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1

Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

2007-08-01

2

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

3

Evaluation of anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests for talent identification in female field hockey.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to develop an effective testing battery for female field hockey by using anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests to distinguish between regional representative (Rep, n = 35) and local club level (Club, n = 39) female field hockey players. Rep players were significantly leaner and recorded faster times for the 10-m and 40-m sprints as well as the Illinois Agility Run (with and without dribbling a hockey ball). Rep players also had greater aerobic and lower body muscular power and were more accurate in the shooting accuracy test, p < 0.05. No significant differences between groups were evident for height, body mass, speed decrement in 6 x 40-m repeated sprints, handgrip strength, or pushing speed. These results indicate that %BF, sprinting speed, agility, dribbling control, aerobic and muscular power, and shooting accuracy can distinguish between female field hockey players of varying standards. Therefore talent identification programs for female field hockey should include assessments of these physical parameters. PMID:12955867

Keogh, Justin W L; Weber, Clare L; Dalton, Carl T

2003-06-01

4

Multi-level slug tests in highly permeable formations: 2. Hydraulic conductivity identification, method verification, and field applications  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.

Zlotnik, V. A.; McGuire, V. L.

1998-01-01

5

Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

1986-01-01

6

Field testing an enzyme-linked synthetic oligonucleotide probe for identification of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis.  

PubMed

Tests were carried out in Kenya to determine whether the enzyme-linked synthetic oligonucleotide probe (pAna 1) developed for identifying species of the Anopheles gambiae complex could be used under field conditions. The An. arabiensis male-specific pAna 1 probe was able to identify all male larval instars and adult males. However, the non-radioactive assay was not sufficiently sensitive to identify male sperm DNA in all the mated female An. arabiensis. Although the ratio of An. arabiensis to An. gambiae s.s. identified with pAna 1 in males during the dry season was in agreement with the ratio in half-gravid females identified cytogenetically, the ratios were different during the wet season. This study demonstrates that the enzyme-linked DNA probe assay is applicable under field conditions. PMID:8122921

Githeko, A K; Service, M W; Atieli, F K; Hill, S M; Crampton, J M

1993-12-01

7

FIELD DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA's OHMSETT facility has developed a rapid field test that includes some of the theoretical aspects and conditions of dispersion at sea. This Field Dispersant Effectiveness Test (FDET) has been used to evaluate the dispersibility of various commonly-transported oils and mak...

8

LSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

Jaffe, P.

1979-01-01

9

Channel identification machines for multidimensional receptive fields  

PubMed Central

We present algorithms for identifying multidimensional receptive fields directly from spike trains produced by biophysically-grounded neuron models. We demonstrate that only the projection of a receptive field onto the input stimulus space may be perfectly identified and derive conditions under which this identification is possible. We also provide detailed examples of identification of neural circuits incorporating spatiotemporal and spectrotemporal receptive fields. PMID:25309413

Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

2014-01-01

10

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-print Network

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

11

Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

2009-01-01

12

RESOLVE 2010 Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

2010-01-01

13

Talent Identification in Track and Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Talent identification in most sports occurs through mass participation and the process of natural selection; track and field does not enjoy such widespread participation. This paper reports on a project undertaken for the following purposes: improve the means by which youth with the potential for high level performance can be identified; develop…

Henson, Phillip; And Others

14

On model structure testing in system identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In system identification it is assumed in many cases that the order of the system is known. Thus it is important to perform tests for determining the correct model order. For a single-input, single-output system the order is the only structural parameter, but for multivariable systems there are several structural parameters. It is in such cases not enough to test

T. Soderstrom

1977-01-01

15

FSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

1981-01-01

16

Subcritical flutter testing and system identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

Houbolt, J. C.

1974-01-01

17

LSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

Jaffe, P.

1980-01-01

18

Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System Based on Short-Term Electrostatic Field Variations at the Active Volcano Popocatepetl, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocatepetl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially- designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocatepetl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocatepetl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release and mass flux and (3) immediate risk assessment of ongoing volcanic eruptions using permanent sensors located on volcanoes with pyroclastic eruptions.

Berger, P.

2006-12-01

19

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01

20

FIELD TESTING AND CORRELATION OF LABORATORY AND FIELD TEST DATA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since World War II the Quartermaster Laboratories in the United States, as part of a broad test development programme, have continued investigations of the correlation between field and laboratory testing. As a result of these studies, several working correlations have been developed which have proved useful in predicting the probable performance of textile materials in use. Underlying the success achieved

W. E. MORTON; Louis I. Weiner; Stephen J. Kennedy

1953-01-01

21

The Smell Identification Test as a Measure of Olfactory Identification Ability in Schizophrenia and Healthy Populations  

E-print Network

The Smell Identification Test as a Measure of Olfactory Identification Ability in Schizophrenia University of Chicago Sohee Park Vanderbilt University This study examines University of Pennsylvania Smell of this task (Doty, Shaman, & Dann, 1984). The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT

Park, Sohee

22

Identification Friend, Foe or Neutral Joint Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Identification Friend, Foe, or Neutral (IFFN) Joint Test Force (JTF) located at Kirtland AFB, NM, has developed a testbed that is composed of high fidelity, real time man-in-the-loop simulators designed to replicate the NATO Central Region Integrated Air Defense System. The purpose of the test is to assess the ability of this air defense system to correctly identify and engage enemy aircraft. The testbed represents the largest real time command and control (C2) simulation which consists of 57 medium and high fidelity tactical consoles and over a million lines of code. The OSD-sponsored testbed development and test is scheduled to run through July 1989. After this the testbed will beome the Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility (TACCSF) operated by the USAF Tactical Air Warfare Center (TAWC). The facility will be used by both Army and Air Force commands to resolve joint operational issues and support test and evaluation of the NATO Air Command and Control System (ACCS).

Haile, James E.

1989-07-01

23

Extended field test on the use of visual ear tags and electronic boluses for the identification of different goat breeds in the United States.  

PubMed

A total of 295 goats from 4 breeds (Alpine, n = 74; Angora, n = 75; Boer-cross, n = 73; Spanish, n = 73) were used to assess the retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (B1, 20 g, n = 95; B2, 75 g, n = 100; and B3, 82 g, n = 100) according to breed and feeding conditions. Time for bolus administration, reading with a handheld reader, and animal data recording (goat identification, breed, and bolus type) were registered. Each goat was also identified with 1 flag-button plastic ear tag (4.6 g, 51 x 41 mm). Retention of boluses and ear tags was regularly monitored for 1 yr. Ruminal fluid in 5 goats from each breed and management group was obtained with an oro-ruminal probe at 2 h after feeding. Ruminal pH was measured at 24 h and at wk 1, 2, 3, and 4 and used as an indicator of feeding conditions on rumen environment. Time for bolus administration differed by bolus type (B1, 14 +/- 2 s; B2, 24 +/- 2 s; B3, 27 +/- 2 s; P < 0.05) and goat breed (Alpine, 34 +/- 3 s; Angora, 17 +/- 2 s; Boer-cross, 16 +/- 1 s; Spanish, 19 +/- 2 s; P < 0.05), although differences were due to greater times for B2 and B3 in Alpine goats. Time for bolus administration averaged 22 +/- 1 s, and overall time for bolusing, reading, and data typing was 49 +/- 1 s on average. Ruminal pH differed according to breed and feeding management (lactating Alpine, 6.50 +/- 0.07; yearling Alpine, 6.73 +/- 0.07; Angora, 6.34 +/- 0.06; Boer-cross, 6.62 +/- 0.04; Spanish, 6.32 +/- 0.08; P < 0.05), but no early bolus losses occurred; rumen pH did not differ according to bolus type (B1, 6.45 +/- 0.05; B2, 6.39 +/- 0.07; B3, 6.49 +/- 0.05; P > 0.05). At 6 mo, electronic boluses showed greater retention than ear tags (99.7 vs. 97.2%; P < 0.05). At 12 mo, bolus retention was 96.3, 100, and 97.8% for B1, B2, and B3, respectively, not differing between B1 and B3 (P = 0.562). No effect of breed and bolus type on bolus retention was detected. No goat losing, at the same time, both bolus and ear tag was observed. Ear tag retention (91.7%) was less (P < 0.05) than all types of bolus (98.1%) on average. Ear tag retention in Boer-cross (98.6%) and Alpine (96.9%) goats was greater (P < 0.05) than in Spanish (88.7%) and Angora (82.9%) and tended to differ (P = 0.095) between Spanish and Alpine. In conclusion, unlike flag-button visual ear tags and mini-boluses used here, properly designed boluses (e.g., standard bolus) met International Committee for Animal Recording and National Animal Identification System retention requirements for goat identification under US conditions and are recommended in practice. PMID:19329484

Carné, S; Gipson, T A; Rovai, M; Merkel, R C; Caja, G

2009-07-01

24

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life  

SciTech Connect

For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

Ahrens, J.S.

1997-05-01

25

Galaxy Merger Identification in the CANDELS GOODS-South Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyzed a catalog of 7,628 galaxies at 0field in order to identify a sample of galaxy mergers and interactions. Mergers are believed to play a fundamental role in galaxy evolution. Developing methods to robustly and efficiently identify mergers becomes vital as we look to higher redshifts. We explored merger identification based on visual morphology classification and preliminary attempts with automated methods. Using multiple detailed visual morphology classifications for each galaxy conducted by the CANDELS structure and morphology team, we created selection criteria to identify mergers from this visual classification catalog. We chose galaxies with high interaction classification and evidence of merger signatures (i.e. tidal features, double nuclei) to generate a catalog of 1051 galaxies we are confident are mergers. This represents a conservative sample of possible mergers. For comparison, we also tested automated merger identification techniques previously used for lower redshift (z<1) galaxies. This is one of the first large investigations of galaxy mergers at z>1. O’Leary was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

O'Leary, Erin M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

2013-01-01

26

Evaluation of Rapid Tests for the Identification of Mycobacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY. The use of eight rapid tests for the identification of 1307 strains of mycobacteria belonging to 18 species was evaluated. The standard niacin, nitrate-reductase and catalase tests were supplemented by new tests for the detection of fi glucosidase, urease, penicillinase, trehalase and cephalosporinase. This combination of eight rapid tests was not able to replace more conventional procedures but in

VERONIQUE LEVY-FREBAULT; JEANNINE GRANDRY; H. L. David

1982-01-01

27

Field Project: Fossil Collection, Identification, and Report Writing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The primary purposes of this exercise are to assemble a collection of fossils in the field, to gain experience in fossil identification, to interpret the mode of life and environment in which the organisms lived, and to present this in a written format . This exercise is designed to sharpen the observational skills that are steadily developed during lab and integrate them with lecture concepts.

Leslie, Steve

28

Rapid Color Test Identification System for Screening of Counterfeit Fluoroquinolone  

Microsoft Academic Search

The protocol of rapid identification system consists of three chemical color reactions; two group tests for fluoroquinolone class and a compound specific test each for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and sparfloxacin. The group color reactions are based on (a) Oxidizing behavior of quinolone and (b) Fluorine functional groups, both of which are characteristic of fluoroquinolone class. The compound specific

B K. SINGH; D V. PARWATE; S K. SHUKLA

29

A contribution to the identification of switched dynamical systems over finite fields  

E-print Network

A contribution to the identification of switched dynamical systems over finite fields Phuoc Vo Tan the identification for switched linear systems over finite fields. It is inspired from the procedure suggested in [4 of the identification procedure for the class of switched linear systems. Batch identification is considered

Boyer, Edmond

30

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-print Network

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

31

Testing two-field inflation  

SciTech Connect

We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and to constrain classes of two-field models using WMAP data. Using covariant formalism, we first develop a framework for understanding the background field kinematics and introduce a ''slow-turn'' approximation. Next, we find covariant expressions for the evolution of the adiabatic/curvature and entropy/isocurvature modes, and we discuss how the evolution of modes can be inferred mostly from the background kinematics and the geometry of the field manifold. From these expressions, we derive semianalytic formulas for the curvature, isocurvature, and cross spectra, and the standard spectral observables, all to second order in the slow-roll and slow-turn approximations. In tandem, we show how our covariant formalism provides useful intuition into how the general features of the inflationary Lagrangian translate into distinct features in the observable power spectra. In particular, we find that key features of the power spectra can be directly read off from the nature of the roll path, the curve the field vector rolls along with respect to the two-dimensional field manifold. For example, models whose roll path makes a sharp turn around 60 e-foldings before the end of inflation tend to be ruled out because they produce stronger departures from scale invariance than are allowed by the latest CMB observations. Finally, we apply our formalism to confront four classes of two-field models with WMAP data, including doubly quadratic and quartic potentials and nonstandard kinetic terms, showing how whether a model is ruled out or not depends not only on certain features of the inflationary Lagrangian, but also on the initial conditions. Ultimately, for a two-field model to be consistent with observations, we show that it must possess the right balance of certain kinematical and dynamical behaviors, which we reduce to a set of functions that represent the main characteristics of any two-field model of inflation.

Peterson, Courtney M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Tegmark, Max [Department of Physics and MIT Kavli Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-01-15

32

A Field Test of Black English Tests for Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The SCRDT Black English Tests for Teachers, a battery consisting of the Reading Pedagogy (RP) and History and Structure of Black English (HSBE) tests, was field tested to determine reliability of the tests; their intercorrelations; the relation of teacher characteristics (sex, age, place of birth, ethnicity, years of experience, attitudes, etc.)…

Politzer, Robert L.; Hoover, Mary R.

33

SNAP: an integral field spectrograph for supernova identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

A well-adapted spectrograph concept has been developed for the SNAP (SuperNova\\/Acceleration Probe) experiment. The goal is to ensure proper identification of Type Ia supernovae and to standardize the magnitude of each candidate by determining explosion parameters. An instrument based on an integral field method with the powerful concept of imager slicing has been designed and is presented in this paper.

Anne Ealet; Eric Prieto; Alain Bonissent; Roger Malina; G. Bernstein; Stephane Basa; Oliver Le Fèvre; Alain Mazure; Christophe Bonneville; Carl W. Akerlof; Greg Aldering; R. Amanullah; Pierre Astier; E. Barrelet; Christopher Bebek; Lars Bergstrom; John Bercovitz; Manfred Bester; C. R. Bower; William C. Carithers Jr.; Eugene D. Commins; C. Day; Susana E. Deustua; Richard S. DiGennaro; R. Ellis; Mikael Eriksson; Andrew Fruchter; Jean-Francois Genat; Gerson Goldhaber; Ariel Goobar; Donald E. Groom; Stewart E. Harris; Peter R. Harvey; Henry D. Heetderks; Steven E. Holland; Dragan Huterer; Armin Karcher; Alex G. Kim; William F. Kolbe; B. Krieger; R. Lafever; J. Lamoureux; Michael L. Lampton; Michael E. Levi; Daniel S. Levin; Eric V. Linder; Stewart C. Loken; R. Massey; Timothy McKay; Shawn P. McKee; Ramon Miquel; E. Moertsell; N. Mostek; Stuart Mufson; J. A. Musser; Peter E. Nugent; Hakeem M. Oluseyi; Reynald Pain; Nicholas P. Palaio; David H. Pankow; Saul Perlmutter; R. Pratt; Alexandre Refregier; J. Rhodes; Kem E. Robinson; N. Roe; Michael Sholl; Michael S. Schubnell; G. Smadja; George F. Smoot; Anthony Spadafora; Gregory Tarle; Andrew D. Tomasch; H. von der Lippe; D. Vincent; J.-P. Walder; Guobin Wang

2003-01-01

34

Field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes field testing and gives preliminary findings. Solidified ion exchange resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being field tested to develop a low-level waste data base and obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in martices

R. D. Rogers; J. W. McConnell; E. C. Davis; M. W. Findlay

1987-01-01

35

Field Test of Combination Seeding Flares  

E-print Network

2008 during the Polarimetric Cloud Analysis and Seeding Test 2 (POLCAST2) field project. Aircraft for cloud seeding and airborne measurements. For the 1 July 2008 flight, the Cessna 340 aircraft's flareField Test of Combination Seeding Flares Report to Ice Crystal Engineering 5985 49th St. SE

Delene, David J.

36

Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification  

E-print Network

The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

Tom, Jonathan

2010-04-27

37

The "Sniffin' Kids" Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children  

PubMed Central

Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years. PMID:24979650

Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

2014-01-01

38

Functional Test of Field Programmable Analog Arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work a strategy for testing analog networks, known as transient response analysis method, is applied to test the configurable analog blocks (CABs) of field programmable analog arrays (FPAAs). In this method the circuit under test (CUT) is programmed to implement first and second order blocks and the transient response of these blocks to known input stimuli is analyzed.

Tiago R. Balen; José Vicente Calvano; Marcelo Lubaszewski; Michel Renovell

2006-01-01

39

Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is

J. P. Zbasnik; D. N. Cornish; R. M. Scanlan; A. M. Jewell; R. L. Leber; A. R. Rosdahl; M. R. Chaplin

1980-01-01

40

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1)  

E-print Network

FIELD TESTING OF YOUNG BREEDING PIGS II. - THE ACCURACY OF FIELD TESTING (1) B. U. HOFSTRA D. MINKEMA Research Institute for Animal Husbandry « Schoonoovd », Dviebevgseweg IOd, Zeist, the Nethevlands SUMMARY The accuracy of the field test, for the individual selection of gilts and for the progeny tes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

41

A computational inverse method for identification of non-Gaussian random fields using the Bayesian  

E-print Network

A computational inverse method for identification of non-Gaussian random fields using the Bayesian an inverse stochastic problem must be solved to perform the identification of the random field. A complete This paper is devoted to the identification of Bayesian posteriors for the random coefficients of the high

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Testing Large Structures in the Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

2009-01-01

43

[Personality tests and gender identification in male transsexuals].  

PubMed

The aim of this research project was to study gender identification in male transsexuals compared to male and female controls, using the Rorschach test and the MMPI. In the international literature, many researches have shown that the nature of the human response on Rorschach card III is linked to gender identification, as is the MMPI Mf scale. Ten untreated male homosexual transsexuals and 18 treated and operated male homosexual transsexuals were compared to 10 male and 12 female controls regarding verbal IQ, human content on Rorschach card III and the MMPI Mf scale. Absence of hormonal treatment for the first group of transsexuals was checked by a blood test at the time of the psychological testing. Responses on Rorschach card III were scored according to different kinds of human contents: male (M), female (F), gender-unidentified/neutral (N), bisexual (B), feminine then masculine or the opposite (M/F), and nonhuman (NH). N, B, M/F and NH responses were rare in all Rorschach protocols. As expected, responses given by participants in the control group were significantly more consistent with their anatomical sex than with the opposite sex. Untreated transsexuals do not differ from treated and operated transsexuals on Rorschach data, and both transsexual groups give significantly more female human representations than male controls. Transsexuals' results are similar to female controls. Untreated transsexuals' mean score on the MMPI Mf scale is significantly higher than that of treated and operated transsexuals' score, in the male profile (biological sex). Both groups of transsexuals score higher on the Mf scale in the male profile than in the female profile. The mean Mf score in the male profile is significantly higher than that of male controls, whereas, in the female profile, the mean Mf score is similar to that of female controls. This study shows that for both groups of transsexuals, results are homogenous in respect of Rorschach and MMPI, showing hyper-conformism to self-perceived gender. Results in both groups are similar to results of female controls, but tend to show even more feminine gender identification. The absence of any significant difference between untreated and treated and operated transsexuals seems surprising, suggesting that the hormonal treatment has not had a major impact on gender identification processes. It would doubtless be interesting to study gender identification using even more kinds of data: all human contents in the Rorschach protocol (not just the responses given to card III), MMPI Mf scale, Draw-A-Person Test and Animal-and-Opposite Drawing Test. This would enhance result liability and could provide useful information about how gendter identification processes evolve after surgical sex reassigment. PMID:15971637

Coussinoux, S; Gallarda, T; Smith, J; Bourdel, M C; Cordier, B; Brémont, C; Poirier, M F; Haddou, M; Olié, J P

2005-01-01

44

Catalase Test asan AidtotheIdentification of Enterobacteriace ae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Itwas further notedthat a widevariety of methods exist fortheexecution ofthecatalase test, thatthere isno universally accepted strength specified forthehydrogen peroxide, andthat no gradations forthevigor andspeed ofthereaction havebeenmentioned. Underthecondi- tions oftheclinical laboratory, we havedeveloped a simple, rapid, andaccu- ratemethodforthecatalase testthathasbeenofgreatvalue as an aidinthe identification oftheEnterobacteriaceae. With3%H202,itwas observed that Serratia, Proteus, andProvidencia were vigorous catalase reactors. OnlySal- monella andrareEscherichia, Enterobacter, andKlebsiella isolates were

WELTON I. TAYLOR

1972-01-01

45

Skeletal identification by radiographic comparison: blind tests of a morphoscopic method using antemortem chest radiographs.  

PubMed

This study investigated the value of antemortem (AM) and postmortem (PM) radiographs of the claviculae and C3-T4 vertebrae to identify skeletons of missing U.S. soldiers from past military operations. In total, 12 field-recovered skeletons and AM chest radiographs of 1460 individuals were used. For each skeleton, examiners analyzed an array of AM chest radiographs (up to 1000 individuals) and attempted to identify the correct PM/AM radiographic match. When examiners were able to compare all images within a single test, only true-positive identifications were made. When AM radiographs were presented one-at-a-time, in sequential order, and without examiners having knowledge of array size, erroneous identifications resulted but they were almost exclusively made by untrained examiners (accuracy = 35% vs. 90% for trained examiners). This study demonstrates the value of chest radiographs for the identification of disarticulated and even eroded skeletons, but only when methods are wielded by trained examiners. PMID:21306373

Stephan, Carl N; Winburn, Allysha P; Christensen, Alexander F; Tyrrell, Andrew J

2011-03-01

46

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25

47

IDENTIFICATION OF HARDENING PARAMETERS USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS AND FULL-FIELD  

E-print Network

the heterogeneous strain fields on the identification of isotropic hardening parameters. Results are compared1 IDENTIFICATION OF HARDENING PARAMETERS USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS AND FULL-FIELD MEASUREMENTS using full-field measurements. An orthotropic Hill criterion including an isotropic hardening

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes field testing and gives preliminary findings. Solidified ion exchange resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being field tested to develop a low-level waste data base and obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in martices of cement and Dow polymer. Emphasis is placed on obtaining data on performance of waste in a disposal environment using lysimeter arrays at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. 6 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Rogers, R.D.; McConnell, J.W.; Davis, E.C.; Findlay, M.W.

1987-01-01

49

Field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is obtaining information on performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms manufactured from ion exchange resins used to clean up water from the accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined in field tests. This paper presents a description of the field testing and results from the first year of operation. 8 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

1987-01-01

50

Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.  

PubMed

The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

1983-04-01

51

Large scale test of sensor fingerprint camera identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a large scale test of camera identification from sensor fingerprints. To overcome the problem of acquiring a large number of cameras and taking the images, we utilized Flickr, an existing on-line image sharing site. In our experiment, we tested over one million images spanning 6896 individual cameras covering 150 models. The gathered data provides practical estimates of false acceptance and false rejection rates, giving us the opportunity to compare the experimental data with theoretical estimates. We also test images against a database of fingerprints, simulating thus the situation when a forensic analyst wants to find if a given image belongs to a database of already known cameras. The experimental results set a lower bound on the performance and reveal several interesting new facts about camera fingerprints and their impact on error analysis in practice. We believe that this study will be a valuable reference for forensic investigators in their effort to use this method in court.

Goljan, Miroslav; Fridrich, Jessica; Filler, Tomáš

2009-02-01

52

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuel: Field Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes phase 2 of a Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) research project examining technical issues related to the usage of biodiesel in the state. The results of a small-scale field test involving the use of 20 percent biodiesel (B...

C. Strong, D. Shukla

2004-01-01

53

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS  

E-print Network

Energy Research & Development Division Melissa Jones Executive Director DISCLAIMER This reportAUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS APPENDICES Response Research Center PIERINTERIMPROJECTREPORT March 2008 CEC-500-2007-093-AP #12;#12;Prepared By

54

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS  

E-print Network

Research Office Martha Krebs, Ph.D. Deputy Director Energy Research & Development Division Melissa Jones) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS

55

APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

56

RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

57

Identification of Pedestrian Bridge Dynamic Response trough Field Measurements and Numerical Modelling: Case Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we develop a technique for performing system identification in typical pedestrian bridges, using routine equipment at a minimal configuration, and for cases where actual structural data are either sparse or absent. To this end, two pedestrian bridges were examined, modelled and finally instrumented so as to record their dynamic response under operational conditions. More specifically, the bridges were numerically modelled using the finite element method (FEM) according to what was deduced to be their current operating status, while rational assumptions were made with respect to uncertain structural properties. Next, results from field testing using a portable accelerometer unit were processed to produce response spectra that were used as input to a structural identification software program, which in turn yielded the excited natural frequencies and mode shapes of the bridges. The low level of discrepancy is given between analytical and experimental results, the latter are used for a final calibration of the numerical models.

Manolis, George D.; Athanatopoulou-Kyriakou, Asimina; Dragos, Kosmas D.; Arabatzis, Argyris; Lavdas, Alexandros; Karakostas, Christos Z.

2014-06-01

58

49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified...to protect trains and on-track equipment; (4) An analysis...are necessary to support the field testing, must be...

2013-10-01

59

49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified...to protect trains and on-track equipment; (4) An analysis...are necessary to support the field testing, must be...

2012-10-01

60

Biometric Animal Databases from Field Photographs: Identification of Individual Zebra in the Wild  

E-print Network

Biometric Animal Databases from Field Photographs: Identification of Individual Zebra in the Wild University of Illinois at Chicago tanyabw@uic.edu ABSTRACT We describe an algorithmic and experimental approach to a fundamental problem in field ecology: computer-assisted individual animal identification. We

Rubenstein, Daniel I.

61

Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR  

PubMed Central

The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans. PMID:24031493

Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otávio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

2010-01-01

62

Field tests using radioactive matter 2.  

PubMed

Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within <1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. PMID:22923250

Rulik, P; Prouza, Z; Hovorka, J; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Fronka, A; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Skrkal, J

2013-04-01

63

Identification of Medically Relevant Nocardia Species with an Abbreviated Battery of Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several

Deanna L. Kiska; Karen Hicks; David J. Pettit

2002-01-01

64

Helicopter derivative identification from analytic models and flight test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent results of stability derivative identification from helicopter analytic models and flight test data are presented. Six and nine degree-of-freedom (DOF) linear models are identified from an analytic nonlinear helicopter simulation using a least square technique. The identified models are compared with the convectional partial differentiation method for obtaining derivatives to form the basis for interpretation of derivatives identified from flight data. Six degree-of-freedom models are identified from CH-53A and CH-54B flight data, using an extended Kalman filter modified to process several maneuvers simultaneously. The a priori derivative estimate is obtained by optimal filtering of the data and then using a least square method. The results demonstrate that a six DOF identified model is sufficient to determine the low frequency modes of motion, but a nine DOF rotor/body model is necessary for proper representation of short-term response.

Molusis, J. H.; Briczinski, S.

1974-01-01

65

Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

2001-01-01

66

Asteroid Dynamical Families: a Reliability Test for Two Identification Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since a couple of years the asteroid families are under the light of a renewed interest. This is due to the simultaneous improvement of the techniques of proper elements computation and of the methods of classification. Recently, two different cluster analysis methods (Zappalà et al. 1990; Bendjoya et al. 1991) have provided two very similar lists of asteroid families. This has brought a renewed confidence on the reliability of asteroid families classification. Since a new set of improved proper elements is now available (Milani & Kneževi? 1992), the idea of the present work is to test the two identification methods by means of artificially generated families in order to gain an insight into their limitations and to possibly develop improved strategies for future analyses. Different cases have been envisaged in order to study the effectiveness of the methods as a function of increasing background densities and of the spread of the families. The ability of the methods to detect peculiar features such as filaments or to separate two close families has also been tested. The number of interlopers has been determined in each case in order to evaluate their relative amount. While some improvements to the adopted procedures are suggested by the numerical tests, the results presented in the present paper are encouraging and allow us to be confident about the reliability of our previous family lists, as well as about the expected performances of the methods in future applications.

Bendjoya, P.; Cellino, A.; Froeschle, C.; Zappala, V.

1993-05-01

67

Field tests of a small instrumented pile  

E-print Network

vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

Korb, Kenneth Wayne

2012-06-07

68

3X-100 blade field test.  

SciTech Connect

In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

2008-03-01

69

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08

70

Modified visual field test for ptosis surgery (Leicester Peripheral Field Test)  

PubMed Central

Introduction There is lack of consensus among Primary Health Care Trusts (PCTs) and health insurers on how to reimburse ptosis surgery and upper lid blepharoplasty, as these procedures can be regarded as cosmetic. Standardised photographs are expensive and difficult to achieve, whilst the routine 24-2 visual field lacks the range to detect visually significant superior field defects. Aim To introduce a modified visual field designed to assess the functional disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis and to demonstrate the effectiveness of surgery in improving the visual field. Methods Patients who had surgery for ptosis or dermatochalasis between January 2006 and December 2009 were prospectively invited to perform a modified visual field test pre- and post-operatively. Results In total, 97 patients amounting to 194 eyes were included in the study. Ninety five eyes had aponeurotic repair with or without blepharoplasty and 77 eyes had blepharoplasty alone. This modified test has a sensitivity of 98.8% of detecting ptosis. For patients who underwent ptosis surgery with or without blepharoplasty, 84.2% recorded an improvement in points seen with the test and 81% recorded an improvement in visual field height. For those who had blepharoplasty alone, 90.9% recorded an improvement in points seen in the modified visual field test and 80.6% had improvement in visual field height. Conclusion Our modified visual field assessment is a quick and easy way to assess patient disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis. Surgery improves the demonstrated defect, confirming that ptosis and dermatochalasis can be considered a functional rather than cosmetic issue. PMID:21252946

Ho, S F; Morawski, A; Sampath, R; Burns, J

2011-01-01

71

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-06-23

72

Optimizations for the EcoPod field identification tool  

PubMed Central

Background We sketch our species identification tool for palm sized computers that helps knowledgeable observers with census activities. An algorithm turns an identification matrix into a minimal length series of questions that guide the operator towards identification. Historic observation data from the census geographic area helps minimize question volume. We explore how much historic data is required to boost performance, and whether the use of history negatively impacts identification of rare species. We also explore how characteristics of the matrix interact with the algorithm, and how best to predict the probability of observing a previously unseen species. Results Point counts of birds taken at Stanford University's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve between 2000 and 2005 were used to examine the algorithm. A computer identified species by correctly answering, and counting the algorithm's questions. We also explored how the character density of the key matrix and the theoretical minimum number of questions for each bird in the matrix influenced the algorithm. Our investigation of the required probability smoothing determined whether Laplace smoothing of observation probabilities was sufficient, or whether the more complex Good-Turing technique is required. Conclusion Historic data improved identification speed, but only impacted the top 25% most frequently observed birds. For rare birds the history based algorithms did not impose a noticeable penalty in the number of questions required for identification. For our dataset neither age of the historic data, nor the number of observation years impacted the algorithm. Density of characters for different taxa in the identification matrix did not impact the algorithms. Intrinsic differences in identifying different birds did affect the algorithm, but the differences affected the baseline method of not using historic data to exactly the same degree. We found that Laplace smoothing performed better for rare species than Simple Good-Turing, and that, contrary to expectation, the technique did not then adversely affect identification performance for frequently observed birds. PMID:18366649

Manoharan, Aswath; Stamberger, Jeannie; Yu, YuanYuan; Paepcke, Andreas

2008-01-01

73

Mine field detection and identification using terahertz spectroscopic imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial, temporal, and spectroscopic characteristics associated with pulsed THz (100 GHz 70 THz) radiation provide this emerging technology with the potential for reliable identification of buried objects such as non-metallic landmines. With a suitable integration of these attributes, one can envision a THz detection platform that provides: (1) accurate identification of buried objects, and (2) a source-to-sample working distance

Robert Osiander; Joseph A. Miragliotta; Zhiping Jiang; Jingzhou Xu; Xi-Cheng Zhang

2003-01-01

74

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04

75

Cooperative field test program for wind systems  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01

76

Large Scale Test of Sensor Fingerprint Camera Identification Miroslav Goljan, Jessica Fridrich, and Toms Filler  

E-print Network

also test images against a database of fingerprints, simulating thus the situation when a forensic identification, digital forensics, photo-response non-uniformity, sensor fingerprint. 1. MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSIVELarge Scale Test of Sensor Fingerprint Camera Identification Miroslav Goljan, Jessica Fridrich

Fridrich, Jessica

77

Aircraft flutter test design using identification and simulation: a SCILAB toolbox  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present here a complete procedure for the design and validation of a test for the flutter phenomenon. We start by presenting a covariance driven subspace identification method for output-only observations. This method applies to in-flight situation. Of course the flutter situation cannot be observed on aircrafts. For the design of a test we use the results of the identification;

Laurent Mevel; Maurice Goursat; Albert Benveniste; Michle Basseville

2005-01-01

78

Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

Deficits in odor identification have been the most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predict these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ. PMID:19819272

Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G.

2014-01-01

79

Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap  

PubMed Central

Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

2014-01-01

80

Field testing of the Cobra Seal System  

SciTech Connect

The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01

81

Interactive Vector Field Feature Identification Joel Daniels II, Erik W. Anderson, Student Member, IEEE,  

E-print Network

Interactive Vector Field Feature Identification Joel Daniels II, Erik W. Anderson, Student Member) of desired feature types. These control points guide a mapping of the vector field points to the interactive of these attributes forms a representation of the vector field samples in the attribute space. We project

Utah, University of

82

Development of Teaching Materials for Field Identification of Plants and Analysis of Their Effectiveness in Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces teaching materials developed for field identification of plants with synoptical keys, identification tables, cards, and programs. Selects approximately 2000 seed plants and uses visibly identifiable characteristics for classification. Recommends using the methodology of identification in other areas for biological identification. (YDS)

Ohkawa, Chizuru

2000-01-01

83

Overview of Identification Methods of Mechanical Parameters Based on Full-field Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews recently developed methods for constitutive parameter identification based on kinematic full-field measurements,\\u000a namely the finite element model updating method (FEMU), the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM), the virtual fields method\\u000a (VFM), the equilibrium gap method (EGM) and the reciprocity gap method (RGM). Their formulation and underlying principles\\u000a are presented and discussed. These identification techniques are then applied to

Stéphane Avril; Marc Bonnet; Anne-Sophie Bretelle; Michel Grédiac; François Hild; Patrick Ienny; Félix Latourte; Didier Lemosse; Stéphane Pagano; Emmanuel Pagnacco; Fabrice Pierron

2008-01-01

84

Soil Sample Questionnaire --Field Crops Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres  

E-print Network

of irrigation season: days 12. Water sources: well reservoir creek or river canal project Name of creek, river laboratory address: Soil Testing Laboratory Renewable Resources Department University of Wyoming Dept. 3354, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071. Persons seeking admission, employment, or access to programs

Norton, Jay B.

85

Field testing method for photovaltaic modules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For remote areas, where solar photovoltaic modules are the only source of power, it is essential to perform preventive maintenance to insure that the PV system works properly; unfortunately, prices for PV testers range from 1,700 to 8,000. To address this issue, a portable inexpensive tester and analysis methodology have been developed. Assembling a simple tester, which costs $530 and weighs about 5 pounds, and using the Four-Parameters PV Model, we characterized the current-voltage (I-V) curve at environmental testing conditions; and then employing radiation, temperature, and age degradation sensitivity equations, we extrapolated the I-V curve to standard testing conditions. After applying the methodology to three kinds of silicon modules (mono-crystalline, multi-crystalline, and thin-film), we obtained maximum power points up to 97% of the manufacturer's specifications. Therefore, based on these results, it is reasonably accurate and affordable to verify the performance of solar modules in the field.

Ramos, Gerber N.

86

The Role of Field Testing in Environmental Measurements.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the role that field testing plays in environmental measurements now and for the future. Such issues as when field testing should be conducted, the reliability of field tests, regulatory acceptance, cost efficiency, and the use of mobile laboratories are reviewed. (LZ)

Poppiti, James

1994-01-01

87

Long Range Science Rover (Rocky 7) Mojave Desert Field Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes current rover field testing activities of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and p resents results obtained to-date. These field tests were c ollaborative ac tivities between JPL engineers and a team of scientists from several universities and NASA centers. The broad objective of these field tests is to simulate, as closely as possible, realistic mission scenarios for

Samad Hayati

1997-01-01

88

Identification of time delay model for integrating processes from closed-loop step test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a closed-loop step response test, a model identification method is proposed for integrating processes with time delay in this paper. By introducing a damping factor to the closed-loop step response for realization of the Laplace transform, a frequency response estimation algorithm is developed in terms of the closed-loop control structure used for identification. Correspondingly, two model identification algorithms

Tao Liu; Furong Gao; Chunhui Zhao

2009-01-01

89

Identification of low-order process model with time delay from closed-loop step test  

Microsoft Academic Search

To facilitate control-oriented model identification during closed-loop system operation, a low-order model identification method is proposed in this paper, based on using closed-loop step response test. By introducing a damping factor to the closed-loop step response for realization of the Laplace transform, a frequency response estimation algorithm is developed in terms of the closed-loop control structure used for identification. Correspondingly,

Tao Liu; Furong Gao; Chunhui Zhao

2009-01-01

90

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2011-01-01

91

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2013-01-01

92

9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...typing, Salmonella enteritidis Isolate 24.00 24.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 (b) Virology identification tests. User fees for virology identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized...

2012-01-01

93

A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

1988-01-01

94

How to use magnetic field information for coronal loop identification?  

E-print Network

The structure of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field because the magnetic pressure is about four orders of magnitude higher than the plasma pressure. Due to the high conductivity the emitting coronal plasma (visible e.g. in SOHO/EIT) outlines the magnetic field lines. The gradient of the emitting plasma structures is significantly lower parallel to the magnetic field lines than in the perpendicular direction. Consequently information regarding the coronal magnetic field can be used for the interpretation of coronal plasma structures. We extrapolate the coronal magnetic field from photospheric magnetic field measurements into the corona. The extrapolation method depends on assumptions regarding coronal currents, e.g. potential fields (current free) or force-free fields (current parallel to magnetic field). As a next step we project the reconstructed 3D magnetic field lines on an EIT-image and compare with the emitting plasma structures. Coronal loops are identified as closed magnetic field lines with a high emissivity in EIT and a small gradient of the emissivity along the magnetic field.

T. Wiegelmann; B. Inhester; A. Lagg; S. K. Solanki

2008-01-30

95

Ecological Field Theory: the concept and field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological field theory (EFT) quantifies plant spatial influences as pulsating geometric zones about individual plants. It provides the basis for a methodology to include spatial interactions between plants of different size, function and growth-form in models of plant community dynamics. The key components of EFT are: 1. the influence domain of individuals (D), 2. the field intensity within the domains

J. Walker; P. J. H. Sharpe; L. K. Penridge; H. Wu

1989-01-01

96

Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMerieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm (R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308-314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual

FERNANDO GARCIA-GARROTE; EMILIA CERCENADO; EMILIO BOUZA

2000-01-01

97

The resolution of field identification fixed points in diagonal coset theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fixed point resolution problem is solved for diagonal coset theories. The primary fields into which the fixed points are resolved are described by submodules of the branching spaces, obtained as eigenspaces of the automorphisms that implement field identification. To compute the characters and the modular S-matrix we use ‘orbit Lie algebras’ and ‘twining characters’, which were introduced in a

Jürgen Fuchs; Bert Schellekens; Christoph Schweigert

1996-01-01

98

Genetic Analyses of Juvenile Steelhead, Coastal Cutthroat Trout, and Their Hybrids Differ Substantially from Field Identifications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of their similar appearance and frequent hybridization, juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii are difficult to distinguish visually. Nevertheless, field biologists often use visual methods to classify juvenile individuals. This study investigated hybridization between these species and determined the accuracy of field identification where hybridization occurred. Using a five-point classification system, two evaluators identified

Jason Baumsteiger; David Hankin; Eric J. Loudenslager

2005-01-01

99

An Improved Rotor Resistance Identification Method for Magnetic Field Regulation in Bearingless Induction Motor Drives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bearingless induction motors have combined characteristics of an induction motor and magnetic bearings. Bearingless induction motors tend to suffer from the influence of rotor resistance variation under field-oriented control because magnetic suspension is sensitive to magnetic field rotational position error. In this paper, a novel rotor resistance identification technique based on variables in the magnetic suspension control loop is proposed.

Akira Chiba; Daigo Akamatsu; Tadashi Fukao; M. Azizur Rahman

2008-01-01

100

EVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK  

E-print Network

16 hours at 37 °C. Staining procedure and catalase test The staining on the colony to be tested need not a complete Gram stain since we are mostly interested in morphology. The catalase test is carried outEVALUATION OF THREE RAPID TESTS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATED IN BOVINE MILK

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

101

Identification of anisotropic tensile strength of cortical bone using Brazilian test.  

PubMed

For a proper analysis of cortical bone behaviour, it is essential to take into account both the elastic stiffness and the failure criteria. While ultrasound methods allow complete identification of the elastic orthotropic coefficients, tests used to characterise the various failure mechanisms and to identify the brittle tensile strength in all directions are currently inadequate. In the present work we propose the Brazilian test as a complement to conventional tensile tests. In fact, this experimental technique, rarely employed in the biomechanics field, has the potential to provide an accurate description of the anisotropic strength of cortical bone. Additionally, it allows us to assess the scale influence on failure behaviour which may be attributed to an intrinsic length in correlation with the cortical bone microstructure. In order to correctly set up the Brazilian test, several aspects such as the machining, the geometrical parameters of the specimen and the loading conditions were determined. The finite element method was used to evaluate the maximal tensile stress at the centre of a 2D anisotropic elastic specimen as a simple function of the loading. To validate the protocol, the Brazilian test was carried out on 29 cortical bovine cylindrical specimens with diameters ranging from 10mm to 4mm. PMID:25051151

Allena, Rachele; Cluzel, Christophe

2014-10-01

102

Strategy for genotoxicity testing: hazard identification and risk assessment in relation to in vitro testing.  

PubMed

This report summarizes the proceedings of the September 9-10, 2005 meeting of the Expert Working Group on Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment in Relation to In Vitro Testing, part of an initiative on genetic toxicology. The objective of the Working Group was to develop recommendations for interpretation of results from tests commonly included in regulatory genetic toxicology test batteries, and to propose an appropriate strategy for follow-up testing when positive in vitro results were obtained in these assays. The Group noted the high frequency of positive in vitro findings in the genotoxicity test batteries with agents found not to be carcinogenic and thought not to pose a carcinogenic health hazard to humans. The Group agreed that a set of consensus principles for appropriate interpretation and follow-up testing when initial in vitro tests are positive was needed. Current differences in emphasis and policy among different regulatory agencies were recognized as a basis of this need. Using a consensus process among a balanced group of recognized international authorities from industry, government, and academia, it was agreed that a strategy based on these principles should include guidance on: (1) interpretation of initial results in the "core" test battery; (2) criteria for determining when follow-up testing is needed; (3) criteria for selecting appropriate follow-up tests; (4) definition of when the evidence is sufficient to define the mode of action and the relevance to human exposure; and (5) definition of approaches to evaluate the degree of health risk under conditions of exposure of the species of concern (generally the human). A framework for addressing these issues was discussed, and a general "decision tree" was developed that included criteria for assessing the need for further testing, selecting appropriate follow-up tests, and determining a sufficient weight of evidence to attribute a level of risk and stop testing. The discussion included case studies based on actual test results that illustrated common situations encountered, and consensus opinions were developed based on group analysis of these cases. The Working Group defined circumstances in which the pattern and magnitude of positive results was such that there was very low or no concern (e.g., non-reproducible or marginal responses), and no further testing would be needed. This included a discussion of the importance of the use of historical control data. The criteria for determining when follow-up testing is needed included factors, such as evidence of reproducibility, level of cytotoxicity at which an increased DNA damage or mutation frequency is observed, relationship of results to the historical control range of values, and total weight of evidence across assays. When the initial battery is negative, further testing might be required based on information from the published literature, structure activity considerations, or the potential for significant human metabolites not generated in the test systems. Additional testing might also be needed retrospectively when increase in tumors or evidence of pre-neoplastic change is seen. When follow-up testing is needed, it should be based on knowledge about the mode of action, based on reports in the literature or learned from the nature of the responses observed in the initial tests. The initial findings, and available information about the biochemical and pharmacological nature of the agent, are generally sufficient to conclude that the responses observed are consistent with certain molecular mechanisms and inconsistent with others. Follow-up tests should be sensitive to the types of genetic damage known to be capable of inducing the response observed initially. It was recognized that genotoxic events might arise from processes other than direct reactivity with DNA, that these mechanisms may have a non-linear, or threshold, dose-response relationship, and that in such cases it may be possible to determine an exposure level below which there is negligible concern about an effect

Thybaud, V; Aardema, M; Clements, J; Dearfield, K; Galloway, S; Hayashi, M; Jacobson-Kram, D; Kirkland, D; MacGregor, J T; Marzin, D; Ohyama, W; Schuler, M; Suzuki, H; Zeiger, E

2007-02-01

103

Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown that XYZ data derived from UAV photogrammetry has a similar practical accuracy to RTK GPS, which is commonly used for cadastral, topographic and engineering survey work. This means that UAV photogrammetry can, for the most part, replace GPS surveying as the main method of data capture for engineering projects, boundary mapping and topographical surveying. Aerial Photogrammetry, in conjunction with RTK GPS, can now be used for projects with a 1:200 map scale accuracy requirement.

Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

2013-08-01

104

Molecular identification of field-collected Culicoides larvae in the southern part of Japan.  

PubMed

Although Culicoides biting midges act as a vector of important human and domestic animal diseases, their ecology is poorly understood. The lack of proper identification systems of Culicoides larvae is one of the main obstacles to progress in research. Based on mitochondrial sequences of 19 Japanese Culicoides species, we designed a universal primer set to amplify the partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (cox 1). The polymerase chain reaction product amplified from extracted DNA of Culicoides larvae using the primer set was directly sequenced, and species identification based on the variation at cox1 was conducted. Using the molecular identification system, we sorted 243 specimens of field-collected larvae from the southern part of Japan into 10 species including Culicoides arakawae (Arakawa), Culicoides oxystoma Kieffer, and Culicoides brevitarsis Kieffer, which are regarded as vectors of important livestock animal diseases. Eight species of Culicoides larvae, including C. arakawae and C. oxystoma, were recovered from active paddy fields and an abandoned paddy field. The result suggests that paddy fields contribute to breeding a variety of Culicoides species and maintenance and spread of Culicoides-borne pathogens. In contrast, larvae of C. brevitarsis were collected from cattle dung in pastures. The molecular identification system described herein using nucleotide sequences successfully achieved larval identification and will be useful for a better understanding of larval habitats of Culicoides biting midges. PMID:24180116

Yanase, Tohru; Matsumoto, Yukiko; Matsumori, Yoichi; Aizawa, Maki; Hirata, Miki; Kato, Tomoko; Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Makoto; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Noda, Hiroaki

2013-09-01

105

Nonlinear System Identification and Modeling of A New Fatigue Testing Rig Based on Inertial Forces  

E-print Network

Nonlinear System Identification and Modeling of A New Fatigue Testing Rig Based on Inertial Forces fatigue testing rig based on inertial forces is in- troduced. The test rig has capacity to mimic various loading conditions including high frequency loads. The rig design al- lows reconfigurations to accommodate

Chelidze, David

106

Nondestructive Testing and Identification for Bridge Rating: Pilot Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A nondestructive bridge testing scheme based on a practical impact testing methodology has been described. In this method, acceleration responses at several points on a test bridge due to impact are measured and frequency response functions are computed. ...

A. E. Aktan, M. Raghavendrachar

1990-01-01

107

Rotorcraft derivative identification from analytical models and flight test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general procedure is presented for systematic development of rotorcraft models for use in systems identification, which includes fuselage and rotor degrees of freedom (DOF). Formulations for rigid blade flap and lag as well as the normal mode representation of an elastic blade are developed for hingeless and articulated rotor systems. The method of multiblade coordinates is used to obtain linear constant coefficient state variable models of various levels of approximation. Two of the approximate models, a 6 DOF, are identified from a nonlinear articulated helicopter computer simulation. The results demonstrate the accuracy attainable for each model. Advanced results outline the status of rotorcraft modeling and systems identification and indicate areas that require further investigation.

Molusis, J. A.

1975-01-01

108

Cassini star tracking and identification algorithms, scene simulation, and testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cassini spacecraft uses a CCD-based star tracker, the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU), for attitude identification in the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS). SOftware to process SRU data resides in the Flight Computer (AFC) and is integrated with all other AACS functions. The Cassini mission will use autonomous star identification for initial attitude determination,and a star tracking function for maintaining attitude, both performed by processing pixel data produced by the SRU and sent to the AFC via a dma interface. Because of the complexity of the StarID software, special software simulation tools were created to simulate the SRU output as a function of commands, spacecraft attitude, and star screen, and allow the introduction of fault conditions.

Alexander, James W.; Chang, Daniel H.

1996-10-01

109

A valid field test protocol of linear speed and agility in rugby union.  

PubMed

Field testing is a key component to measure player performance in all sports, which provides coaches and strength and conditioning staff information to evaluate player performance and measure desired training effects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and construct validity of a rugby union field test protocol based on analysis of the components of the game. Participants were placed in an Academy (n = 17) or Club (n = 11) group determined by current playing level. Trials of 10- and 30-m linear speed (LS), change of direction speed, and reactive agility speed were measured to evaluate the field test protocol's utility in distinguishing players of different playing abilities. Reliability analysis of each field test demonstrated stable values allowing this field test protocol to be used to compare between groups. Furthermore, the Academy players performed significantly (p < 0.05) faster compared to Club players in all LS and agility components. These results suggest that this field test protocol is appropriate to identify rugby union players of varying playing abilities allowing coaches and strength and fitness staff to measure a player's capability to execute critical aspects of the game and may have application in performance evaluation and talent identification. The results from this study suggest that this test battery is an appropriate measure in identifying the varying playing abilities of rugby union players. This enables coaches and fitness staff to assess a player's capability in executing critical aspects of the game and also may have application in performance evaluation and talent identification. PMID:21116198

Green, Brian S; Blake, Catherine; Caulfield, Brian M

2011-05-01

110

Identification of peripheral visual images in a laterally restricted gaze field.  

PubMed

When the peripheral visual field is restricted or distorted, as occurs with certain spectacle lenses, the identification of objects in the periphery requires a coordinated head and eye movement. Initial experiments on the identification of peripheral images under such restrictions show that the degradation in performance is defined by a consistent additional delay in the time required to identify the image correctly. An analysis of the motor movements shows that performance is solely determined by movements of the head; eye movements are sufficiently precise and fast so they do not limit performance. A quantitative model of the identification task was developed and model simulations confirmed the experimental findings that head movement variables, specifically response latency and movement duration, uniquely determine identification performance. Hence, improved performance under these conditions must come from modifications in head-movement control either through training or adaptive processes. PMID:2326117

Semmlow, J L; Gauthier, G M; Vercher, J L

1990-02-01

111

FIELD-TESTING DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This article briefly reviews an extensive field study by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Penn Water Authority, which resulted in the development of a series of models to investigate contaminant propagation in a water distribution system. The application of on...

112

Field testing for selection and development of high reliability sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reasons behind field testing are advanced and a methodology of development testing described. The basis of the testing is comparison and methods of automating the process of reducing the sensor outputs to a common denominator for correlation are briefly discussed. To illustrate the process of selection and development testing for automatic weather station sensors, examples of cloud height detectors,

A. D. Stewart; D. J. McKay; T. Hacking

1975-01-01

113

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23

114

Methods Studies on System Identification from Transient Rotor Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the more important methods are discussed that have been used or proposed for aircraft parameter identification. The methods are classified into two groups: Equation error or regression estimates and Bayesian estimates and their derivatives that are based on probabilistic concepts. In both of these two groups the cost function can be optimized either globally over the entire time span of the transient, or sequentially, leading to the formulation of optimum filters. Identifiability problems and the validation of the estimates are briefly outlined, and applications to lifting rotors are discussed.

Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.; Yin, S. K.

1975-01-01

115

Field testing of a crossflow water turbine  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to design, construct and test a small low-cost crossflow water turbine with the possibility of introducing a similar design to rural villages in the tropics. The turbine was constructed out of discarded aluminum plates. It was designed with an interchangeable runner. Four 6-inch runners with 10, 15, 20 and 30 blades each were constructed. The study sought to evaluate the performance of the turbine using each of the 4 runners. A fifth runner was added later to the tests by cutting down the number of blades in the 30-blade runner to 6. The turbine and the runners were subjected to various levels of flow rates. Further, each runner was tested over a wide range of rotational speeds. Optimum power or efficiency and rotational speed were determined for each runner. An output power and efficiency prediction equation was developed using dimensional analysis. The aluminum-constructed turbine performed most efficiently with the 20-blade runner. A maximum efficiency of about 47% was attained at a rotational speed of 330 rpm. The deprived prediction equation for power and efficiency yielded values that were only half of the values from theoretical efficiency equations developed by previous authors. The derived equation is limited only to the same turbine size as the one tested.

Tongco, A.F.

1988-01-01

116

Field testing of a crossflow water turbine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to design, construct and test a small low-cost crossflow water turbine with the possibility of introducing a similar design to rural villages in the tropics. The turbine was constructed out of discarded aluminum plates. It was designed with an interchangeable runner. Four 6-inch runners with 10, 15, 20 and 30 blades each were constructed.

Tongco

1988-01-01

117

A low-power CMOS integrated circuit for field-powered radio frequency identification tags  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cheap, compact radio frequency identification (RFID) tags will make a wide range of new applications cost-effective. Minimum cost can be achieved only in a passive tag (that acquires operating power from the interrogating RF field). A compact tag form factor demands a small tag antenna, that in turn demands either external components or a high-frequency RF carrier for effective tag

D. Friedman; H. Heinreich; D.-W. Duan

1997-01-01

118

A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow  

E-print Network

. The Bayesian approach restates the ill-posed inverse problem as a well-posed problem in an expanded stochastic identification; Bayesian inference; Inverse Prob- lems; Markov Random Field 1 Introduction The contamination-dispersion equation (ADE) with a hierarchical Bayesian computation method backward through time. The contaminant

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

119

The Role of Forensic Odontology in the Field of Human Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The profession of forensic odontology can make a significant contribution to the field of forensic science in the identification of people both dead and living. The opinion of this author is that this profession is often neglected. This article is a non-technical review of the basic methods that can be used to gather scientific evidence through the use of forensic

HO WOHN KIM

1986-01-01

120

Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure  

PubMed Central

Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

2014-01-01

121

Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

1993-01-01

122

Provision Point Mechanisms and Field Validity Tests of Contingent Valuation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past field validity tests of contingent valuation have relied on voluntary contribution mechanisms to elicit actual willingness to pay, and may overestimate hypothetical bias because of free riding in the actual contributions. This paper argues that provision point mechanisms are a preferred alternative for field validity tests of contingent valuation because they increase the proportion of demand revealed in cases

GREGORY L. POE; JEREMY E. CLARK; Daniel Rondeau; WILLIAM D. SCHULZE

2002-01-01

123

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

SciTech Connect

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

2011-01-17

124

Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The FLAG offers broadly applicable, self-contained modular classroom assessment techniques and discipline-specific tools for STEM instructors interested in new approaches to evaluating student learning, attitudes and performance. Each has been developed, tested and refined in real colleges and universities classrooms. The FLAG also contains an assessment primer, a section to help you select the most appropriate assessment technique(s) for your course goals, and other resources.

Mintzes, Joel; Lewis, Eileen; Zeilik, Michael

2004-07-13

125

Developmental validation of a novel lateral flow strip test for rapid identification of human blood (Rapid Stain Identification--Blood).  

PubMed

Human blood is the body fluid most commonly encountered at crime scenes, and blood detection may aid investigators in reconstructing what occurred during a crime. In addition, blood detection can help determine which items of evidence should be processed for DNA-STR testing. Unfortunately, many common substances can cause red-brown stains that resemble blood. Furthermore, many current human blood detection methods are presumptive and prone to false positive results. Here, the developmental validation of a new blood identification test, Rapid Stain Identification--Blood (RSID--Blood), is described. RSID--Blood utilizes two anti-glycophorin A (red blood cell membrane specific protein) monoclonal antibodies in a lateral flow strip test format to detect human blood. We present evidence demonstrating that this test is accurate, reproducible, easy to use, and highly specific for human blood. Importantly, RSID--Blood does not cross-react with ferret, skunk, or primate blood and exhibits no high-dose hook effect. Also, we describe studies on the sensitivity, body fluid specificity, and species specificity of RSID--Blood. In addition, we show that the test can detect blood from a variety of forensic exhibits prior to processing for DNA-STR analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that RSID--Blood is effective and useful for the detection of human blood on forensic exhibits, and offers improved blood detection when compared to other currently used methods. PMID:19083828

Schweers, Brett A; Old, Jennifer; Boonlayangoor, P W; Reich, Karl A

2008-06-01

126

Full-Field Strain Measurement and Identification of Composites Moduli at High Strain Rate with the Virtual Fields Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper deals with full-field strain measurement on glass\\/epoxy composite tensile specimens submitted to high strain\\u000a rate loading through a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device and with the identification of their mechanical properties.\\u000a First, the adopted methodology is presented: the device, including an Ultra-High Speed camera, and the experimental procedure\\u000a to obtain relevant displacement maps are described. The

R. Moulart; F. Pierron; S. R. Hallett; M. R. Wisnom

2011-01-01

127

A comparative test of the developmental, role-playing, and defensive explanations of offspring identification.  

PubMed

Following Mussen and Distler (1959) and Bandura, Ross and Ross (1963), the developmental, defensive, and role-playing theories of identification are tested on high school seniors. Previous tests have supported the developmental and role-playing hypotheses about equally, while the defensive hypothesis lacks consistent empirical support. Questions are raised, however, about the merit of these tests. Data are presented on seniors in an Eastern suburban school and a Midwestern small town school which support the developmental (warmth) hypothesis but which are inconsistent with the defensive and role-playing hypotheses. Parental behavior is measured by the Bronfenbrenner Parent Behavior Questionnaire and identification is measured by the semantic differential. PMID:742464

Sullivan, J L; Minns, D R

1978-01-01

128

Gifted Identification Beyond the IQ Test: Rating Scales and Other Assessment Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes rating scales and other tests and procedures used in gifted identification aside from traditional intelligence\\u000a tests (see Newman, this volume, for discussion of IQ tests). The chapter highlights how a psychologist’s conception of giftedness\\u000a should guide the particular tests and procedures that one selects in conducting a gifted evaluation. The chapter very briefly\\u000a describes a variety of

Steven I. Pfeiffer; Samara Blei

129

Lacunarity Measures of Potential Fields in Covered Lithology Identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measure distributions, both multifractal and other kinds, are not unique, so spatial patterns with the same measure may have different appearances. Lacunarity analysis is a method of description of dispersion in spatial patterns across a range of scales, and is one way of descriminating clustering of similar values. Lacunarity of an image was calculated using a moving window across a range of scales as the ratio of the second moment divided by the square of the first moment for values within the window. This gives a curve of lacunarity versus resolution (scale); the curve is concave for highly clustered data, pseudolinear or convex for data with clusters at many scales such as multifractal simulations, and constant for uniformly spaced data. Breaks in slope of the curve indicate scales that are important in the structure of the spatial pattern. Gravity and magnetic field anomaly data are well known to be multifractal and thus calculated lacunarities of gridded datasets have been investigated to determine if the resulting curves are a useful measure of texture of the potential field data and helpful in identifying likely lithologies at depth beneath cover. Lacunarity is often calculated on binary data, but it can also be calculated using quantitative data. The quantitative data case lacunarity measure was computed for grids using a 25 by 25 km window moving over the grid, each window overlapping the previous one by 12.5 km. The data were the aeromagnetic and isostatic gravity anomaly grids for the state of Arizona at 0.5 km grid-interval, resulting in a lacunarity curves for gravity and aeromagnetic anomaly for each of approximately 2500 windows. The open-source software R was used for plotting a map of window center locations and lacunarity curves, and the map was loaded into Google Earth, together with maps of the gravity and magnetic field anomaly, porphyry copper deposit locations, and the geological map of Arizona. Windows were selected to compare lacunarity curves over various lithologies, mineralized versus unmineralized areas, and areas of cover with nearby areas of exposed lithostratigraphic units. Lacunarity curves for windows showed both clustered and scale-independent behaviors. Forty-one known porphyry copper deposits, mined or unmined, showed break-in-slope statistics in the gravity anomaly lacunarity curves of the windows containing them of (2.7, 3.4, 4.5, 6.7 and 16.4 km) for minimum, first quartile, median, third quartile, and maximum (square) window sides. These dimensions describe the size of clusters of anomalies within the 25x25 km window containing the deposit and surrounding lithology. For windows nearby on similar lithologies but no known deposits, the statistics are (2.2, 3.7, 5.0, 8.8 and 33.1 km), and the lacunarity curves for deposit windows are generally distinct in amplitude or shape, suggesting that the lacunarity measure has some power of discrimination. Lacunarity plots on similar and differing lithologies overlap but show differences on average especially between different geologic domains. The variability in the lacunarity curves shows that the measure can be useful in discrimination of lithologies, especially when combined with other measures of the potential field data.

Gettings, M. E.

2013-12-01

130

Development of a polymerase chain reaction-probe test for identification of Alloiococcus otitis.  

PubMed Central

A rapid polymerase chain reaction test was developed for specific identification of the human middle ear pathogen Alloiococcus otitis. Primers for the enzymatic amplification reaction were designed from highly specific sequences within the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, a confirmatory test based on hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction products to a specific internal probe was developed. Images PMID:1380011

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1992-01-01

131

Development of a polymerase chain reaction-probe test for identification of Alloiococcus otitis.  

PubMed

A rapid polymerase chain reaction test was developed for specific identification of the human middle ear pathogen Alloiococcus otitis. Primers for the enzymatic amplification reaction were designed from highly specific sequences within the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, a confirmatory test based on hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction products to a specific internal probe was developed. PMID:1380011

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1992-08-01

132

Wavelet Denoising of Flight Flutter Testing Data for Improvement of Parameter Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of modal parameter estimation plays a crucial role in flutter boundary prediction. A new wavelet denoising method is introduced for flight flutter testing data, which can improve the estimation of frequency domain identification algorithms. In this method, the testing data is first preprocessed with a gradient inverse weighted filter to initially lower the noise. The redundant wavelet transform

Wei TANG; Zhong-ke SHI

2005-01-01

133

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial suscep- tibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to

Karen C. Carroll; Brian D. Glanz; Anita P. Borek; Chad Burger; Hasan S. Bhally; Susan Henciak; Diane Flayhart; Merab Kekelidze; Chythanya Rajanna; Arnold Kreger; Alexander Sulakvelidze; Maryvonne Moulin-Schouleur; Catherine Schouler; Patrick Tailliez; Mu-Rong Kao; Eric Oswald; Jacques Mainil; Miguel Blanco; Roger E. Morey; Renee L. Galloway; Sandra L. Bragg; Arnold G. Steigerwalt; Leonard W. Mayer; Paul N. Levett

2006-01-01

134

Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D sonic anemometer  

E-print Network

Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D" by CFD calculations Spinner AnemometrySpinner Anemometry -- An Innovative Wind Measurement Concept Conclusions: So far, spinner anemometry seem to work according to the idea. Wind tunnel and free field tests

135

FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

1983-01-01

136

Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory  

E-print Network

It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

2007-06-12

137

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1997-01-01

138

Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification  

SciTech Connect

The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

1996-12-01

139

STATISTICAL ISSUES IN DNA IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING SAUNAK SEN  

E-print Network

science, as well as medical testing. Although the objective of DNA forensic analysis ("DNA fingerprinting FRANCISCO sen@biostat.ucsf.edu INTRODUCTION Advances in DNA technologies have dramatically altered forensic will then apply those concepts in the context of DNA fingerprinting and genetic testing. ANATOMY OF A DIAGNOSTIC

Sen, Saunak

140

Defect Identification with Model-Based Test Automation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software is an integral part of automotive products, but organizations face many problems that impede rapid development of software systems critical to their operations and growth. Manual processes to generate tests for software will become increasingly insufficient as automotive software becomes more complex, and more safety-critical. A method exists to develop tests automatically from formal, precise requirement and design models.

Mark Blackburn; Aaron Nauman; Bob Busser; Bryan Stensvad

2002-01-01

141

Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

2002-01-01

142

A PILOT STUDY COMPARING TWO FIELD TESTS WITH THE TREADMILL RUN TEST IN SOCCER PLAYERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players.

Abdul Rashid Aziz; Frankie H. Y. Tan; Kong Chuan Teh

143

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...procedures for laboratory and field testing...For most laboratory testing, the...

2012-07-01

144

40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065...Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...procedures for laboratory and field testing...For most laboratory testing, the...

2013-07-01

145

A novel microbead-based microfluidic device for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.  

PubMed

Effective treatment of infectious diseases depends on the ability to rapidly identify the infecting bacteria and the use of sensitive antibiotics. The currently used identification assays usually take more than 72 h to perform and have a low sensitivity. Herein, we present a microbead-based microfluidic platform that is highly sensitive and rapid for bacterial detection and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The platform includes four units, one of which is used for bacterial identification and the other three are used for susceptibility testing. Our results showed that Escherichia coli O157 at a cell density range of 10(1)-10(5) CFU/?L could be detected within 30 min. Additionally, the effects of three antibiotics on E. coli O157 were evaluated within 4-8 h. Overall, this integrated microbead-based microdevice provides a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and highly effective platform for the identification of bacteria, as well as antibiotic sensitivity testing. PMID:24996540

He, J; Mu, X; Guo, Z; Hao, H; Zhang, C; Zhao, Z; Wang, Q

2014-12-01

146

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2011-07-01

147

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2012-07-01

148

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2010-07-01

149

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2013-07-01

150

Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests; Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs.

Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; LaTorre, V.R.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Nitao, J.J.; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.; Wilder, D.

1989-07-26

151

Field test and mathematical modeling of bioremediation of an oil-contaminated soil. Part 1: Field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fire-wall area (about 270 ft x 310 ft) with the Bunker C oil contaminated soil was selected for the bioremediation field test. This fire-wall area was separated into 18 plots by dirt dikes to test 6 bioremediation methods with three tests of each method. The six treatment methods were: (a) aeration with basic nutrients and indigenous organisms (BNIO); (b)

K. Y. Li; T. Xu; J. A. Colapret; W. A. Cawley; J. S. Bonner; A. Ernest; P. B. Verramachaneni

1994-01-01

152

Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

2013-01-01

153

Lumped parameter identification of a quarter car test rig  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quarter car model is a simple and widely used mathematical model to analyze the vibration and control problem of vehicles. In this study, a quarter car test rig is modeled as a lumped parameter system. Model parameters of the system are determined by measurements and experiments. Forced vibration method is used to identify the stiffness and damping parameters of the lumped model. A modal shaker is used to generate the road input in the test rig. The accelerations of the road input, sprung and unsprung masses are measured by piezoelectric accelerometers. The frequency response functions are obtained by using acceleration data. The identified parameters of the test rig are adjusted by comparing the experimental and simulation results.

Taskin, Y.; Yagiz, N.; Yuksek, I.

2013-02-01

154

Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.  

PubMed

The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

2013-02-01

155

Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

Ratajczak, A. F.

1985-01-01

156

Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests  

SciTech Connect

This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided.

Webb, R.H.

1994-10-01

157

A comprehensive test method for reprogammable field programmable gate arrays  

E-print Network

In this thesis, a new test algorithm for reprogrammable field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) is developed. The fault models consisting of stuck-at faults, bridge faults, programmable switch stuck-on, and stuck-off faults, are utilized. Both...

Ashen, David Glen

2012-06-07

158

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing...previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant or air flow. (2) If the...

2010-07-01

159

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing...previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant or air flow. (2) If the...

2012-07-01

160

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing...previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant or air flow. (2) If the...

2013-07-01

161

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing...previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant or air flow. (2) If the...

2011-07-01

162

Wide-Field Camera 3 Ground Testing and Calibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic UV\\/Optical\\/IR imager being developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), underwent a lengthy thermal-vacuum testing and calibration process during the summer of 2007. A full suite of instrument calibrations was performed, including measurements of basic detector properties such as dark current, read noise, flat field response, gain, and linearity. System level tests of

Howard A. Bushouse; S. Baggett; H. Bond; T. Brown; G. Hartig; B. Hilbert; R. Hill; J. Kim; R. Kimble; J. MacKenty; A. Martel; P. McCullough; L. Petro; S. Rinehart; M. Robberto

2007-01-01

163

Field identification of birdseye in sugar maple (acer saccharum marsh. ). Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect

Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is critical for two principal reasons: (1) it allows for the enumeration of a valuable resource that may influence management decisions, and (2) it may prevent improper manufacturing of logs at the job site. Both factors should help increase overall timber sale return. The objective of the paper is to provide a background on birdseye sugar maples and a detailed sequential methodology for field identification of birdseye in standing trees.

Bragg, D.C.; Stokke, D.D.

1994-01-01

164

Field and laboratory tests of a high volume cascade impactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of three different configurations of a recently developed high volume cascade impactor (HVCI) system was tested in both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, the HVCI was run simultaneously with a virtual impactor and a low pressure impactor using a 3- or 4-day sampling duration. The study was carried out in downtown Helsinki between June and September

Markus Sillanpää; Risto Hillamo; Timo Mäkelä; Arto S Pennanen; Raimo O Salonen

2003-01-01

165

SMALL HYBRID SOLAR POWER SYSTEM: FIRST FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents field tests of an original concept of a small hybrid solar power plant integrating three technologies: hermetic volumetric scroll expander- generators installed in two superposed Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC), a (bio-)Diesel engine with heat recovery exchangers and a solar field made of two rows of sun following flat plate concentrators with vacuumed isolated collector tubes. The basic

Samuel Martin; Malick Kane; Daniel Favrat

166

Variation in AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test) scores within the first weeks of imprisonment  

PubMed Central

AIM Although the prevalence of alcohol problems amongst detainees is suspected to be high, it seems that only the most flagrant problems are detected, thus considerably restricting the field for the intervention of experts in alcohol abuse and not providing an opportunity for preventive efforts. This study examined the re-test reliability of AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test) in screening prisoners METHOD AUDIT was administered for the first time on the day of entry to prison and again about 15 days later. The results were analysed according to two AUDIT thresholds: a score of 8 or higher and 12 or higher. RESULTS Of 75 consecutive entrants tested, 47 male prisoners completed the study. At the first administration, 19.1% of these 47 men met criteria for a probable alcohol problem but this percentage rose to 59.6% on the second occasion (p=0.0001). The proportion of subjects with a score 12 or higher (probably dependent) was 10.6% the first time versus 42.6% the second time (p=0.0001). In the 19 who scored positive at the 2nd administration only, changes in answers to the 10 items were coherent with a total score growing from 3.0 to 18.1 (p=0.0001). No prisoner had a lower AUDIT score on the 2nd administration. As alcohol problems are not routinely considered during the medical and biological examination at entry, no confirmation of the AUDIT results could be obtained, although those obtained at the second administration fitted well with the prevalence rates in previous reports. CONCLUSION AUDIT, for the purpose of giving a prevalence estimate or to enter appropriate prisoners into more detailed assessment or interventions, should not be conducted immediately at entry, but some weeks later. PMID:15082463

Maggia, Brigitte; Martin, Sandrine; Crouzet, Corinne; Richard, Pascal; Wagner, Pierre; Balmes, Jean-Louis; Nalpas, Bertrand

2004-01-01

167

A simple, low cost application of a flight test parameter identification system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flight test system combines state-of-the-art microprocessor technology and high accuracy instrumentation with parameter identification technology which minimize data and flight time requirements. The system was designed to avoid permanent modifications of the test airplane and allow quick installation. It is capable of longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control derivative estimation. This paper presents details of this system, calibration and flight test procedures, and the results of the Cessna 172 flight test program. The system has proven easy to install, simple to operate, and capable of accurate estimation of stability and control parameters in the Cessna 172 flight tests.

Clarke, R.; Roskam, J.

1982-01-01

168

A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples.  

PubMed

This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of oocyst suspensions of known number of oocysts from Eimeria mitis, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella were prepared and ground using glass beads or mini-pestle. DNA was extracted from ruptured oocysts using commercial systems (GeneReleaser, Qiagen Stoolkit and Prepman) or phenol-chloroform DNA extraction, followed by identification of species-specific ITS-1 sequences by optimised single species PCR assays. The Stoolkit and Prepman protocols showed insufficient repeatability, and the former was also expensive and relatively time-consuming. In contrast, both the GeneReleaser protocol and phenol-chloroform protocols were robust and sensitive, detecting less than 0.4 oocysts of each species per PCR. Finally, we evaluated our new protocol on 68 coccidia positive field samples. Our data suggests that rupturing the oocysts by mini-pestle grinding, preparing the DNA with GeneReleaser, followed by optimised single species PCR assays, makes a robust and sensitive procedure for identifying chicken Eimeria species in field samples. Importantly, it also provides minimal hands-on-time in the pre-PCR process, lower contamination risk and no handling of toxic chemicals. PMID:17386979

Haug, Anita; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G

2007-05-15

169

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

Walker, D. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-12-01

170

Wide field camera 3 ground testing and calibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is fully integrated with its flight detectors and has undergone several rounds of ground testing and calibration at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The testing processes are highly automated, with WFC3 and the optical stimulus, which is used to provide external targets and illumination, being

H. Bushouse; S. Baggett; H. Bond; T. Brown; S. Deustua; G. F. Hartig; B. Hilbert; R. J. Hill; J. Kim-Quijano; R. A. Kimble; J. W. MacKenty; A. Martel; P. McCullough; L. Petro; S. Rinehart; M. Robberto

2008-01-01

171

Reproducibility of pulmonary function tests under laboratory and field conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reproducibility of pulmonary function tests in the laboratory and in a mobile field survey vehicle has been studied. Groups of laboratory workers were studied at base and a random sample of 38 coalminers was examined in the mobile laboratory. The intra-subject variability of some newer tests of lung function, including closing volume and maximum flow at low lung volumes,

R G Love; M D Attfield; K D Isles

1980-01-01

172

Testing the configurable analog blocks of field programmable analog arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of testing the configurable analog blocks (CABs) of field programmable analog arrays (FPAAs) is addressed in This work. The considered fault model comprises deviations in the nominal values of CAB programmable capacitors, deviations in the programmable gains of CAB input amplifiers and stuck-on\\/stuck-open faults in CAB switches. The problem of test stimuli generation is solved, in a first

T. Balen; F. Azais; M. Lubaszewski; M. Renovell

2004-01-01

173

Testing the Configurable Analog Blocks of Field Programmable Analog Arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of testing the Configurable Analog Blocks (CABs) of Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAAs) is addressed in this paper. The considered fault model comprises deviations in the nominal values of CAB programmable capacitors, deviations in the programmable gains of CAB input amplifiers and stuck- on\\/stuck-open faults in CAB switches. The problem of test stimuli generation is solved, in a

Tiago R. Balen; Antonio Andrade Jr.; Florence Azaïs; Michel Renovell; Marcelo Lubaszewski

2004-01-01

174

Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

2011-01-01

175

Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

2013-01-01

176

Development of a field test for evaluating aerobic fitness.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the reproducibility and utility of a standardised and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15 mISWRT]) to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 14 middle-aged participants performed the 15-m ISWRT 3 times within one week (Test 1, Test 2, Test 3). Reproducibility of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed), HRmax, and VO 2max for each test. The utility of the 15-m ISWRT for evaluating VO 2max over a wide range in middle-aged adults was tested by comparing the range of VO 2max obtained from the portable expired gas analyzer with the VO 2max reference values and ranges for health promotion published by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. A multiple comparison of distance completed in the 15-m ISWRT Test 1, Test 2, and Test 3 found no significant difference between Test 2 and Test 3. The ICC was 0.99 for Test 2 vs. Test 3. VO 2max measured from the 15-m ISWRT in Test 3 had a minimum value of 22.8 ml/kg/min and a maximum value of 38.7 ml/kg/min. In conclusion, the 15-m ISWRT is reliable and useful for evaluating VO 2max in middle-aged adults. PMID:22377946

Mikawa, K; Yano, Y; Senjyu, H

2012-05-01

177

Bayesian-based hypothesis testing for topology error identification in generalized state estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops a Bayesian-based hypothesis testing procedure to be applied in conjunction with topology error processing via normalized Lagrange multipliers. As an advantage over previous methods, the proposed approach eliminates the need of repeated state estimator runs for alternative hypothesis evaluation. The identification process assumes that the set of switching devices is partitioned into suspect and true subsets. A

Elizete Maria Lourenço; Antonio Simões Costa; Kevin A. Clements

2004-01-01

178

Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor  

DOEpatents

A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

Smith, Desmond J. (Oakland, CA); Rubin, Edward M. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01

179

Identification of the Gifted: Tests and Measurements: A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 668.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The annotated bibliography on tests and measurements for identification of the gifted contains approximately 75 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents published from 1959 to 1973 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources Information Center…

ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

180

Wide-field camera 3 ground testing and calibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager being developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is now fully integrated and has undergone extensive ground testing at Goddard Space Flight Center, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum test environments. The thermal-vacuum testing marks the first time that both of the WFC3 UV\\/Visible and IR channels have been operated and characterized in

H. Bushouse; S. Baggett; T. Brown; G. F. Hartig; B. Hilbert; R. J. Hill; R. A. Kimble; O. Lupie; J. W. MacKenty; I. N. Reid; M. Robberto

2006-01-01

181

Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

1996-10-01

182

Internal consistency reliability of the fractionated and whole University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal consistency reliability (ICR) of the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and\\u000a its 10-, 20-, and 30-item fractions was explored, as well as the relationships between the fractions and the entire 40-item\\u000a test. Pearson correlation coefficients (rs) were computed among all independent combinations and permutations of the four 10-item UPSIT booklets using data from 774\\u000a subjects.

Richard L. Doty; Richard E. Frye; Udayan Agrawal

1989-01-01

183

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

184

Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.  

SciTech Connect

The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

2010-12-01

185

The design of a test rig for the identification of dynamic coefficients of a high temperature magnetic bearing  

E-print Network

This thesis is a report on the research and Micrographics. development to design a test rig for the identification of the dynamic coefficients of a radial magnetic bearing. The test rig development is intended for dynamic coefficient observation...

Rahtika, I Putu Gede Sopan

2012-06-07

186

Flight test validation of a frequency-based system identification method on an F-15 aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A frequency-based performance identification approach was evaluated using flight data from the NASA F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control aircraft. The approach used frequency separation to identify the effectiveness of multiple controls simultaneously as an alternative to independent control identification methods. Fourier transformations converted measured control and response data into frequency domain representations. Performance gradients were formed using multiterm frequency matching of control and response frequency domain models. An objective function was generated using these performance gradients. This function was formally optimized to produce a coordinated control trim set. This algorithm was applied to longitudinal acceleration and evaluated using two control effectors: nozzle throat area and inlet first ramp. Three criteria were investigated to validate the approach: simultaneous gradient identification, gradient frequency dependency, and repeatability. This report describes the flight test results. These data demonstrate that the approach can accurately identify performance gradients during simultaneous control excitation independent of excitation frequency.

Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Orme, John S.; Hreha, Mark A.

1995-01-01

187

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

188

Field test results prove GPS performance and utility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel ship configuration for Navy ocean going vessels. The signal-processing and data-processing architectures of the receivers are described. Specific test data are presented which highlight dynamic position accuracy, static position accuracy, acquisition times, and field reliability.

Blank, R. W.; Rhodes, W. D., Jr.

189

Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

Morris, A. Terry

1996-01-01

190

Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

Schaeffer, J. S.; Haas, R. C.; Diana, J. S.; Breck, J. E.

1999-01-01

191

Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

1998-01-01

192

Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

2013-01-01

193

Identification of free-field soil properties using nupec recorded ground motions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Over the past twenty years, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to investigate various aspects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects on nuclear power plant structures, includ...

J. Xu C. Costantino, C. Hofmayer, A. Murphy, N. Chokshi, Y. Kitada

2001-01-01

194

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification  

PubMed Central

Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-01-01

195

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF WATTS NICKEL RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

A field test was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a polyamide reverse-osmosis membrane in hollow fine fiber configuration for closed-loop treatment of rinse water from a Watts-type nickel bath. Performance of the membrane module was determined by measuring the prod...

196

A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

1977-01-01

197

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

198

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

199

Field testing for cosmic ray soft errors in semiconductor memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a review of experiments performed by IBM to investigate the causes of soft errors in semiconductor memory chips under field test conditions. The effects of alpha-particles and cosmic rays are separated by comparing multiple measurements of the soft-error rate (SER) of samples of memory chips deep underground and at various altitudes above the earth. The results of

Timothy J. O'gorman; John M. Ross; Allen H. Taber; James F. Ziegler; Hans P. Muhlfeld; Charles J. Montrose; Huntington W. Curtis; James L. Walsh

1996-01-01

200

Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

Oldsen, Carl F.

201

Field Testing of Two Fast-Drying Traffic Paints.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Problems in achieving specified 60-sec drying times using newly adopted heated paint led to evaluation of a faster 20-sec drying time paint. In field tests it was compared with the regular New York 60-sec paint. Drying time was determined by driving an au...

E. D. McNaught, K. C. Hahn

1975-01-01

202

FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

203

Field Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie  

E-print Network

and Fastener Behavior Slide 8 Lateral built-up load cell Chevron patterns Transverse gages Strain Gauge Lateral built-up load cell Strain Gauge Strategy #12;Field Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie and Fastener Behavior Slide 10 Lateral built-up load cell Strain Gauge Strategy Curvature

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

204

The 40kW fuel cell field test support  

Microsoft Academic Search

GRI and the gas utilities are supporting a field test as one step forward in the commercialization of fuel cells. Broad programmatic oriented activities conducted by GKC include: preparation and presentation of a seminar on guidelines for use by individual utilities, first in the screening of candidate sites and then for use in the design of the fuel cell site

J. A. Orlando; M. G. Gamze

1982-01-01

205

Project WILD Evaluation Final Report of Field Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this evaluation was to discover what effect Project WILD had on students and teachers. These effects included changes in student learning and attitudes about wildlife as well as teachers' reactions to the Project WILD implementation and materials. The project was field tested in three states, in three demographic areas…

Fleming, M. Lynette

206

A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

207

High field, low current operation of engineering test reactors  

SciTech Connect

Steady state engineering test reactors with high field, low current operation are investigated and compared to high current, lower field concepts. Illustrative high field ETR parameters are R = 3 m, ..cap alpha.. approx. 0.5 m, B approx. 10 T, ..beta.. = 2.2% and I = 4 MA. For similar wall loading the fusion power of an illustrative high field, low current concept could be about 50% that of a lower field device like TIBER II. This reduction could lead to a 50% decrease in tritium consumption, resulting in a substantial decrease in operating cost. Furthermore, high field operation could lead to substantially reduced current drive requirements and cost. A reduction in current drive source power on the order of 40 to 50 MW may be attainable relative to a lower field, high current design like TIBER II implying a possible cost savings on the order of $200 M. If current drive is less efficient than assumed, the savings could be even greater. Through larger ..beta../sub p/ and aspect ratio, greater prospects for bootstrap current operation also exist. Further savings would be obtained from the reduced size of the first wall/blanket/shield system. The effects of high fields on magnet costs are very dependent on technological assumptions. Further improvements in the future may lie with advances in superconducting and structural materials.

Schwartz, J.; Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Williams, J.E.C.

1987-06-01

208

Uncertainty in Identification of Blood Group A Subtypes by Agglutination Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of the blood group A subtypes, i.e. A1, A2, and A1-A2 intermediate (Aint), by agglutination test, particularly in AB red cells, is ambiguous. The expressions of A subtypes in red blood cells are the consequences of diverse formations of the A substances by the action of three types of blood group N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-transferases controlled by A1, A2, and Aint genes.

Akira Yoshida; Vibha Davé; Josef Prchal

1985-01-01

209

Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will serve, with appropriate modifications, as the engineering development model (EDM) and will be fielded aboard a U.S. Navy ship. This paper summarizes the process of developing and fielding IRSS, describes test results accomplished at sea during 1996, and discusses the technical and engineering lessons associated with design, development and testing of IRSS. Results are presented covering the areas of sensor component and overall system radiometrics (e.g., sensitivity and dynamic range), channel uniformity, stabilization, and optical, electrical and information (i.e., signal processing/track) resolution.

Ax, George R., Jr.; Buss, James R.

1997-08-01

210

Elastoplastic parameter identification by simulation of static and dynamic indentation tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents a numerical optimisation procedure for the identification of elastoplastic material parameters by means of inverse analysis, through both static and dynamic indentation tests. A finite element method (FEM) modelling of the indentation test is put in place by analysing first macroscopic effects (indentation curve, residual imprint geometry) at variable constitutive parameters (elastic modulus, yield stress, hardening coefficient). The FEM solver is then linked to an optimisation routine by assembling an integrated loop towards the solution of the inverse problem. Later, the FEM solver is replaced by a radial basis function network interpolation of pre-calculated data, combined to a principal component analysis, allowing the reduction of the computational burden of each non-linear analysis. Next, a detailed study on the identification procedure is performed by applying it to pseudo-experimental data that is generated numerically prior to the inverse analysis, which is possibly affected by random noise with given variance. The reliability of the inverse procedure is then demonstrated for both static and dynamic indentation tests as a necessary condition for further validations with true experimental data. The information from only the imprint geometry is shown to be sufficient for consistent material parameter identification.

Arizzi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

2014-04-01

211

Evaluation of the reliability of soccer-specific field tests.  

PubMed

The soccer-specific field tests are popular among coaches due to their simplicity, validity, and minimal use of equipment. Nevertheless, there is a general lack of data about their reliability, particularly regarding the tests of anaerobic performance. Twenty professional male soccer players performed 3 consecutive trials of the tests of throwing-in and standing-kick performance (the distance measured) as well as on timed 10-m sprint, flying 20-m sprint, running 10 x 5 m, zigzag running with and without the ball, and the skill index (i.e., the ratio of the zigzag running without and with the ball). With the exception of the throwing-in and standing kick, the evaluated tests revealed high intraclass correlation coefficients (i.e., >0.80), small within-individual variations (coefficient of variation, <4%), and sample sizes for detecting a 2% change in the tested performance that are either close to or below the standard size of a professional soccer squad. In addition to simplicity and face validity, most of the evaluated tests revealed high reliability. Therefore, the evaluated tests are recommended for sport-specific profiling and early selection of young athletes as well as for routine testing procedures that could detect effects of various intervention procedures. Regarding the throwing-in and standing-kick tests, direct measurement of the ball velocity (e.g., with a standard radar gun) is recommended. PMID:18545209

Mirkov, Dragan; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Kukolj, Milos; Ugarkovic, Dusan; Jaric, Slobodan

2008-07-01

212

Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

1996-09-01

213

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01

214

Identification of dynamic loading on a bending plate using the Virtual Fields Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper aims at identifying local dynamic transverse forces and distributed pressures acting on the surface of a thin plate, from its measured vibration response. It is related to previous work by other authors on the so-called Force Analysis Technique but uses a different formulation. The paper first presents the theoretical developments based on the Virtual Fields Method and then, numerically simulated data are processed to validate the identification algorithm. Finally, experimental data are used. Both mechanical point load excitation, and distributed acoustic excitation of a bending panel are considered. The force reconstruction results are very satisfactory and the low computational times together with the simple implementation make the Virtual Fields technique attractive for this type of problem.

Berry, Alain; Robin, Olivier; Pierron, Fabrice

2014-12-01

215

Field test of a high efficiency, automatic defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the market evaluation and field test portion of a program to design, develop, and demonstrate a high efficiency, automatic defrosting refrigerator-freezer for the residential market. After the successful completion of Phase I of the program, which concentrated on the design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) high-efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, Phase II was initiated in February 1979 to evaluate the sales potential and performance of the high-efficiency refrigerator concept under field conditions, as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. In Phase I, a survey of food consumption and storage trends, family size, and consumer buying habits led to a sales-weighted average-capacity forecast for 1985 of approximately 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) and identification of the top-mount, automatic defrosting refrigerator as the projected sales leader. To meet this market demand, a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) top-mount was selected as the baseline for the Phase I design and development. In Phase II, a 509 1 (18 ft/sup 3/) unit using Phase I technology was chosen for the field test, since the slightly larger model better fit the participating manufacturer's new product development efforts and market.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01

216

trnL-F is a powerful marker for DNA identification of field vittarioid gametophytes (Pteridaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims The gametophyte phase of ferns plays an important role in habitat selection, dispersal, adaptation and evolution. However, ecological studies on fern gametophytes have been impeded due to the difficulty of species identification of free-living gametophytes. DNA barcoding provides an alternative approach to identifying fern gametophytes but is rarely applied to field studies. In this study, an example of field vittarioid gametophyte identification using DNA barcoding, which has not been done before, is given. Methods A combination of distance-based and tree-based approaches was performed to evaluate the discriminating power of three candidate barcodes (matK, rbcL and trnL-F) on 16 vittarioid sporophytes. Sequences of the trnL-F region were generated from 15 fern gametophyte populations by tissue-direct PCR and were compared against the sporophyte dataset, using BLAST. Key Results trnL-F earns highest primer universality and discriminatory ability scores, whereas PCR success rates were very low for matK and rbcL regions (10·8 % and 41·3 %, respectively). BLAST analyses showed that all the sampled field gametophytes could be successfully identified to species level. Three gametophyte populations were also discovered to be living beyond the known occurrence of their sporophyte counterparts. Conclusions This study demonstrates that DNA barcoding (i.e. reference databasing, tissue-direct PCR and molecular analysis), especially the trnL-F region, is an efficient tool to identify field gametophytes, and has considerable potential in exploring the ecology of fern gametophytes. PMID:23380240

Chen, Cheng Wei; Huang, Yao Moan; Kuo, Li Yaung; Nguyen, Quoc Dat; Luu, Hong Truong; Callado, John Rey; Farrar, Donald R.; Chiou, Wen Liang

2013-01-01

217

Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters  

PubMed Central

Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs?=??0.65 and ?0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min?1) and relative (mL·kg?1·min?1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs?=??0.79 to 0.55 and ?0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg?1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Desiree; Malm, Christer

2013-01-01

218

A field-test battery for elite, young soccer players.  

PubMed

The validity and reliability of a battery of field-based performance tests was examined. The opinions of coaches, fitness professionals and players (n=170, 172 and 101 respectively) on the importance of performance testing were established using a questionnaire. On 2 occasions, separated by 7 days, 80 elite, young soccer players (mean±SD [and range]: age 13.2±2.6 [8.9-19.1] years; stature 1.59±0.18 m [1.32-1.91]; body mass 50.6±17.1 [26.5-88.7] kg) completed a battery of field-based tests comprised of heart rate response to a submaximal Multi-stage fitness test, 3 types of vertical jump, sprints over 10 and 20 m, and an agility test. Physical performance testing was considered important by coaches (97%), fitness professionals (94%) and players (83%). The systematic bias ratio and the random error components of the 95% ratio limits of agreement for the first and second tests, for the U9-U11 vs. U12-U14 vs. U15-U18 age groups, were [Systematic bias (*/÷ ratio limits)]: Heart rate (Level 5): 0.983 (*/÷ 1.044) vs. 0.969 (*/÷ 1.056) vs. 0.983 (*/÷ 1.055); Rocket jump: 0998 (*/÷ 1.112) vs. 0.999 (*/÷ 1.106) vs. 0.996 (*/÷ 1.093); 10 m sprint: 0.997 (*/÷ 1.038) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.033) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.038); Agility test: 1.010 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.014 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.002 (*/÷1.053). All tests, except heart rate recovery from the Multi-stage fitness test, were able to distinguish between different ability and age groups of players (p<0.05). Thus, the field-test battery demonstrated logical and construct validity, and was shown to be a reliable and objective tool for assessing elite, young soccer players. PMID:23143702

Hulse, M A; Morris, J G; Hawkins, R D; Hodson, A; Nevill, A M; Nevill, M E

2013-04-01

219

Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

Not Available

2011-11-01

220

Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

1993-07-01

221

TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS: A SUBARU FIELD  

SciTech Connect

We use a dense redshift survey in the foreground of the Subaru GTO2deg{sup 2} weak-lensing field (centered at {alpha}{sub 2000} = 16{sup h}04{sup m}44{sup s}; {delta}{sub 2000} = 43 Degree-Sign 11'24'') to assess the completeness and comment on the purity of massive halo identification in the weak-lensing map. The redshift survey (published here) includes 4541 galaxies; 4405 are new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. Among the weak-lensing peaks with a signal-to-noise greater than 4.25, 2/3 correspond to individual massive systems; this result is essentially identical to the Geller et al. test of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) field F2. The Subaru map, based on images in substantially better seeing than the DLS, enables detection of less massive halos at fixed redshift as expected. We demonstrate that the procedure adopted by Miyazaki et al. for removing some contaminated peaks from the weak-lensing map improves agreement between the lensing map and the redshift survey in the identification of candidate massive systems.

Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Utsumi, Yousuke [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Miyazaki, Satoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Dell'Antonio, Ian P., E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: yousuke.utsumi@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: satoshi@subaru.naoj.org, E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, Box 1843, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

2012-05-10

222

Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test.

Wunan Lin

1993-02-01

223

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on

McConnell J. W. Jr; R. D. Rogers; J. D. Jastrow; D. S. Wickliff

1992-01-01

224

Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

1992-01-01

225

Spatial memory in rufous hummingbirds ( Selasphorus rufus ): A field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial memory abilities of free-ranging rufous hummingbirds were tested in an “open-field” analogue of a radial maze.\\u000a Eight artificial “flowers” filled with sucrose solution and arranged in a circle were placed within each bird’s feeding territory.\\u000a The birds were given two types of trial: in “free” trials, birds could choose which four of eight flowers to feed from before

S. D. Healy; T. A. Hurly

1995-01-01

226

Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

1997-09-01

227

Testing Multi-Field Inflation with Galaxy Bias  

E-print Network

Multi-field models of inflation predict an inequality between the amplitude tauNL of the collapsed limit of the four-point correlator of the primordial curvature perturbation and the amplitude fNL of the squeezed limit of its three-point correlator. While a convincing detection of non-Gaussianity through the squeezed limit of the three-point correlator would rule out all single-field models, a robust confirmation or disproval of the inequality between tauNL and fNL would provide crucial information about the validity of multi-field models of inflation. In this paper, we discuss to which extent future measurements of the scale-dependence of galaxy bias can test multi-field inflationary scenarios. The strong degeneracy between the effect of a non-vanishing fNL and tauNL on halo bias can be broken by considering multiple tracer populations of the same surveyed volume. If halos down to 1e13 Msun/h are resolved in a survey of volume 25(Gpc/h)^3, then testing multi-field models of inflation at the 3-\\sigma level would require, for instance, a detection of tauNL at the level of tauNL~1e5 given a measurement of a local bispectrum with amplitude fNL~10. However, we find that disproving multi-field models of inflation with measurements of the non-Gaussian bias only will be very challenging, unless |fNL| > 80 and one can achieve a halo mass resolution of 1e10 Msun/h.

Matteo Biagetti; Vincent Desjacques; Antonio Riotto

2012-08-08

228

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2010-01-01

229

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2013-01-01

230

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2011-01-01

231

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2012-01-01

232

10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.  

...707.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7...designated positions. (a)(1) Each workplace substance abuse program will provide for random testing for...

2014-01-01

233

A Review of Quality of Life after Predictive Testing for and Earlier Identification of Neurodegenerative Diseases  

PubMed Central

The past decade has witnessed an explosion of evidence suggesting that many neurodegenerative diseases can be detected years, if not decades, earlier than previously thought. To date, these scientific advances have not provoked any parallel translational or clinical improvements. There is an urgency to capitalize on this momentum so earlier detection of disease can be more readily translated into improved health-related quality of life for families at risk for, or suffering with, neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in neurodegenerative diseases and the importance of these “patient reported outcomes” for all clinical research. Next, we address HRQOL following early identification or predictive genetic testing in some neurodegenerative diseases: Huntington disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion diseases, hereditary ataxias, Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and Wilson's disease. After a brief report of available direct-to-consumer genetic tests, we address the juxtaposition of earlier disease identification with assumed reluctance towards predictive genetic testing. Forty-one studies examining health related outcomes following predictive genetic testing for neurodegenerative disease suggested that (a) extreme or catastrophic outcomes are rare; (b) consequences commonly include transiently increased anxiety and/or depression; (c) most participants report no regret; (d) many persons report extensive benefits to receiving genetic information; and (e) stigmatization and discrimination for genetic diseases are poorly understood and policy and laws are needed. Caution is appropriate for earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases but findings suggest further progress is safe, feasible and likely to advance clinical care. PMID:24036231

Paulsen, Jane S.; Nance, Martha; Kim, Ji-In; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Panegyres, Peter K.; Erwin, Cheryl; Goh, Anita; McCusker, Elizabeth; Williams, Janet K.

2013-01-01

234

Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308–314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, ?16 ?g/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10834961

Garcia-Garrote, Fernando; Cercenado, Emilia; Bouza, Emilio

2000-01-01

235

Geological Characterization of Remote Field Sites Using Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy: Results from the 1999 Marsokhod Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment (MFE) provided an opportunity to test the suitability of rover-borne visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared field spectrometers to contribute to the remote geological exploration of a Mars analog field site.

Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S. W.; Moersch, J.; Roush, T.; Horton, K.; Bishop, J.; Cabrol, N. A.; Cockell, C.; Gazis, P.; Newsom, H. E.

2000-01-01

236

Field tests of the surface area modulation downhole telemetry system  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests of the surface area modulation (SAM) downhole wireless telemetry system were performed at the DOE Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming in November, 1995 and September, 1996. SAM telemetry involves the introduction of a gap of electrically insulating material in the tubular conductors in the well. The electrical resistance of a switch in this gap can then be modulated to alter the electrical characteristics of a circuit involving the well tubulars. These changes affect the current in the circuit, which is monitored with a surface ammeter. Downhole data are encoded and transmitted to the surface as a pattern of current oscillations. The tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the system to transmit information from depths exceeding 2,000 feet to the surface at up to 2,400 baud.

Keefe, R.G.; Ballard, S.

1997-09-01

237

Simple and rapid field tests for brucellosis in livestock.  

PubMed

Four simple and rapid field tests for the serodiagnosis of brucellosis in cattle, goat, sheep and swine were developed. The performance of the assays was investigated using serum samples collected in Portugal from animals originating from herds with a defined sanitary status with respect to the presence of brucellosis. The sensitivity calculated for the bovine, caprine, ovine and swine Brucella lateral flow assays based on results obtained for samples collected from animals with culture confirmed brucellosis was 90%, 100%, 90% and 73%, respectively. None of the samples from animals from herds free of brucellosis reacted in the flow assays indicating a high specificity. However, as expected, some degree of reactivity was observed when testing selected serum samples that reacted non-specific in reference tests for brucellosis. PMID:18321664

Abdoel, Theresia; Dias, Isabel Travassos; Cardoso, Regina; Smits, Henk L

2008-08-25

238

A case study of field testing of windpumps in India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A tentative methodology for the testing of appropriate technology design windpumps and some early experience in operation of a relatively simple field test are described. This testing serves three purposes. One is comparative assessment under identical conditions. Second is keeping an impartial record of maintenance requirements. Third is to generate performance data to permit prediction of the quantity of water likely to be lifted on a gross, monthly basis at different places. The 10 minutes data generated intermittently can be utilized where velocity distribution profiles are known. This is the case at 37 places in India. But at another 317 places only monthly mean wind speeds are known. At these places 24-hourly performance data can be used in making first approximation of expected monthly outputs.

Venkatanarayana, A.

1985-02-01

239

Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors.  

PubMed

The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case. PMID:20370296

Olcay, Ali B; Pottebaum, Tait S; Krueger, Paul S

2010-03-01

240

Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing  

SciTech Connect

Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

2000-01-01

241

ROTSE All Sky Surveys for Variable Stars I: Test Fields  

E-print Network

The ROTSE-I experiment has generated CCD photometry for the entire Northern sky in two epochs nightly since March 1998. These sky patrol data are a powerful resource for studies of astrophysical transients. As a demonstration project, we present first results of a search for periodic variable stars derived from ROTSE-I observations. Variable identification, period determination, and type classification are conducted via automatic algorithms. In a set of nine ROTSE-I sky patrol fields covering about 2000 square degrees we identify 1781 periodic variable stars with mean magnitudes between m_v=10.0 and m_v=15.5. About 90% of these objects are newly identified as variable. Examples of many familiar types are presented. All classifications for this study have been manually confirmed. The selection criteria for this analysis have been conservatively defined, and are known to be biased against some variable classes. This preliminary study includes only 5.6% of the total ROTSE-I sky coverage, suggesting that the full ROTSE-I variable catalog will include more than 32,000 periodic variable stars.

ROTSE Collaboration; C. Akerlof; S. Amrose; R. Balsano; J. Bloch; D. Casperson; S. Fletcher; G. Gisler; J. Hills; R. Kehoe; B. Lee; S. Marshall; T. McKay; A. Pawl; J. Schaefer; J. Szymanski; J. Wren

2000-01-21

242

Testing for optic ataxia in a blind field  

PubMed Central

Optic ataxia is a component of Balint's syndrome and is a disorder that results from damage to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) leading to deficits in reaching and grasping objects presented in the visual field opposite to the damaged hemisphere. It is also often the case that Balint's syndrome is accompanied by visual field defects due to the proximity of parietal and occipital cortices and also due to the subcortical pathway relaying visual information from the retina to the visual cortex passing underneath the parietal cortex. The presence of primary visual defects such as hemianopia often prevents clinicians from diagnosing higher-level visual deficits such as optic ataxia; the patient cannot reach to targets he/she cannot see. Here, we show that through the use of a paradigm that takes advantage of remapping mechanisms, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. We measured reach endpoints of a patient presenting with left optic ataxia as well as a quadrantanopia in the left lower visual field in eye-static and eye-dynamic conditions. In static conditions, we first asked the patient to reach to targets viewed in her non-optic ataxic intact right visual field (fixating on the left of the target array). In this case, the patient showed undershoots equivalent to controls. Next, we asked her to reach to (the same) targets viewed in the upper left optic ataxic but intact visual field (fixating to the right of the target array). The undershooting pattern increased greatly, consistent with unilateral left optic ataxia. In dynamic conditions, we asked her to view targets in her good (right lower) visual field before reorienting her line of sight to the opposite side, causing the internal representation of the target to be updated into the opposite (ataxic) blind visual field. The patient then reached to the remembered (and updated) location of the target. We found errors typical of optic ataxia for reaches guided toward the quadrantanopic field. This confirmed that reaching errors depended on the updated internal representation of the target and not on where the target was viewed initially. In both the patient and the controls, the updating of target location was partial, with reaching errors observed subsequent to an eye movement made from left to right fixation positions being intermediate between the left and right static conditions. Thus, using this remapping paradigm, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. In conclusion, this remapping paradigm would allow clinicians to test for visuo-manual transformation deficits (optic ataxia) even when it is associated with hemianopia. PMID:23898253

Khan, Aarlenne Z.; Pisella, Laure; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves

2013-01-01

243

The fractal dimension of a test signal: implications for system identification procedures.  

PubMed

The experimental identification of a non-linear biologic transducer is often approached via consideration of its response to a stochastic test ensemble, such as Gaussian white noise (Marmarelis and Marmarelis 1978). In this approach, the input-output relationship a deterministic transducer is described by an orthogonal series of functionals. Laboratory implementation of such procedures requires the use of a particular test signal drawn from the idealized stochastic ensemble; the statistics of the particular test signal necessarily deviate from the statistics of the ensemble. The notion of a fractal dimension (specifically the capacity dimension) is a means to characterize a complex time series. It characterizes one aspect of the difference between a specific example of a test signal and the test ensemble from which it is drawn: the fractal dimension of ideal Gaussian white noise is infinite, while the fractal dimension of a particular test signal is finite. This paper shows that the fractal dimension of a test signal is a key descriptor of its departure from ideality: the fractal dimension of the test signal bounds the number of terms that can reliably be identified in the orthogonal functional series of an unknown transducer. PMID:3435730

Victor, J D

1987-01-01

244

Statistical Tests of Taylor's Hypothesis: An Application to Precipitation Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Taylor Hypothesis (TH) as applied to rainfall is a proposition about the space-time covariance structure of the rainfall field. Specifically, it supposes that if a spatio-temporal precipitation field with a stationary covariance Cov(r, ?) in both space r and time ?, moves with a constant velocity v, then the temporal covariance at time lag ? is equal to the spatial covariance at space lag v ?, that is, Cov(0, ?) = Cov(v ?, 0). Qualitatively this means that the field evolves slowly in time relative to the advective time scale, which is often referred to as the 'frozen field' hypothesis. Of specific interest is whether there is a cut-off or decorrelation time scale for which the TH holds for a given mean flow velocity v. In this study the validity of the TH is tested for precipitation fields using high-resolution gridded NEXRAD radar reflectivity data produced by the WSI Corporation by employing two different statistical approaches. The first method is based upon rigorous hypothesis testing while the second is based on a simple correlation analysis, which neglects possible dependencies in the correlation estimates. We use radar reflectivity values from the southeastern United States with an approximate horizontal resolution of 4 km x 4 km and a temporal resolution of 15 minutes. During the 4-day period from 2 to 5 May 2002, substantial precipitation occurs in the region of interest, and the motion of the precipitation systems is approximately uniform. The results of both statistical methods suggest that the TH might hold for the shortest space and time scales resolved by the data (4 km and 15 minutes), but that it does not hold for longer periods or larger spatial scales. Also, the simple correlation analysis tends to overestimate the statistical significance through failing to account for correlations between the covariance estimates.

Murthi, A.; Li, B.; Bowman, K.; North, G.; Genton, M.; Sherman, M.

2009-05-01

245

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01

246

Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

Morelli, Eugene A.

2000-01-01

247

System identification of the Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF), a laboratory-scale research project to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, has been developed. This system represents a scaled model of a planned Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LAMSTF consists of a small cylindrical permanent magnet suspended element which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The cylinder is a rigid body and can be controlled to move in five independent degrees of freedom. Six position variables are sensed indirectly by using infrared light-emitting diodes and light-receiving phototransistors. The motion of the suspended cylinder is in general nonlinear and hence only the linear, time-invariant perturbed motion about an equilibrium state is considered. One of the main challenges in this project is the control of the suspended element over a wide range of orientations. An accurate dynamic model plays an essential role in controller design. The analytical model is first derived and open-loop characteristics discussed. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control for system identification. Projection filters are first proposed to identify the state space model from closed-loop input/output test data in the time domain. This method is then extended to identify linear systems from the frequency test data. A canonical transformation matrix is also derived to transform the identified state space model into the physical coordinate. The LAMSTF system is stabilized by using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) feedback controller for closed-loop identification. The rate information is obtained by calculating the back difference of the sensed position signals. Only the closed-loop random input/output data are recorded. Preliminary results from numerical simulations demonstrate that the identified system model is fairly accurate from either time domain or frequency-domain data. Experiments will be performed to validate the proposed closed-loop identification algorithms.

Huang, Jen-Kuang

1994-01-01

248

Field tests and model analyses of seepage into drift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper focuses on field test results and model analyses of the first set of five niche seepage tests conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. The test results suggest that (1) a niche opening (short drift excavated for this study) acts as a capillary barrier; (2) a seepage threshold exists; and (3) the seepage is a fraction of the liquid released above the ceiling. Before seepage quantification, air injection and liquid release tests at two niche locations were conducted to characterize the fracture flow paths. Nearly two-order-of-magnitude changes in air permeability values were measured before and after niche excavation. The dyed liquid flow paths, together with a localized wet feature potentially associated with an ambient flow path, were mapped during dry excavation operations. After niche excavation, the seepage is quantified by the ratio of the water mass dripped into a niche to the mass released above the opening at selected borehole intervals. For the first set of five tests conducted at Niche 3650 site, the ratios range from 0% (no dripping for two tests) to 27.2%. Changes in flow path distributions and water accumulation near seepage threshold were observed on the niche ceiling. The seepage test results compare reasonably well with model results without parameter adjustments, using capillary barrier boundary condition in the niche and two-dimensional and three-dimensional conceptualizations to represent discrete fracture and fracture network for the flow paths. Model analyses of the niche tests indicate that the seepage is very sensitive to the niche boundary condition and is moderately sensitive to the heterogeneity of the fracture flow paths and to the strengths of matrix imbibition. Strong capillary strength and large storage capacity of the fracture flow paths limit the seepage. High permeability value also enhances diversion and reduces seepage for low liquid release rate.

Wang, J. S. Y.; Trautz, R. C.; Cook, P. J.; Finsterle, S.; James, A. L.; Birkholzer, J.

1999-05-01

249

Design criteria evaluation using and reliability test improvement based field test data on statistical analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the reliability analysis of start\\/stop (S\\/S) cycles of domestic heat pump and air conditioning (HP\\/AC) applications in United States. The statistical analysis has been done on the field test data in different climate regions; the design criteria, durability, and reliability of the products can be established based upon the results of the analysis. The reliability demonstration test

Wenzhen Yan; A. T. Herfat

2004-01-01

250

On the problem of source identification from far-field observations in hysteretic materials  

SciTech Connect

Propagation resulting from finite pulselength stresses applied at one end of a hysteretic material is analyzed using a propagation model containing a double modulus, or two-signal-speed, approximation of the stress-strain relation. The local signal speed is determined at any instant by both the value of stress and the sign of its time derivative (i.e., time-local history). It is shown that far-field waveforms do not determine unique source profiles. The propagation mechanism responsible for the ambiguity in source identification is common to broad classes of both local and global hysteretic stress-strain operators. Consequently, one may expect that it is typical of hysteretic materials that remote sources are not uniquely determined by observed waveforms. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

Kadish, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States) 87545] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States) 87545

1998-06-01

251

Interlaboratory Agreement of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Identification of Leptospira Serovars  

PubMed Central

Leptospirosis may be caused by > 250 Leptospira serovars. Serovar classification is a complex task that most laboratories cannot perform. We assessed the interlaboratory reproducibility of a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identification technique developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Blinded exchange of 93 Leptospiraceae strains occurred between San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the CDC. PFGE was performed and gel images were analyzed and compared with patterns present in each laboratory's database (CDC database: > 800 strain patterns; SAMMC database: > 300 strain patterns). Overall, 93.7% (74 of 79) of strains present in each receiving laboratory's database were correctly identified. Five isolates were misidentified, and two isolates did not match serovar PFGE patterns in the receiving laboratory's database. Patterns for these seven isolates were identical between laboratories; four serovars represented misidentified reference strains. The PFGE methodology studied showed excellent interlaboratory reproducibility, enabling standardization and data sharing between laboratories. PMID:23817329

Mende, Katrin; Galloway, Renee L.; Becker, Sara J.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Murray, Clinton K.; Hospenthal, Duane R.

2013-01-01

252

Bayesian identification of the local transmissivity using time-drawdown data from pumping tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional pumping test analysis techniques focus mostly on estimating the effective transmissivity of the perturbed subsurface volume surrounding the extraction and observation wells, ignoring the existing local-scale heterogeneity. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether transient drawdown data derived from pumping tests can also be used to identify the statistical spatial structure of the local transmissivity field. The

Nadim K. Copty; Angelos N. Findikakis

2004-01-01

253

Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

2000-01-01

254

Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system`s ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites.

Reed, S. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Christy, C.E. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Heath, R.E. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-01

255

Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments  

SciTech Connect

The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

1994-08-01

256

A Pilot Study Comparing Two Field Tests with the Treadmill Run Test in Soccer Players  

PubMed Central

This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players’ performance (i.e. distance covered) in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Players’ performance in the YIET was not significantly correlated with the measured VO2max obtained in the same YIET nor with the measured VO2max obtained in the MST and in the TRT (all p > 0.05). In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players’ performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05); and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06). The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players’ intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player’s endurance performance. Key PointsBoth the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test and 20m multistage shuttle run test are valid measures of aerobic exertion in soccer playersMeasured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players’ intermittent endurance performance.In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player’s endurance performance. PMID:24431967

Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Frankie H. Y.; Teh, Kong Chuan

2005-01-01

257

A pilot study comparing two field tests with the treadmill run test in soccer players.  

PubMed

This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered) in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Players' performance in the YIET was not significantly correlated with the measured VO2max obtained in the same YIET nor with the measured VO2max obtained in the MST and in the TRT (all p > 0.05). In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05); and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06). The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance. Key PointsBoth the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test and 20m multistage shuttle run test are valid measures of aerobic exertion in soccer playersMeasured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance.In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance. PMID:24431967

Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Frankie H Y; Teh, Kong Chuan

2005-06-01

258

The identification and characteristics of field resistance to lettuce downy mildew (Bremia lactucae Regel)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-one accessions of three Lactuca species which showed no recognisable race specific resistance to Bremia lactucae when tested in the laboratory as seedlings, exhibited different degrees of susceptibility when exposed to natural field infection. As a group, crisp genotypes had less mildew and a slower rate of disease development than other types of lettuce. Wild forms of Lactuca sativa and

I. R. Crute; Judith M. Norwood

1981-01-01

259

Test Observations and Plans For the Hubble Deep Field - South  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will discuss the planning process, scheduling constraints, and scientific considerations which we have studied and undertaken thus far for the southern Hubble Deep Field observations which are to be performed in October of 1998. Observations from a 3-orbit test program taken in October 1997 at the same position angle and with the same guide stars will be presented to the community for comment and for informational purposes. Planning is constrained in part by CVZ passages, by solar avoidance, zodiacal light, effective use of filters and gratings minimizing effects of scattered earthshine, SAA avoidance, avoidance of bright stars, and availability of suitable guide stars. In particular, it is crucial to test the same guide stars that will be used for the full set of observations. This preview of science data on the field will also allow us to fine-tune any other aspects of the program which may be better optimized scientifically. The HDF-S test observations will consist of one orbit of STIS 50CCD clear aperture imaging to image the field around the QSO, and two orbits of STIS NUV-MAMA G230L spectroscopy on the QSO to obtain a low resolution spectrum. In addition, three orbits of WFPC2 F606W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 6.2 arc minutes from the QSO, and three orbits of NIC3 F160W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 8.7 arc minutes from the QSO. The actual HDF-S observations next October are currently planned to include the same complement of filters for WFPC2 as was used in the original HDF-N ( F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W ). Other options yet to be determined will be pursued for STIS and NICMOS for the full campaign. For more information, see our HDF-South Web site at the URL http://www.stsci.edu/ftp/science/hdf/hdfsouth/hdfs.html.

Williams, R. E.; Baum, S. A.; Blacker, B. S.; Carollo, M.; Casertano, S.; Dickinson, M. E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Madau, P.; Postman, M.; Stiavelli, M.

1997-12-01

260

Field test of wavelength-saving quantum key distribution network.  

PubMed

We propose a wavelength-saving topology of a quantum key distribution (QKD) network based on passive optical elements, and we report on the field test of this network on commercial telecom optical fiber at the frequency of 20 MHz. In this network, five nodes are supported with two wavelengths, and every two nodes can share secure keys directly at the same time. We also characterized the insertion loss and cross talk effects on the point-to-point QKD system after introducing this QKD network. PMID:20634861

Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Tao; Li, Hong-Wei; Xu, Fang-Xing; Zhou, Zheng; Yang, Yang; Huang, Da-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Li, Fang-Yi; Liu, Dong; Wang, Yong-Gang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

2010-07-15

261

Wavefront dislocations and testing of coherent optical fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown, that spiral interferograms can be used for diagnostics of screw dislocations. The connection between the type of spiral line, the type of defect and the values of wavefronts curvatures of interfering beams is established. The spherical wave is considered as reference wavefront. The results of analysis for isolated dislocation are integrated on case of defects set. It is shown, that the diagnostics of coherent fields with defects as screw dislocation requires the preliminary study of wavefront topology. The outline of execution of such testing is offered.

Bobrov, Boris D.

1996-04-01

262

Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

Kearney, D. W.

1981-02-01

263

Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

1987-12-01

264

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

265

Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being tested to: (a) develop a low-level waste data base, and (b) obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. This paper updates field testing of those waste forms during FY-1989. The results of the lysimeters is presented and the use of lysimeter data in performance assessment is discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

1990-01-01

266

Optimizing Field Campaigns Using A Hypothesis Testing Framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field campaigns in hydrogeology often aim to characterize aquifers for modeling and predicting flow and transport of contaminants to facilitate in some objective related to environmental protection or public health and safety. Many times these objectives depend on predicting the answer to a yes/no question, such as: will contaminant concentration in an aquifer surpass a threshold value? Will a contaminant reach a river outflow before it degrades? Is water from an extraction well safe for consumption? It remains difficult, however, to predict the extent to which a field campaign will improve modeling and prediction efforts or the chance of success in the original objective. Presented here is a method for designing field campaigns around the original objective by posing it in a hypothesis testing framework and optimizing campaigns with minimizing probability of error as the goal. The first step in this process is to formulate the null and alternative hypotheses, which represent the two possible outcomes of the yes/no question in the objective. The alternative hypothesis is the desirable outcome which requires a specified level of certainty to be accepted. The null hypothesis, on the other hand, is the "safe" fallback assumption, which is accepted if the alternative hypothesis lacks sufficient supporting evidence. Of key concern in designing field campaigns is the probability of making an error (Type I or Type II). A level of significance is chosen based on the severity of each type of error and the level of risk that is considered acceptable for each case. A field campaign can then be designed to gain enough information to reduce the probability of error to the acceptable level while expending as few resources as possible. A case study examined here is attempting to predict the arrival time of a contaminant in an aquifer. A scenario is first established in which a contaminant is travelling from a point source to a control plane, which could represent, for example, a water supply well or an environmentally sensitive area. In this case, the null hypothesis is that this arrival time is less than or equal to a specified critical value, while the alternative hypothesis is that the arrival time is greater than the critical value. In this case, the field campaign involves measuring conductivity at various locations throughout the aquifer. The campaign could vary both in the number of measurements and the location of the measurements. Estimating the probability of error resulting from a field campaign involves numerical simulations in which travel time is calculated on numerous fields that are physically and statistically plausible. The calculated travel time for each field is then compared to the hypothesis that would have been accepted via an analysis using only information ascertained by the field campaign in question. The result from each field falls into one of four categories: correctly accepting the null hypothesis, correctly accepting the alternative hypothesis, error of Type I, and error of Type II. Differing field campaign strategies can then be compared based on the frequency of errors resulting from each strategy.

Harken, B. J.; Over, M. W.; Rubin, Y.

2012-12-01

267

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to the CLSI guidelines, was the reference AST method. Essential and categorical agreements were determined. The overall levels of agreement for the genus- and species-level identifications were 95.6% and 94.4%, respectively. Fourteen isolates were incorrectly identified by the Phoenix system; 10 of these were incorrectly identified to the species level. Three of these were Enterobacter (Pantoea) species and four of these were Shigella spp. misidentified as Escherichia coli. For AST results, the essential and categorical agreements were 98.7% and 97.9%, respectively. The very major error, major error, and minor error rates were 0.38%, 0.33%, and 1.8%, respectively. Six isolates (three E. coli isolates and three Klebsiella isolates) were extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producers. All six were flagged by the Phoenix system expert rules. The Phoenix system compares favorably to traditional methods for ID and AST of Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:17021074

Carroll, Karen C.; Glanz, Brian D.; Borek, Anita P.; Burger, Chad; Bhally, Hasan S.; Henciak, Susan; Flayhart, Diane

2006-01-01

268

Revising the Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT) by means of Item Response Theory.  

PubMed

Cannabis use among adolescents and young adults has become a major public health challenge. Several European countries are currently developing short screening instruments to identify 'problematic' forms of cannabis use in general population surveys. One such instrument is the Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT), a 10-item questionnaire based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Previous research found that some CUDIT items did not perform well psychometrically. In the interests of improving the psychometric properties of the CUDIT, this study replaces the poorly performing items with new items that specifically address cannabis use. Analyses are based on a sub-sample of 558 recent cannabis users from a representative population sample of 5722 individuals (aged 13-32) who were surveyed in the 2007 Swiss Cannabis Monitoring Study. Four new items were added to the original CUDIT. Psychometric properties of all 14 items, as well as the dimensionality of the supplemented CUDIT were then examined using Item Response Theory. Results indicate the unidimensionality of CUDIT and an improvement in its psychometric performance when three original items (usual hours being stoned; injuries; guilt) are replaced by new ones (motives for using cannabis; missing out leisure time activities; difficulties at work/school). However, improvements were limited to cannabis users with a high problem score. For epidemiological purposes, any further revision of CUDIT should therefore include a greater number of 'easier' items. PMID:20812291

Annaheim, Beatrice; Scotto, Thomas J; Gmel, Gerhard

2010-09-01

269

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17

270

Loop Identification and Capacity Estimation of Digital Subscriber Lines with Single Ended Line Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital subscriber lines offer the possibility to deliver broadband services over the existing telephone network. Still, beforehand subscriber loops must be tested to see whether they can support high-speed data services, and at what bit rate. From the existing measurement techniques, Single Ended Line Testing is often preferred because all necessary measurements can be performed from the central office. Consequently the capacity cannot be measured directly, but should be calculated through the estimation of the loop make-up. This paper discusses some main difficulties of this identification. Moreover, in contrast to the traditional approach where the data are interpreted in the time domain, this paper presents a new approach by doing most of the processing in the frequency domain.

Neus, Carine; Foubert, Wim; van Biesen, Leo

271

Forensic identification of urine using the DMAC test: a method validation study.  

PubMed

Forensic scientists may sometimes be asked to identify the presence of urine in cases such as harassment, rape or murder. One popular presumptive test method uses para-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC), favoured because it is simple, rapid and safe. This paper confirms that DMAC reacts with urea rather than creatinine, ammonia or uric acid. Sensitivity studies found that the 0.1% w/v DMAC solution currently used for urine identification detects levels of urea found in other body fluids, potentially resulting in false positives. A 0.05% w/v solution was found to be more appropriate in terms of sensitivity to urea however the test is still not specific for urine, giving positive reactions with a number of body fluids (saliva, semen, sweat and vaginal material) and other substances (foot lotion, hair removal cream and broccoli). PMID:22583500

Ong, Sandy Y; Wain, Adrian; Groombridge, Linda; Grimes, Eileen

2012-06-01

272

Spectral modeling for the identification and quantification of algal blooms: A test of approach  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to develop and test a Monte Carlo modelling approach for the characterization of reflectance for different bloom-forming marine phytoplankton species. The model was tested on optical data for four species (Dunaliella salina, Pavlova pinguis, Emiliania huxleyi and Synechocystes spp.) and simulations performed over a range of chlorophyll concentrations. Discriminant analysis identified 10 key wavelengths which could be used to maximize the separation between the four species. The resulting wavelengths were combined in a neural network to show 100% accuracy in classifying species type. Further simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of aquatic humus on reflectance characteristics and the change in wavelengths for algal discrimination. The implications for the development of algorithms for the identification of algal bloom species type by remote sensing are briefly discussed.

Malthus, T.J.; Grieve, L. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Harwar, M.D. [Univ. of Wolverhampton (United Kingdom)

1997-06-01

273

Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-08-01

274

Detection and identification of microorganisms using a combined flow field-flow fractionation/spectroscopy technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This doctoral project is focused on the implementation of a novel micron and sub-micron particle characterization technology for in-situ, continuous monitoring and detecting of microorganisms in water. The particle technology is based on simultaneous characterizing the joint particle property distribution (size, shape, and chemical composition) through the combined fractionation/separation and light scattering detection and interpretation techniques. Over more than a decade, field-flow fractionation (FFF) has shown to be well-suited for the separation and/or selection of bacteria (Giddings, 1993). As the most universal fractionation technique among the FFF family, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) has been chosen as the separation device in this research. The multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometer and the UV-vis/liquid core optical waveguide constitute the primary on-line light scattering detection system. The angular spectra obtained by the MALLS photometer provided information on the shape of microorganism; the multi-wavelength transmission spectra of microorganisms contain quantitative information on their size, number, shape, chemical composition and internal structure, which are essential for identification and classification of microorganisms. Both experimental results and the theoretical prediction have revealed that the particle size resolution capabilities of the FFFF fractionation system coupled with the sensitivity of the laser light scattering to particle shape, and the sensitivity of the UV-vis spectra to cell size, shape, cell orientation and chemical composition offer an integrated system for the identification and classification of microorganisms. The ability to discriminate between cell species was demonstrated by the light scattering and absorption interpretation model, which is based on light scattering theory (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation), spectral deconvolution techniques, and on the approximation of the frequency dependent optical properties of the basic constituents of microorganisms. It is further demonstrated that the combined multi-angle light scattering and multi-wavelength transmission spectroscopic technique can provide reliable information on the cell size, cell count, shape, cell alignment, chemical composition and basic understanding of the light scattering origins within the cell. Advances in the development of miniaturized spectrometers and the micromachined field-flow fractionation technique increase the potential of this method as a candidate for a rapid, reliable and efficient biosensor.

Fu, Xiaojuan

275

Microseismic Monitoring of a Carbon Sequestration Field Test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microseismic monitoring was implemented as part of a comprehensive carbon sequestration monitoring program at the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's geologic field test site in Otsego County, Michigan. The field test itself consisted of the injection of ~10,000 tonnes of CO2 over 31 days. The intent of the microseismic monitoring program was to understand its potential for verifying cap rock integrity and for identifying the position of the CO2 plume. Microseismic monitoring was achieved using two downhole geophone arrays located in observation wells within 750m of the injection well. One event was recorded during a period of higher relative injection rate and located at the base of the cap rock within the permitted injection interval, suggesting a possible linkage with pressure change or fluid mobilization caused by the CO2 injection processes. The full seismic moment tensor was determined for the injection related event revealing a complex failure mechanism that is consistent with a fracture initiation. The orientation of the fracture is consistant with the maximum horizontal stress in the region. In this context, failure mechanism is taken to be the description of the movement of the rocks. Microseismic monitoring has proved to be a valuable tool for monitoring cap rock integrity.

Urbancic, T. I.; Daugherty, J.; Baig, A. M.

2009-12-01

276

The identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania using ITS-1 primers and  

E-print Network

to identify the trypanosome species carried by individual tsetse flies. The first method is basedThe identification, diversity and prevalence of trypanosomes in field caught tsetse in Tanzania School of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4PS, UK c Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis

Tyler, Charles

277

Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) field test installations  

SciTech Connect

The MIMS program is funded by the Department of Energy under the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The program objective is to develop cost effective, modular, multi-sensor monitoring systems. Both in-plant and ground based sensors are envisioned. It is also desirable to develop sensors/systems that can be fielded/deployed in a rapid fashion. A MIMS architecture was selected to allow modular integration of sensors and systems and is based on LonWorks technology, commercially developed by Echelon Corporation. The first MIMS fieldable hardware was demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The field test, known within the DOE as the Item Tracking and Transparency (IT&I) demonstration, involved the collaboration and cooperation of five DOE laboratories (Sandia (SNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Pacific Northwest (PNL), Los Alamos (LANL), and Oak Ridge (ORNL)). The IT&T demonstration involved the monitoring of special nuclear material as it was transported around the facility utilizing sensors from the participating labs. The scenario was programmed to ignore normal activity in the facility until entry into the room where the material was stored. A second demonstration, which involved three separate scenarios, was conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The participants included representatives from SNL, LLNL, PNL, and INEL. DOE has selected INEL as the long term testbed for MIMS developed sensors, systems, and scenarios. This paper will describe the installation, intended purpose, and results of the field demonstrations at LLNL and INEL under the MIMS program.

Martinez, R.L.; Waymire, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fuess, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-07-01

278

Laboratory and field assessment of arsenic testing field kits in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India.  

PubMed

High concentrations of arsenic in ground waters in West Bengal and Bangladesh have become a major cause for concern in recent years. Given the enormity and the severity of the problem of arsenic poisoning, a task of evaluating the commercially available arsenic detection field kits for their capabilities was undertaken. In the light of the findings, generic specifications were recommended which could form the basis for indigenous manufacture of these kits in the arsenic affected countries. This article presents the results of the laboratory and field evaluation conducted in Bangladesh and West Bengal of five arsenic testing field kits. The salient features of the kits, their merits and limitations have been brought out. Based on the criteria of kit design, quality of chemicals used, colour comparator charts, detection range, time required for analysis, cost etc., a comparative ranking of the kits has been made to facilitate the choice of the kit to meet specific requirements. PMID:11336408

Pande, S P; Deshpande, L S; Kaul, S N

2001-04-01

279

Choking Under the Pressure of a Positive Stereotype: Gender Identification and Self-Consciousness Moderate Men's Math Test Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly

Michael J. Tagler

2012-01-01

280

The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

1989-02-01

281

Evaluation of three disk tests for identification of enterococci, leuconostocs, and pediococci.  

PubMed Central

Simple rapid tests for presumptive identification of catalase-negative non-beta-hemolytic cocci (i.e., enterococci, leuconostocs, and pediococci) have not previously been available. Seven hundred thirty-four strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic, catalase-negative, non-beta-hemolytic gram-positive cocci were tested for susceptibility to vancomycin (Vans) by a screening procedure and production of leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) and pyrrolidonylarylamidase (PYRase) in disk tests. Three unique patterns of activity in response to the three disks (30 micrograms of vancomycin, PYRase, and LAPase) can be used to presumptively identify the vancomycin-resistant (Vanr) enterococci (Vanr and PYRase and LAPase positive), leuconostocs (Vanr and PYRase and LAPase negative), and pediococci (Vanr, PYRase negative, and LAPase positive). The results indicate that, together with Gram stain characteristics and the catalase test, the vancomycin, LAPase, and PYRase disk tests can be used to presumptively identify Vanr strains of enterococci as well as Leuconostoc and Pediococcus strains from human infections. PMID:7790454

Facklam, R; Pigott, N; Franklin, R; Elliott, J

1995-01-01

282

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

SciTech Connect

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which various insulation materials were installed. The panel was located in an environmental chamber. The test samples included various cellulosic, glass fiber and rockwool insulations as well as sterile cotton as a control. Steel and copper coupons together with water-cooled copper pipes were embedded in the insulation and exposed for 6 months. It was found that moisture absorption by the insulation was the primary factor in causing corrosion but required that chemical activity from insulation components also be present. No corrosion occurred in the absence of insulation or in rockwool and glassfiber insulation. All cellulose insulations caused some corrosion. Mostly this was minimal but in a few cases severe pitting resulted. Such behavior of the cellulose did not correspond to previous laboratory test results in saturated insulation or leachants made from the insulation. However, laboratory testing of leachants made from some of the cellulose after the simulated wall test showed a change in pitting tendency, suggesting that time and/or exposure to moisture can change the corrosiveness. This should be further explored. 12 refs., 9 figs, 3 tabs.

Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.; Desjarlais, A.

1988-09-01

283

Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Bactec Blood Culture Broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus Test  

PubMed Central

The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth. PMID:24153135

Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E.

2014-01-01

284

Rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus directly from Bactec blood culture broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus test.  

PubMed

The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth. PMID:24153135

Qian, Qinfang; Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E

2014-01-01

285

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01

286

Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2012-01-01

287

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

2002-09-30

288

FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER  

E-print Network

#12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

289

Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

1996-12-01

290

The 5 min running field test: test and retest reliability on trained men and women  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The repeatability of the maximal aerobic velocity (v\\u000a amax) estimated using the 5 min running field test (5RFT) has been examined in an heterogeneous population of 132 subjects distributed in five groups considering their sporting activities,\\u000a their competition levels and their physical fitness levels: among them were national and local runners, rugby players, and\\u000a multi-sport women and men. To establish the

Michel Dabonneville; Paul Berthon; Philippe Vaslin; Nicole Fellmann

2003-01-01

291

Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water bearing intervals the CET is shown to compare favourably with the CBL/VDL and yields significant additional information on channeling, cement distribution, and the success of casing centralization. In addition, the accuracy of the acoustic calipers have proved sufficient to be used in assisting drilling and completion operations. The response of the tool to a microannulus has also been demonstrated by multiple runs under varying wellbore pressures.

Leigh, C.A.; Finlayson, C.G.; Van der Kolk, C.

1984-01-01

292

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-08-01

293

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Jastrow, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wickliff, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01

294

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31

295

[Studies on identification of drugs of abuse by diode array detection. I. Screening-test and identification of benzodiazepines by HPLC-DAD with ICOS software system].  

PubMed

For the establishment of screening-test and identification of 20 benzodiazepines (Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Clonazepam, Clotiazepam, Cloxazolam, Diazepam, Estazolam, Fludiazepam, Flunitrazepam, Flurazepam, Lorazepam, Lormetazepam, Medazolam, Midazepam, Nimetazepam, Nitrazepam, Oxazepam, Prazepam, Triazolam), the optimum separation condition on HPLC was investigated by using Interactive Computer Optimization for HPLC Separation (ICOS) software. The two eluent systems of 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.1)-methanol-acetonitrile (66.4:5.7:27.9) and 0.1% TFA-methanol-acetonitrile (61.6:16.1:22.3) were selected by HPLC analyses using ICOS. These optimum separation conditions enabled the screening test and identification of the 20 benzodiazepines on HPLC with photodiode array detection. PMID:7920567

Shimamine, M; Masunari, T; Nakahara, Y

1993-01-01

296

Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the field testing task, using lysimeter arrays, is to expose samples of solidified resin waste to the actual physical, chemical, and microbiological conditions of disposal enviroment. Wastes used in the experiment include a mixture of synthetic organic ion exchange resins and a mixture of organic exchange resins and an inorganic zeolite. Solidification agents used to produce the 4.8-by 7.6-cm cylindrical waste forms used in the study were Portland Type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene. Seven of these waste forms were stacked end-to-end and inserted into each lysimeter to provide a 1-L volume. There are 10 lysimeters, 5 at ORNL and 5 at ANL-E. Lysimeters used in this study were designed to be self-contained units which will be disposed at the termination of the 20-year study. Each is a 0.91-by 3.12-m right-circular cylinder divided into an upper compartment, which contains fill material, waste forms, and instrumentation, and an empty lower compartment, which collects leachate. Four lysimeters at each site are filled with soil, while a fifth (used as a control) is filled with inert silica oxide sand. Instrumentation within each lysimeter includes porous cup soil-water samplers and soil moisture/temperature probes. The probes are connected to an on-site data acquisition and storage system (DAS) which also collects data from a field meteorological station located at each site. 9 refs.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

1988-01-01

297

Test of Climate Field Reconstruction Performance Using Pseudoproxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The level of skill in proxy-based reconstructions of past climate can be estimated using statistical verification procedures wherein part of the instrumental record is withheld from the calculations and then compared to the reconstruction. Due to the short duration of the instrumental data (~150 years), however, other approaches must be used to estimate the longer-term (e.g. century-scale) fidelity of the reconstructions. One such approach uses long-duration climate simulations. We used a 1150-year-long run of the NCAR CSM coupled model subject to estimated long-term natural and anthropogenic radiative forcing changes to test the Regularized Expectation Maximization (RegEM) method of climate field reconstruction (CFR). Our tests involved the creation of pseudoproxy networks, which are a combinations of model data and noise of various amplitudes and color. We used RegEM to train the pseudoproxy networks over short (<150 year) calibration intervals then diagnosed the skill of the resulting reconstruction using an independent validation period extending more than 1000 years back in time. Our results show that, for a variety of signal-to-noise ratios (including those of actual proxy networks) and noise colors, CFR should yield reliable climate reconstructions within estimated uncertainties.

Rutherford, S. D.; Mann, M. E.; Wahl, E. R.; Ammann, C.

2006-12-01

298

Exoantigen tests for the rapid and specific identification of Apophysomyces elegans and Saksenaea vasiformis.  

PubMed

Apophysomyces elegans and Saksenaea vasiformis frequently fail to sporulate on routine media used in clinical laboratories, thus delaying or preventing their specific identification. We have developed exoantigen test reagents capable of identifying non-sporulating isolates of A. elegans and S. vasiformis. A reagent containing three specific A. elegans precipitins was produced when A. elegans antiserum was absorbed with S. vasiformis. Antigenic analyses showed that at least two serotypes of S. vasiformis exist. Only six of 10 S. vasiformis isolates studied produced bands of identity with S. vasiformis (B-2190) (serotype 1) antiserum absorbed with S. vasiformis (B-2189) (serotype 2) antigens. The remaining four isolates, however, produced bands of identity with S. vasiformis B-2189 antiserum absorbed with B-2190 antigens. Antigenic differences among the isolates of the two groups could be correlated to some extent with the morphologic differences observed, especially with respect to the size of the sporangia and sporangiospores. PMID:2501468

Lombardi, G; Padhye, A A; Standard, P G; Kaufman, L; Ajello, L

1989-01-01

299

Testing An Identification Algorithm for Extragalactic OB Associations Using a Galactic Sample  

E-print Network

We have used a Galactic sample of OB stars and associations to test the performance of an automatic grouping algorithm designed to identify extragalactic OB associations. The algorithm identifies the known Galactic OB associations correctly when the search radius (78 pc) is defined by the observed stellar surface density. Galactic OB associations identified with a 78 pc search radius have diameters that are $\\sim$3 times larger than OB associations identified with a 22 pc search radius in M33. Applying the smaller search radius to the Galactic data matches both the sizes and the number of member stars between the two galaxies quite well. Thus, we argue that this and similar algorithms should be used with a constant physical search radius, rather than one which varies with the stellar surface density. Such an approach would allow the identification of differences in the giant molecular cloud populations and star formation efficiency under most circumstances.

Christine D. Wilson; Karen J. Bakker

1996-06-28

300

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1991-01-01

301

Frontal eye field activity enhances object identification during covert visual search.  

PubMed

We investigated the link between neuronal activity in the frontal eye field (FEF) and the enhancement of visual processing associated with covert spatial attention in the absence of eye movements. We correlated activity recorded in the FEF of monkeys manually reporting the identity of a visual search target to performance accuracy and reaction time. Monkeys were cued to the most probable target location with a cue array containing a popout color singleton. Neurons exhibited spatially selective responses for the popout cue stimulus and for the target of the search array. The magnitude of activity related to the location of the cue prior to the presentation of the search array was correlated with trends in behavioral performance across valid, invalid, and neutral cue trial conditions. However, the speed and accuracy of the behavioral report on individual trials were predicted by the magnitude of spatial selectivity related to the target to be identified, not for the spatial cue. A minimum level of selectivity was necessary for target detection and a higher level for target identification. Muscimol inactivation of FEF produced spatially selective perceptual deficits in the covert search task that were correlated with the effectiveness of the inactivation and were strongest on invalid cue trials that require an endogenous attention shift. These results demonstrate a strong functional link between FEF activity and covert spatial attention and suggest that spatial signals from FEF directly influence visual processing during the time that a stimulus to be identified is being processed by the visual system. PMID:19828723

Monosov, Ilya E; Thompson, Kirk G

2009-12-01

302

System Identification of Local Field Potentials under Deep Brain Stimulation in a Healthy Primate  

PubMed Central

High frequency (HF) Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the Sub-Thalamic Nucleus (STN) is a clinically recognized therapy for the treatment of motor disorders in Parkinson Disease (PD). The underlying mechanisms of DBS and how it impacts neighboring nuclei, however, are not yet completely understood. Electrophysiological data has been collected in PD patients and primates to better understand the impact of DBS on STN and the entire Basal Ganglia (BG) motor circuit. We use single unit recordings from Globus Pallidus, both pars interna and externa segments (GPi and GPe) in the BG, in a normal primate before and after DBS to reconstruct Local Field Potentials (LFPs) in the region. We then use system identification techniques to understand how GPe LFP activity and the DBS signal applied to STN influence GPi LFP activity. Our models suggest that when no stimulation is applied, the GPe LFPs have an inhibitory effect on GPi LFPs with a 2-3 ms delay, as is the case for single unit neuronal activity. On the other hand, when DBS is ON the models suggest that stimulation has a dominant effect on GPi LFPs which mask the inhibitory effects of GPe. PMID:21096635

Pedoto, Gilda; Santaniello, Sabato; Montgomery, Erwin B.; Gale, John T.; Fiengo, Giovanni; Glielmo, Luigi; Sarma, Sridevi V.

2013-01-01

303

Evaluation of a behavioral method for objective vision testing and identification of achromatopsia in dogs  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop a quantifiable behavioral test for identification of achromatopsic dogs based on visual performance. Animals 14 dogs. Procedures A 3.6-m-long obstacle-avoidance course with 6 obstacle panels was developed from a preliminary 2.4-m-long course. Achromatopsic and visually normal control dogs were run through the course at 4 ambient light intensities (from dim to bright: 0.2, 25, 65, and 646 lux). Completion of 4 runs ranging from dimmest to brightest light intensity constituted 1 complete trial. Each dog underwent 3 trials. Transit times were measured and compared between dog groups and between light intensities by use of a generalized linear model and ANOVA. Results At the 3 highest light intensities, the achromatopsic dogs needed significantly more time to pass through the obstacle course than the control animals. Compared with the mean transit time at the lowest light intensity, mean transit times were 2.6 times as long at 25 lux, 3.2 times as long at 65 lux, and 5.7 times as long at 646 lux. The achromatopsic dogs had signs of increasing difficulty navigating around the obstacle panels with increasing light intensities; this was not the situation for the control dogs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance A 3.6-m-long obstacle-avoidance course with 6 movable obstacle panels allowed identification of achromatopsic dogs at ambient light intensities ? 25 lux based on transit times. This test could be helpful in the evaluation of new cone photoreceptor–specific treatments. PMID:20043788

Garcia, Monique M.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Cocores, Christina A.; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Komaromy, Andras M.

2010-01-01

304

Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

1993-10-01

305

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31

306

Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

Hess, Ronald A.

1990-01-01

307

On-line identification, flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural mode parameters for V-22 tiltrotor aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

New algorithms and results are presented for flutter testing and adaptive notching of structural modes in V-22 tiltrotor aircraft\\u000a based on simulated and flight-test data from Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHTI). For flutter testing and the identification\\u000a of structural mode frequencies, dampings and mode shapes, time domain state space techniques based on Deterministic Stochastic\\u000a Realization Algorithms (DSRA) are used to

R. K. Mehra; P. O. ARambel; A. M. Sampath; R. K. Prasanth; T. C. Parham

2000-01-01

308

Rapid field identification of subjects involved in firearm-related crimes based on electroanalysis coupled with advanced chemometric data treatment.  

PubMed

We demonstrate a novel system for the detection and discrimination of varying levels of exposure to gunshot residue from subjects in various control scenarios. Our aim is to address the key challenge of minimizing the false positive identification of individuals suspected of discharging a firearm. The chemometric treatment of voltammetric data from different controls using Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) provides several distinct clusters for each scenario examined. Multiple samples were taken from subjects in controlled tests such as secondary contact with gunshot residue (GSR), loading a firearm, and postdischarge of a firearm. These controls were examined at both bare carbon and gold-modified screen-printed electrodes using different sampling methods: the 'swipe' method with integrated sampling and electroanalysis and a more traditional acid-assisted q-tip swabbing method. The electroanalytical fingerprint of each sample was examined using square-wave voltammetry; the resulting data were preprocessed with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), followed by CVA treatment. High levels of discrimination were thus achieved in each case over 3 classes of samples (reflecting different levels of involvement), achieving maximum accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 100% employing the leave-one-out validation method. Further validation with the 'jack-knife' technique was performed, and the resulting values were in good agreement with the former method. Additionally, samples from subjects in daily contact with relevant metallic constituents were analyzed to assess possible false positives. This system may serve as a potential method for a portable, field-deployable system aimed at rapidly identifying a subject who has loaded or discharged a firearm to verify involvement in a crime, hence providing law enforcement personnel with an invaluable forensic tool in the field. PMID:23121395

Cetó, Xavier; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Windmiller, Joshua R; del Valle, Manel; Wang, Joseph

2012-12-01

309

Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.  

PubMed

Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure. PMID:22822682

Tagler, Michael J

2012-01-01

310

Cultivar Evaluation and Essential Test Locations Identification for Sugarcane Breeding in China  

PubMed Central

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

Luo, Jun; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai

2014-01-01

311

78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...concerning the field testing of the following unlicensed...Bayer HealthCare LLC, Animal Health...

2013-09-24

312

Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

Montgomery, Jim

2012-01-01

313

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31

314

Field tests of X-ray backscatter mine detection  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of a backscattered X-ray landmine detection system has been demonstrated in laboratories at both Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Florida (UF). To assess the system`s response to a variety of objects, buried plastic and metal antitank landmines, surface plastic antipersonnel landmines, and surface metal fragments were used as targets. The X-ray machine used for the field test system was an industrial X-ray machine which was operated at 150 kV and 5 mZ and collimated to create a 2 cm diameter X-ray spot on the soil. The detectors used were two plastic scintillation detectors: one collimated to respond primarily to photons that have undergone multiple collision and the other uncollimated to respond primarily to photons that have had only one collision. To provide motion, the system was mounted on a gantry and rastered side-to-side using a computer-controlled stepper motor with a come-along providing the forward movement. Data generated from the detector responses were then analyzed to provide the images and locations of landmines. A new analysis method that increases resolution was used. Changing from the lab environment to the field did not decrease the system`s ability to detect buried or obscured landmines. The addition of rain, blowing dust, rocky soil and native plant-life did not lower the system`s resolution or contrast for the plastic or the metal landmines. Concepts for a civilian mine detection system based on this work using commercial off the shelf (COTS) equipment were developed.

Lockwood, G.J.; Shope, S.L.; Wehlburg, J.C.; Selph, M.M.; Jojola, J.M.; Turman, B.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jacobs, J.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1998-08-01

315

Birba field PVT variations along the hydrocarbon column and confirmatory field tests  

SciTech Connect

Birba-1, drilled in 1978, encountered oil in a carbonate ''stringer'' embedded in Pre-Cambrian Era salt. The reservoir pressure is anomalously high (53 200 kPa at 2600 m ss) and the oil contains 260 m/sup 3//m/sup 3/ solution gas. A well 2.5 km south of BB-1 encountered the stringer 212 m shallower and proved it gas bearing. Based on reservoir pressures this gas could have been in communication with the oil. However, at initial conditions the oil is undersaturated by 5700 kPa and any contact with a primary gascap would be unconventional. From thermodynamic calculations it was concluded that compositional variations along the hydrocarbon column as well as the undersaturation of the Birba oil could be explained by gravity effects, i.e. the calculations predicted PVT properties which were strongly depth dependent. Furthermore, the calculations also led to a suspicion that hydrocarbons below the oil-down-to known at that time would be immovable. The above concepts were proven in the field by an interference test which showed a pressure response in the gascap due to oil production and an appraisal well that encountered high hydrocarbon saturations in an interval 150 m deeper than the BB-1 level but with water as the movable phase. This paper describes the intriguing PVT properties, being illustrative of a practical application of thermodynamical modelling, and also the testing that was carried out for confirmation. The various options for field development are discussed.

Riemens, W.G.; de Jong, L.N.J.

1985-03-01

316

Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

2006-01-01

317

Identification of earthquake sources responsible for subsurface VLF electric field emissions observed at Agra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Employing USGS earthquake data for Indian region and very low frequency (VLF, 3 kHz) subsurface electric field data obtained by using a borehole antenna at Agra in India, statistical analysis has been carried out to identify the earthquake sources responsible for VLF data. The correlation coefficient between occurrence number of VLF noise bursts and earthquakes are calculated and level of null hypothesis tested. The results show that seismic activities occurring close to the observing station and the main boundary fault located at the southern base of Himalaya are the main sources of VLF emissions recorded at the station.

Singh, Vikram; Singh, Birbal; Kumar, Manoj; Hayakawa, M.

318

Uncertainty law in ambient modal identification---Part II: Implication and field verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a qualitative analysis of the uncertainty laws for the modal parameters identified in a Bayesian approach using ambient vibration data, based on the theory developed in the companion paper. The uncertainty laws are also appraised using field test data. The paper intends to provide insights for planning ambient vibration tests and managing the uncertainties of the identified modal parameters. Some typical questions that shall be addressed are: to estimate the damping ratio to within 30% of posterior coefficient of variation (c.o.v), what is the minimum data duration? Will deploying an additional accelerometer significantly improve the accuracy in damping (or frequency)? Answers to these questions based on this work can be found in the Conclusions. As the Bayesian approach allows full use of information in the data for given modeling assumptions, the uncertainty laws obtained in this work represent the lower limit of uncertainty (estimation error) that can be achieved by any method (Bayesian or non-Bayesian).

Au, Siu-Kui

2014-10-01

319

The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform  

SciTech Connect

Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

Rossabi, J.

1993-03-05

320

Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in the open water and during ice breaking. Continuous time-series of full mass spectra with a one minute time resolution were recorded throughout the campaign between August 2nd and September 7th 2008 running up to a net VOC data set of 745 hours. Over 370 mass peaks have been separated, about 340 show signal intensities above the 30 minute detection limit of ~3pptv. Additionally we analyzed samples from nine helicopter based soundings providing vertical VOC profiles up to 3000 m.a.s.l. The performance of the newly developed instrument will be discussed and ASCOS data will be shown. Acknowledgment: The ASCOS expedition was arranged by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and was an effort within the framework of SWEDARCTIC 2008. For more information on ASCOS see http://ascos.se/. We thank the ASCOS organizers - Caroline Leck and Michael Tjernström - all ASCOS participants, the SPRS and the Oden crew for the excellent team work and Armin Wisthaler for his assistance in planning and preparations. The TOF-MS system was funded by the University of Innsbruck (Uni Infrastruktur Programm). The development project was financially supported by the Austrian Research Funding Association (FFG). [1] Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes 1995, 149-150, 609-619. [2] Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A. Chemical Society Review 1998, 27, 347-375. [3] De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C. Mass Spectrometry Reviews 2007, 26, 223-257. [4] Goldstein, A. H.; Galbally, I. E. Environmental Science and Technology 2007, 41, 154-1521.

Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

2009-04-01

321

Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is…

Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

2012-01-01

322

Automation of gas chromatography instruments. Part I. Automated peak identification in the chromatograms of standard test mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of the chromatogram recorded during the gas chromatographic analysis of a standard test mixture is of importance in the assessment of the performance of the underlying GC system. Automated evaluation is essential in the development of software that can be used in systems that can perform totally automated analysis. In this study, an algorithm for automated peak identification

Hai Du; Martin J. Stillman

1997-01-01

323

Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?  

EPA Science Inventory

Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

324

Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing the thickness of the failure layer and the width of the possible failure are essential for the required barrier design parameter height and width. First results of the calculated drag coefficients of dynamic impact pressure measurements showed that the dynamic coefficient cw is much lower than 1.0 which is contradictory to most of existing dimensioning property protection guidelines. It appears to us that special adaptation to the system like smaller mesh sizes and special ground-barrier interface compared to normal rock-fall barriers and channelised debris flow barriers are necessary to improve the retention behavior of shallow landslide barriers. Detailed analysis of the friction coefficient in relationship with pore water pressure measurements gives interesting insights into the dynamic of fluid-solid mixed flows. Impact pressures dependencies on flow features are analyzed and discussed with respect to existing models and guidelines for shallow landslides.

Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

2010-05-01

325

Unambiguous identification of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles through quantitative susceptibility mapping of the nonlinear response to magnetic fields  

PubMed Central

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles generate signal void regions on gradient echo images due to their strong magnetization. In practice, the signal void region might be indistinguishable from that generated by air. However, the response of SPIO to an externally applied magnetic field is non-linear. Magnetization of SPIO saturates at around 1 Tesla while magnetization of water and air increase linearly with field strength. Phantom experiment and mice experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a non-ambiguous identification of superparamagnetic contrast agents. PMID:20688448

Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Wong, Richard; Prince, Martin; Wang, Yi

2010-01-01

326

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01

327

An Explication and Test of Communication Network Content and Multiplexity as Predictors of Organizational Identification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between identification and communication using organizational identification (OI) as a theoretical framework for studying communication networks among incoming graduate students in three university departments of communication. Concludes that, irrespective of initial OI, stronger initial multiplexity predicts the growth…

Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

1991-01-01

328

Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

2002-03-01

329

Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps  

E-print Network

., Copeland Corp., and Du Pont Fluoroproducts. In 1993 a field test was initiated to gain some experience with R-407C and POE lubricants. This paper reviews that testing and the results. FIELD TEST DESCRIPTION The main objectives of the field test were... the following: 1) validate R407C refrigerant and POE lubricant processing procedures for both the factory and the field, 2) monitor the installed units to assess compatibility of the refrigerant and lubricant with the system, 3) obtain input from the field...

Boyd, A.

1996-01-01

330

Identification of structural surfaces' positions on an F\\/A-18 using the subspace identification method from flight flutter tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current paper, a linear state-space mathematical model, identified from flight flutter tests is presented, to simulate the aeroelastic deflections of specific structural parts of the NASA F\\/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing research aircraft. The flight flutter tests were performed in steady-level flight with Schroeder frequency excitation induced on the aircraft ailerons by an on-board excitation system activated by the

M N Beaulieu; S De Jesus Mota; R M Botez

2007-01-01

331

Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

2007-07-09

332

A semi-field approach to testing effects of fresh pesticide residues on bees in multiple-rate test  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a semi-field cage test specifically designed to test effects of delayed exposure to plant protection products. The trial involved the use of standardised mini-beehives. The principle of the trial was to prepare two groups of potted test plants per treatment. The first group of plants remained untreated, while the second group was treated at the desired rate and

F. Bakker; J. N. M. Calis

2003-01-01

333

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

334

Superconducting Test Cavity With Dielectric Concentrator for High Q, High Surface Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

A superconducting test cavity and cryostat are being developed to support the testing of round wafer samples of new superconducting materials. The cavity is designed to test these samples in surface fields up to and beyond the BCS limit of Nb. The design is optimized to produce maximum surface field on the sample compared with that elsewhere in the cavity.

Nathaniel Pogue; Raymond Blackburn; Peter McIntyre; Akhdiyor Sattarov

2009-01-01

335

GUIDELINES FOR FIELD TESTING AQUATIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This guidance has been developed for those attempting to field validate aquatic fate and transport models. Included are discussions of the major steps in validating models and sections on the individual fate and transport processes: biodegradation, oxidation, hydrolysis, photolys...

336

High performances simulation of ultrasonic fields for Non Destructive Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasonic imaging is a commonly used method to detect and identify defects in a mechanical part in nuclear applications. Nowadays massively parallel architectures enable the simulation of ultrasonic field emitted by a phased array transducer inspecting a part across a coupling medium. In this paper, regular field computation model will be discussed along its implementations on General Purpose Processors (GPP) and Graphic Processing Units (GPU).

Lambert, Jason; Lacassagne, Lionel; Rougeron, Gilles; Le Berre, Stéphane; Chatillon, Sylvain

2014-06-01

337

Stimulus magnification equates identification and discrimination of biological motion across the visual field q,qq  

E-print Network

Stimulus magnification equates identification and discrimination of biological motion across history: Received 9 July 2008 Received in revised form 9 September 2008 Keywords: Biological motion Point-light walkers Size scaling Cortical magnification Peripheral vision a b s t r a c t There is conflicting

Troje, Nikolaus

338

Development and Testing of a Rapid Multiplex Assay for the Identification of Biological Stains.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

While DNA profiling makes it possible to individualize biological stains, the identification of the stain itself can present forensic serologists with a significant challenge. Current antibody- and enzyme activity-based assays used by forensic practitione...

K. M. Legg

2013-01-01

339

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification.  

PubMed

A FEASIBILITY TEST OF MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF EUROPEAN FRUIT FLIES (DIPTERA: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences - almost 20% of the total - this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-12-30

340

Testing symmetries in effective models of higher derivative field theories  

SciTech Connect

Higher derivative field theories with interactions raise serious doubts about their validity due to severe energy instabilities. In many cases the implementation of a direct perturbation treatment to excise the dangerous negative-energies from a higher derivative field theory may lead to violations of Lorentz and other symmetries. In this work we study a perturbative formulation for higher derivative field theories that allows the construction of a low-energy effective field theory being a genuine perturbations over the ordinary-derivative theory and having a positive-defined Hamiltonian. We show that some discrete symmetries are recovered in the low-energy effective theory when the perturbative method to reduce the negative-energy degrees of freedom from the higher derivative theory is applied. In particular, we focus on the higher derivative Maxwell-Chern-Simons model which is a Lorentz invariant and parity-odd theory in 2+1 dimensions. The parity violation arises in the effective action of QED{sub 3} as a quantum correction from the massive fermionic sector. We obtain the effective field theory which remains Lorentz invariant, but parity invariant to the order considered in the perturbative expansion.

Reyes, C. Marat [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2009-11-15

341

Application of the nuclide identification system SHAMAN in monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty  

Microsoft Academic Search

SHAMAN is an expert system for qualitative and quantitative radionuclide identification in gamma spectrometry. SHAMAN requires\\u000a as input the calibrations, peak search, and fitting results from reliable spectral analysis software, such as SAMPO. SHAMAN\\u000a uses a comprehensive reference library with 2600 radionuclides and 80 000 gamma-lines, as well as a rule base consisting of\\u000a sixty inference rules. Identification results are

P. A. Aarnio; J. J. Ala-Heikkilä; T. T. Hakulinen; M. T. Nikkinen

1998-01-01

342

Hazard identification: efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens and putative nongenotoxic carcinogens.  

PubMed Central

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. The efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been examined using a combined data set derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/International Agency for Research on Cancer Genetic Activity Profile (EPA/IARC GAP) and EPA Gene-Tox databases. Our review of these data indicates adequate sensitivity of batteries of in vitro short-term mutagenicity tests in identifying germ cell mutagens. The analysis also supports the inclusion of an in vivo assay as suggested in proposed regulatory testing guidelines. In the context of carcinogenicity testing, the ability of short-term bioassays to detect genotoxic or mutagenic carcinogens is well established. Such tests are not considered to be as sensitive to nongenotoxic or nonmutagenic carcinogens. However, analyses presented in this report using the EPA/IARC GAP database demonstrate that many putative nongenotoxic carcinogens that have been adequately tested in short-term genetic bioassays induce gene or chromosomal mutation or aneuploidy. Further investigation should reveal whether the mutagenicity of these agents plays an important mechanistic role in their carcinogenicity. PMID:8143649

Waters, M D; Stack, H F; Jackson, M A; Bridges, B A

1993-01-01

343

I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays  

E-print Network

vectors needed are significantly less than for a voltage-based testing technique. All components in the FPGA chip except the configuration logic are considered. The resources consist of three parts: configurable logic blocks (CLBs), input/output blocks...

Zhao, Lan

2012-06-07

344

40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...sampling PEMS instruments with ambient air until sampling begins to prevent...analyzers using a zero gas or ambient air introduced at the analyzer...

2010-07-01

345

Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

2010-05-13

346

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...parameters (including the duration of the tests or analyses and, in the case of field tests, the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the treatment zone), monitoring procedures, post-demonstration clean-up activities, and any...

2013-07-01

347

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...parameters (including the duration of the tests or analyses and, in the case of field tests, the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the treatment zone), monitoring procedures, post-demonstration clean-up activities, and any...

2011-07-01

348

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...parameters (including the duration of the tests or analyses and, in the case of field tests, the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the treatment zone), monitoring procedures, post-demonstration clean-up activities, and any...

2012-07-01

349

40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35...STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall...

2010-07-01

350

Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

1977-01-01

351

Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

Nigbor, R. L.; Evans, J. R.; Hutt, C. R.

2009-01-01

352

Context Rossby Testing strong-field general relativity with  

E-print Network

New era of observations : access to the vicinity of the horizon of a BH GRAVITY (2014), LOFT (2020 of observations : access to the vicinity of the horizon of a BH GRAVITY (2014), LOFT (2020) Needed : accurate;Context Rossby GRAVITY (2014) LOFT (2020) A new era of strong-field GR observations GRAVITY : probe

Gourgoulhon, Eric

353

FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER  

EPA Science Inventory

This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

354

Standardized Field Sobriety Testing: Learning from Our Mistakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there was a significant difference between the NHTSA\\/IACP standardized administrative procedures learned by officers in the basic SFST practitioner course and the manner in which these same officers administer the SFST procedures in the field. Furthermore, if there is a significant difference from the standardized NHTSA\\/IACP approved procedures, what elements had

TD Walden

355

CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

356

Identification of African swine fever viral antigens in the hemolymph of soft ticks (Argasidae: Ornithodoros) by the immunodot blot test.  

PubMed

The immunodot blot test was used to identify African swine fever virus (ASFV) antigens in the hemolymph from soft ticks (Ornithodoros coriaceus) fed on ASFV-infected pigs. The immunodot blot test was sensitive and specific for ASFV antigens and has potential field application. Hemolymph from field-collected ticks can be screened for ASFV and a variety of other tick-borne pathogens using this test. PMID:3532842

Geering, G; Endris, R G; Haslett, T M; Doroski, P L; Hess, W R

1986-09-01

357

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

2011-02-27

358

Identification of self consistent field interaction parameter from continuum Monte Carlo simulation of model polymer blends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monte Carlo simulations of binary AB polymer blends have been performed to evaluate the effective interaction parameter ?e of self consistent field theory, and to quantify corrections to RPA predictions for fluctuations. We consider a model with a non-bonded pair interaction vij(r) = ?ijf(r) for which f(r) is of the repulsive Lennard-Jones form, ?AA=?BB, and ?AB= ?AA+ ??. Using thermodynamic perturbation theory, to first order in ??, we obtain an interaction free energy with the composition dependence predicted by Flory-Huggins theory, with an effective interaction parameter ?e= ??zc. Here, zc is an effective coordination number given by the average of the sum of values of f(r) for interactions between a test monomer and nearby monomers on other chains, in a reference system with ??=0. Results for composition fluctuations in semigrand ensemble simulations of blends with a range of values of ??!=0, for several chain lengths, are compared to RPA predictions calculated using this perturbatively defined ?e parameter.

Chung, Jun Kyung; Morse, David

2008-03-01

359

Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips  

E-print Network

) Vasanta Bhanu Madduri, B. E. , Osmania University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mark H. Weichold Field emitting cathode structures using a new material, oxidized porous silicon, are fabricated and characterized. The emission occurs from micro...-tips formed at the interface between the oxidized porous silicon and the bulk silicon. The density of the emission tips is proportional to the pore density. Porous silicon cathode strips are formed by anodic dissolution of photolithographically patterned p...

Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

2012-06-07

360

A new dynamic test for the identification of high speed friction law using a gas-gun device  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of metal forming, which involves high speed loads, the determination of the friction law is one of the most essential topics. Especially for Finite-element simulation the development of innovative local friction laws improves the quality of the numerical results. One of the most critical point reside in the accuracy of the identification of the governing friction law parameters. A new experimental test is based on conical extrusion. The idea is to launch a cylindrical projectile into a target provided with a conical bore prolonged with a cylindrical one. The projectile is stopped by friction forces occurring at the interface between those materials. After impact the length of extrusion is taken into account for friction law identification. The experimental set-up used is a ballistic gas-gun device capable to launch the projectile, in vacuum conditions, up to 300m/s. The experiment is simulated by a numerical model using ABAQUS Explicit finite-element code. This code allows the implementation of various user friction laws through a FORTRAN subroutine. In order to obtain accurate results, the viscoplastic constitutive law used for both materials (projectile and target) was previously experimentally identified. The friction law identification uses a combined Monte-Carlo and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm which provides a very precisely set of parameters law. The test presented in this paper involves two metallic materials: steel 42CrMo4 for the target and aluminum 2017 for the projectile. The friction law for the pair of materials used was validated using experimental test at different speeds of impact (149 up to 235m/s) and the results are quite good proving a good identification of the friction law parameters.

Nistor, I.; Pantalé, O.; Caperaa, S.; Sattouf, C.

2003-09-01

361

Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

2007-01-01

362

A Field Test of A Full Inclusion Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental project was implemented to test the effectiveness of full inclusion of students with learning and behavioral disorders at a rural middle school within the Appalachian region of Kentucky. Thirteen students with behavioral disorders or learning disabilities were placed in four regular classrooms for 3 months. Five teachers…

Din, Feng S.

363

Robert's Rules for Optimal Learning: Model Development, Field Testing, Implications!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The value of accelerated learning techniques developed by the national organization for Suggestive Accelerated Learning Techniques (SALT) was tested in a study using Administrative Policy students taking the capstone course in the Eastern Washington University School of Business. Educators have linked the brain and how it functions to various…

McGinty, Robert L.

364

EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application  

EPA Science Inventory

Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station?s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology?s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

365

Stability of Markers Used for Identification of Two Rhizobium galegae Inoculant Strains after Five Years in the Field  

PubMed Central

The stability of identification markers was examined for two Rhizobium galegae inoculant strains after 5 years in the field. The two strains are genetically closely related, but differ in their lipopolysaccharides. Strain HAMBI 540 has lipopolysaccharide of the rough type, whereas that of strain HAMBI 1461 is of the smooth type. The properties that were examined for 10 field isolates of each inoculant type were symbiotic phenotype, phage type, intrinsic antibiotic resistance, maximum growth temperature, lipopolysaccharide and total soluble protein patterns, immunological properties, DNA restriction profiles, and DNA hybridization patterns, which were determined by using nifHDK and recA sequences as probes. Of these properties, all remained stable in soil, with the exception of some variation in intrinsic antibiotic resistance and the acquisition of an extra EcoRI restriction fragment by one of the isolates. Thus, both the rough and the smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotypes persisted equally well in soil. Images PMID:16348119

Lindstrom, K.; Lipsanen, P.; Kaijalainen, S.

1990-01-01

366

The Major Field Test in Business: A Solution to the Problem of Assurance of Learning Assessment?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Colleges and universities are being asked by numerous sources to provide assurance of learning assessments of their students and programs. Colleges of business have responded by using a plethora of assessment tools, including the Major Field Test in Business. In this article, the authors show that the use of the Major Field Test in Business for…

Green, Jeffrey J.; Stone, Courtenay Clifford; Zegeye, Abera

2014-01-01

367

40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065...Measurements § 1065.295 PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. (a) Application. You may use an inertial balance to quantify net PM on a sample...

2010-07-01

368

Me and My Environment Formative Evaluation Report 1. Arranging Field Tests: Characteristics of Sites and Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first in a series of evaluation reports gives characteristics of sites and approximately 500 students in field tests of Me and My Environment, a 3-year life science curriculum for 13- to 16-year-old educable mentally handicapped (EMH) adolescents. Described are the field test design, which involves 14 data gathering approaches, and the…

Steele, Joe M.

369

78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2013-05-21

370

76 FR 12932 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's...Disease Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-03-09

371

76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine...Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-01-19

372

76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-12-28

373

77 FR 22283 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Interleukin-2...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Feline Interleukin-2...Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2012-04-13

374

76 FR 66032 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's...Disease Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-10-25

375

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud brightening2  

E-print Network

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud radiation9 management approach to geoengineering the Earth's climate in order to offset10 anthropogenic deemed successful.17 18 19 20 Keywords: geoengineering, clouds, albedo, field test21 #12;1. Introduction

Wood, Robert

376

Habituation of medaka ( Oryzias latipes) demonstrated by open-field testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habituation to novel environments is frequently studied to analyze cognitive phenotypes in animals, and an open-field test is generally conducted to investigate the changes that occur in animals during habituation. The test has not been used in behavioral studies of medaka (Oryzias latipes), which is recently being used in behavioral research. Therefore, we examined the open-field behavior of medaka on

Wataru Matsunaga; Eiji Watanabe

2010-01-01

377

Unified Gravimetric Reference Frame for Polish IGS\\/EPN Stations and Geodynamic Test Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absolute gravity values are useful to regional geodynamic purposes as a complement of position monitoring at IGS\\/EPN permanent stations. Absolute gravity stations in region of geodynamic test field are also necessary as precise reference level for relative gravimetric measurements and long-period gravity monitoring. Absolute gravimetric network to unify gravimetric reference level for GNSS permanent stations and geodynamic test fields had

Janusz Walo; Tomasz Olszak; Andrzej Pachuta; Dominik Próchniewicz; Ryszard Szpunar

2010-01-01

378

Using Pumped Storage Loads in Restoration Paths: A Field Test in the Italian National Grid  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with power system restoration and discusses the connection of pumped storage loads to restoration paths. This new strategy allows avoiding any disturbance to customers during field tests of restoration paths and improves as well the reliability of restoration plans. The first application of the new strategy concerned the field test of a new path in central Italy.

Stefano Quaia; Alessio Marchesin; Bruno Marsigli; Antonio Pascucci

2005-01-01

379

Multi-centre testing and validation of current protocols for the identification of Gyrodactylus salaris (Monogenea).  

PubMed

Despite routine screening requirements for the notifiable fish pathogen Gyrodactylus salaris, no standard operating procedure exists for its rapid identification and discrimination from other species of Gyrodactylus. This study assessed screening and identification efficiencies under real-world conditions for the most commonly employed identification methodologies: visual, morphometric and molecular analyses. Obtained data were used to design a best-practice processing and decision-making protocol allowing rapid specimen throughput and maximal classification accuracy. True specimen identities were established using a consensus from all three identification methods, coupled with the use of host and location information. The most experienced salmonid gyrodactylid expert correctly identified 95.1% of G. salaris specimens. Statistical methods of classification identified 66.7% of the G. salaris, demonstrating the need for much wider training. Molecular techniques (internal transcribed spacer region-restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP)/cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) sequencing) conducted in the diagnostic laboratory most experienced in the analysis of gyrodactylid material, identified 100% of the true G. salaris specimens. Taking into account causes of potential specimen loss, the probabilities of a specimen being accurately identified were 95%, 87% and 92% for visual, morphometric and molecular techniques, respectively, and the probabilities of correctly identifying a specimen of G. salaris by each method were 81%, 58% and 92%. Inter-analyst agreement for 189 gyrodactylids assessed by all three methods using Fleiss' Kappa suggested substantial agreement in identification between the methods. During routine surveillance periods when low numbers of specimens are analysed, we recommend that specimens be analysed using the ITS-RFLP approach followed by sequencing of specimens with a "G. salaris-like" (i.e. G. salaris, Gyrodactylus thymalli) banding pattern. During periods of suspected outbreaks, where a high volume of specimens is expected, we recommended that specimens be identified using visual identification, as the fastest processing method, to select "G. salaris-like" specimens, which are subsequently identified by molecular-based techniques. PMID:20595003

Shinn, A P; Collins, C; García-Vásquez, A; Snow, M; Matejusová, I; Paladini, G; Longshaw, M; Lindenstrøm, T; Stone, D M; Turnbull, J F; Picon-Camacho, S M; Rivera, C Vázquez; Duguid, R A; Mo, T A; Hansen, H; Olstad, K; Cable, J; Harris, P D; Kerr, R; Graham, D; Monaghan, S J; Yoon, G H; Buchmann, K; Taylor, N G H; Bakke, T A; Raynard, R; Irving, S; Bron, J E

2010-10-01

380

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01

381

Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will

George R. Ax; James R. Buss

1997-01-01

382

Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) EPICOR-II Resin\\/Liner Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is obtaining information on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being tested

J. W. Jr. McConnell; R. D. Rogers

1990-01-01

383

Rock tests in nonuniform fields of tensile stresses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents experimental data on the strength of samples tested for bending and diametrically compressed core-shaped samples with a central hole. The obtained strengths of the samples are compared with the strength of samples under uniaxial tension using nonlocal strength criteria. It is shown that the calculated and measured strengths of the rock samples are in good agreement with each other when using a common approach to strength evaluation based on the Neuber-Novozhilov integral fracture criterion.

Efimov, V. P.

2013-09-01

384

Analytical technology to go: Environmental testing goes into the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

American industry spends more than $1.5 billion a year analyzing soil and water samples to comply with EPA wastewater-discharge and soil-cleanup requirements. This represents more than 10 million samples per year. Analytical testing must be performed during every phase of hazardous-waste site cleanup. During the site assessment phase, a small number of samples are collected and analyzed to identify hazardous

Wester

1994-01-01

385

Normative Performance on the Brief Smell Identification Test (BSIT) in a Multi-Ethnic Bilingual Cohort: A Project FRONTIER Study  

PubMed Central

The Brief Smell Identification Test (BSIT) is a commonly used measure of olfactory functioning in elderly populations. Few studies have provided normative data for this measure, and minimal data are available regarding the impact of sociodemographic factors on test scores. This study presents normative data for the BSIT in a sample of English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanic and non-Hispanic Whites. A Rasch analysis was also conducted to identify the items that best discriminated between varying levels of olfactory functioning, as measured by the BSIT. The total sample included 302 older adults seen as part of an ongoing study of rural cognitive aging, Project FRONTIER. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that BSIT scores require adjustment by age and gender, but years of education, ethnicity, and language did not significantly influence BSIT performance. Four items best discriminated between varying levels of smell identification, accounting for 59.44% of total information provided by the measure. However, items did not represent a continuum of difficulty on the BSIT. The results of this study indicate that the BSIT appears to be well-suited for assessing odor identification deficits in older adults of diverse backgrounds, but that fine-tuning of this instrument may be recommended in light of its items’ difficulty and discrimination parameters. Clinical and empirical implications are discussed. PMID:23634698

Menon, Chloe; Westervelt, Holly James; Jahn, Danielle R.; Dressel, Jeffrey A.; O'Bryant, Sid E.

2013-01-01

386

The Earth-Moon-Sun natural laboratory for testing of gravitational and electromagnetic fields coupling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental investigations of electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere boundary layer are done at the distance spaced stations, situated on VSU test ground, at Main Geophysical Observa-tory(St. Petersburg), on Kamchatka pen., on Lake Baikal. The distance spaced reception of electrical and magnetic fields will allow to analyze more widely the nature of the investigated interactions. Monitoring of electromagnetic fields in the

Lubov Grunskaya; Valiriy Isakevich; Vladislav Efimov; Alexander Zakirov

2010-01-01

387

Seasonal peculiarities of behavior of ground squirrel Citellus undulatus in holeboard and open field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal changes in the behavior of ground squirrels Citellus undulatus (n=35) in holeboard and open field tests were studied. It was found that the number of head dips and rearings in the holeboard and the number of crossed squares, rearings, and runs across the field center in the open field in ground squirrels during arousal between bouts at the end

T. P. Semenova; I. A. Anoshkina; B. M. Khomut; S. G. Kolaeva

2001-01-01

388

Unified Gravimetric Reference Frame for Polish IGS/EPN Stations and Geodynamic Test Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Absolute gravity values are useful to regional geodynamic purposes as a complement of position monitoring at IGS/EPN permanent stations. Absolute gravity stations in region of geodynamic test field are also necessary as precise reference level for relative gravimetric measurements and long-period gravity monitoring. Absolute gravimetric network to unify gravimetric reference level for GNSS permanent stations and geodynamic test fields had been established in Poland in 2007-2008. Within a framework of this project six absolute gravity stations were established nearby IGS/EPN stations and seven points in two geodynamic test fields: Pieniny Test Field (3 points) and Sudetes Network (4 points). Final results of establishment of Unified Gravimetric Reference Frame for Polish IGS/EPN Stations and Geodynamic Test Fields are presented in the paper. Some issues with gravity reference level (comparing to Polish Fundamental Gravimetric Network), instruments parameters, observation elaboration and points stabilisation are also discussed.

Walo, Janusz; Olszak, Tomasz; Pachuta, Andrzej; Próchniewicz, Dominik; Szpunar, Ryszard

2010-05-01

389

Test plan for the field evaluation and demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit  

SciTech Connect

This report describes test details of a full demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a mobile trailer capable of employing the use of soil fixatives, dust suppression agents, misting, and vacuum systems. These systems can perform a large number of contamination control functions to support the Office of Waste Technology Development (OTD) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) projects, transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, and emergency response for hazardous and radioactive materials incidents. The demonstration will include both performance testing at the North Holmes Laboratory Facility (NHLF) and field testing in conjunction with the Remote Excavation System Demonstration at the Cold Test Pit. The NHLF will test operational parameters using water only, and the field demonstration at the Cold Test Pit involves full scale operation of vacuum, fixant, misting, and dust suppression systems. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the field demonstration are included in this test plan.

Winberg, M.R.; Thompson, D.N.

1993-06-01

390

The LLNL HFTF (High-Field Test Facility): A flexible superconducting test facility for fusion magnet development  

SciTech Connect

The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) is a flexible and, in many ways, unique facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for providing the test capabilities needed to develop the superconducting magnet systems of the next generation fusion machines. The superconducting coil set in HFTF has been operated successfully at LLNL, but in its original configuration, its utility as a test facility was somewhat restricted and cryogenic losses were intolerable. A new cryostat for the coil set allows the magnet system to remain cold indefinitely so the system is available on short notice to provide high fields (about 11 T) inside a reasonably large test volume (0.3-m diam). The test volume is physically and thermally isolated from the coil volume, allowing test articles to be inserted and removed without disturbing the coil cryogenic volume, which is maintained by an on-line refrigerator. Indeed, with the proper precautions, it is even unnecessary to drop the field in the HFTF during such an operation. The separate test volume also allows reduced temperature operation without the expense and complication of subcooling the entire coil set (about 20-t cold mass). The HFTF has thus become a key facility in the LLNL magnet development program, where the primary goal is to demonstrate the technology for producing fields to 15 T with winding-pack current densities of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ in coils sized for fusion applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.

1987-09-17

391

First tests of a Micromegas TPC in a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

Since the summer of 2003, a large Micromegas TPC prototype (1000 channels, 50 cm drift, 50 cm diameter) has been operated in a 2T superconducting magnet at Saclay. A description of this apparatus and first results from cosmic ray tests are presented. Additional measurements using simpler detectors with a laser source, an X-ray gun and radio-active sources are discussed. Drift velocity and gain measurements, electron attachment and aging studies for a Micromegas TPC are presented. In particular, using simulations and measurements, it is shown that an $Argon-CF_4$ mixture is optimal for operation at a future Linear Collider.

Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Lepeltier, V.; Ronan, M.

2004-12-10

392

Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour  

SciTech Connect

An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

1993-12-31

393

Field testing of power utility condenser tube alloys  

SciTech Connect

The performances of various copper alloys after 4 years exposure in condenser steam-side and cooling water environments of three operating power utility plants are described. In the steam-side environment, the copper alloys exhibited low corrosion rates, and there was little variation in corrosion resistance as a function of major alloying elements. A comparison of the field data and data from a laboratory simulated condenser environment showed good correlation. The corrosion rates of the materials in the cooling tower water (under deposits and subject to low flow conditions) were approximately an order of magnitude greater than their counterparts in the steam environment. In freshwater there was little variation in material performance as a function of alloying elements; in brackish water a distinct difference in corrosion response was noted among the various alloys.

Sheldon, G.P.; Polan, N.W.

1985-03-01

394

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27

395

Estimation of Hydropower Generator Parameters Through Field Simulations of Standard Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four standard test procedures-the three phase short-circuit test , the field decrement test, the slip test, and the applied voltage test-for estimation of synchronous generator parameters have been implemented in a time-stepping finite-element software. In this paper, the main features of the implementation and the postprocessing of data are described. The validity of the application is demonstrated by comparison with

Johan Lidenholm; Urban Lundin

2010-01-01

396

Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Medically Relevant Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

A study was conducted to evaluate the new VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of gram-positive cocci. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (n = 100), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (n = 100), Enterococcus spp. (n = 89), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 29), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 66) were examined with the ID-GPC identification card and with the AST-P515 (for staphylococci), AST-P516 (for enterococci and S. agalactiae) and AST-P506 (for pneumococci) susceptibility cards. The identification comparison methods were the API Staph for staphylococci and the API 20 Strep for streptococci and enterococci; for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the agar dilution method according to the procedure of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) was used. The VITEK 2 system correctly identified to the species level (only one choice or after simple supplementary tests) 99% of S. aureus, 96.5% of S. agalactiae, 96.9% of S. pneumoniae, 92.7% of Enterococcus faecalis, 91.3% of Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and 88% of Staphylococcus epidermidis but was least able to identify Enterococcus faecium (71.4% correct). More than 90% of gram-positive cocci were identified within 3 h. According to the NCCLS breakpoints, antimicrobial susceptibility testing with the VITEK 2 system gave 96% correct category agreement, 0.82% very major errors, 0.17% major errors, and 2.7% minor errors. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed category agreement from 94 to 100% for S. aureus, from 90 to 100% for CNS, from 91 to 100% for enterococci, from 96 to 100% for S. agalactiae, and from 91 to 100% for S. pneumoniae. Microorganism-antibiotic combinations that gave very major errors were CNS-erythromycin, CNS-oxacillin, enterococci-teicoplanin, and enterococci-high-concentration gentamicin. Major errors were observed for CNS-oxacillin and S. agalactiae-tetracycline combinations. In conclusion the results of this study indicate that the VITEK 2 system represents an accurate and acceptable means for performing identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests with medically relevant gram-positive cocci. PMID:11980942

Ligozzi, Marco; Bernini, Cinzia; Bonora, Maria Grazia; de Fatima, Maria; Zuliani, Jessica; Fontana, Roberta

2002-01-01

397

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

2003-01-01

398

Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: field evaluation of prototype test devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report describes results of the third and final phase of a study conducted for the General Services Administration (GSA) to develop a field-test method to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulation materials. Field tests were conducted on 17 fibrous and 2 cementitious spray-applied materials to assess surface and bulk compression\\/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact properties. The tests

W. J. Rossiter; W. E. Roberts; R. G. Mathey

1989-01-01

399

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results  

SciTech Connect

California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-04-06

400

NOISE SOURCE IDENTIFICATION IN A PROPFAN MODEL BY MEANS OF ACOUSTICAL NEAR FIELD MEASUREMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the exploration of the dominant aerodynamic noise sources, the pressure fluctuations in the exit plane (near field) of the propfan model CRISP (Counter Rotating Integrated Shrouded Propfan) were measured with conventional 1\\/4 inch microphones. The pressure field of the tone components was resolved into a distribution of duct modes. Knowledge of the dominant modes allows conclusions about the dominant

F. Holste; W. Neise

1997-01-01

401

Wind turbine blade aerodynamics: The analysis of field test data  

SciTech Connect

Data obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory site test of a wind turbine (The Combined Experiment) was analyzed specifically to capture information regarding the aerodynamic loading experienced by the machine rotor blades. The inflow conditions were shown to be extremely variable. These inflows yielded three different operational regimes about the blades. Each regime produced very different aerodynamic loading conditions. Two of these regimes could not have been readily predicted from wind tunnel data. These conditions are being subjected to further analyses to provide new guidelines for both designers and operators. The roles of unsteady aerodynamics effects are highlighted since periods of dynamic stall were shown to be associated with brief episodes of high aerodynamic forces.

Luttges, M.W.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences

1994-08-01

402

Supercritical Heat Exchanger Field Test (SHEFT). 1: Field performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field performance on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service are presented. The test data were taken for geothermal brine on the tube side and hydrocarbon on the shell side in counterflow for six primary heat exchangers, and for hydrocarbon on the shell side and cooling water on the tube side for the condenser. Test data were for heating isobutane, 90\\/10

L. F. Silvester; L. O. Veaulaurier; K. F. Mirk; R. L. Fulton

1981-01-01

403

An integral E-field accuracy test for high frequency asymptotic solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accuracy test based on satisfaction of the E-field boundary condition is proposed for high-frequency asymptotic solutions. Generalized Lorentz reciprocity is employed to formulate the accuracy test. The test is quantitative in nature and requires only numerical integration for implementation.

M. Tew; R. Mittra

1980-01-01

404

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-print Network

are presented in Table 1. The area specific air flow rate was chosen as representative of the surface of a frame Test parameters CSTB CTBA Test chamber Glass, 0.05 m3 (CLIMPAQ) Stainless steel, 1 m3 Temperature 23MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS F

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-print Network

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

406

COMPARING THE FIELD AND LABORATORY EMISSION CELL (FLEC) WITH TRADITIONAL EMISSIONS TESTING CHAMBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses a series of tests, designed to evaluate the performance of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) as applied to the testing of emissions from two indoor coating materials (floor wax and latex paint). he tests included validation of the repeatability of ...

407

Development of a Field Test Method to Evaluate Gaseous Air Cleaner Performance in a Multizone Building  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of gaseous air cleaners for commercial and residential buildings has typically been evaluated using test protocols developed for a controlled laboratory chamber or a test duct. It is currently unknown how laboratory measurements relate to the actual performance of an air cleaner installed in a real building. However, to date, there are no air cleaner field test protocols

Cynthia Howard-Reed; Victor Henzel; Steven J. Nabinger; Andrew K. Persily; Dale Hess; Sunhee Lee; Kevin Tory; Manuela Burgers; Bill Lilley; Richard Baldauf; Eben Thoma; Michael Hays; Richard Shores; John Kinsey; Brian Gullett; Sue Kimbrough; Vlad Isakov; Thomas Long; Richard Snow; Andrey Khlystov; Jason Weinstein; Fu-Lin Chen; Robert Seila; David Olson; Ian Gilmour; Seung-Hyun Cho; Nealson Watkins; Patricia Rowley; Gary Whitten; Greg Yarwood; Marc Carreras-Sospedra; Donald Dabdub; Jacob Brouwer; Eladio Knipping; Naresh Kumar; Ken Darrow; Anne Hampson; Bruce Hedman; James Droppo; Bruce Napier; B. deCastro; Lu Wang; Jana Mihalic; Patrick Breysse; Alison Geyh; Timothy Buckley; M. Garci´a; M. Sa´nchez; Isidro rez; Beatriz Torre; Gui Li; Alex Visscher; Chungching Wang; Min-Der Lin; Chenfang Lin; Seoung Kim; Chivalai Temiyasathit; Victoria Chen; Sun-Kyoung Park; Melanie Sattler; Armistead Russell

2008-01-01

408

SERDP AND NRMRL SPONSOR FIELD TEST OF COSOLVENT-ENHANCED DNAPL REMOVAL  

EPA Science Inventory

A field test of multicomponent cosolvent flooding for in-situ remediation of DNAPL source zones was conducted at the Dover National Test Site (DNTS) at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, in July, 2001. The test was part of an Enhanced Source Removal (ESR) demonstration project fund...

409

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 5. Hanna III field test research report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna III was conducted during the spring

T. C. Bartke; D. D. Fischer; S. B. King; R. M. Boyd; A. E. Humphrey

1985-01-01

410

Identification of a nonlinear groundwater flow at a slug test in fractured rock and its influence on the test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many laboratory and numerical studies reported that a groundwater flow through a fracture at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers does not obey the cubic law which assumes a linear relation between the hydraulic gradient and the flux. Most of them observed that the transitions from a linear to nonlinear flow arose at the Reynolds numbers greater than 10. A slug test is one of the common hydraulic tests, and used for estimation of the hydraulic properties of an aquifer by analyzing the recovery after a sudden change in hydraulic pressure. In this study, we conducted a series of slug tests with various initial head displacements at an experimental borehole at KAERI's (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) underground research tunnel whose host rock is Jurassic granite. The Reynolds number at a fracture during slug tests was calculated using the geophysical logging data and slug test results, and the nonlinear flow regime at slug tests was identified. From changes in the Reynolds number during the tests and estimates of the hydraulic properties from the tests, the influence of a nonlinear flow on a slug test was discussed. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity of groundwater flow at a slug test became more severe and the estimated hydraulic conductivity decreased as the initial head displacement increased.

Ji, S.; Koh, Y.

2013-12-01

411

Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that their details can be seen. PMID:22476475

Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

2011-01-01

412

A test rig for the identification of rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film bearings  

E-print Network

A test rig and measurement procedure to identify the rotordynamic coefficients of generic fluid film bearing elements are described. The test apparatus allows the exchange of test articles without modifications to the basic design of the machine...

Robison, Lewis Miller

2012-06-07

413

Identification of FOPDT and SOPDT process dynamics using closed loop test.  

PubMed

In this paper, identification of stable and unstable first order, second order overdamped and underdamped process dynamics with time delay is presented. Relay with hysteresis is used to induce a limit cycle output and using this information, unknown process model parameters are estimated. State space based generalized analytical expressions are derived to achieve accurate results. To show the performance of the proposed method expressions are also derived for systems with a zero. In real time systems, measurement noise is an important issue during identification of process dynamics. A relay with hysteresis reduces the effect of measurement noise, in addition a new multiloop control strategy is proposed to recover the original limit cycle. Simulation results are included to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24917070

Bajarangbali, Raghunath; Majhi, Somanath; Pandey, Saurabh

2014-07-01

414

Identification of superconducting phases in ceramic particles by magnetic field induced forces using a magnetized wire  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new equipment for minority phase analysis of superconducting (SC) phases within chemically inhomogeneous ceramic grains using a high gradient magnetic field or field induced effect of torque is presented. Single grains down to 20 ?m are either captured by a magnetized iron wire or identified because of their torque movement in a pulsed magnetic field. An assembly of many hundreds of grains can be investigated for minor quantities of SC phases from 80 K up to room temperature. A maximum field of up to 100-140 mT allows us to reliably identify SC grains and evaluate their SC critical temperatures Tc. Localization of SC grains allows us to extract them for further analysis. Experiments with YBa2Cu3O2-? grains demonstrated that Tc values evaluated in such a way are rather close to those, which are determined by magnetization measurements.

Pérez, Daniel; Hulliger, Jürg

2010-06-01

415

Identification and characterization of Hydraulic Flow Units in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela  

E-print Network

This thesis focuses on the integration of core and well log data in order to provide a petrophysical characterization of the Hydraulic Flow Units (HFU) in the San Juan Formation, Orocual Field, Venezuela. We used three separate approaches...

Deghirmandjian, Odilia

2012-06-07

416

Further studies on the reliability of the bacitracin inhibition test for the presumptive identification of Lancefield group A streptococci.  

PubMed Central

The reliability of the bacitracin inhibition test to differentiate between 125 Lancefield group A and 122 non-group A beta-haemolytic streptococci was studied. Bacitracin discs containing 0-02, 0-04, or 0-1 international units and the conditions recommended by both the Association of Clinical Pathologists and the Federal Drug Administration for routine sensitivity testing were used. The results suggest that the presence or absence of a zone of inhibition around a 0-04 unit disc can be used routinely for the presumptive identification of group A streptococci and that a specific zone size can be used for reading the test only with a 0-1 unit disc. PMID:325019

Coleman, D J; McGhie, D; Tebbutt, G M

1977-01-01

417

On the identification of defects in a periodic waveguide from far field data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to apply the linear sampling method and the factorization method to retrieve some defects in a known periodic 2D waveguide from scattering data. More precisely, some far field approximations of these two sampling methods are derived. They amount to considering the so-called propagating Floquet modes as incident waves. The efficiency of the far field formulation of the linear sampling method is shown with the help of some numerical experiments.

Bourgeois, L.; Fliss, S.

2014-09-01

418

ELECTRIC-FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND IDENTIFICATION OF CURRENTS CAUSING MAGNETIC DISTURBANCES IN POLAR CAP  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve Ba + clouds were released at invariant latitudes 76 ø to 78 ø from three rockets launched from Cape Parry, Northwest Territories, Canada, for the study of polar-cap electric fields and their relationship to polar-cap magnetic-field disturbances. All flights occurred under conditions characterized by Kp  3. E was typically between 20 and 40 volts\\/km, directed roughly from dawn

J. P. Heppner; J. D. Stolarik; E. M. Wescott

1971-01-01

419

Field Testing of an In-Situ Neutron Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration: First Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of an ongoing effort to demonstrate the utility of using in-situ neutron spectroscopy to measure water content on planetary surfaces, we have developed a field site for carrying out neutron spectroscopy measurements. Specifically, our objectives in developing the field site are: 1) Demonstrate in-situ neutron measurements in a realistic field test scenario; 2) Demonstrate our ability to accurately model neutron measurements for various conditions and identify measurement factors that need to be controlled and/or accounted for such as detailed stratigraphy; 3) Provide a field test location for future in-situ neutron measurements using a variety of instrument and soil configurations.

Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Feldman, W. C.; Wiens, R. C.

2004-01-01

420

An Experiment to Test Geophysical Methods For Monitoring Fluid Re-Injection at the Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is supporting US students to participate in GNS Science’s geothermal research program supported by the New Zealand Government. The NSF international program aims to quick-start a new generation of geothermal-oriented US geophysics students who will be poised to be active participants and leaders in US geothermal energy development. This year’s project evaluated joint passive seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) field measurements to determine three-dimensional (3-D) reservoir characteristics during fluid withdrawal and re-injection. A preliminary test of the ability to achieve repeatable MT data in high noise locations was carried out in the Wairakei geothermal field using a 14-site base-line MT survey and repeat occupations at four sites. Different data processing schemes identified MT frequency bands where impedance phase tensor data were most sensitive to known variables such as daily solar source variations, wind, and drilling operations. Other frequency bands were identified where good MT repeatability will allow further tests. A streamlined method was developed for visualizing 3-D earthquake focal mechanisms resulting from production changes in geothermal reservoirs. The computer program allows spatial sorting of seismic events and thus subsurface fracture identification.

Jiracek, G. R.; Bowles-Martinez, E.; Feucht, D. W.; Ryan, J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Bannister, S. C.; Bertrand, T.; Bennie, S.; Bourguignon, S.

2010-12-01

421

Piloted Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5, 20, 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the NASA 1A control law. Each maneuver is to be realized by the pilot applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls. Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

Morelli, Eugene A.

1996-01-01

422

Parameter Identification Flight Test Maneuvers for Closed Loop Modeling of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for closed loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for longitudinal and lateral linear model parameter estimation at 5,20,30,45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, using the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) control law in Thrust Vectoring (TV) mode. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific pilot station controls using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time / amplitude points defining each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

Batterson, James G. (Technical Monitor); Morelli, E. A.

1996-01-01

423

Use of AUDIT for alcohol screening among emergency room patients in Thailand. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) against blood alcohol levels and medical diagnoses. The population under study included 695 current drinkers admitted to emergency rooms of four regional Thailand hospitals. The AUDIT positivity rate was 61% among 343 patients who drank prior to admission and 32% among 352 patients who did not drink alcohol before admission. Breath alcohol levels were positively associated with AUDIT scores. The sensitivity against a previous or current alcohol-related medical diagnosis was 89%. We concluded that the AUDIT is a satisfactory instrument for alcohol screening in this population. PMID:10540976

Lapham, S C; Brown, P; Suriyawongpaisal, P; Skipper, B J; Chadbunchachai, W; Paisarnsilp, S

1999-11-01

424

Part I. Break up of the hydrogen molecular ion by an electric field. Part II. Protein identification via mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Part I. We have calculated the induced shifts and widths of the first few electronic Sigma levels of the H+2 molecular ion in the presence of a dc and low frequency o ac field (through order o2), over a range of internuclear separations. We find that the 2p (in united-atom-limit quantum numbers) ionization width exhibits peaks as the internuclear separation is increased. We attribute these peaks to the shape resonances originating from the mixing of the 2p state, which is localized in the higher well of the double-well electronic potential, with energetically nearby highly excited states that are localized in the lower well. We also have calculated the frequency profile of the rate for breakup of H+2 by one photon in the presence of a strong doc field. After photoexcitation of the molecular ion from its ground 1sQ electronic state to the 2psigma electronic state, the nuclei are temporarily trapped by a do field-induced barrier with turning point Rmax; subsequently the nuclei are released through dc-field-ionization from the 2psigma state. We interpret the change in the frequency profile, as the strength Fdc of the dc field varies, in terms of two competing effects: (i) the relative proximity of R max to the internuclear separation at which the the ionization rate has its most prominent shape resonance, which in a.u. is approximately 3/(8 Fdc) + 3, and (ii) the dispersion of the probability distribution of the nuclei due to over-the-barrier dissociation from the 1ssigma state. Part II. Identification of mutated or post-translationally modified peptides by matching tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) against protein databases is especially important for high-throughput MS/MS projects when possibility of expert analysis is limited. We describe new spectral convolution, dynamic programming spectral alignment, and branch-and-bound algorithms for MS/MS database search. We demonstrate their advantages in identification of modified peptides over the conventional Shared Peaks Count approach---filtering a database search by spectral alignment scores reliably identifies tryptic peptides differing by up to 2 mutations/modifications from a peptide in a database.

Mulyukov, Zufar

425

EMISSION TEST REPORT - FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL - CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

426

EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

427

Some Field Observations Concerning the Impact of Test Preparatory Programs on Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between gender and the race/geographic area of students and their Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score gains after participation in one of two test preparatory programs was studied. Black (n=181) and native-born Appalachian white (n=67) high school juniors were selected on the basis of high scores on the California Achievement…

Wing, Cliff W., Jr.; And Others

428

Field-based video pre-test counseling, oral testing and telephonic post-test counseling: Implementation of an HIV field testing package among high-risk Indian men  

PubMed Central

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling and then connected them to government facilities. 598 MSM and truck drivers participated in the FTP and completed surveys covering sociodemographics, HIV testing history, risk behaviors, and opinions on the FTP. Those who had previously been tested preferred traditional methods to video counseling. MSM and truck drivers equally preferred video counseling, although MSM who had been previously tested preferred traditional methods. Nearly all participants preferred oral testing. Rates of counseling completion and linkage to government centers were low, with one third of newly identified positives completing follow-up. With increased public-private coordination, this FTP could identify many hard-to-reach preliminary positive individuals and connect them to government testing and care. PMID:22827901

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2013-01-01

429

Classical Solution of Field Equation of Gravitational Gauge Field and Classical Tests of Gauge Theory of Gravity  

E-print Network

A systematic method is developed to study classical motion of a mass point in gravitational gauge field. First, the formulation of gauge theory of gravity in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates is given. Then in spherical coordinates system, a spherical symmetric solution of the field equation of gravitational gauge field is obtained, which is just the Schwarzschild solution. In gauge theory of gravity, the equation of motion of a classical mass point in gravitational gauge field is given by Newton's second law of motion. A relativistic form of the gravitational force on a mass point is deduced in this paper. Based on the spherical symmetric solution of the field equation and Newton's second law of motion, we can discuss classical tests of gauge theory of gravity, including the deflection of light by the sun, the precession of the perihelia of the orbits of the inner planets and the time delay of radar echoes passing the sun. It is found that the theoretical predictions of these classical tests given by gauge theory of gravity are completely the same as those given by general relativity. From the study in this paper, an important qualitative conclusion on the nature of gravity is that gravity can be treated as a kind of physical interactions in flat Minkowski space-time, and the equation of motion of mass point in gravitational field can be given by Newton's second law of motion.

Ning Wu; Dahua Zhang

2005-08-01

430

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

SciTech Connect

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01

431

Demonstration of the fiducial concept using data from the March 1985 GPS field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first field test of NASA's Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Program took place in March of 1985. The principal objective of this test was the demonstration of the feasibility of the fiducial station approach to precise GPS-based geodesy and orbit determination. Other objectives included an assessment of the performance of the several GPS receiver types involved in these field tests and the testing of the GIPSY software for GPS data analysis. In this article, the GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning System) software system is described and baseline solutions are examined for consistency with independent measurements made using very long baseline interferometry.

Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Wu, S. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Dixon, T. H.; Williams, B. G.

1986-01-01

432

The ROSAT Deep Survey II. Optical identification, photomettry and spectra of sources in the Lockman field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with\\u000afluxes in the $0.5 - 2$ keV band larger than 5.5 $10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$\\u000as$^{-1}$ in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper I). We have obtained deep\\u000abroad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the\\u000apositions of the X-ray sources.

Maarten Schmidt; Guenther Hasinger; James Gunn; Don Schneider; Richard Burg; Riccardo Giacconi; Ingo Lehmann; John MacKenty; Joachim Truemper; Gianni Zamorani

1997-01-01

433

Field-based video pre-test counseling, oral testing, and telephonic post-test counseling: implementation of an HIV field testing package among high-risk Indian men.  

PubMed

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling and then connected them to government facilities. A total of 598 MSM and truck drivers participated in the FTP and completed surveys covering sociodemographics, HIV testing history, risk behaviors, and opinions on the FTP. MSM and truck drivers equally preferred video counseling, although MSM who had been previously tested preferred traditional methods. Nearly all participants preferred oral testing. Rates of counseling completion and linkage to government centers were low, with one-third of newly identified positives completing follow-up. With increased public-private coordination, this FTP could identify many hard-to-reach preliminary positive individuals and connect them to government testing and care. PMID:22827901

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V; Prem Kumar, G; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A

2012-08-01

434

Identification by Virtual Screening and In Vitro Testing of Human DOPA Decarboxylase Inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Dopa decarboxylase (DDC), a pyridoxal 5?-phosphate (PLP) enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of dopamine and serotonin, is involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a neurodegenerative disease mainly due to a progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the midbrain. Co-administration of L-Dopa with peripheral DDC inhibitors (carbidopa or benserazide) is the most effective symptomatic treatment for PD. Although carbidopa and trihydroxybenzylhydrazine (the in vivo hydrolysis product of benserazide) are both powerful irreversible DDC inhibitors, they are not selective because they irreversibly bind to free PLP and PLP-enzymes, thus inducing diverse side effects. Therefore, the main goals of this study were (a) to use virtual screening to identify potential human DDC inhibitors and (b) to evaluate the reliability of our virtual-screening (VS) protocol by experimentally testing the “in vitro” activity of selected molecules. Starting from the crystal structure of the DDC-carbidopa complex, a new VS protocol, integrating pharmacophore searches and molecular docking, was developed. Analysis of 15 selected compounds, obtained by filtering the public ZINC database, yielded two molecules that bind to the active site of human DDC and behave as competitive inhibitors with Ki values ?10 µM. By performing in silico similarity search on the latter compounds followed by a substructure search using the core of the most active compound we identified several competitive inhibitors of human DDC with Ki values in the low micromolar range, unable to bind free PLP, and predicted to not cross the blood-brain barrier. The most potent inhibitor with a Ki value of 500 nM represents a new lead compound, targeting human DDC, that may be the basis for lead optimization in the development of new DDC inhibitors. To our knowledge, a similar approach has not been reported yet in the field of DDC inhibitors discovery. PMID:22384042

Cellini, Barbara; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Giardina, Giorgio; Bossa, Francesco; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

2012-01-01

435

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-print Network

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information Anemometers i Table of Contents 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................2 2.1. KNMI cup anemometer and wind vane....................................................2 2

Stoffelen, Ad

436

Officer competency in the Texas Standardized Field Sobriety Testing Program: a quantitative study  

E-print Network

Many law enforcement officers (LEOs) have successfully completed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Standardized Field Sobriety Testing (SFST) course to enhance their ability to detect impaired drivers. However, in recent...

Merkley, Rodney Joseph

2012-06-07

437

Abstract We conducted a food supplementation field experiment to test two hypotheses: (1) fecundity of the  

E-print Network

of ecology's major themes. The concept is central to theories of how animals forage, how populations growAbstract We conducted a food supplementation field experiment to test two hypotheses: (1) fecundity

Illinois at Chicago, University of

438

LITTORAL ENCLOSURES FOR AQUATIC FIELD TESTING OF PESTICIDES: THE EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS ON A NATURAL SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

A littoral enclosure protocol designed for aquatic field testing of pesticides is described. he enclosures are replicated, relatively economical, and incorporates all trophic levels, the natural shoreline, and undisturbed bottom sediments. he results of using this protocol to stu...

439

Increasing the depth of field in an LWIR system for improved object identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a long wave infrared (LWIR) system there is the need to capture the maximum amount of information of objects over a broad volume for the identification and classification by the human or machine observer. In a traditional imaging system the optics limit the capture of this information to a narrow object volume. This limitation can hinder the observer's ability to navigate and/or identify friend or foe in combat or civilian operations. By giving the observer a larger volume of clear imagery their ability to perform will drastically improve. The system presented allows the efficient capture of object information over a broad volume and is enabled by a technology called Wavefront Coding. A Wavefront Coded system employs the joint optimization of the optics, detection and signal processing. Through a specialized design of the system"s optical phase, the system becomes invariant to the aberrations that traditionally limit the effective volume of clear imagery. In the process of becoming invariant, the specialized phase creates a uniform blur across the detected image. Signal processing is applied to remove the blur, resulting in a high quality image. A device specific noise model is presented that was developed for the optimization and accurate simulation of the system. Additionally, still images taken from a video feed from the as-built system are shown, allowing the side by side comparison of a Wavefront Coded and traditional imaging system.

Kubala, Kenneth S.; Wach, Hans B.; Chumachenko, Vladislav V.; Dowski, Edward R., Jr.

2005-05-01

440

FIELD TESTING PESTICIDE TRANSPORT MODELS AT A COOPERATIVE TEST SITE NEAR PLAINS, GEORGIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. DePartment of Agriculture, the U.S. eological survey, and The University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station developed a joint research effort to investigate and to model pesticide movement at a field site. he participants...