied to longitudinal acceleration and evaluated using two control effectors: nozzle throat area and inlet first ramp. Three criteria were investigated to validate the approach: simultaneous gradient identification, gradient frequency dependency, and repeatability. This report describes the flight test results. These data demonstrate that the approach can accurately identify performance gradients during simultaneous control excitation independent of excitation frequency.

Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Orme, John S.; Hreha, Mark A.

1995-01-01

184

Field test of an advanced maintenance-system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Flight Control Maintenance Diagnostic System (FCMDS), a knowledge-based laboratory development that can serve as a prototype in addressing the common and persistent problems in the maintenance of military aircraft, has completed a preliminary field test. FCMDS was developed to test the theories that a range of maintenance technicians can effectively troubleshoot and repair complicated aircraft systems using a knowledge-based

John B. Schroeder; Gary M. Smith; P. Bursch; J. W. Meisner

1992-01-01

185

FIELD TESTING OF VOCS IN SOIL USING SENSIDYNE DETECTOR TUBES  

EPA Science Inventory

Present field testing for VOCs in soil and water involves sending samples to distant laboratories, waiting weeks for results, at a cost of 30 - 50 $ per sample. The goal of this science activity was to develop and test in the laboratory a methodology to detect VOCs in soil and w...

186

DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

187

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement Field Test and  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Residential Duct Placement Field Test and Research Reports Tests of Homes with Ducts in Conditioned Space (product 6.6.2b) Literature Search (product 6.3.1) Interview with Builders and Researchers (product 6.3.2) Representative House Designs Summary Report (product 6

188

Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

2011-01-01

189

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

Walker, D. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-12-01

190

Developing and pilot testing practical measures of preanalytic surgical specimen identification defects.  

PubMed

Accurate patient identification is a National Patient Safety Goal. Misidentification of surgical specimens is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. The authors developed 12 practical, process-based, standardized measures of surgical specimen identification defects during the preanalytic phase of pathology testing (from the operating room to the surgical pathology laboratory) that could be used to quantify the occurrence of these defects. The measures (6 container and 6 requisition identification defects) were developed by a panel of physicians, pathologists, nurses, and quality experts. A total of 69 hospitals prospectively collected data over 3 months. Overall, there were identification defects in 2.9% of cases (1780/60 501; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0%-4.4%), 1.2% of containers (1018/81 656; 95% CI = 0.8%-2.0%), and 2.3% of requisitions (1417/61 245; 95% CI = 1.2%-4.6%). Future research is needed to evaluate if hospitals are able to use these measures to assess interventions meant to reduce the frequency of specimen identification defects and improve patient safety. PMID:23322909

Bixenstine, Paul J; Zarbo, Richard J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Yenokyan, Gayane; Robinson, Raymond; Hudson, Daniel W; Prescott, Arlene M; Hubble, Ron; Murphy, Mary M; George, Chris T; D'Angelo, Rita; Watson, Sam R; Lubomski, Lisa H; Berenholtz, Sean M

2013-01-01

191

A test pattern identification algorithm and its application to CINRAD/SA(B) data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A variety of faulty radar echoes may cause serious problems with radar data applications, especially radar data assimilation and quantitative precipitation estimates. In this study, "test pattern" caused by test signal or radar hardware failures in CINRAD (China New Generation Weather Radar) SA and SB radar operational observations are investigated. In order to distinguish the test pattern from other types of radar echoes, such as precipitation, clear air and other non-meteorological echoes, five feature parameters including the effective reflectivity data percentage ( R Z), velocity RF (range folding) data percentage ( R RF), missing velocity data percentage ( R M), averaged along-azimuth reflectivity fluctuation and averaged along-beam reflectivity fluctuation are proposed. Based on the fuzzy logic method, a test pattern identification algorithm is developed, and the statistical results from all the different kinds of radar echoes indicate the performance of the algorithm. Analysis of two typical cases with heavy precipitation echoes located inside the test pattern are performed. The statistical results show that the test pattern identification algorithm performs well, since the test pattern is recognized in most cases. Besides, the algorithm can effectively remove the test pattern signal and retain strong precipitation echoes in heavy rainfall events.

Jiang, Yuan; Liu, Liping

2014-03-01

192

Evaluation of PCR, IEF and ELISA techniques for the detection and identification of potato cyst nematodes from field soil samples in England and Wales.  

PubMed

Effective management of potato cyst nematodes (PCNs) requires simple, rapid and accurate identification and quantification of field populations. Soil samples from a survey of 484 fields in potato rotations in England and Wales were used to compare the identification and quantification of PCNs using IEF, PCR, ELISA and bait plant tests. The cyst counts and bait plant test revealed that 64.3% of field samples contained PCNs. Bait plant tests increased the detection rate of PCNs in field samples by 4-6.4%. This means that some infestations are cryptic and would not normally be detected by standard counts. IEF, PCR and ELISA methods distinguished between Globodera rostochiensis and G pallida and were able to register mixed populations; however they were not in full agreement. All methods suggested that G pallida is the dominant species in the field samples tested. The PCR results indicated that 66% of field samples contained pure G pallida, 8% contained pure G rostochiensis and 26% contained mixtures of the two species. Estimates of the relative process times taken per sample in the PCR, IEF and ELISA techniques are given. PMID:11721525

Ibrahim, S K; Minnis, S T; Barker, A D; Russell, M D; Haydock, P P; Evans, K; Grove, I G; Woods, S R; Wilcox, A

2001-11-01

193

Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

1998-01-01

194

Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

1996-10-01

195

DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

2001-10-01

196

Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

Morris, A. Terry

1996-01-01

197

Olfactory identification in non-demented elderly population and in mild cognitive impairment: a comparison of performance in clinical odor identification versus Boston Naming Test.  

PubMed

Performance in olfactory identification was studied in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), using slightly expanded standard clinical approach to study the olfactory nerve. Four hundred and eighty-six cognitively normal individuals and 72 individuals with MCI underwent spontaneous and cued odor identification and delayed odor recall. Performance in these was compared with the performance in the CERAD version of the Boston Naming Test (BNT). The individuals with MCI scores significantly worse in all tests compared with controls, but the performance in tests assessing odor were less impaired than performance in the BNT. Standard assessment of olfactory nerve function is not sufficient to study cognitive impairment in MCI. PMID:19551462

Laakso, Mikko P; Tervo, Susanna; Hänninen, Tuomo; Vanhanen, Matti; Hallikainen, Merja; Soininen, Hilkka

2009-07-01

198

Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel  

SciTech Connect

Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T. [Research Centre on Tools Materials and Processes (CROMeP), Ecole des mines d'Albi-Carmaux, 81013 ALBI Cedex 9 (France)

2007-04-07

199

Field identification of birdseye in sugar maple (acer saccharum marsh. ). Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect

Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is critical for two principal reasons: (1) it allows for the enumeration of a valuable resource that may influence management decisions, and (2) it may prevent improper manufacturing of logs at the job site. Both factors should help increase overall timber sale return. The objective of the paper is to provide a background on birdseye sugar maples and a detailed sequential methodology for field identification of birdseye in standing trees.

Bragg, D.C.; Stokke, D.D.

1994-01-01

200

Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?  

PubMed

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=?-0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=?-0.82) and bench press (rs?=?-0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.83) and bench press (rs?=?-0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=?-0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=?-0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

201

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

202

Force model identification for magnetic suspension systems via magnetic field measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In magnetic suspension analysis, a simplified model of the current-to-distance relationship is not sufficient to design an optimal control. Due to the nonlinearity of the magnetic field, an accurate model, which is a function of the suspended object, suspension distance, core material, and operation conditions, is difficult to obtain. An improved force-model-identification method for magnetic suspension systems establishes reliable parameters

Chin E. Lin; Huei L. Jou

1993-01-01

203

Bacteriophage-Based Latex Agglutination Test for Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus  

PubMed Central

Rapid diagnosis is essential for the management of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A host recognition protein from S. aureus bacteriophage phiSLT was recombinantly produced and used to coat streptavidin latex beads to develop a latex agglutination test (LAT). The diagnostic accuracy of this bacteriophage-based test was compared with that of a conventional LAT, Pastorex Staph-Plus, by investigating a clinical collection of 86 S. aureus isolates and 128 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from deep tissue infections. All of the clinical S. aureus isolates were correctly identified by the bacteriophage-based test. While most of the CoNS were correctly identified as non-S. aureus isolates, 7.9% of the CoNS caused agglutination. Thus, the sensitivity of the bacteriophage-based LAT for identification of S. aureus among clinical isolates was 100%, its specificity was 92.1%, its positive predictive value (PPV) was 89.6%, and its negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Pastorex LAT for the identification of S. aureus were 100%, 99.2%, 98.9%, and 100%, respectively. Among the additionally tested 35 S. aureus and 91 non-S. aureus staphylococcal reference and type strains, 1 isolate was false negative by each system; 13 and 8 isolates were false positive by the bacteriophage-based and Pastorex LATs, respectively. The ability of the phiSLT protein to detect S. aureus was dependent on the presence of wall teichoic acid (WTA) and corresponded to the production of ribitol phosphate WTA, which is found in most S. aureus clones but only a small minority of CoNS. Bacteriophage-based LAT identification is a promising strategy for rapid pathogen identification. Finding more specific bacteriophage proteins would increase the specificity of this novel diagnostic approach. PMID:25031449

Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Walther, Thomas; Molinaro, Sonja; Li, Xuehua; Xia, Guoqing; Wieser, Andreas; Peters, Georg; Peschel, Andreas

2014-01-01

204

Identification of Propionibacterium acnes and related organisms by precipitin tests with trichloroacetic acid extracts.  

PubMed

The serological identification of Propionibacterium acnes, P. granulosum, and P. avidum, using trichloroacetic acid extracts, is described. With antisera prepared against reference strains, the method has been tested on 142 strains recently isolated from human skin. All except two of the strains could be identified serologically, and there was excellent agreement between the serological results and the fermentation pattern of the strains. Two serological types of P. acnes and two of P. avidum were identified, but only one of P. granulosum. PMID:972178

Cummins, C S

1976-08-01

205

Validation Studies of an Immunochromatographic 1Step Test for the Forensic Identification of Human Blood  

Microsoft Academic Search

An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the de- tection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The fol- lowing experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensi- tivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extrac- tion media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in

Manfred N. Hochmeister; Bruce Budowle; Rebecca Sparkes; Oskar Rudin; Christian Gehrig; Michael Thali; Lars Schmidt; Adrien Cordier; Richard Dirnhofer

206

Ambient vibration testing of historic masonry towers for structural identification and damage assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of the ambient-vibration based investigations carried out to assess the structural conditions of a masonry bell-tower are presented. The tower, dating back to the XVII century and about 74m high, is characterised by the presence of major cracks on the western and eastern load-bearing walls.The assessment procedure includes full-scale ambient vibration testing, modal identification from ambient vibration responses,

C. Gentile; A. Saisi

2007-01-01

207

Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

1983-12-01

208

Field testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: spent fuel test and radionuclide migration experiments  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests in the Climax Stock are being conducted. The Climax Stock, a granitic instrusive, has been administratively excluded from consideration as a full-scale repository site. However, it provides a readily available facility for field testing with high-level radioactive materials at a depth (420 m) approaching that of a repository. The major test activity in the 1980 fiscal year has been initiation of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). This test, which was authorized in June 1978, is designed to evaluate the generic feasibility of geologic storage and retrievability of commercial power reactor spent fuel assemblies in a granitic medium. In addition, the test is configured and instrumented to provide thermal and thermomechanical response data that will be relevant to the design of a repository in hard crystalline rock. The other field activity in the Climax Stock is a radionuclide migration test. It combines a series of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of existing hydrologic models for pretest predictions and data interpretation. Goals of this project are to develop: (1) field measurement techniques for radionuclide migration studies in a hydrologic regime where the controlling mechanism is fracture permeability; (2) field test data on radionuclide migration; and (3) a comparison of laboratory- and field-measured retardation factors. This radionuclide migration test, which was authorized in the middle of the 1980 fiscal year, is in the preliminary design phase. The detailed program plan was prepared and subjected to formal peer review in August. In September/October researchers conducted preliminary flow tests with water in selected near-vertical fractures intersected by small horizontal boreholes. These tests were needed to establish the range of pressures, flow rates, and other operating parameters to be used in conducting the nuclide migration tests. 21 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

Ballou, L.B.; Isherwood, D.J.; Patrick, W.C.

1982-12-31

209

The 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40)  

PubMed Central

Background Most existing olfactory identification (ID) tests have the primary aim of diagnosing clinical olfactory dysfunction, thereby rendering them sub-optimal for experimental settings where the aim is to detect differences in healthy subjects’ odor ID abilities. Materials and methods We have developed an extended version of the olfactory ID subtest of the Sniffin’ Sticks test battery to better assess the variability in ID scores and thereby olfactory abilities of healthy, adult individuals. Twenty-four odorants, corresponding cue labels, and distractor labels were added to the existing 16-item Sniffin’ Sticks ID test to create the 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40). The MONEX-40 was administered to 259 healthy young subjects, of which 72 were retested on an average of 212 days (SD 112 days) later. Results The added odor items demonstrated good validity, as shown by a significant correlation of the results with the original 16-item ID test. In addition, the MONEX-40 achieved a significant test–retest and split-half reliability. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that the MONEX-40 is a reliable method for experimental assessment of odor ID ability in healthy, young individuals. Moreover, its use of a wider range of odors allows the experimenter to present subsets of the MONEX-40 within the same experiment while maintaining statistical power. PMID:22200409

Freiherr, Jessica; Gordon, Amy R.; Alden, Eva C.; Ponting, Andrea L.; Hernandez, Monica F.; Boesveldt, Sanne; Lundström, Johan N.

2013-01-01

210

Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project  

SciTech Connect

The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

Leshikar, G.A.

1997-05-16

211

Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

Bindschadler, Robert

1987-01-01

212

Dielectric EM Field Probes for HPM Test & Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

To meet test and evaluation needs for high power microwave (HPM), we describe developments on miniature all-dielectric optical E-field sensors with flat RF sensing response from ~ MHz to 12 GHz, with negligible field perturbation, good sensitivity (~2V\\/m), and >100dB dynamic range. Initial devices use a 20 mm long sensing region in an integrated optical (IO) waveguide Mach- Zehnder interferometer

Richard Forber; W. C. Wang; De-Yu Zang; Stephen Schultz; Richard Selfridge

213

Field test of microbend fiber sensor for hospital use  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we report a field test of a microbend fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate, breathing pattern, Ballistocardiogram and heart rate during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Comparative experiments conducted between our sensor and commercial physiologic device on a healthy male subject showed an accuracy of +/-2bpm for simultaneous measurement of both breathing rate and heart rate. Our preliminary field test on simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects in the 3.0 Tesla MRI environment showed very good agreement compared with measurements obtained from conventional MRcompatible devices.

Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

2014-05-01

214

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

215

U.S. field testing programs and results  

SciTech Connect

The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

Wicks, G.G.

2000-06-09

216

Development of normative data for the Brazilian adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.  

PubMed

It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms. PMID:25547105

Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

2015-02-01

217

Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 10, October 2001 ( c 2001) IDENTIFICATION, SYNTHESIS, AND FIELD EVALUATION  

E-print Network

Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 27, No. 10, October 2001 ( c 2001) IDENTIFICATION, SYNTHESIS/yr (Anonymous, 2000). Recent studies on the sexual behavior and field ecology of E. aurantiana on citrus trees

Ishida, Yuko

218

Evaluation of possibilities in identification and susceptibility testing for Candida glabrata clinical isolates with the Integral System Yeast Plus (ISYP).  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate possibilities of correct identification and susceptibility testing of C. glabrata clinical isolates with Integral System Yeast Plus (ISYP). For species identification, as the reference method, API Candida test and species-specific PCR reactions were used. The potential of antifungal susceptibility testing by the ISYP test was compared with the Sensititre Yeast One. Whilst the reference methods confirmed that the received population (n = 65 isolates) represented only C. glabrata, identification with the ISYP system showed correct data only in the case of 18 strains tested (27.7%). Species identification of the other 47 strains with the ISYP test was not possible at all. Significant differences were also observed for drug susceptibility testing carried out by the ISYP and the Sensititre Yeast One. The highest level of disagreement in classifying strains as resistant or susceptible estimated, as 73.9% and 40.0%, was observed for itraconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Satisfactory results were only obtained for 5-fluorocytosine with 93.8% agreement between both methods. In our opinion the idea of the ISYP system is certainly good. The combination of identification ability and drug susceptibility testing in one test is very important, especially from a clinical point of view. However, the current version of the ISYP has many disadvantages. We would like to encourage the manufacturer to make an effort and develop a new, more accurate version of the test. PMID:24939684

Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Naumiuk, Lukasz; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierzanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Milewski, Slawomir

2014-06-01

219

Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

1999-01-01

220

78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant AGENCY: Animal and Plant...and then to field test, an unlicensed DNA Immunostimulant recommended for reduction...LLC, Animal Health Division. Product: DNA Immunostimulant. Possible Field Test...

2013-09-24

221

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or laboratory analyses...phase of the facility permit, conditions...conducting the field tests or laboratory...

2010-07-01

222

Development of an anaerobic capacity test for field sport athletes.  

PubMed

Maximally accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) has been argued to be currently the best non-invasive method for estimating anaerobic capacity (Medbø et al., 1988, Ramsbottom et al., 1997). An easy to administer field test that could accurately predict MAOD, would be of great use to many field sport athletes and coaches. Fifteen male rugby union players undertook MAOD testing (99.4 +/- 16.9ml x kg(-1)) on a treadmill using a modification of procedure 3 as described by Medbø et al. (1988). All subjects also performed a 300m Shuttle Run Test (66.7 +/- 2.2s), run over a 20m distance. Analysis of the MAOD and 300m Shuttle Run Test time relationship revealed a significant correlation of r = -0.69 [p<0.01). Furthermore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that when subjects were split into 'good' and 'poor' groups based on 300m Shuttle Run Test times, the times distinguished between 'good' and 'poor' MAOD values (P<0.05). The findings of the present study support the validity of the 300m Shuttle Run Test as a useful estimate of anaerobic capacity in football athletes. Unexplained variance could be due to speed and agility factors associated with the 300m Shuttle Run Test. Methodological issues pertaining to the accurate assessment of MAOD are also discussed. PMID:14609144

Moore, A; Murphy, A

2003-09-01

223

A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

1977-01-01

224

Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

Walker, Bonnie

225

FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

226

Field performance testing : heritability and correction of sex effect  

E-print Network

Field performance testing : heritability and correction of sex effect J. NAVEAU S.C.A., Pen animals from the selection centre of Pen-Ar-Lan (France). The sex effect was estimated on the basis models, one including sex, the other excluding it. Results showed that in a farm unit, sex may

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Safe Playing Program: Final Report on Process Field Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two previous experimental observational studies, the Safe-Playing Kit, a program with empirically proven potential for reducing the risk of pedestrian accidents to preschoolers, was developed. The purpose of the present study was to field test a prototype of the kit in 17 diverse preschools and day care centers located in eight states. Feedback…

Embry, Dennis D.; Malfetti, James L.

228

A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

2011-01-01

229

A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

230

Design and testing of the LITE Variable Field Stop mechanism  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Variable Field Stop (VFS) is a rotary mechanism that reliably positions any of four aperture plates in the optical path of a spaceflight experiment, limiting the amount of light reaching the detectors. This paper discusses the design, operation, and testing of the VFS.

Dillman, Robert A.

1993-01-01

231

Guidelines for Student Threat Assessment: Field-Test Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A demonstration project was conducted to field-test guidelines for schools to use in responding to student threats of violence. Results from 188 student threats occurring in 35 schools over the course of one school year are described. School- based teams used a decision-tree model to evaluate the seriousness of a threat and take appropriate action to reduce the threat of

Dewey G. Cornell; Peter L. Sheras; Sebastian Kaplan; David McConville; Julea Douglass; Andrea Elkon; Lela McKnight; Chris Branson; Joanna Cole

232

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF COPPER CYANIDE RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field tests of reverse osmosis (RO) were conducted on copper cyanide rinse waters at two different sites: Whyco Chromium Co. and New England Plating Co. At both sites, closed-loop treatment was used with plating chemicals recycled to the bath and purified water recycled to the ri...

233

Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of

Timothy J. O'gorman; John M. Ross; Allen H. Taber; James F. Ziegler; Hans P. Muhlfeld; Charles J. Montrose; Huntington W. Curtis; James L. Walsh

1996-01-01

234

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Analog Missions and Field Tests  

E-print Network

National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAfacts Analog Missions and Field Tests NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Reef Base, located 63 feet beneath is actively planning to expand the frontier of human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit to destinations

235

Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

Ramirez, A.L. [ed.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

1991-08-01

236

Cosmic Censorship, Black Holes and Integer-spin Test Fields  

E-print Network

It has been argued that, starting with a slightly sub-extremal Kerr black hole instead of an extremal one, it is possible to overspin a black hole past the extremal limit and turn it into a naked singularity by sending test bodies, if one neglects radiative and self-force effects. In this work we show that (i) an extremal Kerr black hole can not be overspun as a result of the interaction with massless integer spin test fields (scalar, electromagnetic, or gravitational), (ii) overspinning can be achieved if we start with a nearly extremal black hole instead, and (iii) for the scalar field, the argument applies to more general black holes, and also allows use of a more general field configuration. Our analysis also neglects radiative and self-force effects.

Düzta?, Koray

2013-01-01

237

Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2-4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells' cultures margins).

Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanis?aw; Siero?, Aleksander; Paw?owska–Góral, Katarzyna; Cie?lar, Grzegorz; Siero?–Sto?tny, Karolina

2013-04-01

238

A mutual MRAS identification scheme for position sensorless field orientation control of induction machines  

SciTech Connect

A mutual Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) containing two models is proposed to implement a position sensorless Field Orientation Control (FOC) of an induction machine. For the rotor speed estimation, one model is used as a reference model and another is the adjustable model. Pure integration and stator leakage inductance are removed from the reference model, resulting in robust performance in low and high speed ranges. For the stator resistance identification, the two models switch their roles, that is, the reference model becomes the adjustable model and the adjustable model becomes the reference model. Assuming a brief stable rotor speed interval, the stator resistance can be tracked very well. To further improve the estimation accuracy of rotor speed and stator resistance, a simple on-line rotor time constant identification is included. This mutual MRAS scheme is a cost effective approach for position sensorless variable speed implementation. Computer simulations and experimental results are given to show its effectiveness.

Zhen, L.; Xu, L. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31

239

Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

Not Available

2011-11-01

240

Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

2014-11-01

241

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2010-01-01

242

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2011-01-01

243

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2014-01-01

244

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2013-01-01

245

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2012-01-01

246

Field test of a high efficiency, automatic defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the market evaluation and field test portion of a program to design, develop, and demonstrate a high efficiency, automatic defrosting refrigerator-freezer for the residential market. After the successful completion of Phase I of the program, which concentrated on the design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) high-efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, Phase II was initiated in February 1979 to evaluate the sales potential and performance of the high-efficiency refrigerator concept under field conditions, as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. In Phase I, a survey of food consumption and storage trends, family size, and consumer buying habits led to a sales-weighted average-capacity forecast for 1985 of approximately 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) and identification of the top-mount, automatic defrosting refrigerator as the projected sales leader. To meet this market demand, a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) top-mount was selected as the baseline for the Phase I design and development. In Phase II, a 509 1 (18 ft/sup 3/) unit using Phase I technology was chosen for the field test, since the slightly larger model better fit the participating manufacturer's new product development efforts and market.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01

247

Observational Test of Coronal Magnetic Field Models I. Comparison with Potential Field Model  

E-print Network

Recent advances have made it possible to obtain two-dimensional line-of-sight magnetic field maps of the solar corona from spectropolarimetric observations of the Fe XIII 1075 nm forbidden coronal emission line. Together with the linear polarization measurements that map the azimuthal direction of the coronal magnetic field, these coronal vector magnetograms now allow for direct observational testing of theoretical coronal magnetic field models. This paper presents a study testing the validity of potential-field coronal magnetic field models. We constructed a theoretical coronal magnetic field model of active region AR 10582 observed by the SOLARC coronagraph in 2004 by a global potential field extrapolation of the synoptic map of Carrington Rotation 2014. Synthesized linear and circular polarization maps from thin layers of the coronal magnetic field model above the active region along the line of sight are compared with the observed maps. We found that reasonable agreement occurs from layers located just above the sunspot of AR 10582, near the plane of the sky. This result provides the first observational evidence that potential field extrapolation can yield a reasonable approximation of the magnetic field configuration of the solar corona for simple and stable active regions.

Yu Liu; Haosheng Lin

2008-05-16

248

Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

Littell, Justin D.

2010-01-01

249

Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

250

A new method for the spectroscopic identification of stellar non-radial pulsation modes. I. The method and numerical tests  

E-print Network

We present the Fourier parameter fit method, a new method for spectroscopically identifying stellar radial and non-radial pulsation modes based on the high-resolution time-series spectroscopy of absorption-line profiles. In contrast to previous methods this one permits a quantification of the statistical significance of the computed solutions. The application of genetic algorithms in seeking solutions makes it possible to search through a large parameter space. The mode identification is carried out by minimizing chi-square, using the observed amplitude and phase across the line profile and their modeled counterparts. Computations of the theoretical line profiles are based on a stellar displacement field, which is described as superposition of spherical harmonics and that includes the first order effects of the Coriolis force. We made numerical tests of the method on a grid of different mono- and multi-mode models for 0 <= l <= 4 in order to explore its capabilities and limitations. Our results show that whereas the azimuthal order m can be unambiguously identified for low-order modes, the error of l is in the range of pm 1. The value of m can be determined with higher precision than with other spectroscopic mode identification methods. Improved values for the inclination can be obtained from the analysis of non-axisymmetric pulsation modes. The new method is ideally suited to intermediatley rotating Delta Scuti and Beta Cephei stars.

W. Zima

2006-06-21

251

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-print Network

that the laboratory prototype (or alpha version) is ready for operation and testing in a utility's substation. Thus Roane Substation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The TPET will be jointly operated by ORNL and TVA in a controlled substation that mimics real- world electrical environments under controlled conditions

252

Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

1996-09-01

253

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01

254

Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and its use for the identification of fireball fragmentation  

SciTech Connect

We propose an application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for rapidity distributions of individual events in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The test is particularly suited to recognizing nonstatistical differences between the events. Thus when applied to a narrow centrality class it could indicate differences between events that would not be expected if all events evolved according to the same scenario. In particular, as an example we assume here a possible fragmentation of the fireball into smaller pieces at the quark/hadron phase transition. Quantitative studies are performed with a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating such a distribution of hadrons. We conclude that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is a very powerful tool for the identification of the fragmentation process.

Melo, Ivan [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physics Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 11, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Torrieri, Giorgio [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogel, Sascha; Bleicher, Marcus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Korony, Samuel [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Gintner, Mikulas [Zilinska Univerzita, Univerzitna 1, 01026 Zilina (Slovakia); Univerzita Mateja Bela, Tajovskeho 40, 97401 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)

2009-08-15

255

Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

Morelli, Eugene A.

2000-01-01

256

System identification of the Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF), a laboratory-scale research project to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, has been developed. This system represents a scaled model of a planned Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LAMSTF consists of a small cylindrical permanent magnet suspended element which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The cylinder is a rigid body and can be controlled to move in five independent degrees of freedom. Six position variables are sensed indirectly by using infrared light-emitting diodes and light-receiving phototransistors. The motion of the suspended cylinder is in general nonlinear and hence only the linear, time-invariant perturbed motion about an equilibrium state is considered. One of the main challenges in this project is the control of the suspended element over a wide range of orientations. An accurate dynamic model plays an essential role in controller design. The analytical model is first derived and open-loop characteristics discussed. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control for system identification. Projection filters are first proposed to identify the state space model from closed-loop input/output test data in the time domain. This method is then extended to identify linear systems from the frequency test data. A canonical transformation matrix is also derived to transform the identified state space model into the physical coordinate. The LAMSTF system is stabilized by using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) feedback controller for closed-loop identification. The rate information is obtained by calculating the back difference of the sensed position signals. Only the closed-loop random input/output data are recorded. Preliminary results from numerical simulations demonstrate that the identified system model is fairly accurate from either time domain or frequency-domain data. Experiments will be performed to validate the proposed closed-loop identification algorithms.

Huang, Jen-Kuang

1994-01-01

257

Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test.

Wunan Lin

1993-02-01

258

Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal  

PubMed Central

Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as “retests,” beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

2013-01-01

259

Field test of a DFB fiber laser geophone system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we report the first stage field test results of a novel DFB fiber laser geophone system in Shengli oilfield. Two distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser geophones are wavelength multiplexed and the space between them is 50m. The performance of DFB fiber laser geophones are tested by weak seismic signals stimulated by explosions together with conventional 20DX moving-coil geophones. The results show that the DFB fiber laser geophones have highly similarity with conventional geophones and higher bandwidth. The DFB fiber laser geophone system is promising in micro-seismic monitoring of unconventional oil and gas hydraulic fracturing.

Sun, Zhihui; Zhang, Faxiang; Li, Shujuan; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding; Li, Hongguo; Wu, Xuebing

2013-12-01

260

Field test of the superconducting gravimeter as a hydrologic sensor.  

PubMed

We report on a field test of a transportable version of a superconducting gravimeter (SG) intended for groundwater storage monitoring. The test was conducted over a 6-month period at a site adjacent to a well in the recharge zone of the karstic Edwards Aquifer, a major groundwater resource in central Texas. The purpose of the study was to assess requirements for unattended operation of the SG in a field setting and to obtain a gravimetric estimate of aquifer specific yield. The experiment confirmed successful operation of the SG, but water level changes were small (<0.3 m) leading to uncertainty in the estimate of specific yield. Barometric pressure changes were the dominant cause of both water level variations and non-tidal gravity changes. The specific yield estimate (0.26) is larger than most published values and dependent mainly on low frequency variations in residual gravity and water level time series. PMID:21895647

Wilson, Clark R; Scanlon, Bridget; Sharp, John; Longuevergne, Laurent; Wu, Hongqiu

2012-01-01

261

? Pegasi: testing Vega-like magnetic fields in B stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. The bright B pulsator ? Peg shows both p and g modes of ? Cep and SPB types. It has also been claimed that it is a magnetic star, while others do not detect any magnetic field. Aims: We check for the presence of a magnetic field, with the aim to characterise it if it exists, or else provide a firm upper limit of its strength if it is not detected. If ? Peg is magnetic as claimed, it would make an ideal asteroseismic target for testing various theoretical scenarios. If it is very weakly magnetic, it would be the first observation of an extension of Vega-like fields to early B stars. Finally, if it is not magnetic and we can provide a very low upper limit on its non-detected field, it would make an important result for stellar evolution models. Methods: We acquired high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric Narval data at Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). We also gathered existing dimaPol spectropolarimetric data from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and Musicos spectropolarimetric data from TBL. We analysed the Narval and Musicos observations using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique to derive the longitudinal magnetic field and Zeeman signatures in lines. The longitudinal field strength was also extracted from the H? line observed with the DAO. With a Monte Carlo simulation we derived the maximum strength of the field possibly hosted by ? Peg. Results: We find that no magnetic signatures are visible in the very high quality spectropolarimetric data. The average longitudinal field measured in the Narval data is Bl = -0.1 ± 0.4 G. We derive a very strict upper limit of the dipolar field strength of Bpol ~ 40 G. Conclusions: We conclude that ? Peg is not magnetic: it hosts neither a strong stable fossil field as observed in a fraction of massive stars nor a very weak Vega-like field. There is therefore no evidence that Vega-like fields exist in B stars, contrary to the predictions by fossil field dichotomy scenarios. These scenarios should thus be revised. Our results also provide strong constraints for stellar evolution models. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.Tables 1-3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

Neiner, C.; Monin, D.; Leroy, B.; Mathis, S.; Bohlender, D.

2014-02-01

262

Strong-field tests of relativistic gravity and binary pulsars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of pulsars in gravitationally bound binary systems provide a unique opportunity for testing the strong-field regime of relativistic gravity. We present a detailed account of the ``parametrized post-Keplerian'' (PPK) formalism, a general phenomenological framework designed to extract the maximum possible information from pulsar timing and pulse-structure data. The PPK approach allows dynamical information to be obtained from the data

Thibault Damour; J. H. Taylor

1992-01-01

263

Spatial memory in rufous hummingbirds ( Selasphorus rufus ): A field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial memory abilities of free-ranging rufous hummingbirds were tested in an “open-field” analogue of a radial maze.\\u000a Eight artificial “flowers” filled with sucrose solution and arranged in a circle were placed within each bird’s feeding territory.\\u000a The birds were given two types of trial: in “free” trials, birds could choose which four of eight flowers to feed from before

S. D. Healy; T. A. Hurly

1995-01-01

264

On-site cell field test support program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

1982-09-01

265

Technology assessment and strategy for development of a Rapid Field Water Microbiology Test Kit. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

A literature and market search of existing technology for the detection, identification, and quantification of microorganisms in water was conducted. Based upon the availability of technologies and their configurations, an assessment of the appropriate strategies to pursue for the near and long term development plans in development of the Rapid Field Bacteriology Test Kit was performed. Near term technologies to improve the Army's capability to detect microorganisms would appear to be essentially improvements in versatility and measurement of coliform indicator organisms. New chromogenic and fluorogenic indicator substances associated with new substrates appear to be best suited for test kit development either for quantitative membrane filter tests or presence/absence and multiple fermentation tests. Test times, incubator requirements, and operator involvement appear to be similar to older technologies. Long term development would appear to favor such technologies as genetic probes with amplification of the hydridized nucleic acid materials of positive samples, and some immunological based systems such as enzyme linked, immuno-sorbent assays. In both cases, the major problems would appear to be sample preparation and development of signal strengths from the reactions which would allow the user to see results in 1 hour.

Preston, D.R.; Schaub, S.A.

1991-09-01

266

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01

267

Performance evaluation of infrared imaging system in field test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared imaging system has been applied widely in both military and civilian fields. Since the infrared imager has various types and different parameters, for system manufacturers and customers, there is great demand for evaluating the performance of IR imaging systems with a standard tool or platform. Since the first generation IR imager was developed, the standard method to assess the performance has been the MRTD or related improved methods which are not perfect adaptable for current linear scanning imager or 2D staring imager based on FPA detector. For this problem, this paper describes an evaluation method based on the triangular orientation discrimination metric which is considered as the effective and emerging method to evaluate the synthesis performance of EO system. To realize the evaluation in field test, an experiment instrument is developed. And considering the importance of operational environment, the field test is carried in practical atmospheric environment. The test imagers include panoramic imaging system and staring imaging systems with different optics and detectors parameters (both cooled and uncooled). After showing the instrument and experiment setup, the experiment results are shown. The target range performance is analyzed and discussed. In data analysis part, the article gives the range prediction values obtained from TOD method, MRTD method and practical experiment, and shows the analysis and results discussion. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of this evaluation tool, and it can be taken as a platform to give the uniform performance prediction reference.

Wang, Chensheng; Guo, Xiaodong; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Zhi-jie

2014-11-01

268

Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

1997-09-01

269

Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

2000-01-01

270

Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing  

SciTech Connect

Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

2000-01-01

271

A simple field test to assess endurance in inexperienced runners.  

PubMed

The accuracy of a simple field test, the 3-minute, 30-second endurance capacity test (3'30'' ECT), was evaluated in 12 moderately trained athletes. It consisted of 10 3-minute running bouts, separated by 30-second passive recoveries. The first 5 bouts were performed at 75% of maximal aerobic speed (MAS, which was previously determined), and the last 5 were at a self-selected speed. The result of this test is a speed called Vend, expressed in km.h and calculated as the mean speed for the last 5 bouts. The critical velocity (CV) and the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) were also determined. Another 17 moderately trained athletes then participated in a test-retest procedure to assess the reproducibility of the 3'30'' ECT. The results showed that Vend was correlated with all studied parameters (p < 0.05). Vend and CV did not differ relative to MAS (Vend: 82.8 +/- 3.3% of MAS; CV 82.5 +/- 3.3% of MAS; p > 0.05). The test-retest procedure indicated a coefficient of variation of 1.99 +/- 1.88%. Vend is thus an interesting indicator because (a) it is based on a noninvasive single-visit protocol, (b) its application is in the heavy exercise domain, and (c) it is highly reproducible. The 3'30'' ECT thus seems to be an adequate test to determine endurance capacity in moderately trained subjects. PMID:20634753

Schnitzler, Christophe; Heck, Gregory; Chatard, Jean-Claude; Ernwein, Viviane

2010-08-01

272

The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania using ITS-1 primers and  

E-print Network

The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania Research Institute, P.O. Box 1026, Tanga, Tanzania Received 15 April 2007; received in revised form 26 July-scale field studies of trypanosome-infected tsetse in Tanzania in the National Parks of Tarangire

Tyler, Charles

273

Progressive Aerodynamic Model Identification From Dynamic Water Tunnel Test of the F-16XL Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of a general aerodynamic model that is adequate for predicting the forces and moments in the nonlinear and unsteady portions of the flight envelope has not been accomplished to a satisfactory degree. Predicting aerodynamic response during arbitrary motion of an aircraft over the complete flight envelope requires further development of the mathematical model and the associated methods for ground-based testing in order to allow identification of the model. In this study, a general nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model is presented, followed by a summary of a linear modeling methodology that includes test and identification methods, and then a progressive series of steps suggesting a roadmap to develop a general nonlinear methodology that defines modeling, testing, and identification methods. Initial steps of the general methodology were applied to static and oscillatory test data to identify rolling-moment coefficient. Static measurements uncovered complicated dependencies of the aerodynamic coefficient on angle of attack and sideslip in the stall region making it difficult to find a simple analytical expression for the measurement data. In order to assess the effect of sideslip on the damping and unsteady terms, oscillatory tests in roll were conducted at different values of an initial offset in sideslip. Candidate runs for analyses were selected where higher order harmonics were required for the model and where in-phase and out-of-phase components varied with frequency. From these results it was found that only data in the angle-of-attack range of 35 degrees to 37.5 degrees met these requirements. From the limited results it was observed that the identified models fit the data well and both the damping-in-roll and the unsteady term gain are decreasing with increasing sideslip and motion amplitude. Limited similarity between parameter values in the nonlinear model and the linear model suggest that identifiability of parameters in both terms may be a problem. However, the proposed methodology can still be used with careful experiment design and carefully selected values of angle of attack, sideslip, amplitude, and frequency of the oscillatory data.

Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Szyba, Nathan M.

2004-01-01

274

Identification of dynamic loading on a bending plate using the Virtual Fields Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper aims at identifying local dynamic transverse forces and distributed pressures acting on the surface of a thin plate, from its measured vibration response. It is related to previous work by other authors on the so-called Force Analysis Technique but uses a different formulation. The paper first presents the theoretical developments based on the Virtual Fields Method and then, numerically simulated data are processed to validate the identification algorithm. Finally, experimental data are used. Both mechanical point load excitation, and distributed acoustic excitation of a bending panel are considered. The force reconstruction results are very satisfactory and the low computational times together with the simple implementation make the Virtual Fields technique attractive for this type of problem.

Berry, Alain; Robin, Olivier; Pierron, Fabrice

2014-12-01

275

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1993-01-01

276

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17

277

The ROSAT Deep Survey II. Optical identification, photomettry and spectra of sources in the Lockman field  

E-print Network

The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the $0.5 - 2$ keV band larger than 5.5 $10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper I). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux. Keywords: surveys -- galaxies: active -- quasars: emission lines -- galaxies: Seyfert -- X-rays: galaxies

Maarten Schmidt; Guenther Hasinger; James Gunn; Don Schneider; Richard Burg; Riccardo Giacconi; Ingo Lehmann; John MacKenty; Joachim Truemper; Gianni Zamorani

1997-09-15

278

Numerical Tests of Fast Reconnection in Weakly Stochastic Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effects of turbulence on magnetic reconnection using three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. This is the first attempt to test a model of fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of weak turbulence proposed by Lazarian & Vishniac. This model predicts that weak turbulence, which is generically present in most astrophysical systems, enhances the rate of reconnection by reducing the transverse scale for reconnection events and by allowing many independent flux reconnection events to occur simultaneously. As a result, the reconnection speed becomes independent of Ohmic resistivity and is determined by the magnetic field wandering induced by turbulence. We test the dependence of the reconnection speed on turbulent power, the energy injection scale, and resistivity. We apply the open and experiment with the outflow boundary conditions in our numerical model and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of various setups. To test our results, we also perform simulations of turbulence with the same outflow boundaries but without a large-scale field reversal, thus without large-scale reconnection. To quantify the reconnection speed we use both an intuitive definition, i.e., the speed of the reconnected flux inflow, and a more sophisticated definition based on a formally derived analytical expression. Our results confirm the predictions of the Lazarian and Vishniac model. In particular, we find that the reconnection speed is proportional to the square root of the injected power, as predicted by the model. The dependence on the injection scale for some of our models is a bit weaker than expected, i.e., l 3/4 inj, compared to the predicted linear dependence on the injection scale, which may require some refinement of the model or may be due to effects such as the finite size of the excitation region, which are not a part of the model. The reconnection speed was found to depend on the expected rate of magnetic field wandering and not on the magnitude of the guide field. In our models, we see no dependence on the guide field when its strength is comparable to the reconnected component. More importantly, while in the absence of turbulence we successfully reproduce the Sweet-Parker scaling of reconnection, in the presence of turbulence we do not observe any dependence on Ohmic resistivity, confirming that the reconnection of the weakly stochastic field is fast. We also do not observe a dependence on anomalous resistivity, which suggests that the presence of anomalous effects, e.g., Hall MHD effects, may be irrelevant for astrophysical systems with weakly stochastic magnetic fields.

Kowal, Grzegorz; Lazarian, A.; Vishniac, E. T.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.

2009-07-01

279

Lessons Learned From Field Tests Of Planetary Surface Rovers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I review results and lessons learned from field tests of planetary surface rovers. Terrestrial field tests help to train scientists in rover capabilities, and guides developments to improve them. Key metrics of rover science performance include distance traveled and number of science targets studied using instrument placement or sample manipulation. Field tests show that traverse range is governed primarily by commanding frequency rather than a rover’s maximum speed. With real-time feedback, teleoperated rovers can traverse kilometers per day. With commanded operations, typical traverses are a few meters. Longer traverses are risky and error prone. Tasks requiring moving a few meters to a target followed by manipulation or instrument placement take several command cycles per target. Higher level autonomy for navigation and manipulation is needed to improve performance. Rovers are being called upon to play a key role in the search for evidence of life on Mars. Conditions on the Martian surface today appear to preclude living organisms, but more clement conditions in the past may have supported the formation of a fossil record. However, any fossil record on Mars is likely to be produced by microbial life, and to be extremely ancient. Finding unambiguous evidence of biogenic origin of putative fossil structures will require collecting high priority samples and returning them to Earth. Recognition of fossiliferous deposits using rover data is problematical. Information provided by a rover is of very low bandwidth and fidelity compared to that observed by a field geologist. Limitations arise in both quality and quantity of data transmitted to Earth. In a rover mission simulation performed in a fossil-rich terrestrial field site hosting dinosaur tracks and stromatolites, science teams did not find any evidence of fossils. However, living organisms such as endolithic microorganisms and lichens have been identified in field experiments using color imaging and spectroscopy. Field experiments show that interpretations of a site are heavily effected by what data is sampled by the rover, and due to sparse sampling, inevitably many important clues that guide correct and complete geologic interpretation are missed. Performance might be improved by autonomously recognizing science value onboard the rover.

Stoker, C. R.

2003-04-01

280

Hypothesis Testing through Field Investigation of Mystery Mounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this field exercise, students examine the mystery mounds and patterned ground on the top of Umptanum Ridge in central Washington. Groups of 3-4 students design and conduct a field investigation and write a single joint report. Each group formulates a testable hypothesis that addresses one of the proposed processes involved in forming or subsequently shaping the mounds. The groups design an experiment to test their hypothesis, collect the necessary field observations and measurements during a regular afternoon field lab period and write a scientific report that includes an introduction, statement of hypothesis, background information, methods, data, analysis and interpretations, discussion of uncertainties, conclusions, and references. One week later, reports are turned in and students form "jigsaw" discussion groups composed of one student from each field research group. Each student briefly summarizes their group's research hypothesis and results to the jigsaw group. The jigsaw groups then each develop a revised hypothesis based on these combined results and present that to the entire class. Designed for a geomorphology course Uses online and/or real-time data Has minimal/no quantitative component Addresses student fear of quantitative aspect and/or inadequate quantitative skills Addresses student misconceptions

Lisa Ely

281

Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Bactec Blood Culture Broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus Test  

PubMed Central

The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth. PMID:24153135

Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E.

2014-01-01

282

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01

283

Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments  

SciTech Connect

The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

1994-08-01

284

Identification of Staphylococcus aureus: DNase and Mannitol salt agar improve the efficiency of the tube coagulase test  

PubMed Central

Background The ideal identification of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates requires a battery of tests and this is costly in resource limited settings. In many developing countries, the tube coagulase test is usually confirmatory for S. aureus and is routinely done using either human or sheep plasma. This study evaluated Mannitol salt agar and the deoxyribonuclease (DNase) test for improving the efficiency of the tube coagulase test in resource limited settings. The efficiency of human and sheep plasma with tube coagulase tests was also evaluated. Methods One hundred and eighty Gram positive, Catalase positive cocci occurring in pairs, short chains or clusters were subjected to growth on Mannitol salt agar, deoxyribonuclease and tube coagulase tests. Of these, isolates that were positive for at least two of the three tests (n = 60) were used to evaluate the performance of the tube coagulase test for identification of S. aureus, using PCR-amplification of the nuc gene as a gold standard. Results Human plasma was more sensitive than sheep plasma for the tube coagulase test (sensitivity of 91% vs. 81% respectively), but both plasmas had very low specificity (11% and 7% respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the tube coagulase test (human plasma) was markedly improved when Mannitol salt agar and DNase were introduced as a tri-combination test for routine identification of Staphylococcus aureus (100% specificity and 75% sensitivity). The specificity and sensitivity of Mannitol salt agar/DNase/tube coagulase (sheep plasma) combination was 100% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion The efficiency of the tube coagulase test can be markedly improved by sequel testing of the isolates with Mannitol salt agar, DNase and Tube coagulase. There is no single phenotypic test (including tube coagulase) that can guarantee reliable results in the identification of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:20707914

2010-01-01

285

Dark Ages Radio Explorer - Field Tests of a Prototype Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept designed to measure the sky-averaged redshifted HI 21-cm signal from the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization between 40 - 120 MHz (z = 11 - 35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the intense human-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) found on Earth. The science objectives of DARE include charting the history of the formation of the first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization, and end of the Dark Ages. A prototype science instrument has been constructed, consisting of bi-conical dipole antennas and a differential amplifier balun followed by a receiver and JPL-Caltech designed digital spectrometer. Extensive tests with this instrument are underway in order to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the overall DARE instrument. Here, we present results from preliminary field tests at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site in Green Bank, West Virginia. Further field tests will be performed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. This research has been supported by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR), headquartered at the University of Colorado Boulder and funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A. Part of this research was conducted at that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J. J.

2012-05-01

286

IDENTIFICATION OF FREE-FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES USING NUPEC RECORDED GROUND MOTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Over the past twenty years, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to investigate various aspects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects on nuclear power plant structures, including embedment and dynamic structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI) effects. As part of a collaborative agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NUPEC, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a numerical analysis to predict the free field soil profile using industry standard methods and the recorded free field responses to actual earthquake events. This paper describes the BNL free-field analyses, including the methods and the analysis results and their comparison to recorded data in the free field. The free-field soil profiles determined from the BNL analyses are being used for both the embedment and SSSI studies, the results of which will be made available upon their completion.

Xu, J.; Costantino, C.; Hofmayer, C.; Murphy, A.; Chokshi, N.; Kitada, Y.

2001-03-22

287

Optical cross beam field tests at ESSA Haswell Field site, October 1969  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests with both the visible and IR optical cross beam systems was made at the Haswell, Colorado, Field Site of ESSA. This memorandum covers only the details of the test setup and runs. A joint field test program was undertaken by ESSA at a 164 meter (500 foot) meteorological tower. The tower was instrumented with wind sensors, temperature sensors, temperature sensors, fluctuating wind and temperature sensors and humidity sensors. The sensors were located at three elevations: 42, 192 and 162 meters. A movable elevator was also instrumented and could be positioned at any desired location along the tower height. The main object of the cross beam studies was to compare the visible and IR systems. The instruments were also arranged so that direct comparison with the sensors on the tower can be made.

Sandborn, V. A.

1974-01-01

288

Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2012-01-01

289

Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution  

E-print Network

A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

2014-08-11

290

Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

2008-01-01

291

Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

1987-12-01

292

Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

Kearney, D. W.

1981-02-01

293

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

294

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

SciTech Connect

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which various insulation materials were installed. The panel was located in an environmental chamber. The test samples included various cellulosic, glass fiber and rockwool insulations as well as sterile cotton as a control. Steel and copper coupons together with water-cooled copper pipes were embedded in the insulation and exposed for 6 months. It was found that moisture absorption by the insulation was the primary factor in causing corrosion but required that chemical activity from insulation components also be present. No corrosion occurred in the absence of insulation or in rockwool and glassfiber insulation. All cellulose insulations caused some corrosion. Mostly this was minimal but in a few cases severe pitting resulted. Such behavior of the cellulose did not correspond to previous laboratory test results in saturated insulation or leachants made from the insulation. However, laboratory testing of leachants made from some of the cellulose after the simulated wall test showed a change in pitting tendency, suggesting that time and/or exposure to moisture can change the corrosiveness. This should be further explored. 12 refs., 9 figs, 3 tabs.

Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.; Desjarlais, A.

1988-09-01

295

The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

1989-02-01

296

Modeling and testing for joint association using a genetic random field model.  

PubMed

Substantial progress has been made in identifying single genetic variants predisposing to common complex diseases. Nonetheless, the genetic etiology of human diseases remains largely unknown. Human complex diseases are likely influenced by the joint effect of a large number of genetic variants instead of a single variant. The joint analysis of multiple genetic variants considering linkage disequilibrium (LD) and potential interactions can further enhance the discovery process, leading to the identification of new disease-susceptibility genetic variants. Motivated by development in spatial statistics, we propose a new statistical model based on the random field theory, referred to as a genetic random field model (GenRF), for joint association analysis with the consideration of possible gene-gene interactions and LD. Using a pseudo-likelihood approach, a GenRF test for the joint association of multiple genetic variants is developed, which has the following advantages: (1) accommodating complex interactions for improved performance; (2) natural dimension reduction; (3) boosting power in the presence of LD; and (4) computationally efficient. Simulation studies are conducted under various scenarios. The development has been focused on quantitative traits and robustness of the GenRF test to other traits, for example, binary traits, is also discussed. Compared with a commonly adopted kernel machine approach, SKAT, as well as other more standard methods, GenRF shows overall comparable performance and better performance in the presence of complex interactions. The method is further illustrated by an application to the Dallas Heart Study. PMID:24628067

He, Zihuai; Zhang, Min; Zhan, Xiaowei; Lu, Qing

2014-03-13

297

Lessons Learnt from the Dynamic Identification / Qualification Tests on the ESC-A Upper stage Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modelling approach made at the beginning of the development. The upper composite of the ARIANE 5, consisting of upper stage, vehicle equipment bay, payload carrying structures, payload dummies and fairing, was modal tested to validate the mathematical model of the launcher. Additionally, transfer functions were measured for Pogo investigations. Validated mathematical launcher models are the basis to predict the launcher global responses in the low frequency domain with sufficient confidence. The predicted global axial and lateral responses for selected sections at the stage represent the flight loads for these sections. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. The verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro shock) a stage separation test was performed. All the equipment was qualified separately for its dynamic (sine, random and shock excitation) and thermal environment to proof its structural and functional integrity. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine-vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electrodynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 150 Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experiences which were made - the comparison between prediction and test results shows the ability and good quality of analysis but - the advantage of combined analysis of shaker table and stage model for test prediction - local effects observed in test - the dependency of damping on the load level - the efficiency of the so called SARO-Damping Device

Rittweger, A.; Beuchel, W.; Eckhardt, K.

2002-01-01

298

On-line identification, flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural mode parameters for V-22 tiltrotor aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

New algorithms and results are presented for flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural modes in V-22 tiltrotor aircraft\\u000a based on simulated and flight-test data from Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHTI). For flutter testing and the identification\\u000a of structural mode frequencies, dampings and mode shapes, time domain state space techniques based on Deterministic Stochastic\\u000a Realization Algorithms (DSRA) are used to

R. K. Mehra; P. O. ARambel; A. M. Sampath; R. K. Prasanth; T. C. Parham

2000-01-01

299

Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors.  

PubMed

The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case. PMID:20370296

Olcay, Ali B; Pottebaum, Tait S; Krueger, Paul S

2010-03-01

300

Use of laboratory and field testing to identify potential production problems in the Troll field  

SciTech Connect

The areal extent of the oil found in Troll made it clear at a very early stage in the field's appraisal that subsea wells would be required if the oil were developed. Owing to cooling in the subsea flowline, subsea wells can be expected to pose more production chemistry problems than would be expected with conventional platform wells. Consequently, a number of laboratory tests were carried out during the appraisal campaign to identify problems to be expected with scaling, foaming, emulsification, wax deposition, and hydrates. Dehydration and wax deposition tests were also carried out offshore during appraisal-well testing. These tests are described, together with the methods subsequently adopted to minimize future production problems.

Hartley, R.; Jadid, M.B.

1989-02-01

301

Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-08-01

302

FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER  

E-print Network

#12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

303

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

2002-09-30

304

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01

305

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1991-01-01

306

Characterization and identification of field ectomycorrhizae of Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer.  

PubMed

Field ectomycorrhizae sampled under Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer have been characterized and described in detail based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The described ectomycorrhiza has traits typical of Boletales: whitish with three differentiated plectenchymatous layers in the mantle in plan view forming ring-like structures and rhizomorphs with highly differentiated hyphae. The inflated, smooth cystidia-like clavate end cells on the surface of the rhizomorphs and their slightly twisted external hyphae are additional characterizing features. The Hartig net occupies 1 1/2 rows of cortical cells, partly reaching the endodermis. Not all hyphae have clamps. The identification of the fungal symbiont as B. edulis was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequence comparison between mycorrhizas and sporocarps. The singularity of this symbiotic association, as well as its ecological and practical implications, are discussed. PMID:16800301

Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; de Miguel, Ana María; Martínez-Peña, Fernando

2006-01-01

307

Wavelet transform analysis for lithological characteristics identification in siliciclastic oil fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we propose the application of the wavelet transform analysis in well-logs (radioactivity, resistivity and sonic) to identify facies. The wavelet transform is applied to a set of well-log data for identifying correlations between wavelet coefficients and lithofacies sequences. Our results indicate that the scales, in a multiscale analysis, are related to the rock thickness and depending on the scale used it is possible to identify other particular or general sequences. The results obtained are compared and corroborated by standard geological procedures for lithological characterization, indicating that the wavelet analysis provides qualitative guides for the identification of lithological properties in wells. All our analyses are based on a siliciclastic oil field that belongs to Chicontepec Formation of the Tampico-Misantla basin in Mexico.

Perez-Muñoz, Teresa; Velasco-Hernandez, Jorge; Hernandez-Martinez, Eliseo

2013-11-01

308

Boeing 727-100 test project (high energy radiated field tests)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discussed here is a radio frequency (RF) coupling test on a BOEING 727-100 commercial aircraft. The objective of the test was to measure the coupling, or penetration, of RF signals in a BOEING 727-100 in the frequency range of 1.0 MHz to 6.0 GHz. The RF field levels generated inside the airplane during flight are probably not a health hazard with respect to passengers and crew because exposure time to high intensity RF fields is of short duration. However, this project has demonstrated that RF energy can couple into aircraft compartments and onto electrical wiring. The extent to which existing RF sources can impose unwanted electrical signals or voltages on critical aircraft components during flyby are shown.

Crowther, T.; Ybarrondo, L. J.; Skousen, N.; Hintze, M.

1989-07-01

309

The identification and characteristics of field resistance to lettuce downy mildew (Bremia lactucae Regel)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-one accessions of three Lactuca species which showed no recognisable race specific resistance to Bremia lactucae when tested in the laboratory as seedlings, exhibited different degrees of susceptibility when exposed to natural field infection. As a group, crisp genotypes had less mildew and a slower rate of disease development than other types of lettuce. Wild forms of Lactuca sativa and

I. R. Crute; Judith M. Norwood

1981-01-01

310

Identification of staphylococci with a self-educating system using fatty acid analysis and biochemical tests.  

PubMed Central

We characterized all of the 35 aerobic taxa of the genus Staphylococcus by using an objective, self-learning system combining both whole-cell fatty acid (FA) analysis and the results of 35 biochemical tests. Isolates were compared with the type strain for each taxon to generate an FA profile library and a biochemical table of test responses. Isolates were accepted into the system if they had a similarity index of > or = 0.6 for a taxon within the FA profile library and if they were identified as the same taxon by a computer program using a probability matrix constructed from the biochemical data. These stringent criteria led to acceptance of 1,117 strains assigned to legitimate taxa. Additional FA groups were assembled from selected strains that did not meet the inclusion criteria based on the type strains and were added to the system as separate entries. Currently, 1,512 isolates have bee accepted into the system. This approach has resulted in a comprehensive table of biochemical test results and a FA profile library, which together provide a practical system for valid identifications. PMID:8940451

Behme, R J; Shuttleworth, R; McNabb, A; Colby, W D

1996-01-01

311

Cell balancing for vehicle identification perception experiments and correcting for cell imbalance in test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrections are given for cell imbalance in the design and analysis of twelve (12)-target identification (ID) perception tests. Such tests are an important tool in the development of the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) observer performance model used in NVThermIP to compare electro-optical systems. It is shown that the partitions of the 12-target set previously used in perception experiments exhibit statistically significant cell imbalance. Results from perception testing are used to determine the relative difficulty of identifying different images in the set. A program is presented to partition the set into lists that are balanced according to the collected observer data. The relative difficulty of image subsets is shown to be related to the best-fit V 50 values for the subsets. The results of past perception experiments are adjusted to account for cell imbalance using the subset V 50 terms. Under the proper conditions, the adjusted results are shown to better follow the TTP model for observer performance.

Moore, Richard K.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.

2007-04-01

312

Cultivar Evaluation and Essential Test Locations Identification for Sugarcane Breeding in China  

PubMed Central

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

Luo, Jun; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai

2014-01-01

313

Cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China.  

PubMed

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai; Que, Youxiong

2014-01-01

314

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01

315

Boundary shape identification problems in two-dimensional domains related to thermal testing of materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification of the geometrical structure of the system boundary for a two-dimensional diffusion system is reported. The domain identification problem treated here is converted into an optimization problem based on a fit-to-data criterion and theoretical convergence results for approximate identification techniques are discussed. Results of numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of the theoretical ideas are reported.

Banks, H. T.; Kojima, Fumio

1988-01-01

316

Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

Hess, Ronald A.

1990-01-01

317

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31

318

Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics  

PubMed Central

The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

2015-01-01

319

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31

320

MSU Extension offers this water resistant identification guide ideal for field use developed by Extension specialists. The guide  

E-print Network

MSU Extension offers this water resistant identification guide ideal for field use developed that provide natural pest control by feeding on pest insects, such as aphids, thrips, caterpillars and beetles and Landscapes $10 3-digit Vcode · Ants · Beetles · Lacewings · Parasitoids · Predatory flies · Spiders · True

321

Comparison of SVM RBF-NN and DT for crop and weed identification based on spectral measurement over corn fields  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

It is important to find an appropriate pattern-recognition method for in-field plant identification based on spectral measurement in order to classify the crop and weeds accurately. In this study, the method of Support Vector Machine (SVM) was evaluated and compared with two other methods, Decision ...

322

Field tests of interspecific resource-based competition among phytoplankton  

PubMed Central

The hypothesis that interspecific resource-based competition caused the spring and summer vertical segregation of phytoplankton species was tested in Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada). Two species (Cyclotella glomerata Bachmann and Synedra radians Kütz.) became dominant at different depth intervals (0-30 m and 60-90 m, respectively). Experimental transplants of assemblages between depths demonstrated asymmetrical competition. In the phosphate-limited region near the surface, growth of S. radians declined in the presence of C. glomerata. However, growth of C. glomerata was not affected by the presence of S. radians in the light-limited region at depth. This study provides field verification of resource-based competition theory. Images PMID:16593853

Carney, Heath J.

1987-01-01

323

Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

2012-01-01

324

76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...an unlicensed Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. The environmental assessment, which is...Inc. Product: Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. Field Test Locations: North...

2011-12-28

325

78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment, which is...Inc. Product: Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations:...

2013-05-21

326

78 FR 30899 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Collection Activities; Comment Request; NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies System...records. Title of Collection: NCES Cognitive, Pilot, and Field Test Studies System...of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory activities, pilot...

2013-05-23

327

Comparative evaluation of three immunochromatographic identification tests for culture confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex  

PubMed Central

Background The rapid identification of acid-fast bacilli recovered from patient specimens as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) is critically important for accurate diagnosis and treatment. A thin-layer immunochromatographic (TLC) assay using anti-MPB64 or anti-MPT64 monoclonal antibodies was developed to discriminate between MTC and non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM). Capilia TB-Neo, which is the improved version of Capilia TB, is recently developed and needs to be evaluated. Methods Capilia TB-Neo was evaluated by using reference strains including 96 Mycobacterium species (4 MTC and 92 NTM) and 3 other bacterial genera, and clinical isolates (500 MTC and 90 NTM isolates). M. tuberculosis isolates tested negative by Capilia TB-Neo were sequenced for mpt64 gene. Results Capilia TB-Neo showed 100% agreement to a subset of reference strains. Non-specific reaction to M. marinum was not observed. The sensitivity and specificity of Capilia TB-Neo to the clinical isolates were 99.4% (99.6% for M. tuberculosis, excluding M. bovis BCG) for clinical MTC isolates and 100% for NTM isolates tested, respectively. Two M. tuberculosis isolates tested negative by Capilia TB-Neo: one harbored a 63-bp deletion in the mpt64 gene and the other possessed a 3,659-bp deletion from Rv1977 to Rv1981c, a region including the entire mpt64 gene. Conclusions Capilia TB-Neo is a simple, rapid and highly sensitive test for identifying MTC, and showed better specificity than Capilia TB. However, Capilia TB-Neo still showed false-negative results with mpt64 mutations. The limitation should be recognized for clinical use. PMID:24484470

2014-01-01

328

An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

Twissell, Adrian

2011-01-01

329

Identification of a Loan Supply Function: A Cross-Country Test for the Existence of a Bank Lending Channel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the theoretical predictions of the Bernanke-Blinder (1988) model, we seek to examine the existence of a bank lending channel through the empirical identification of a loan supply function and to assess the impact of differential bank characteristics on banks’ ability to supply loans. To this end, we estimate a loan supply model and test for the restrictions implied by

Sophocles N. Brissimis; Matthaios D. Delis

2007-01-01

330

Applicability of subchronic toxicity test with Hyalella azteca for toxicity identification evaluation programs  

SciTech Connect

A series of screening tests including the short-term chronic exposure of Ceriodaphnia dubia to sediment pore waters, 10-day exposures of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to bulk sediments and a bioaccumulation study with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment of Plow Shop Pond, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Chronic endpoints such as reproduction and growth indicated sediment toxicity, however, a toxicity identification evaluation program was initiated to further define the source and extent of the toxicity. A short-term chronic exposure with C. dubia was a logical choice for the TIE, however, since amphipods are epibenthic organisms, they are a better surrogate of sediment dwelling organisms than a water column species such as C. dubia. Observations performed during H. azteca culture suggested that this species of amphipod could thrive in the water column for up to three weeks. Therefore, 7-day old H. azteca were exposed to pore water samples under static-renewal conditions for 10 days. Survival and growth (i.e., dry weight) were determined at the termination of each exposure. Laboratory control group performance consistently averaged a {>=}90% survival and {>=}43 {micro}g of dry weight per amphipod. Growth of amphipods used in each exposure generally exceeded two times the initial body weight after 10 days of exposure. Previous studies have indicated that the growth and reproductive response of H. azteca are positively correlated for a given set of exposure conditions. The results of these 10-day subchronic exposures with H. azteca provide a consistent and reliable measure of the chronic sediment toxicity with a benthic invertebrate for toxicity identification evaluation programs.

Putt, A.E.; Jop, K.M. [Springborn Labs., Wareham, MA (United States)

1995-12-31

331

[Identification of susceptibility gene for pig umbilical hernia in different populations using transmission disequilibrium test].  

PubMed

A genome-wide scan for pig umbilical hernia (UH) was performed in a White Duroc × Erhualian resource population reported by our previously study, which detected two susceptibility microsatellite markers (SWR1928 on SSC7 and SW830 on SSC10) significantly affecting pig UH. Herein, fine mapping studies and identification of susceptibility genes for UH were performed in two different populations. A total of 40 SNPs in 12 positional candidate genes located on the two significant segments were genotyped in the F2/F3 resource population. Quality control of the genotype data and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) were conducted using Plink v1.07 software. The results showed that g.708G>A in IL16 (interleukin 16) gene and g.10664G>A in CDC73 (cell division cycle 73) gene were significantly associated with pig UH. These two prominent SNPs and another two weakly associated SNPs g.10546A>G and g.10811A>G in CDC73 were also undergone the replication TDT test in the outbred commercial populations. All SNPs in the CDC73 gene were confirmed to be significantly associated with pig UH (P<0.05), including g. 10546A>G and g.10811A>G with extreme significant level (P<0.01). Based on these results, CDC73 should be a susceptibility gene for pig UH according to its biological functions and the molecular pathogenesis of UH. PMID:25406247

Su, Ying; Long, Yi; Ruan, Guorong; Wu, Lihua; Zhang, Zhiyan; Xiao, Shijun; Deng, Weiyun; Lv, Xianshan; Hu, Dou; Wu, Guozao; Shen, Huqun; Liao, Xinjun; Ding, Nengshui; Huang, Lusheng

2014-10-01

332

Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.  

PubMed

Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application. PMID:25446515

Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

2015-02-01

333

Reliability and field testing of distributed strain and temperature sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distributed fiber optic sensing presents unique features that have no match in conventional sensing techniques. The ability to measure temperatures and strain at thousands of points along a single fiber is particularly interesting for the monitoring of large structures such as pipelines, flow lines, oil wells, dams and dikes. Sensing systems based on Brillouin and Raman scattering have been used for example to detect pipeline leakages, verify pipeline operational parameters, prevent failure of pipelines installed in landslide areas, optimize oil production from wells and detect hot-spots in high-power cables. The measurement instruments have been vastly improved in terms of spatial, temperature and strain resolution, distance range, measurement time, data processing and system cost. Analyzers for Brillouin and Raman scattering are now commercially available and offer reliable operation in field conditions. New application opportunities have however demonstrated that the design and production of sensing cables is a critical element for the success of any distributed sensing instrumentation project. Although standard telecommunication cables can be effectively used for sensing ordinary temperatures, monitoring high and low temperatures or distributed strain present unique challenges that require specific cable designs. This contribution presents three cable designs for high-temperature sensing, strain sensing and combined strain and temperature monitoring as well as the respective testing procedures during production and in the field.

Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko

2006-03-01

334

Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

Montgomery, Jim

2012-01-01

335

Detection and identification of microorganisms using a combined flow field-flow fractionation/spectroscopy technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This doctoral project is focused on the implementation of a novel micron and sub-micron particle characterization technology for in-situ, continuous monitoring and detecting of microorganisms in water. The particle technology is based on simultaneous characterizing the joint particle property distribution (size, shape, and chemical composition) through the combined fractionation/separation and light scattering detection and interpretation techniques. Over more than a decade, field-flow fractionation (FFF) has shown to be well-suited for the separation and/or selection of bacteria (Giddings, 1993). As the most universal fractionation technique among the FFF family, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) has been chosen as the separation device in this research. The multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometer and the UV-vis/liquid core optical waveguide constitute the primary on-line light scattering detection system. The angular spectra obtained by the MALLS photometer provided information on the shape of microorganism; the multi-wavelength transmission spectra of microorganisms contain quantitative information on their size, number, shape, chemical composition and internal structure, which are essential for identification and classification of microorganisms. Both experimental results and the theoretical prediction have revealed that the particle size resolution capabilities of the FFFF fractionation system coupled with the sensitivity of the laser light scattering to particle shape, and the sensitivity of the UV-vis spectra to cell size, shape, cell orientation and chemical composition offer an integrated system for the identification and classification of microorganisms. The ability to discriminate between cell species was demonstrated by the light scattering and absorption interpretation model, which is based on light scattering theory (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation), spectral deconvolution techniques, and on the approximation of the frequency dependent optical properties of the basic constituents of microorganisms. It is further demonstrated that the combined multi-angle light scattering and multi-wavelength transmission spectroscopic technique can provide reliable information on the cell size, cell count, shape, cell alignment, chemical composition and basic understanding of the light scattering origins within the cell. Advances in the development of miniaturized spectrometers and the micromachined field-flow fractionation technique increase the potential of this method as a candidate for a rapid, reliable and efficient biosensor.

Fu, Xiaojuan

336

Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of gram-negative bacilli from blood cultures by the AutoMicrobic system.  

PubMed Central

A procedure was developed which allows direct identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of fermentative and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli from positive blood cultures. A 10-ml sample was removed from turbid blood culture bottles, and the bacteria were washed and concentrated by centrifugation. The bacterial pellet was used to inoculate an Enterobacteriaceae Plus Identification Card and a Gram-Negative General Susceptibility Card of the AutoMicrobic system. Results with these cards were compared with results obtained with standard technique for 196 blood cultures seeded with recent clinical isolates. Identification of most cultures was available in 8 h, whereas the antimicrobial susceptibility results were available in an average of 4.7 h for all organisms. Direct identification was correct for 95% of the cultures, whereas the antimicrobial susceptibility data had an average agreement of 87% with 3.8% very major and 1.4% major errors. In using this procedure it was possible to provide accurate preliminary identification and results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests for gram-negative bacilli on the same day that a blood culture was determined to be positive. PMID:7016914

Moore, D F; Hamada, S S; Marso, E; Martin, W J

1981-01-01

337

Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs  

PubMed Central

Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

2012-01-01

338

Field tracer-transport tests in unsaturated fractured tuff.  

PubMed

This paper presents the results of a field investigation in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, NV. This investigation included a series of tests during which tracer-laced water was released into a high-permeability zone within a horizontal injection borehole. The tracer concentration was monitored in the seepage collected in an excavated slot about 1.6 m below the borehole. Results showed significant variability in the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix. Analyses of the breakthrough curves suggest that flow and transport pathways are dynamic, rather than fixed, and related to liquid-release rates. Under high release rates, fractures acted as the predominant flow pathways, with limited fracture-matrix interaction. Under low release rates, fracture flow was comparatively less dominant, with a noticeable contribution from matrix flow. Observations of tracer concentrations rebounding in seepage water, following an interruption of flow, provided evidence of mass exchange between the fast-flowing fractures and slow- or non-flowing regions. The tests also showed the applicability of fluorinated benzoate tracers in situations where multiple tracers of similar physical properties are warranted. PMID:11530924

Hu, Q; Salve, R; Stringfellow, W T; Wang, J S

2001-09-01

339

Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

1997-02-01

340

Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

1993-10-01

341

Comparison of the QuadFERM+ 2-hr identification system with conventional carbohydrate degradation tests for confirmatory identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.  

PubMed

The QuadFERM+ (Analytab Products, Plainview, NY) rapid identification system was evaluated for its ability to identify correctly Neisseria gonorhoeae isolates from specimens obtained at a sexually transmitted disease clinic. One hundred eighty-five isolates (115 N. gonorrhoeae, 45 Neisseria meningitidis, 16 Neisseria species, and nine Branhamella catarrhalis; fresh isolates, frozen stock cultures, and cultures referred from local health agencies) were tested with the QuadFERM+ system and conventional biochemical tests. The two discrepant results were obtained with QuadFERM+, for a lactose-positive isolate of Neisseria sicca and a maltose-positive N. meningitidis. Both were negative by conventional sugar degradation tests. The N. sicca was negative when repeated in the QuadFERM+, and the N. meningitidis reverted from maltose-positive to maltose-negative after 3 hr. Twelve beta-lactamase positive organisms (six N. gonorrhoeae plus six B. catarrhalis) and 173 beta-lactamase-negative organisms showed 100% agreement between the acidometric QuadFERM+ beta-lactamase test and the conventional starch-iodine method. Thus the QuadFERM+ is a rapid and acceptable alternative for the identification of N. gonorrhoeae in a sexually transmitted disease clinic. PMID:2500720

Gradus, M S; Ng, C M; Silver, K J

1989-01-01

342

Draft for Peer Review and Field Testing 6-20-2009  

E-print Network

Draft for Peer Review and Field Testing 6-20-2009 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program DRAFT Islands Region U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;Draft for Peer Review and Field Testing 6-20-2009 Abstract;Draft for Peer Review and Field Testing 6-20-2009 Contents Preface

US Army Corps of Engineers

343

40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? ...whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards...for testing engines in the field. Use fuel meeting the specifications...has reached stable operating temperatures. For example, this...

2010-07-01

344

40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? ...whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards...for testing engines in the field. Use fuel meeting the specifications...has reached stable operating temperatures. For example, this...

2011-07-01

345

Field testing of the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System for drugs in oral fluid.  

PubMed

A preliminary field evaluation of a second-generation handheld oral fluid testing device, the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System (DDS2), is described. As part of a larger study, drivers were randomly stopped at various locations across California (in 2012) and asked to submit voluntarily to a questionnaire regarding their drug and alcohol use, a breath alcohol test and collection of oral fluid with the Quantisal device. The Quantisal-collected oral fluid samples were sent for laboratory-based analyses. At one location, 50 drivers were asked to submit an additional oral fluid sample using the DDS2 collection device; these samples were analyzed by using the DDS2 mobile test system. Thirty-eight donors (76%) provided specimens that were successfully run on the mobile system; in 12 cases (24%), the device failed to provide a valid result. Thirty-two of the 38 collected samples were negative for all drugs; five were positive for tetrahydrocannabinol and one was positive for methamphetamine using the mobile device. These results corresponded exactly with the laboratory-based results from the Quantisal oral fluid collection. PMID:23558436

Moore, Christine; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Lacey, John

2013-06-01

346

STRESS GERMINATION RING TEST WITH IIRB AND FIELD VALIDATION IN MICHIGAN  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This test was conducted to validate field emergence on lines selected by European breeding companies for a ‘ring test’ to evaluate the water germination stress test developed at East Lansing for predicting relative field emergence. Water and hydrogen peroxide germination tests were conducted prior t...

347

COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

348

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31

349

Routine testing of magnetic field homogeneity on clinical MRI systems  

SciTech Connect

Poor main magnetic field (B{sub 0}) homogeneity (H{sub B}) leads to artifacts and signal losses in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The American College of Radiology's MRI quality control manual mandates annual checks of H{sub B}, suggesting tests using spectral linewidth and phase-difference ({delta}{phi}) maps. A new method, the bandwidth-difference ({delta}BW) method, which compares the distortion for small and large BW acquisitions to determine the H{sub B}, is proposed. The {delta}BW method has the advantage that it can be used to measure multiple diameters of spherical volumes (DSV) in a single phantom. A phantom has been developed to exploit this method and results obtained with it are compared to those using three standard methods. Small receiver BW in the presence of poor H{sub B} leads to geometric distortions because gradients are reduced to the level of the B{sub 0} inhomogeneities. Data were acquired using seven MRI systems from different manufacturers, ranging in field strength from 0.2 to 3.0 T. Fast gradient echo pulse sequences were scanned twice using small and large BWs. H{sub B} was measured from the shift of landmarks between the two BW acquisitions. Results were compared with data from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) method, the {delta}{phi} method and one manufacturer's resonant frequency mapping data. The FWHM method was available on two systems and the {delta}{phi} method was available on one. The {delta}BW method could be performed in all scanners investigated. The H{sub B} measured ranged 0.11-0.32 ppm to 6.7-12.9 ppm for DSV of 13-22.6 cm. Direct comparisons of the data obtained using the {delta}BW method showed good agreement with data obtained using the FWHM method. Data obtained using the {delta}BW method compared favorably with the manufacturer's resonant frequency map. The {delta}BW method produces measurements of H{sub B} at various DSV values that can be obtained from a single set of phantom images. The accuracy of {delta}BW B{sub 0} homogeneity measurements are comparable to the other methods tested.

Chen, H.-H.; Boykin, Rex D.; Clarke, Geoffrey D.; Gao, J.-H.T.; Roby, John W. III [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78284 (United States); Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78284 (United States)

2006-11-15

350

A comprehensive test method for reprogammable field programmable gate arrays  

E-print Network

the logic and interconnection resources are tested by the proposed method in a hierarchical manner. The proposed test method is divided into three parts of several programming steps each. Parts I and II of the proposed method test the interconnection...

Ashen, David Glen

1996-01-01

351

The killing field of Khao Lak: forensic odontology in Thailand tsunami victim identification.  

PubMed

Forensic odontology is the science of dental identification. This paper describes the contribution of forensic odontology to tsunami victim identification in Thailand, with particular reference to the Singaporean victims. Thirteen Singaporeans were reported missing in Phuket following the Indian ocean tsunami on 26 December 2004. To date, 10 victims have been found and identified, eight of whom were identified by dental records. The author travelled twice to southern Thailand and spent 5 weeks there. First, in December 2004 as part of a Singapore Police Force Disaster Victim Identification team deployed in Khao Lak, and later in July 2005 at the Thai Tsunami Victim Identification Information Management Centre in Phuket. PMID:16438268

Tan, Peng-Hui

2005-12-01

352

A chi**2 test used for particle identification with the Hall A RICH detector at Jlab  

SciTech Connect

An algorithm, based on the ?2 test, employed for particle identification by RICH detectors, is described. This algorithm is independent and complementary to the traditional algorithm based on the comparison between the average of the measured Cherenkov angles and the expected Cherenkov angles of the photons generated in the RICH by the particle to be identified. On the other hand it is much simpler and faster than a full likelihood analysis of the full event pattern. The particle rejection ratios achievable with the combined use of this algorithm and the algorithm based on the comparison between the average and the expected Cherenkov angles are very high. The algorithm also allows one to identify noise easily. The application of the algorithm is shown for the Hall A RICH detector in the E94-107 experiment at JLab. In this experiment an enormous background made up of pions and protons is 30 000 times bigger than the signal and had to be identified and rejected in order to extract the kaons from the electroproduction of hypernuclei.

Urciuoli, G M; Cusanno, F; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Iodice, M; Lagamba, L; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S

2009-12-01

353

Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter  

SciTech Connect

A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

1999-07-01

354

The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform  

SciTech Connect

Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

Rossabi, J.

1993-03-05

355

Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.  

PubMed

Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions. PMID:24364681

Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

2014-06-01

356

Improved adaptive Markov random field based super-resolution mapping for mangrove tree identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditionally, forest tree crowns are extracted using airborne or spaceborne hyper-/multi-spectral remotely sensed images or pansharpened images. However, these medium/low spatial resolution images suffer from the mixed pixel problem, and the cost to collect very high resolution image collection is high. Moreover, existing feature extraction techniques cannot extract local patterns from medium/low resolution images. Therefore, super-resolution mapping (SRM) techniques, which generate land-cover maps with finer spatial resolution than the original remotely sensed image, can be beneficial for the extraction of forest trees. The SRM methods can improve the quality of information extraction by combining spectral information and spatial context into image classification problems. In this paper we have improved an adaptive Markov random field approach for super-resolution mapping (MRF-SRM) based on spatially adaptive MRF-SPM to overcome the limitation of equal covariance matrices assumption for all classes. We applied the developed method for mangrove tree identification from multispectral image recorded by QuickBird satellite, where we generated a super-resolution map with the panchromatic image spatial resolution of 0.6 m. Moreover, the performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by employing the simulated image with different covariance matrices for each class. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the new adaptive MRF-SRM method has increased the overall accuracy by 5.1% and the termination conditions of this method were satisfied three times faster when compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

Aghighi, H.; Trinder, J.; Lim, S.; Tarabalka, Y.

2014-11-01

357

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

358

Identification of human semenogelin in membrane strip test as an alternative method for the detection of semen.  

PubMed

Semenogelin (Sg), a protein originating in the seminal vesicles and a substrate for prostate specific antigen (PSA or p30), is a useful marker for the identification of semen. And detection of Sg has been available commercially in a membrane test recently. PSA is commonly used to detect semen in forensic significant samples taken from sexual assault cases. The strip PSA test has been available commercially from various manufacturers for many years. In this study, we evaluated two immunochromatographic membrane tests, one for Sg and the other for PSA by analyzing human semen, other human bodily fluids/materials including urine, blood, saliva, sweat, breast milk, vaginal secretion and fecal materials, semen from various animals and forensic casework samples. The data demonstrate that both Sg and PSA strip tests provide rapid and sensitive method for identification of seminal plasma. These results show that the immunochromatographic method for Sg detection is useful for the identification of seminal plasma in forensic samples, an alternative to the method for PSA detection. PMID:16949235

Pang, B C M; Cheung, B K K

2007-06-14

359

Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing the thickness of the failure layer and the width of the possible failure are essential for the required barrier design parameter height and width. First results of the calculated drag coefficients of dynamic impact pressure measurements showed that the dynamic coefficient cw is much lower than 1.0 which is contradictory to most of existing dimensioning property protection guidelines. It appears to us that special adaptation to the system like smaller mesh sizes and special ground-barrier interface compared to normal rock-fall barriers and channelised debris flow barriers are necessary to improve the retention behavior of shallow landslide barriers. Detailed analysis of the friction coefficient in relationship with pore water pressure measurements gives interesting insights into the dynamic of fluid-solid mixed flows. Impact pressures dependencies on flow features are analyzed and discussed with respect to existing models and guidelines for shallow landslides.

Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

2010-05-01

360

Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

2009-01-01

361

Distribution and identification of proteolytic Bacillus spp. in paddy field soil under rice cultivation.  

PubMed

Proteolytic bacteria in paddy field soils under rice cultivation were characterized and enumerated using azocoll agar plates. Bacillus spp. were the proteolytic bacteria that were most frequently present, comprising 59% of the isolates. They were always the numerically dominant proteolytic bacteria isolated from three kinds of fertilizer treatments (yearly application of rice-straw compost and chemical fertilizer, yearly application of chemical fertilizer, and no fertilizer application) and at three different stages of rice development (vegetative growth stage, maximal tillering stage, and harvest stage). Of the 411 proteolytic bacteria isolated, 124 isolates had stronger proteolytic activity than others on the basis of gelatin liquefaction tests and most of them were Bacillus spp. (100% in 1989 and 92.4% in 1991). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus were the main bacteria of this group and Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus megaterium were also present. We conclude that these Bacillus spp. are the primary source of soil protease in these paddy fields. PMID:8364803

Watanabe, K; Hayano, K

1993-07-01

362

Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps  

E-print Network

., Copeland Corp., and Du Pont Fluoroproducts. In 1993 a field test was initiated to gain some experience with R-407C and POE lubricants. This paper reviews that testing and the results. FIELD TEST DESCRIPTION The main objectives of the field test were... the following: 1) validate R407C refrigerant and POE lubricant processing procedures for both the factory and the field, 2) monitor the installed units to assess compatibility of the refrigerant and lubricant with the system, 3) obtain input from the field...

Boyd, A.

1996-01-01

363

I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays  

E-print Network

's Configurations VIII 2-to-1 MUX's Configurations IX Test Vectors . 37 X Test Vectors for 4-to-1 MUX's Internal BFs 38 XI Test Vectors for 2-to-1 MUX's Internal BFs XII Contents of Memory Matrices 39 XIII Fault Coverage for External BFs XIV The XC4000 FPGA... Family XV Test Vectors for the 16-to-1 MUX 40 41 XVI MUX Configurations in RAM Mode Testing XVII Test Vectors for the 16x2 Edge-triggered Single-port RAM 48 XVIII Control Vectors for Each Submodule in an XC4000-type S Block (with blanchouts~ N: ly2...

Zhao, Lan

1997-01-01

364

The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

1998-01-01

365

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01

366

Uncertainty law in ambient modal identification---Part II: Implication and field verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a qualitative analysis of the uncertainty laws for the modal parameters identified in a Bayesian approach using ambient vibration data, based on the theory developed in the companion paper. The uncertainty laws are also appraised using field test data. The paper intends to provide insights for planning ambient vibration tests and managing the uncertainties of the identified modal parameters. Some typical questions that shall be addressed are: to estimate the damping ratio to within 30% of posterior coefficient of variation (c.o.v), what is the minimum data duration? Will deploying an additional accelerometer significantly improve the accuracy in damping (or frequency)? Answers to these questions based on this work can be found in the Conclusions. As the Bayesian approach allows full use of information in the data for given modeling assumptions, the uncertainty laws obtained in this work represent the lower limit of uncertainty (estimation error) that can be achieved by any method (Bayesian or non-Bayesian).

Au, Siu-Kui

2014-10-01

367

Field test of the in situ permeable ground water flow sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two in situ permeable flow sensors, recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories, were field tested at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site near College Station, Texas, The flow sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to quantify the magnitude and direction of ground water flow in three dimensions. Two aquifer pumping tests lasting eight and 13 days were used to field

Andrew S. Alden; Clyde L. Munster

1997-01-01

368

Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).  

PubMed

In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (? ? or ? ?) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

2014-07-01

369

49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR...testing must provide: (1) A complete description of the PTC system; (2) An operational...concepts document; (3) A complete description of the specific test procedures,...

2010-10-01

370

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification  

PubMed Central

Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-01-01

371

Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

1983-01-01

372

Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

373

VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX  

E-print Network

323 CHAPTER 17 VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX \\B E Van D A The Tennessee Energy Conservation In Housing (TECH) complex has been utilized since 1977 as a field test site for several novel and conventional heat pump systems for space conditioning and water heating. Systems tested

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

374

Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia  

PubMed Central

Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem® O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D’Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

2014-01-01

375

Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria agar and direct CAMP test provided sooner Listeria monocytogenes identification from neonatal bacteremia.  

PubMed

Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnant women and newborns is a cause for serious concern, and invasive disease outcome strongly depends on prompt antibiotic therapy. To provide sooner identification from neonatal bacteremia we performed a CAMP test directly on positive blood aliquots and inoculated the Liofilchem(®) O.A. Listeria chromogenic agar as well, thus providing a 24-h turn-around time for response. PMID:24695762

Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Argentieri, Angela Valentina; D'Antonio, Marianna; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; Fazii, Paolo

2014-01-01

376

MDAC heliostat field array wind tunnel test data summmary report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wind tunnel test of the MDAC heliostat configuration in a single heliostat, clustered heliostats and clustered heliostats with fence was performed. The tests were conducted at the Fluid Dynamics and Diffusion Laboratory of Colorado State University during February and March 1978. The purpose of the test was to experimentally evaluate the aerodynamic loadings associated with the air flow patterns

J. Xerikos; H. H. Tang

1978-01-01

377

COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF A FIELD TEST KIT FOR LEAD  

EPA Science Inventory

The Hach Lead-Trak(R) test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. onsidered were: perator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. nterferences tested were realistic levels off: a, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, C...

378

Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

2012-01-01

379

Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in the open water and during ice breaking. Continuous time-series of full mass spectra with a one minute time resolution were recorded throughout the campaign between August 2nd and September 7th 2008 running up to a net VOC data set of 745 hours. Over 370 mass peaks have been separated, about 340 show signal intensities above the 30 minute detection limit of ~3pptv. Additionally we analyzed samples from nine helicopter based soundings providing vertical VOC profiles up to 3000 m.a.s.l. The performance of the newly developed instrument will be discussed and ASCOS data will be shown. Acknowledgment: The ASCOS expedition was arranged by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and was an effort within the framework of SWEDARCTIC 2008. For more information on ASCOS see http://ascos.se/. We thank the ASCOS organizers - Caroline Leck and Michael Tjernström - all ASCOS participants, the SPRS and the Oden crew for the excellent team work and Armin Wisthaler for his assistance in planning and preparations. The TOF-MS system was funded by the University of Innsbruck (Uni Infrastruktur Programm). The development project was financially supported by the Austrian Research Funding Association (FFG). [1] Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes 1995, 149-150, 609-619. [2] Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A. Chemical Society Review 1998, 27, 347-375. [3] De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C. Mass Spectrometry Reviews 2007, 26, 223-257. [4] Goldstein, A. H.; Galbally, I. E. Environmental Science and Technology 2007, 41, 154-1521.

Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

2009-04-01

380

Simple and integrated detours: field tests with Columbian ground squirrels.  

PubMed

An internal representation of space offers flexibility to animals during orientation and allows execution of short cuts and detours. We tested the ability of 19 free-ranging Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus) to perform integrated detours that required travelling under- and aboveground. Squirrels were individually tested on their territories (2 tests) and in an arena (7 tests). During tests, animals could reach food by running aboveground and then through tunnels. For the territory tests, natural tunnels were available. For the arena tests, animals used artificial tunnels within a fenced-in part of the meadow. For the last arena test, tubes were placed aboveground replicating the underground structure. In this test animals were asked to make a simple detour, when the full path to the goal was visible. On their territories, 41% of squirrels performed detours. All animals reached the food in the arena. When choosing an arena detour, squirrels based their decision on the proximity of the burrow as well as on whether it led to food. On the last arena test, more squirrels performed correct detours on the first attempt compared to other tests. The results suggest that ground squirrels can perform simple and integrated detours, but animals perform better if the full path is visible. PMID:19396478

Nesterova, Anna Pavlovna; Hansen, Frank

2009-09-01

381

Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

2007-07-09

382

BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris Hodge

2008-03-01

383

Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?  

EPA Science Inventory

Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

384

The 1999 Silver Lake Marsokhod Field Test: Simulation of a Mars Rover Sample Return Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Mars Rover Sample Return mission was simulated in February, 1999 in the Mojave desert using the Marsokhod rover. The rover payload included a color stereo imager (0.3 mrad/pix resolution, 25 cm stereo baseline on pan and tilt platform at 150 cm height), three sets of navigation cameras (monochrome stereo 1 mrad/pix), a manipulator arm carrying a close-up camera, a Visible/Near Infrared spectrometer (0.35-2.5 micron wavelength range) boresighted with the left color camera. Also included in the simulation were simulated Descent Images, a Thermal Emission Spectrometer (8-14 micron wavelength range) and a simulation of the 2001 Surveyor Mission Robotic Arm Camera. A science team, with no prior knowledge of the test site, participated in the mission simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center for 3 weeks. Daily communication cycles transmitted 40 Mbits of data collected by the rover instruments. The rover mission simulated 16 sols on Mars, the rover traversed over 80 m, and acquired 2172 color images, 520 navigation images, 6 arm camera images, 238 NIR spectra, and 18 TIR spectra, for a total data volume of 1024 Mbits. Samples were collected and, subsequent to the field experiment, subjected to petrographic analyses. The science team used the data sets to derive a largely correct interpretation of the geology and mineralogy of the site. The synergism between imaging and spectral data sets in achieving correct and complete interpretations was strongly demonstrated by the experiment. The science team correctly identified a green layer and spectral signature of chlorophyll associated with chasmoendolithic biota in a rock at the field site and designated it for collection. This correct identification of a type of life form that could plausibly be found on Mars demonstrates that rover missions can play a significant role in the search for life on Mars.

Stoker, C. R.; Cabrol, N.

1999-09-01

385

Testing rates of planktonic versus benthic predation in the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predation is a major source of mortality for the eggs, embryos, and larvae of marine invertebrates. Many studies have measured rates of predation on the developmental stages of marine invertebrates in the lab, but few studies have estimated predation rates in the field. Field studies of predation on developmental stages have generally been limited to organisms in a single environment,

Jonathan D. Allen; Justin S. McAlister

2007-01-01

386

Comparisons among lead paint field screening test methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leaded paints are known to present a potential health risk if ingested. There are several field screening and laboratory methods to determine if walls are painted with lead-containing coatings. A common type of field screening method is a colorimetric chemical reaction with the painted surface which is intended to produce qualitative ‘yes\\/no’ results. This method results in some small damage

Gary Hutter; Diane Moshman

1995-01-01

387

A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work illustrates the efficiency of field spectroscopy for rapid identification of minerals in ore body, alteration zone and host rocks. The adopted procedure involves collection of field spectra, their processing for noise, spectral matching and spectral un-mixing with selected library end-members. Average weighted spectral similarity and effective peak matching techniques were used to draw end-members from library. Constrained linear mixture modelling technique was used to convolve end-member spectra. Linear mixture model was optimized based on root mean square error between field- and modelled-spectra. Estimated minerals and their abundances were subsequently compared with conventional procedures such as petrography, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence for accuracy assessment. The mineralized zone is found to contain azurite, galena, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, marcacite, gahnite, hematite, goethite, anglesite and malachite. The alteration zone contains chlorite, kaolinite, actinolite and mica. These mineral assemblages correlate well with the petrographic measurements ( R 2 = 0.89). Subsequently, the bulk chemistry of field samples was compared with spectroscopically derived cumulative weighted mineral chemistry and found to correlate well ( R 2 = 0.91-0.98) at excellent statistical significance levels (90-99%). From this study, it is evident that field spectroscopy can be effectively used for rapid mineral identification and abundance estimation.

Ramakrishnan, D.; Nithya, M.; Singh, K. D.; Bharti, Rishikesh

2013-02-01

388

Integration, alignment, testing, and field support of a multisensor system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phase of the development engineering life cycle in which the greatest risk traditionally emerges is that of integration and test, culminating in final acceptance. Attention is often paid to integration and test aspects too late to influence the earlier phases of the life cycle, where the seeds are sown for success or failure. This paper presents a strategy that

Stephen L. Hall

2004-01-01

389

Field Test of the Superconducting Gravimeter as a Hydrologic Sensor  

E-print Network

) employing a hollow niobium 0.0254 m spherical proof mass, with magnetic fields replacing the metal or quartz with predicted Earth tides. A full discussion of SG principles, develop- ment history, performance, and data

Scanlon, Bridget R.

390

Automated field testing of a track-type tractor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the design process, earthmoving manufacturers routinely subject machines to rigorous, long-term tests to ensure quality. Automating portions of the testing process can potentially reduce the cost and time to complete these tests. We present a system that guides a 175 horsepower track-type tractor (Caterpillar Model D6R XL) along a prescribed route, allowing simple tasks to be completed by the automated machine while more complex tasks, such as site clean up, are handled by an operator. Additionally, the machine can be operated manually or via remote control and observed over the internet using a remote supervisor program. We envision that safety would be handled using work procedures, multiple over-ride methods and a GPS fence. The current system can follow turns within a half meter and straight sections within a quarter meter. The controller hardware and software are integrated with existing on-board electronic modules and allow for portability. The current system successfully handles the challenges of a clutch-brake drive train and has the potential to improve control over test variables, lower testing costs and enable testing at higher speeds allowing for higher impact tests than a human operator can tolerate.

Taylor, Michael A.; Lay, Keith; Struble, Joshua; Allen, William; Subrt, Michael

2003-09-01

391

FIELD TESTING FOR RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF NEW CPV TECHNOLOGIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since early 2007 SolFocus has commissioned up to 25kW concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) generating capacity at several test sites. The goal of these sites is to conduct long-term durability tests in different climate zones to evaluate lifetime and climate acceleration factors. The Arizona site has proven critical to quickly identify material and operational failures difficult to detect in industry standard accelerated

Mark Spencer; Marc Finot

392

Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

2009-01-01

393

Female sex pheromone of Cystidia couaggaria couaggaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae): identification and field attraction.  

PubMed

The plum cankerworm moth, Cystidia couaggaria couaggaria (Geometridae: Ennominae), is a defoliator of Chinese plum trees (Prunus mume). The pheromone components of the female were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with an electro-antennographic (EAG) detector and GC coupled with mass spectrometry. The crude pheromone extract included several EAG-active components, i.e., trienyl, dienyl, and saturated hydrocarbons, with a C21-C25 straight chain. The characteristic mass spectra indicated the unsaturated hydrocarbons to be (3Z,6Z,9Z)-3,6,9-trienes and (6Z,9Z)-6,9-dienes. In the fields, mixtures of the synthetic C<21 and C<23 trienes in a ratio of 2:3 and 1:4 successfully attracted males of this diurnal species during daytime. While the male antennae responded to the C25 triene and saturated hydrocarbons, their synergistic effects were not observed on the male attraction in the fields. Addition of the C21 diene interestingly inhibited the activity of the triene mixture. Males of Cystidia truncangulata, a sympatric diurnal congener of C. c. couaggaria, showed similar EAG responses to the unsaturated hydrocarbons, but no C. truncangulata males were attracted by the lures tested for C. c. couaggaria males, indicating that the identified hydrocarbons comprised the species-specific pheromone of C. c. couaggaria females. PMID:22785473

Yamakawa, Rei; Takubo, Yoshiko; Ohbayashi, Kanako; Naka, Hideshi; Ando, Tetsu

2012-01-01

394

Identification of the intermediate hosts of Habronema microstoma and Habronema muscae under field conditions.  

PubMed

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay was used for the specific detection of Habronema microstoma and Habronema muscae (Nematoda, Spirurida) in order to identify the intermediate hosts of both nematode species under field conditions. A total of 1087 netted and 165 laboratory-bred flies were tested. Flies were identified as Musca domestica Linnaeus 1758, Musca autumnalis De Geer 1776, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus 1758), Haematobia titillans (De Geer 1907) and Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus 1758) (Muscidae). Genomic DNA was extracted from pools of fly heads, thoraces and abdomens, and 703 samples were subjected to a duplex two-step semi-nested PCR assay to specifically detect diagnostic regions within the ribosomal ITS2 sequence of both H. microstoma and H. muscae. Stomoxys calcitrans specimens were positive for H. microstoma DNA and M. domestica specimens were positive for H. muscae DNA. In particular, PCR-positive samples derived from both farm-netted and laboratory-bred flies. The present study represents the first evidence of the vectorial competence of different fly species as intermediate hosts of Habronema stomachworms under field conditions. We discuss the roles of S. calcitrans and M. domestica in transmitting H. microstoma and H. muscae. PMID:18816277

Traversa, D; Otranto, D; Iorio, R; Carluccio, A; Contri, A; Paoletti, B; Bartolini, R; Giangaspero, A

2008-09-01

395

Testing symmetries in effective models of higher derivative field theories  

SciTech Connect

Higher derivative field theories with interactions raise serious doubts about their validity due to severe energy instabilities. In many cases the implementation of a direct perturbation treatment to excise the dangerous negative-energies from a higher derivative field theory may lead to violations of Lorentz and other symmetries. In this work we study a perturbative formulation for higher derivative field theories that allows the construction of a low-energy effective field theory being a genuine perturbations over the ordinary-derivative theory and having a positive-defined Hamiltonian. We show that some discrete symmetries are recovered in the low-energy effective theory when the perturbative method to reduce the negative-energy degrees of freedom from the higher derivative theory is applied. In particular, we focus on the higher derivative Maxwell-Chern-Simons model which is a Lorentz invariant and parity-odd theory in 2+1 dimensions. The parity violation arises in the effective action of QED{sub 3} as a quantum correction from the massive fermionic sector. We obtain the effective field theory which remains Lorentz invariant, but parity invariant to the order considered in the perturbative expansion.

Reyes, C. Marat [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2009-11-15

396

Novel microtiter plate format for testing germ tube formation and proposal of a cost-effective scheme for yeast identification in a clinical laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The germ tube test is most widely used for presumptive identification of Candida albicans. Conventional testing is relatively time-consuming due to the hands-on time involved in preparing and viewing each isolate. In order to reduce workload and costs we have developed a novel microtiter plate test format that offers several advantages: (i) use of removable strips of microtiter wells placed

Heidrun Peltroche-Llacsahuanga; Antje Jenster; Rudolf Lütticken; Gerhard Haase

1999-01-01

397

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

2011-02-27

398

Testing chameleon theories with light propagating through a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

It was recently argued that the observed PVLAS anomaly can be explained by chameleon field theories in which large deviations from Newton's law can be avoided. Here we present the predictions for the dichroism and the birefringence induced in the vacuum by a magnetic field in these models. We show that chameleon particles behave very differently from standard axionlike particles (ALPs). We find that, unlike ALPs, the chameleon particles are confined within the experimental setup. As a consequence, the birefringence is always bigger than the dichroism in PVLAS-type experiments.

Brax, Philippe [Service de Physique Theorique CEA/DSM/SPhT, Unite de recherche associee au CNRS, CEA-Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Bruck, Carsten van de [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Davis, Anne-Christine [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge CB2 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16/19, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Shaw, Douglas [Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge CB2 0WA (United Kingdom)

2007-10-15

399

Identification of Sites Within a Monomeric Red Fluorescent Protein that Tolerate Peptide Insertion and Testing of  

E-print Network

. INTRODUCTION Engineered variants of fluorescent proteins (FPs) cloned from marine organisms of the phylumIdentification of Sites Within a Monomeric Red Fluorescent Protein that Tolerate Peptide Insertion fluorescent proteins (FPs) has dramatically expanded as an ever-increasing numbers of variants and homologs

Campbell, Robert E.

400

Multibar sawless lint cleaner: fiber quality analysis after 3rd year of field testing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

After two years of field testing a prototype spiked-tooth lint cleaner, the Multibar Sawless Lint Cleaner (MBSLC), a final year of field evaluation was conducted at commercial cotton gin in West Texas located approximately 30 miles Southwest of Lubbock, Texas.The cotton lint cleaner was tested in a ...

401

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-print Network

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

Stoffelen, Ad

402

Report on the Massachusetts Field Test of the Applied Communication Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to field test the Applied Communications curriculum, a curriculum intended for both vocational and comprehensive school students in the mid-50 percent of the school by class standing. The field test sought to determine if teachers found the materials effective in teaching communications skills to such a population, how…

Roper, John J.

403

Using Task Data for Recruitment of Workers in Ornamental Horticulture: Report of a Field Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field test of using task data for recruitment of horticulture workers is the final phase of a larger task analysis study of the ornamental horticulture industry in New York State. The field test is designed to obtain a realistic assessment of the potential of task checklists for recruitment, including: (1) employer acceptance attitudes toward…

Berkey, Arthur L.; Drake, William E.

404

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud brightening2  

E-print Network

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud radiation9 management approach to geoengineering the Earth's climate in order to offset10 anthropogenic deemed successful.17 18 19 20 Keywords: geoengineering, clouds, albedo, field test21 #12;1. Introduction

Wood, Robert

405

Identification of normal and pathological posterior inter-malleolar ligament with dedicated high-field vs low-field MRI. A pilot study  

PubMed Central

Summary Aim: the aim of the study was to determine an objective measure of detection of posterior inter-malleolar ligament (PIML) through a magnetic resonance (MRI) of the ankle with two dedicated scanners: high-field (1-Tesla: HMF) and low-field (0.2-Tesla: LMF). Methods: two-hundred subjects were randomly recruited for the study and then divided in two groups (HMF and LMF). We retrospectively evaluated the MRI of the ankle in the two groups of patients. PIML evaluation was performed globally and separately using different scan planes. Results: in HMF and LMF, the PIML was identified respectively in 55 and 11% of cases. PIML was classified as “indeterminate” in 28 and 57% of patients, and “absent” in 17 and 32% of patients. In HMF and LMF the isolated evaluation on the coronal, axial and sagittal planes allowed PIML identification respectively in 100 and 100%, 67.27 and 45.45%, 45.45 and 12.4% of cases. In 5 cases (4/5 of HMF) we also observed a posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) determined by the PIML, with ligament changes (5/5) and associated synovial reactions (1/5), and an arthroscopic confirmation was obtained in 3/5 cases. Conclusion: the presence of the PIML seems to be a possible cause of PAIS and the use of a high-field MR scanner seems optimal for its identification.

Sutera, Raffaello; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonino; Padulo, Johnny; Thomas, Ewan; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

2015-01-01

406

Heliostat field-array wind-tunnel test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of the wind loads produced by airflow patterns in and around certain configurations of model heliostat clusters are investigated. Clusters from a field array of heliostats were chosen so that representative wind flow patterns within typical arrays could be simulated. Two compact and three extended clusters were examined. In addition, some of the cluster configurations were modified by

J. E. Cermak; J. A. Peterka; A. Kareem

1978-01-01

407

Vegetative propagation of kura clover: a field-scale test  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Kura clover is a potentially valuable forage legume, but it has been underutilized. A major reason is the difficulty of establishing it from seed. Since kura is rhizomatous, there have been attempts to propagate it vegetatively, but no reports of success at the field scale. Two harvesting methods we...

408

CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

409

Field tests with a molluscicide containing iron phosphate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of slug pellets containing iron phosphate was evaluated in field trials. In comparison with untreated controls, iron phosphate reduced leaf loss of lettuce, increased the number of marketable lettuce heads and reduced numbers of the slug Arion lusitanicus. The reference treatment metaldehyde was more effective in preventing slug damage and reduced numbers of all slug species present (A.

B. Speiser; C. Kistler

2002-01-01

410

A field test of recursive calculation of crop evapotranspiration  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Numerous methods to calculate the evapotranspiration (ET) rate from field crops have been proposed, but few have convincingly demonstrated to be usefully accurate. The direct measurement of ET requires weighable lysimeters. However, the use of a surface energy balance to calculate ET requires a corr...

411

Laboratory and Field Tests of Ultrasonic Sensors for Precision Sprayers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Reliable function of sensors under rough field conditions is required for the development of variable-rate sprayers to deliver pest control agents to tree liners in ornamental nurseries. Two ultrasonic sensors were examined to identify how their durability and detection stability would be influenced...

412

FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER  

EPA Science Inventory

This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

413

Identification of a nonlinear groundwater flow at a slug test in fractured rock and its influence on the test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many laboratory and numerical studies reported that a groundwater flow through a fracture at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers does not obey the cubic law which assumes a linear relation between the hydraulic gradient and the flux. Most of them observed that the transitions from a linear to nonlinear flow arose at the Reynolds numbers greater than 10. A slug test is one of the common hydraulic tests, and used for estimation of the hydraulic properties of an aquifer by analyzing the recovery after a sudden change in hydraulic pressure. In this study, we conducted a series of slug tests with various initial head displacements at an experimental borehole at KAERI's (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) underground research tunnel whose host rock is Jurassic granite. The Reynolds number at a fracture during slug tests was calculated using the geophysical logging data and slug test results, and the nonlinear flow regime at slug tests was identified. From changes in the Reynolds number during the tests and estimates of the hydraulic properties from the tests, the influence of a nonlinear flow on a slug test was discussed. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity of groundwater flow at a slug test became more severe and the estimated hydraulic conductivity decreased as the initial head displacement increased.

Ji, S.; Koh, Y.

2013-12-01

414

EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application  

EPA Science Inventory

Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station?s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology?s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

415

Robert's Rules for Optimal Learning: Model Development, Field Testing, Implications!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The value of accelerated learning techniques developed by the national organization for Suggestive Accelerated Learning Techniques (SALT) was tested in a study using Administrative Policy students taking the capstone course in the Eastern Washington University School of Business. Educators have linked the brain and how it functions to various…

McGinty, Robert L.

416

A NATIONWIDE FIELD TEST OF PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) subgroup of the RTDF (Remediation Technologies Develop- ment Forum) Phytoremediation Action Team has initiated a collaborative trial to test the use of vegetation to enhance treatment of surface soils contaminated with weathered petroleum hydrocarbons. Collaborators include PERF (Petroleum Environmental Research Forum), USEPA, DOD, major petroleum and energy corpora- tions, environmental consultants, and university participants. Petroleum

P. A. Kulakow; L. Erickson

417

A focused-field eddy current sensor for nondestructive testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

An original structure of an eddy current sensor meant for nondestructive testing of electrically conducting materials is presented. The basic physical principles of the sensors are recalled, and the fact that it is generally impossible to design a sensor with good spatial resolution and good range detection is discussed. An original idea is proposed, which consists of exploiting the good

Dominique Placko; Isabelle Dufour

1993-01-01

418

TESTS OF THE DUAL DIFFERENTIAL RADIOMETER UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A dual differential radiometer was tested on numerous eastern United States lakes and reservoirs. Remotely sensed data were compared with ground-truth chlorophyll a values. Results indicate that the instrument has only limited application in the remote sensing of chlorophyll a in...

419

Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

2007-01-01

420

A test rig for the identification of rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film bearings  

E-print Network

A test rig and measurement procedure to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of generic fluid film bearing elements are described. The test apparatus allows the exchange of test articles without modifications to the basic design of the machine...

Robison, Lewis Miller

1995-01-01

421

Identification of heat source fields from infra-red thermography: Determination of  

E-print Network

-red thermography, a quantitative analysis of heat dissipation sources is proposed via the thermomechanical modeling, source identification, fatigue, self-heating. 2 #12;1 Introduction The measurement and analysis- tion is required. In the present paper, an analysis of the intrinsic dissipation during cyclic loadings

422

MAGNETIC FIELD AND FORCE IDENTIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL MAGNETS FOR BUILDING ELECTROMAGNETIC SHAKERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification process of dynamic systems requires that the system be excited, and the vibration response be measured. Regarding the excitation, it can be done by several means, being electrodynamic shakers and impact hammers the most common ones. Electromagnetic shakers, as excitation devices, present the advantages of not contacting the system (drawback of the electrodynamic shaker) and repeatability of force

André Luis Dias; Raphael E. R. Menuzzo

2008-01-01

423

An Alternative Approach to Specifying Test Electric Field Magnitude for Evaluation of Broadband LMR Antennas  

E-print Network

An Alternative Approach to Specifying Test Electric Field Magnitude for Evaluation of Broadband LMR the disadvantage that the magnitude of the applied electric field is determined by the performance at the nominal field magnitude that is not associated with an arbitrarily-determined frequency. In this report, we

Ellingson, Steven W.

424

Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

2012-01-01

425

Identification and field evaluation of grape shoot volatiles attractive to female grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana).  

PubMed

Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography coupled with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) were used to identify volatile compounds from shoots of riverbank grape (Vitis riparia) that attract the female grape berry moth (GBM, Paralobesia viteana). Consistent EAD activity was obtained for 11 chemicals: (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate, (E)-linalool oxide, (Z)-linalool oxide, nonanal, linalool, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, methyl salicylate, decanal, beta-caryophyllene, germacrene-D, and alpha-farnesene. In flight-tunnel tests that involved female GBM and rubber septa loaded with subsets of these 11 compounds, we found that both the 11-component blend and a seven-component blend, composed of (E)-linalool oxide, (Z)-linalool oxide, nonanal, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, decanal, beta-caryophyllene and germacrene-D, elicited equivalent levels of upwind flight as freshly cut grape shoots. The removal of any of the seven compounds from the seven-component blend resulted in a significant decrease in female upwind flight responses. In a field trial with these two synthetic blends, traps equipped with either blend captured more female GBM compared to traps baited with hexane only (control), although the number of females caught was generally low. There were no differences in the number of males captured among treatments. Although in flight-tunnel trials, moths readily flew upwind to both grape shoots and rubber septa loaded with the best lures, they landed on shoots but not on rubber septa. Coupled with relatively low field catches, this suggests that additional host finding cues need to be identified to improve trap efficacy. PMID:18649104

Cha, Dong H; Nojima, Satoshi; Hesler, Stephen P; Zhang, Aijun; Linn, Charles E; Roelofs, Wendell L; Loeb, Gregory M

2008-09-01

426

Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

Wilson, A. H.

1979-01-01

427

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01

428

Rock tests in nonuniform fields of tensile stresses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents experimental data on the strength of samples tested for bending and diametrically compressed core-shaped samples with a central hole. The obtained strengths of the samples are compared with the strength of samples under uniaxial tension using nonlocal strength criteria. It is shown that the calculated and measured strengths of the rock samples are in good agreement with each other when using a common approach to strength evaluation based on the Neuber-Novozhilov integral fracture criterion.

Efimov, V. P.

2013-09-01

429

Results of the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers: CATSI and AIRIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the US (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

2002-08-01

430

Results from the Pronghorn field test using passive infrared spectroradiometers-CATSI and AIRIS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pronghorn Field Tests were held at the Nevada Test Site for a two-week period in June 2001. Two passive infrared sensors were tested for inclusion into the Joint Service Wide Area Detection Program. The Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS) and Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (CATSI) systems were tested with good results. This field test was a joint effort between the U.S (SBCCOM) and Canada (DREV). Various chemicals were detected and quantified from a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Passive ranging of Chemical Plumes was demonstrated.

Jensen, James O.; Theriault, Jean-Marc; Bradette, Claude; Gittins, Christopher M.; Marinelli, William J.

2002-02-01

431

Pressure-interference testing of the Sumikawa geothermal field  

SciTech Connect

Pressure interference tests have been used to determine the permeability structure of the Sumikawa reservoir. Interference tests between wells S-4 and KY-1 have indicated the presence of a very high permeability (140 md) north-south channel in the altered andesite layer. Pressure buildup data from well SN-7D have provided indications of a high transmissivity (kh {approx} 18 darcy-meters) reservoir located in the granodiorite layer, lack of pressure response in nearby shutin Sumikawa wells implies that the reservoir penetrated by SN-7D is isolated from the shallower reservoir in the altered andesites. The ''altered andesite'' and the ''granodiorite'' formations constitute the principal geothermal aquifers at Sumikawa. Pressure interference tests (wells KY-1 and SB-2, and wells KY-2 and SB-3) have also confirmed the presence of moderately high transmissivity ({approx} 2 darcy-meters) dacitic layers in the ''marine-volcanic complex'' formation. Because of its low vertical permeability, the ''marine volcanic complex'' formation constitutes an attractive target for the reinjection of waste geothermal fluids.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Ariki, K.; Kawano, Y.

1991-01-01

432

Employment of the Large Coil Test Facility in toroidal field coil development  

SciTech Connect

The international Large Coil Task (LCT), involving EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, is developing competing concepts of superconducting toroidal field coils. Six different coils will be tested together in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF). All participants are collaborating in planning and will share all test data.

Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.; Miller, H.E.; Ryan, T.L.

1982-01-01

433

Field experiment on simple vehicle antenna system using geostationary test satellite  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a field experiment of simple developed antenna system for land vehicle use which was tested by use of the Japanese geostationary test satellite called the engineering test satellite-VIII (ETS-VIII). The antenna system was mounted in a vehicle is compact, light weight, and promising for low cost system. The antenna system was built by a planar array antenna

Basari; K. Saito; M. Takahashi; K. Ito

2009-01-01

434

Selection system efficiencies for computer simulated progeny test field designs in loblolly pine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six simulated progeny test field designs in combination with three within-family selection systems were tested on three loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) progeny test sites in southeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Arkansas, to compare genetic gains for the single trait, height. Residual deviations obtained by subtraction of family and plantation mean effects for each plantation were combined with simulated genetic effects

J. A. Loo-Dinkins; C. G. Tauer; C. C. Lambeth

1990-01-01

435

Measurements of the acoustic field on austenitic welds: a way to higher reliability in ultrasonic tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In nuclear power plants many of the welds in austenitic tubes have to be inspected by means of ultrasonic techniques. If component-identical test pieces are available, they are used to qualify the ultrasonic test technology. Acoustic field measurements on such test blocks give information whether the beam of the ultrasonic transducer reaches all critical parts of the weld region and

P Kemnitz; U Richter; H Klüber

1997-01-01

436

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

437

Usability evaluation for mobile device: a comparison of laboratory and field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Usability testing of mobile devices is an emerging area of research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. Guidelines had been established as to how usability tests should be conducted. However, there are limitations to the effectiveness of conventional usability tests, especially for mobile devices. Mobile devices typically are used in different situations, but current evaluation method cannot uncover problems in

Henry Been-lirn Duh; Gerald C. B. Tan; Vivian Hsueh-hua Chen

2006-01-01

438

FIELD TEST KIT FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL-BRINE EFFLUENTS FROM OFFSHORE DRILLING PLATFORMS  

EPA Science Inventory

This research program was initiated to evaluate test methods for characterizing oil-brine effluents from offshore oil production platforms and to package and deliver a field test kit for on-site oil-brine analyses. After an initial laboratory evaluation and selection of test meth...

439

Fit-climbing test: a field test for indoor rock climbing.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to develop an indoor rock-climbing test on an artificial wall (Fit-climbing test). Thirteen climbers (elite group [EG] = 6; recreational group [RG] = 7) performed the following tests: (a) familiarization in the Fit-climbing test, (b) the Fit-climbing test, and (c) a retest to evaluate the Fit-climbing test's reliability. Gas exchange, blood lactate concentration, handgrip strength, and heart rate were measured during the test. Oxygen uptake during the Fit-climbing test was not different between groups (EG = 8.4 ± 1.1 L; RG = 7.9 ± 1.5 L, p > 0.05). The EG performance (120 ± 7 movements) was statistically higher than the RG climbers' performance (78 ± 13 movements) during the Fit-climbing test. Consequently, the oxygen cost per movement during the Fit-climbing test of the EG was significantly lower than that of the RG (p < 0.05). Handgrip strength was higher in the EG when compared with that in the RG in both pre-Fit- and post-Fit-climbing test (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in any other variables analyzed during the Fit-climbing test (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the performance in the Fit-climbing test presented high reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97). Therefore, the performance during the Fit-climbing test may be an alternative to evaluate rock climbers because of its specificity and relation to oxygen cost per movement during climbing. PMID:21904243

Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Franchini, Emerson; Tricoli, Valmor; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Pires, Flávio De Oliveira; Okuno, Nilo M; Kiss, Maria A P D M

2012-06-01

440

Nonlinear parameter identification: Ballistic range experience applicable to flight testing. [using Gauss-Newton method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The parameter identification scheme being used is a differential correction least squares procedure (Gauss-Newton method). The position, orientation, and derivatives of these quantities with respect to the parameters of interest (i.e., sensitivity coefficients) are determined by digital integration of the equations of motion and the parametric differential equations. The application of this technique to three vastly different sets of data is used to illustrate the versatility of the method and to indicate some of the problems that still remain.

Chapman, G.; Kirk, D.

1974-01-01

441

Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated

Rajeswara Reddy Resapu

2009-01-01

442

First tests of a Micromegas TPC in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

Since the summer of 2003, a large Micromegas TPC prototype (1000 channels, 50 cm drift, 50 cm diameter) has been operated in a 2T superconducting magnet at Saclay. A description of this apparatus and first results from cosmic ray tests are presented. Additional measurements using simpler detectors with a laser source, an X-ray gun and radio-active sources are discussed. Drift velocity and gain measurements, electron attachment and aging studies for a Micromegas TPC are presented. In particular, using simulations and measurements, it is shown that an $Argon-CF_4$ mixture is optimal for operation at a future Linear Collider.

Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Lepeltier, V.; Ronan, M.

2004-12-10

443

Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour  

SciTech Connect

An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

1993-12-31

444

A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part I. Development of the technique and preliminary validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The first aim of this work is to develop and validate the technique in reverberating environments where the location and the quantification of each source are difficult by traditional techniques. The reverberant field is clearly challenging also for the proposed technique, affecting the achievable accuracy, mainly due to the fact that coherence between radiated and reverberated fields is often unknown and may be relevant. Secondly, the applicability of the method to real cases is demonstrated. A laboratory test case has been developed using a large wooden panel. The measurement is performed both in anechoic environment and under simulated reverberating conditions, for testing the ability of the selective intensity method to remove the reverberation.

Revel, G. M.; Martarelli, M.; Chiariotti, P.

2010-07-01

445

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

2003-01-01

446

SEURAT: Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing--recommendations for future research in the field of predictive toxicology.  

PubMed

The development of non-animal methodology to evaluate the potential for a chemical to cause systemic toxicity is one of the grand challenges of modern science. The European research programme SEURAT is active in this field and will conclude its first phase, SEURAT-1, in December 2015. Drawing on the experience gained in SEURAT-1 and appreciating international advancement in both basic and regulatory science, we reflect here on how SEURAT should evolve and propose that further research and development should be directed along two complementary and interconnecting work streams. The first work stream would focus on developing new 'paradigm' approaches for regulatory science. The goal here is the identification of 'critical biological targets' relevant for toxicity and to test their suitability to be used as anchors for predicting toxicity. The second work stream would focus on integration and application of new approach methods for hazard (and risk) assessment within the current regulatory 'paradigm', aiming for acceptance of animal-free testing strategies by regulatory authorities (i.e. translating scientific achievements into regulation). Components for both work streams are discussed and may provide a structure for a future research programme in the field of predictive toxicology. PMID:25433540

Daston, George; Knight, Derek J; Schwarz, Michael; Gocht, Tilman; Thomas, Russell S; Mahony, Catherine; Whelan, Maurice

2015-01-01

447

Analysis of field test data on residential heating and cooling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The computer program using field site data collected on 48 homes located in six cities in different climatic regions of the United States is discussed. In addition, a User's Guide was prepared for the computer program which is contained in a separate two-volume document entitled User's Guide for REAP: Residential Energy Analysis Program. Feasibility studies were conducted pertaining to potential improvements for REAP, including: the addition of an oil-furnace model; improving the infiltration subroutine; adding active and/or passive solar subroutines; incorporating a thermal energy storage model; and providing dual HVAC systems (e.g., heat pump-gas furnace). The purpose of REAP is to enable building designers and energy analysts to evaluate how such factors as building design, weather conditions, internal heat loads, and HVAC equipment performance, influence the energy requirements of residential buildings.

Talbert, S. G.

1980-12-01

448

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27

449

Detection and Identification of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Shigella spp. via PCR-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Isolate Testing and Analysis of Food Samples  

PubMed Central

An assay to identify the common food-borne pathogens Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Listeria monocytogenes was developed in collabor