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Sample records for identification field test

  1. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  2. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  3. Multi-level slug tests in highly permeable formations: 2. Hydraulic conductivity identification, method verification, and field applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zlotnik, V.A.; McGuire, V.L.

    1998-01-01

    Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.

  4. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  5. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  6. Field theory of pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agu, Masahiro

    1988-06-01

    Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ψ[χ] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern χ is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern χ with the modified pattern χ+Δχ is assumed to be such that their images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ψ[χ] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern χ leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

  7. Gender Object Identification Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This test was designed primarily for the purpose of assisting social psychologists in researching sex roles and/or sex differences when a nonverbal instrument is desired. The hypothesis was that some objects would be easier for members of one gender to name. The subjects were 30 female and 20 male undergraduate students. Pictures of 65 commercial…

  8. Integrating field methodology and web-based data collection to assess the reliability of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT).

    PubMed

    Celio, Mark A; Vetter-O'Hagen, Courtney S; Lisman, Stephen A; Johansen, Gerard E; Spear, Linda P

    2011-12-01

    Field methodologies offer a unique opportunity to collect ecologically valid data on alcohol use and its associated problems within natural drinking environments. However, limitations in follow-up data collection methods have left unanswered questions regarding the psychometric properties of field-based measures. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the reliability of self-report data collected in a naturally occurring environment - as indexed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) - compared to self-report data obtained through an innovative web-based follow-up procedure. Individuals recruited outside of bars (N=170; mean age=21; range 18-32) provided a BAC sample and completed a self-administered survey packet that included the AUDIT. BAC feedback was provided anonymously through a dedicated web page. Upon sign in, follow-up participants (n=89; 52%) were again asked to complete the AUDIT before receiving their BAC feedback. Reliability analyses demonstrated that AUDIT scores - both continuous and dichotomized at the standard cut-point - were stable across field- and web-based administrations. These results suggest that self-report data obtained from acutely intoxicated individuals in naturally occurring environments are reliable when compared to web-based data obtained after a brief follow-up interval. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the feasibility, utility, and potential of integrating field methods and web-based data collection procedures. PMID:21724340

  9. Mobilestar field test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubow, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    Various field tests were performed in order to gain practical experience and a broader understanding of mobile communications. The first phase consisted of CW propagation tests to develop firsthand experience of propagation phenomena. From this information, estimates of the feasibility and accuracy of power control were possible. The next phase tested the idea of power control. Equipment representative of that expected to be used in an actual mobile satellite communication system was assembled and tested under a variety of environments.

  10. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1979-01-01

    Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

  11. Identification and reliability of microbial aerobic respiration and denitrification kinetics using a single-well push pull field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, A.; Louwyck, A.; Lebbe, L.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to derive reaction rates of microbial processes are important since these processes are determining many chemical reactions influencing groundwater quality. Thereby, it is not only important to derive the parameters, but also to have a firm idea about the reliability with which these are determined. Analysis of residuals, sensitivity analyses and analysis of joint confidence intervals provide an interesting tool for this purpose. The method is illustrated in this paper using a push-pull test designed to derive aerobic respiration and denitrification. Therefore, a test solution containing dissolved oxygen and nitrate as reactive tracer and bromide as non-reactive tracer was injected in organic matter rich sediment. Afterwards, this test solution was extracted and water quality was monitored. ReacTrans, a finite-difference, axial-symmetric groundwater flow and solute transport model was developed to simulate the test and derive hydraulic, solute transport and chemical parameters. Aerobic respiration and denitrification were simulated with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Maximum reaction rates (10.4 and 2.4 mmol/ld for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) and Michaelis constants (0.14 and 0.1 mmol/l for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) were determined. The reliability with which these parameters are derived is indicated by analysis of residuals, sensitivities and joint confidence intervals. This shows that the Michaelis-Menten parameters can be derived reliable with a push-pull test, whereas the test is insensitive to effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Because of the small scale of the test, longitudinal dispersivity was very small and therefore unidentifiable.

  12. Identification and reliability of microbial aerobic respiration and denitrification kinetics using a single-well push-pull field test.

    PubMed

    Vandenbohede, A; Louwyck, A; Lebbe, L

    2008-01-01

    Methods to derive reaction rates of microbial processes are important since these processes are determining many chemical reactions influencing groundwater quality. Thereby, it is not only important to derive the parameters, but also to have a firm idea about the reliability with which these are determined. Analysis of residuals, sensitivity analyses and analysis of joint confidence intervals provide an interesting tool for this purpose. The method is illustrated in this paper using a push-pull test designed to derive aerobic respiration and denitrification. Therefore, a test solution containing dissolved oxygen and nitrate as reactive tracer and bromide as non-reactive tracer was injected in organic matter rich sediment. Afterwards, this test solution was extracted and water quality was monitored. ReacTrans, a finite-difference, axial-symmetric groundwater flow and solute transport model was developed to simulate the test and derive hydraulic, solute transport and chemical parameters. Aerobic respiration and denitrification were simulated with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Maximum reaction rates (10.4 and 2.4 mmol/ld for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) and Michaelis constants (0.14 and 0.1 mmol/l for aerobic respiration and denitrification respectively) were determined. The reliability with which these parameters are derived is indicated by analysis of residuals, sensitivities and joint confidence intervals. This shows that the Michaelis-Menten parameters can be derived reliable with a push-pull test, whereas the test is insensitive to effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Because of the small scale of the test, longitudinal dispersivity was very small and therefore unidentifiable. PMID:17719674

  13. Channel identification machines for multidimensional receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2014-01-01

    We present algorithms for identifying multidimensional receptive fields directly from spike trains produced by biophysically-grounded neuron models. We demonstrate that only the projection of a receptive field onto the input stimulus space may be perfectly identified and derive conditions under which this identification is possible. We also provide detailed examples of identification of neural circuits incorporating spatiotemporal and spectrotemporal receptive fields. PMID:25309413

  14. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  15. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  16. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  17. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  18. Autonomous star field identification for robotic solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    A six-feature all-sky star field identification algorithm has been developed. The minimum identifiable star pattern element consists of an oriented star triplet defined by three stars, their celestial coordinates and visual magnitudes. This algorithm has been integrated with a CCD-based imaging camera. The autonomous intelligent camera identifies in real time any star field without a priori knowledge. Observatory tests on star fields with this intelligent camera are described.

  19. Repository data base, field tests

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-08

    Development of appropriate data that can be used to solidify the base of technology for repository development frequently requires field testing. This field testing is performed in a variety of test facilities both within the US and abroad. Papers presented in this session describe a variety of field test programs currently being conducted or planned as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program, including several geologic media. A subsequent companion session emphasizes results of both laboratory and field tests, as they relate to developing the repository data base. Titles of the papers presented are: (1) Near-Surface Test Facility - Update on Field Testing in Basalt; (2) Field Testing at the Climax Stock on the Nevada Test Site: Spent Fuel and Radionuclide Migration Experiments; (3) Field Experiment Program for Tuff in G Tunnel; (4) Stripa Project: An International Project in the Management of Radioactive Waste Storage; (5) Brine Migration Field Test Plans for Asse, West Germany; (6) Field Testing Activities in Dome Salt at Avery Island, Louisiana; (7) Experimental Studies at the Colorado School of Mines Hard Rock Test Site; (8) NWTS Field Testing - Forward Planning.

  20. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  1. Identification of Blimp Dynamics via Flight Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Goto, Norihiro

    A blimp is introduced as a stable platform for remote-sensing instruments required for unmanned aerial observation and surveillance. In order to develop flight control systems for a blimp, two series of experiments were conducted to identify flight dynamics: constrained flight tests, and indoor free-flight tests. This paper addresses the blimp configuration, experimental set-up, method for identifying dynamics, and the results of identification in comparison with the analytical estimation for each experimental method. Both tests employed a full-scale blimp. The identification method for the constrained flight tests used the extended least-squares method involving the gradient algorithm, and the indoor free-flight tests, the eigen-system realization algorithm involving the autoregressive model fitting algorithm. The results suggest that analytical formulas for estimating the parameters, including added mass effects and stability derivatives, may yield values consistent with experimentally identified ones.

  2. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1980-01-01

    After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

  3. Subcritical flutter testing and system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

  4. CLASSIFICATION TOOLS FOR EFFICIENT IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF IMPAIRMENT: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current monitoring strategies for iotic ecosystems have focused on identification of either specific impaired stream reaches or regional incidence of impaired stream reaches, with little or no ancillary data collected to facilitate diagnosis of impairment, or extrapolation of res...

  5. Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System Based on Short-Term Electrostatic Field Variations at the Active Volcano Popocatepetl, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocatepetl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially- designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocatepetl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocatepetl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release and mass flux and (3) immediate risk assessment of ongoing volcanic eruptions using permanent sensors located on volcanoes with pyroclastic eruptions.

  6. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  7. Performance Recertification Field Test Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    These performance recertification field-test guidelines were developed for the State of Arizona. The functions of the performance recertification program are as follows: a) the determination of teacher effectiveness by student behavior and growth, utilizing performance objectives, b) the determination of teacher effectiveness utilizing other types…

  8. Field Testing Mathematics Reform Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrfield, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the efforts of the Maricopa Mathematics Consortium, in Arizona, to develop a comprehensive mathematics curriculum focusing on application-driven materials at the precalculus level. Reviews the resulting three modules of sample course materials, and discusses three phases of field testing used to assess the modules. Summarizes results…

  9. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  10. Olfactory Identification Test Using Familiar Distracters for Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Jeong, Mi Soon; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Seol, Jeong-Hun; Hong, Seok-Chan; Cho, Jae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Odors used in an odor identification test should be familiar to the subject, but there are some unfamiliar distracters in Korean version of Sniffin' stick (KVSS) II identification test. In this study, we used the results of the original version of KVSS II identification to modify the KVSS II identification test. Methods Eighty-three participants took an original version of KVSS II identification test and a visual analogue scale of subjective odor function. KVSS II identification which has 16 items was performed to choose one out of four odors items. And visual analogue scale was checked from 0 to 10 points of their subjective olfactory function. Two weeks later they took the modified version of KVSS II identification test. Hyposmic or anosmic patients were excluded. Results The mean score of the original version of KVSS II identification and modified version of KVSS II identification were 11.3 and 12.5, respectively (P<0.05). The KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function were positively correlated (r=0.247, P<0.05), as were the modified KVSS II identification test and subjective olfactory function (r=0.329, P<0.05). Conclusion After modification of distracters, KVSS II identification test appears to be suited for assessment of olfactory function. PMID:24587876

  11. Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

  12. Experimental demonstration of a star-field identification algorithm. [integrated with intelligent imaging camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    A fault-tolerant, six-feature, all-sky star-field identification algorithm has been integrated with a CCD-based imaging camera. This autonomous intelligent camera identifies in real time any star field without a priori knowledge and requires a reference catalog incorporating fewer than 1000 stars. Observatory tests on star fields with this intelligent camera are described.

  13. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  14. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  15. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  16. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  17. Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

  18. Corrosion simulator passes field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    Approximately 50 units of Nalco Chemical Co.'s Quantum-C corrosion simulator, a water-cooled, single-tube heat exchanger, were installed for field testing at various refineries over the past 2 1/2 years. Nalco says the simulator duplicates the corrosive environment inside an operating crude unit overhead system. Connected in parallel with a crude unit's overhead heat exchanger, the Quantum-C receives a portion of the process stream, establishing a temperature profile similar to that of the exchanger being monitored. Specimens of condensed fluids at selected temperatures can be obtained from sample ports along the simulator's tube for analysis of acidity or other corrosion indicators. Thus positioned, the simulator senses changes in corrosiveness, which in turn are reported to a minicomputer located in the process unit control room. Data, transmitted via a Rohrback 4100 interface, can then be displayed immediately or stored for later retrieval in any of several report formats. Nalco reports that the simulator identified and eliminated an aggressive but almost undetectable corrosion activity at one refinery. In another instance, the simulator reportedly verified that low pH conditions in a unit accumulator did not require additional neutralizer that would have cost the refiner an added $200/day.

  19. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Random drug testing requirements and identification of... PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.7 Random drug testing requirements and identification of...

  20. Testing two-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Tegmark, Max

    2011-01-01

    We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and to constrain classes of two-field models using WMAP data. Using covariant formalism, we first develop a framework for understanding the background field kinematics and introduce a “slow-turn” approximation. Next, we find covariant expressions for the evolution of the adiabatic/curvature and entropy/isocurvature modes, and we discuss how the evolution of modes can be inferred mostly from the background kinematics and the geometry of the field manifold. From these expressions, we derive semianalytic formulas for the curvature, isocurvature, and cross spectra, and the standard spectral observables, all to second order in the slow-roll and slow-turn approximations. In tandem, we show how our covariant formalism provides useful intuition into how the general features of the inflationary Lagrangian translate into distinct features in the observable power spectra. In particular, we find that key features of the power spectra can be directly read off from the nature of the roll path, the curve the field vector rolls along with respect to the two-dimensional field manifold. For example, models whose roll path makes a sharp turn around 60 e-foldings before the end of inflation tend to be ruled out because they produce stronger departures from scale invariance than are allowed by the latest CMB observations. Finally, we apply our formalism to confront four classes of two-field models with WMAP data, including doubly quadratic and quartic potentials and nonstandard kinetic terms, showing how whether a model is ruled out or not depends not only on certain features of the inflationary Lagrangian, but also on the initial conditions. Ultimately, for a two-field model to be consistent with observations, we show that it must possess the right balance of certain kinematical and dynamical behaviors, which we reduce to a set of functions that represent the main characteristics of any two-field model of inflation.

  1. TESTING BIOREMEDIATION IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational definition for success of in situ bioremediation at field scale includes meeting regulatory goals for ground water quality in a timely fashion at a predictable cost. urrent practice for site characterization does not adequately define the amount of contamination su...

  2. Analyzing Educational Testing Service Graduate Major Field Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) created the Graduate Major Field Test in Business (GMFT-B) for MBA students. This test is administered to all MBA classes at Jacksonville University for the purpose of measuring student academic achievement and growth, as well as to assess educational outcomes. The test is given in the capstone course,…

  3. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  4. Minicourse 18: Main Field Test Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skailand, Dawn

    This report describes the main field test of Minicourse 18: Teaching Reading as Decoding. The purposes of the main field test were: (1) to evaluate the effects of the course on the participating teachers, (2) to evaluate four reteach treatments on teacher skill acquisition, (3) to compare scores for central city and suburban teachers, and (4) to…

  5. Candidate odours for a short form odorant identification test.

    PubMed

    Mal, Ranjit K; Webber, Chris; Nunez, Desmond A

    2013-09-01

    Measurement of olfactory function is difficult and despite the availability of validated olfactory tests these are not in common use in general clinical practice. The mismatch between self-reported olfactory function and objective test response is well known, thus the need for adequate assessment of olfaction is not disputed. We aimed to determine which if any odour in a commercially available olfactory test could be identified by 70 % or more of normal subjects with a view to developing a shortened screening test for use in general otolaryngology and non-specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. Hospital staff and medical students, under 50 years of age were recruited. The tests were undertaken in a quiet room of neutral odour. Subjects were asked to self-identify 12 odorants presented consecutively and to record how strongly they perceived the odorants on a 4-point scale. One hundred and four participants correctly identified the odorant in 466 (37.3 %) of the 1,248 individual odorant identification tests. Peppermint, fish and coffee odours were identified by 88.5, 79.8 and 69.7 % of participants, respectively, without the advantage of a choice of name prompt. These supra-threshold test odour stimuli were perceived as present in all of the individual odour identification tests, but correct identification of the test odour was very much lower for the other nine test stimuli. Peppermint, fish and coffee are odours that should be evaluated further for inclusion in a short form olfactory identification test in a British population. PMID:23389328

  6. Use of Brief Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Eric E.; Kilmer, Lydia M.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools often administer brief intelligence tests as the first step in the identification of students who are cognitively gifted. However, brief measures are often used without consideration of underlying constructs or the psychometric properties of the measures and without regard to the links between screening decisions and educational

  7. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  8. The “Sniffin' Kids” Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children

    PubMed Central

    Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ρ = 0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years. PMID:24979650

  9. Field Testing Selected Micro Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ECO Northwest, Ltd., Helena, MT.

    As part of a study to test the feasibility of expanding computer use within the Montana business community, computer systems were field tested in four Montana small businesses. The four businesses were a newspaper, an advertising agency, a sheep and cattle ranch, and a private investment company. The companies employed from 3 to 20 persons. Three…

  10. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  11. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  12. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-09-22

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation.

  13. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  14. Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.

    PubMed

    1983-04-01

    The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment. PMID:12314506

  15. VALT parameter identification flight test. [VTOL Approach and Landing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaine, R. L.; Bryant, W. H.; Hodge, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a method of establishing the accuracy of previously developed analytical models of research vehicles for a program for developing avionics technology for VTOL aircraft. The research vehicle is a Boeing-Vertol CH-47 tandem rotor transport helicopter equipped with a fly-by-wire control system. The specialized flight test was designed to take into account the presence of winds at flight conditions from hover through transition to cruise. The test provided data to obtain estimates of derivatives by parameter identification.

  16. Comparative Field Tests of Pressurised Rover Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. A.; Wood, N. B.; Clarke, J. D.; Piechochinski, S.; Bamsey, M.; Laing, J. H.

    The conceptual designs, interior layouts and operational performances of three pressurised rover prototypes - Aonia, ARES and Everest - were field tested during a recent simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. A human factors experiment, in which the same crew of three executed the same simulated science mission in each of the three vehicles, yielded comparative data on the capacity of each vehicle to safely and comfortably carry explorers away from the main base, enter and exit the vehicle in spacesuits, perform science tasks in the field, and manage geological and biological samples. As well as offering recommendations for design improvements for specific vehicles, the results suggest that a conventional Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) would not be suitable for analog field work; that a pressurised docking tunnel to the main habitat is essential; that better provisions for spacesuit storage are required; and that a crew consisting of one driver/navigator and two field science crew specialists may be optimal. From a field operations viewpoint, a recurring conflict between rover and habitat crews at the time of return to the habitat was observed. An analysis of these incidents leads to proposed refinements of operational protocols, specific crew training for rover returns and again points to the need for a pressurised docking tunnel. Sound field testing, circulating of results, and building the lessons learned into new vehicles is advocated as a way of producing ever higher fidelity rover analogues.

  17. The spot indole test for identification of swarming Proteus.

    PubMed

    Bale, M J; McLaws, S M; Matsen, J M

    1985-01-01

    The authors evaluated the use of the spot indole test for rapid speciation of swarming Proteus from the primary isolation plate. One hundred seventy-two consecutive isolates of swarming Proteus were studied, 163 Proteus mirabilis and nine Proteus vulgaris. One hundred fifty-six isolates (95.7%) of Proteus mirabilis gave a negative spot indole. Seven (4.3%) gave a positive spot indole test, but all seven isolates were from cultures in which other indole-producing organisms also were present. If only isolates representing single gram-negative strains in the specimens were tested, the predictive value was greater than 99%. Eight of the nine (88.9%) Proteus vulgaris isolates gave a positive spot indole test; one (11.1%) gave a negative result. This isolate also failed to produce indole by conventional methods but was ornithine decarboxylase negative, and additional biochemical testing was consistent with the Proteus vulgaris identification. All Proteus vulgaris isolates were resistant to ampicillin, and 94.2% of the Proteus mirabilis tested were ampicillin susceptible. The spot indole test is a rapid, accurate, simple, and cost-effective means of speciating swarming Proteus strains isolated as the only gram-negative bacilli in a specimen. The spot indole test should be used in conjunction with an ampicillin susceptibility test result or other confirmatory test information if other gram-negative bacilli are present in the culture. PMID:3966445

  18. Techniques for implementing structural model identification using test data

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Martinez, D.R.

    1990-06-01

    Structural system identification methods are analytical techniques for reconciling test data with analytical models. However, for system identification to become a practical tool for engineering analysis, the estimation techniques/codes must communicate with finite element software packages without intensive analyst intervention and supervision. This paper presents a technique used to integrate commercial software packages for finite element modeling (MSC/NASTRAN), mathematical programming techniques (ADS), and linear system analysis (PRO-MATLAB). The parameter estimation techniques and the software for controlling the overall system were programmed in PRO-MATLAB. Two examples of application of this software using measured data are presented. The examples consist of a truss structure in which the model form is well defined, and an electronics package whose model form is ill-defined since it is difficult to model with finite elements. A comparison of the resulting updated models with the experimental data showed significant improvement. 22 refs.

  19. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  20. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Hietala, J.; Wendland, R.D.; Collins, F.

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  1. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E. ); Hietala, J. ); Wendland, R.D. ); Collins, F. )

    1992-01-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  2. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  3. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  4. APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

  5. RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

  6. A new method of field MRTD test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-09-01

    MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

  7. Identification of Algerian Field-Caught Phlebotomine Sand Fly Vectors by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Lafri, Ismail; Almeras, Lionel; Bitam, Idir; Caputo, Aurelia; Yssouf, Amina; Forestier, Claire-Lise; Izri, Arezki; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are known to transmit Leishmania parasites, bacteria and viruses that affect humans and animals in many countries worldwide. Precise sand fly identification is essential to prevent phlebotomine-borne diseases. Over the past two decades, progress in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as an accurate tool for arthropod identification. The objective of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a tool for identifying field-caught phlebotomine. Methodology/Principal Findings Sand flies were captured in four sites in north Algeria. A subset was morphologically and genetically identified. Six species were found in these areas and a total of 28 stored frozen specimens were used for the creation of the reference spectrum database. The relevance of this original method for sand fly identification was validated by two successive blind tests including the morphological identification of 80 new specimens which were stored at -80°C, and 292 unknown specimens, including engorged specimens, which were preserved under different conditions. Intra-species reproducibility and inter-species specificity of the protein profiles were obtained, allowing us to distinguish specimens at the gender level. Querying of the sand fly database using the MS spectra from the blind test groups revealed concordant results between morphological and MALDI-TOF MS identification. However, MS identification results were less efficient for specimens which were engorged or stored in alcohol. Identification of 362 phlebotomine sand flies, captured at four Algerian sites, by MALDI-TOF MS, revealed that the subgenus Larroussius was predominant at all the study sites, except for in M’sila where P. (Phlebotomus) papatasi was the only sand fly species detected. Conclusion The present study highlights the application of MALDI-TOF MS for monitoring sand fly fauna captured in the field. The low cost, reliability and rapidity of MALDI-TOF MS analyses opens up new ways in the management of phlebotomine sand fly-borne diseases. PMID:26771833

  8. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

    1975-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

  9. Field tests using radioactive matter 2.

    PubMed

    Rulik, P; Prouza, Z; Hovorka, J; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Fronka, A; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Skrkal, J

    2013-04-01

    Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within <1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. PMID:22923250

  10. Celebrity Influence and Identification: A Test of the Angelina Effect.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Kami A; Binder, Andrew R; Hurley, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    Angelina Jolie's announcement that she is a BRCA1 carrier and has had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy was met with widespread support as well as speculation about its possible impact on the public. These speculations were the subject of a Time magazine cover story titled "The Angelina Effect" (Kluger et al., 2013 ). Although there is anecdotal evidence to support this hypothesized Angelina effect, empirical tests are lacking. To explore possible links between Angelina's announcement and public health, we surveyed 356 adults immediately after the announcement. Guided by a model of celebrity influence, the survey assessed participants' demographics and health history, identification and parasocial interaction with Jolie, and genetic testing intentions. Results supported the model's predictions and provided preliminary evidence of an Angelina effect. PMID:26192626

  11. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  12. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  13. Interactive ultrasonic field simulation for nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jason; Rougeron, Gilles; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lacassagne, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an ultrasonic field simulation software, dedicated to Non Destructive Testing, aiming at interactivity. This work relies on Civa Software semi-analytical model. By restricting its scope to homogeneous isotropic specimens with simple geometry and half-skip modes, an almost completely regular algorithm, well suited to modern hardware, can be derived. The performance of three implementations on multicore SIMD general purpose processors (GPP), manycore accelerators (MIC) and graphical processing units (GPU) over a set of 18 realistic configurations (a standard one plus 17 variations) are presented and analysed. For GPP and the GPU, interactive performances with almost 30 fps have been reached on the standard configuration. This is, to our knowledge, the very first time for a NDT ultrasonic field simulation software.

  14. Hazard identification and risk assessment procedure for genetically modified plants in the field--GMHAZID.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Raija A; Törmäkangas, Kirsi M; Kauppinen, Veli S

    2002-01-01

    The safe application of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) requires a risk assessment prior to their proposed use. Based on methods from the chemical industry, we developed a hazard identification procedure for the risk assessment of field tests with genetically modified plants. This risk assessment method, GMHAZID, is carried out in the form of guided brainstorm sessions. GMHAZID was tested with a case study for which a risk assessment had previously been made, and the results of the assessments were compared. The results showed that some new hazards potentially leading to uncontrolled spreading, in addition to those from the previous assessment, were identified using GMHAZID. GMHAZID also recognised some hazards leading to failures in the field experiments. We suggest that GMHAZID provides systematics, reliability, and transparency to the risk assessment procedure. PMID:12008290

  15. Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otávio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

    2010-01-01

    The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans. PMID:24031493

  16. Chateaurenard field test recovery mechanisms and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdarot, G.; Putz, A.; Sardin, M.

    1984-04-01

    The Chateaurenard micellar/polymer field test was conducted between 1976 and 1980 in the south part of the Paris Bassin. Pilot design, operations and oil production results have already been presented. We present a detailled analysis of the effluents. It appears that surfactant, most of wich remained trapped in the reservoir, is associated with calcium in the oil when produced, as a result of sodium exchange with the calcium associated with the clay in the reservoir sand. Supporting phase studies and floods through sandpacks are presented to quantify this cation exchange and investigate its influence on oil recovery and phase trapping.

  17. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  18. Fiber optic sensor applications in field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, J.A.

    1984-04-11

    Fiber optic sensors (F.O.S.) are defined, and the application of this technology to measuring various phenomonon in diverse and hostile environments are discussed. F.O.S. advantages and disavantages both technically and operationally are summarized. Three sensor techniques - intensity, interferometric, and polarization - are then discussed in some detail. General environmental instrumentation and controls that support the Nuclear Weapons Test Program at the Nevada Test Site are discussed next to provide the reader with a basic understanding of the programmatic task. This will aid in recognizing the various difficulties of the traditional measurement techniques at the NTS and the potential advantages that fiber optic measurement systems can provide. An F.O.S. development program is then outlined, depicting a plan to design and fabricate a prototype sensor to be available for field testing by the end of FY84. We conclude with future plans for further development of F.O.S. to measure more of the desired physical parameters for the Test Program, and to eventually become an integral part of an overall measurement and control system.

  19. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

  20. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  1. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  2. Modified visual field test for ptosis surgery (Leicester Peripheral Field Test)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S F; Morawski, A; Sampath, R; Burns, J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is lack of consensus among Primary Health Care Trusts (PCTs) and health insurers on how to reimburse ptosis surgery and upper lid blepharoplasty, as these procedures can be regarded as cosmetic. Standardised photographs are expensive and difficult to achieve, whilst the routine 24-2 visual field lacks the range to detect visually significant superior field defects. Aim To introduce a modified visual field designed to assess the functional disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis and to demonstrate the effectiveness of surgery in improving the visual field. Methods Patients who had surgery for ptosis or dermatochalasis between January 2006 and December 2009 were prospectively invited to perform a modified visual field test pre- and post-operatively. Results In total, 97 patients amounting to 194 eyes were included in the study. Ninety five eyes had aponeurotic repair with or without blepharoplasty and 77 eyes had blepharoplasty alone. This modified test has a sensitivity of 98.8% of detecting ptosis. For patients who underwent ptosis surgery with or without blepharoplasty, 84.2% recorded an improvement in points seen with the test and 81% recorded an improvement in visual field height. For those who had blepharoplasty alone, 90.9% recorded an improvement in points seen in the modified visual field test and 80.6% had improvement in visual field height. Conclusion Our modified visual field assessment is a quick and easy way to assess patient disability associated with ptosis and dermatochalasis. Surgery improves the demonstrated defect, confirming that ptosis and dermatochalasis can be considered a functional rather than cosmetic issue. PMID:21252946

  3. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, Andrew M; Butcher, Thomas; Troost, Henry

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

  4. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  5. University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a rapid quantitative olfactory function test for the clinic.

    PubMed

    Doty, R L; Shaman, P; Kimmelman, C P; Dann, M S

    1984-02-01

    Despite the fact that clinical otolaryngologists are often presented with complaints of olfactory dysfunction, they have limited means to diagnose these problems. A major reason has been the lack of a clinically-useful and reliable quantitative test of olfactory function. Recent work at our Clinical Research Center has resulted in the development of such a test. This test--the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT)--can be self-administered and uses microencapsulated odorants which are released by scratching standardized odor-impregnated test booklets. As indicated in this paper, studies have demonstrated that the UPSIT can identify most malingerers and is sensitive to age, gender, smoking habits, and a wide variety of olfactory disorders. A description of this new test, along with some of its applications, is presented. PMID:6694486

  6. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  7. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  8. Field testing of the Cobra Seal System

    SciTech Connect

    Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. ); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

  9. Interpretation of Redondo Creek Field pressure buildup tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent pressure buildup analyses of Redondo Creek Field wells have been facilitated by identification of wellbore storage. The wellbore storage coefficient observed immediately after shut-in is controlled by the compressibility of the two-phase wellbore fluid, but the coefficient decreases when the wellbore storage is controlled by a rising liquid level. Identification of such phenomena aids in defining the correct radial flow regime of the pressure buildup response.

  10. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  11. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  12. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  13. Results of the fourth Hanna field test

    SciTech Connect

    Covell, J. R.; Wojdac, L. F.; Barbour, F. A.; Gardner, G. W.; Glass, R.; Hommert, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The second phase (Hanna IVB) of a coal gasification experiment near Hanna, Wyoming, was completed in September 1979. The experiment attempted to link and gasify coal between process wells spaced 34.3 meters apart. Intermediate wells were positioned between the process wells so that the link could be relayed over shorter distances. Reverse combustion linking was attempted over a 22.9-meter and a 11.4-meter distance of the total well spacing. Thermal activity was generally noted in the upper 3 meters of the coal seam during the link. Two attempts to gasify over the 34.3-meter distance resulted in the propagation of the burn front at the coal overburden interface. Post-burn evaluation indicates fractures as major influencing factors of the combustion process. The Hanna IVB field test provided much insight into influence that geologic features have on in situ coal combustion. The influence of these faults, permeable zones, and cleats, on the air flow patterns can drastically change the overall results of a gasification experiment and should be studied further. The overall results of Hanna IVB were discouraging because of the rapid decline in the heating values for the production gas and the amount of coal gasified. With more complete geologic characerization prior to experimentation and proper well completions, it is believed that most of the subsurface operational problems encountered during Hanna IV could have been avoided.

  14. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  15. Integrated approach to gas accumulation identification in Field M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshevskaya, K.; Rukavishnikov, V.; Belozerov, B.; Podnebesnikh, A.

    2015-02-01

    The given paper describes how the integration of different methods, such as core data, well logs, production logging, seismic data and well test analysis, was used to solve the problem of determining gas accumulation boundaries in sediment complex PK1-3 of Field M. This paper is devoted to the block with wells 2, 36, 49, 85, 127, 148 of the field, since it is characterized by high uncertainty, sc. recently drilled wells 1V, 2V and 120 have produced oil, although according to the present-day geological concept they were considered to be gas saturated in the intervals investigated with production logging. Besides, well 127 that was presumably oil saturated has produced gas. By accounting mismatching production data and the geological concept, the authors have supposed that PK1-3 gas accumulation is characterized by a more complex structure than it was supposed by the predecessors and it is represented by reservoir compartmentalization and high heterogeneity. Therefore, the main goal of the work was to revise the distribution of gas saturated reservoir within the PK1-3 sediment complex. To achieve this goal, the authors have set the following tasks: to revise the geological correlation and gas oil contact; to carry out fault interpretation by means of seismic and well test data; to determine areal facies distribution on the basis of integrated core, perform a log motifs and seismic facies analysis. Thus, the estimation of the gas saturated reservoir portion was implemented in two stages: defining the boundary of gas accumulation in depth on the basis of well logs, production data and fault interpretation; reservoir distribution determination on the basis of the seismic facies analysis within the derived gas accumulation boundary.

  16. Identification of hazelnut fields using spectral and Gabor textural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Selçuk; Taşdemir, Kadim

    2011-09-01

    Land cover identification and monitoring agricultural resources using remote sensing imagery are of great significance for agricultural management and subsidies. Particularly, permanent crops are important in terms of economy (mainly rural development) and environmental protection. Permanent crops (including nut orchards) are extracted with very high resolution remote sensing imagery using visual interpretation or automated systems based on mainly textural features which reflect the regular plantation pattern of their orchards, since the spectral values of the nut orchards are usually close to the spectral values of other woody vegetation due to various reasons such as spectral mixing, slope, and shade. However, when the nut orchards are planted irregularly and densely at fields with high slope, textural delineation of these orchards from other woody vegetation becomes less relevant, posing a challenge for accurate automatic detection of these orchards. This study aims to overcome this challenge using a classification system based on multi-scale textural features together with spectral values. For this purpose, Black Sea region of Turkey, the region with the biggest hazelnut production in the world and the region which suffers most from this issue, is selected and two Quickbird archive images (June 2005 and September 2008) of the region are acquired. To differentiate hazel orchards from other woodlands, in addition to the pansharpened multispectral (4-band) bands of 2005 and 2008 imagery, multi-scale Gabor features are calculated from the panchromatic band of 2008 imagery at four scales and six orientations. One supervised classification method (maximum likelihood classifier, MLC) and one unsupervised method (self-organizing map, SOM) are used for classification based on spectral values, Gabor features and their combination. Both MLC and SOM achieve the highest performance (overall classification accuracies of 95% and 92%, and Kappa values of 0.93 and 0.88, respectively) when multi temporal spectral values and Gabor features are merged. High Fβ values (a combined measure of producer and user accuracy) for detection of hazel orchards (0.97 for MLC and 0.94 for SOM) indicate the high quality of the classification results. When the classification is based on multi spectral values of 2008 imagery and Gabor features, similar Fβ values (0.95 for MLC and 0.93 for SOM) are obtained, favoring the use of one imagery for cost/benefit efficiency. One main outcome is that despite its unsupervised nature, SOM achieves a classification performance very close to the performance of MLC, for detection of hazel orchards.

  17. Sniff magnitude test: relationship to odor identification, detection, and memory tests in a clinic population.

    PubMed

    Tourbier, Isabelle A; Doty, Richard L

    2007-07-01

    Recently a novel measure of olfactory function, the Sniff Magnitude Test (SMT), was developed that relies on changes in inhalation in response to an odor. The relationship of this unique test to that of other olfactory tests has received little investigation. In this study, we assessed, in 132 patients presenting to a chemosensory disorders clinic, the relationship of SMT scores to those from 3 standardized psychophysical tests: the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a phenyl ethyl alcohol odor detection threshold test, and a short-term odor memory/discrimination test. SMT scores were roughly related to olfactory dysfunction categories defined for the UPSIT and correlated moderately with the other tests. Malodors (1% and 3% methylthiobutyrate [MTB], 1% ethyl 3-mercaptoproprionate) exhibited stronger correlations than nonmalodors (3% phenyl ethyl alcohol [PEA], 3% amyl acetate, 3% n-butanol) and elicited greater sniff suppression. In a principal component analysis, the SMT measures loaded on components different from those of the other tests, which loaded on a separate component. Anticipatory responses (i.e., smaller sniffs) occurred across trials for the first malodor (1% MTB), but not for the first nonmalodor (3% PEA), that was encountered. These results, along with those of an earlier factor analysis, suggest that sniff magnitude is influenced by odorant quality and intensity, as well as by cognitive factors. PMID:17488746

  18. Development of toxicant identification procedures for whole sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Besser, J.M.; Ankley, G.T.; Norberg-King, T.J.; West, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    To effectively assess and manage contaminated sediments, identifying the specific contaminants responsible for sediment toxicity is highly desirable. Though effective toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods are well established for water column toxicity, new TIE methodologies are needed that address the special characteristics of whole sediment toxicity tests. Much of the effort to date has focused on the assessment of ammonia toxicity. Whereas pH manipulation is a key tool used to characterize ammonia toxicity in water column TIE, control of pH in interstitial water is much more challenging. Direct addition of hard acid has shown undesirable side effects (e.g., liberation and oxidation of iron), while CO{sub 2}-enrichment is limited in penetration of fine-grained sediments. Biological buffers (MES and POPSO) incorporated into the sediment are effective at altering interstitial pH without causing direct toxicity to Chironomus tentans, Lumbriculus variegatus, and to a lesser extent Hyalella azteca, but the range of pH control achieved has been small ({+-} 0.5 units). Introduction of aquatic plants reduces ammonia concentrations in the water column, but may not provide sufficient control of interstitial water. To date, the most promising results have been achieved using zeolite; adding zeolite to sediment produces moderate reductions in interstitial ammonia concentrations and is non-toxic to the organisms referenced above. Attempts to induce microbial removal of ammonia have been unsuccessful thus far. This presentation will review these and other sediment TIE methods currently under development in laboratories.

  19. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  20. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  1. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  2. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  3. 30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures. 18.14 Section 18.14 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified...

  4. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in odor identification have been the most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predict these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ. PMID:19819272

  5. The Mehrum Coalfire Test Field (MCTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halisch, M.; Wuttke, M. W.; Hesse, Ph.; Han, J.; Kessels, W.

    2009-04-01

    Spontaneous self ignition of coal causes an immense emission of climate relevant gases and affects regional groundwater conditions in such a large scale, that it could not be even rough estimated. This problem occurs all over the world where coal is mined, stored or processed. Keeping these things and also global warming problems in mind, the extinction of such fires becomes a significant task for future climate and environmental protection. In the big arid coal mining belt of the northwest PR China the necessity of environmental as well as resource protection is now realized, leading to increased fire fighting activities. Mostly, the burning coal is partially removed, the surface is insufficiently sealed from oxygen and fire-zones are cooled with valuable fresh water. Such cooling of fire centers is often not sustainable because oxygen rich air may keep on penetrating through the soil surface and reach the cooled down coal which subsequently starts to burn again. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" numerical models are developed to simulate the propagation of underground coal fires in realistic scenarios. These models will be adapted to new data from lab and field experiments including multiphase transport and phase transition processes. The Mehrum test site is used to set up a small scale in situ coal fire experiment in order to validate and verify the codes as well as to better understand the coal fire genesis. The experiment will be carried out under usage of two coal heaps with a total volume of about 1 m3. At the bottom, a layer of hydraulic conductive coarse gravel has been built in. Within this layer, a special ventilation system for air supplying has been embedded. The exact amount of led in air is measured by high resolution flow rate devices. The coal lies directly above the coarse gravel layer. The heating source is located in the lower forth of the coal layer. Positions of other sensors (temperature sensors, electrodes for geoelectrical measurements, gas probing tubes) are based on first numerical results. The coverage consists of a 10 cm to 15 cm strong layer of sand (middle to fine sand). Extinction of the fire by application of water with additives (e. g. salt) and its implication for the underground convection can finally be tested with these installations.

  6. Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

  7. Discrepancies between Aedes aegypti identification in the field and in the laboratory after collection with a sticky trap.

    PubMed

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Lima, Arthur Weiss da Silva; Araújo, Simone Costa; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Galardo, Allan Kardec Ribeiro; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Braga, Ima Aparecida; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; Codeço, Claudia Torres; Valle, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Currently, sticky traps are regularly employed to assist in the surveillance of Aedes aegypti infestation. We tested two alternative procedures for specimen identification performed by local health agents: directly in the field, as recommended by certain manufacturers, or after transportation to the laboratory. A total of 384 sticky traps (MosquiTRAP) were monitored monthly during one year in four geographically representative Brazilian municipalities. When the same samples were inspected in the field and in the laboratory, large differences were noted in the total number of mosquitoes recorded and in the number of specimens identified as Ae. aegypti by both procedures. Although field identification has the potential to speed vector surveillance, these results point to uncertainties in the evaluated protocol. PMID:25317711

  8. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  9. Development of Teaching Materials for Field Identification of Plants and Analysis of Their Effectiveness in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohkawa, Chizuru

    2000-01-01

    Introduces teaching materials developed for field identification of plants with synoptical keys, identification tables, cards, and programs. Selects approximately 2000 seed plants and uses visibly identifiable characteristics for classification. Recommends using the methodology of identification in other areas for biological identification. (YDS)

  10. Bootstrapping Dip Test for PIV Outlier Identification and Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Andree; Pun, Chan-Seng; Dabiri, Dana

    2007-11-01

    A PIV outlier detection and correction method is proposed that does not directly rely on local statistics. A bootstrapping method uses interpolation to generate a distribution of points for each vector component. Statistics are obtained by applying the Hartigan's dip test for bimodality on the distribution points to estimate the mode for each vector component. Significant difference between the estimated modes and outliers is observed; non-spurious vector components are close to the estimated modes. The bootstrapping dip test outlier detection scheme is then repeated until no more vector components are rejected. Two approaches to replace the detected vector components are considered. First, the corresponding mode values are replaced with the detected components, second the remaining vector components are used to re-interpolate the field. Validation includes parametric studies based on the number of undetections and overdetections on simulated fields to determine the optimal sets of parameters. Applications of the optimum parameters to a turbulent jet flow and a synthetic Rankine Vortex flow, both obtained from the PIV Challenge website are shown and details of this methodology is discussed.

  11. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown that XYZ data derived from UAV photogrammetry has a similar practical accuracy to RTK GPS, which is commonly used for cadastral, topographic and engineering survey work. This means that UAV photogrammetry can, for the most part, replace GPS surveying as the main method of data capture for engineering projects, boundary mapping and topographical surveying. Aerial Photogrammetry, in conjunction with RTK GPS, can now be used for projects with a 1:200 map scale accuracy requirement.

  12. Flight Test Identification and Simulation of a UH-60A Helicopter and Slung Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, Luigi S.; Sahai, Ranjana; Tucker, George E.; McCoy, Allen H.; Tyson, Peter H.; Tischler, Mark B.; Rosen, Aviv

    2001-01-01

    Helicopter slung-load operations are common in both military and civil contexts. Helicopters and loads are often qualified for these operations by means of flight tests, which can be expensive and time consuming. There is significant potential to reduce such costs both through revisions in flight-test methods and by using validated simulation models. To these ends, flight tests were conducted at Moffett Field to demonstrate the identification of key dynamic parameters during flight tests (aircraft stability margins and handling-qualities parameters, and load pendulum stability), and to accumulate a data base for simulation development and validation. The test aircraft was a UH-60A Black Hawk, and the primary test load was an instrumented 8- by 6- by 6-ft cargo container. Tests were focused on the lateral and longitudinal axes, which are the axes most affected by the load pendulum modes in the frequency range of interest for handling qualities; tests were conducted at airspeeds from hover to 80 knots. Using telemetered data, the dynamic parameters were evaluated in near real time after each test airspeed and before clearing the aircraft to the next test point. These computations were completed in under 1 min. A simulation model was implemented by integrating an advanced model of the UH-60A aerodynamics, dynamic equations for the two-body slung-load system, and load static aerodynamics obtained from wind-tunnel measurements. Comparisons with flight data for the helicopter alone and with a slung load showed good overall agreement for all parameters and test points; however, unmodeled secondary dynamic losses around 2 Hz were found in the helicopter model and they resulted in conservative stability margin estimates.

  13. The Design and Field Test of the ACT Portfolio System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reckase, Mark D.

    The American College Testing Program (ACT) is field testing a portfolio assessment model. The field test is designed to determine whether it is possible to implement a portfolio assessment model on a national level that will result in scores that are of sufficient reliability and validity that they can be used for decisions at the student level.…

  14. Germination and emergence tests for predicting switchgrass field establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) seed quality tests on field establishment has not been addressed. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of seed quality tests to predict field establishment. Standard Association of Official Seed Analysts (AOSA) tests are based on the percentage of...

  15. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a...

  16. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a...

  17. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a...

  18. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a...

  19. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an uncertified PTC system, or a product of an uncertified PTC system, or any regression testing of a...

  20. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  1. Flight test planning and parameter extraction for rotorcraft system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Demiroz, M. Y.; Talbot, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the mathematical modelling of aircraft dynamics on the basis of an investigation conducted with the aid of the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA). The particular characteristics of RSRA make it possible to investigate aircraft properties which cannot be readily studied elsewhere, for example in the wind tunnel. The considered experiment had mainly the objective to develop an improved understanding of the physics of rotor flapping dynamics and rotor loads in maneuvers. The employed approach is based on a utilization of parameter identification methodology (PID) with application to helicopters. A better understanding of the contribution of the main rotor to the overall aircraft forces and moments is also to be obtained. Attention is given to the mathematical model of a rotorcraft system, an integrated identification method, flight data processing, and the identification of RSRA mathematical models.

  2. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  3. Multiphase pumping: The lessons of long-term field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Elf-Aquitaine, E.L.; Taiani, S.

    1995-12-31

    The field testing of a POSEIDON rotodynamic helicoaxial pump (P302) manufactured by SULZER is being conducted since June 1994 on the Elf Aquitaine`s onshore site of the PECORADE oil field located in the south-west of France. This one-year testing program is aimed at qualifying this design of multiphase pump for future field applications. The multiphase pump has been previously tested at the IFP`s test loop of SOLAIZE for factory acceptance and performance test. This paper describes the PECORADE multiphase loop, the multiphase pump testing procedures and the results obtained in the field of performance, sensitivity, and endurance. The operational and maintenance lessons to be learned from this long-term field testing are presented from the point of view of the operator.

  4. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS FOR NEUROTOXICITY FIELD TESTING: PEARL II AND ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pearl II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. he battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event related slow brain potentials (CNV,P30O), and associated ...

  5. Postmodernism in the Field of Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewy, Arieh

    1996-01-01

    Three eras in the history of examining outcomes of education are described, and a new approach labeled as "assessment" is characterized as a postmodern era of achievement testing. This era is marked by increasing the teacher's authority to evaluate achievement and questioning the relevance of certain psychometric principles of evaluation. (SLD)

  6. Identification and Validation of a Brief Test Anxiety Screening Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Segool, Natasha; Putwain, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of test-based accountability policies around the world has increased the pressure placed on students to perform well on state achievement tests. Educational researchers have begun taking a closer look at the reciprocal effects of test anxiety and high-stakes testing. However, existing test anxiety assessments lack efficiency and…

  7. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  8. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  9. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  10. FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

  11. Identification and Management of Critical Fields for a Claypan Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying fields that need conservation to minimize impacts on stream water quality is critical to ensure effectiveness of conservation programs at the watershed scale. This study was located in the 72 km2 Goodwater Creek Watershed, in northeast Missouri. Most soils in this watershed are character...

  12. Artifacts identification in apertureless near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucciardi, P. G.; Bachelier, G.; Allegrini, M.; Ahn, J.; Hong, M.; Chang, S.; Jhe, W.; Hong, S.-C.; Baek, S. H.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide criteria for optical artifacts recognition in reflection-mode apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy, implementing demodulation techniques at higher harmonics. We show that optical images acquired at different harmonics, although totally uncorrelated from the topography, can be entirely due to far-field artifacts. Such observations are interpreted by developing the dipole-dipole model for the detection scheme at higher harmonics. The model, confirmed by the experiment, predicts a lack of correlation between the topography and optical images even for structures a few tens of nanometers high, due to the rectification effect introduced by the lock-in amplifier used for signal demodulation. Analytical formulas deduced for the far-field background permit to simulate and identify all the different fictitious patterns to be expected from metallic nanowires or nanoparticles of a given shape. In particular, the background dependence on the tip-oscillation amplitude is put forward as the cause of the error-signal artifacts, suggesting, at the same time, specific fine-tuning configurations for background-free imaging. Finally a careful analysis of the phase signal is carried out. In particular, our model correctly interprets the steplike dependence observed experimentally of the background phase signal versus the tip-sample distance, and suggests to look for smooth variations of the phase signal for unambiguous near-field imaging assessment.

  13. Test particle acceleration in turbulent reconnecting magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosiano, John; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Plante, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on particle acceleration in a MHD field was investigated by computing test particle trajectories in turbulent MHD reconnecting fields, including reconnection simulations at different magnetic Reynolds numbers. The dynamics of individual particles were investigated making it possible to examine the acceleration mechanism in great detail. It was found that turbulence influences the acceleration in two ways. It enhances the reconnection electric field while producing a stochastic electric field that gives rise to momentum diffusion; and it produces magnetic 'bubbles' and other irregularities that can temporarily trap test particles in the strong reconnection electric field for times comparable to the magnetofluid characteristic time.

  14. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  15. Goldstone field test activities: Sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The goals are to conduct a research and development program aimed at determining the most effective way to do SETI within the constraints of current technology and estimated budgets. The general search strategy adopted is that which is recommended by the SETI Science Working Group. The strategy for an all sky survey for SETI was further developed over the last year. Scan patterns, scan rates, and signal detection algorithms were developed. Spectral power measurement instrumentation was tested at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A specially designed radio frequency interference (RFI) measurement system was built and installed at the Venus Station. A data base management system for storage and retrieval of the RFI data was partially implemented on a VAX 750 computer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.; E-144 Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collision with terawatt pulses of 1,054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  17. Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

  18. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  19. Field test of stormwater best management practices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.L.; Kaighn, R.J. Jr.; Liao, S.L.; Barnes, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    A dry detention pond, hydraulically modified and draining a small and highly impervious area, and a highway median grassed swale in Charlottesville, Virginia were monitored for a fifteen-month period to test their ability in reducing stormwater pollution. Pollutants examined included total suspended solids, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, and total zinc. The results indicate that for the modified dry pond (with a 7.6 cm or 3 in outflow orifice) an average removal rate of about 50% was obtained for total suspended solids; 40% for total phosphorus; and 30% for both chemical oxygen demand and total zinc. Slightly higher removal rates were obtained for the 31 m or 100 ft long swale with a check dam. Modeling analyses of the pond show that the pollutant removal rate is closely related to the total volume and the intensity of the rainfall events. Both the pond and the swale are fairly effective in removing pollutants when the rainfall volume is small and when storm intensity is low and duration is long.

  20. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  1. Field tests of transgenic barley lines in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing transgenic barley lines for FHB in the greenhouse does not necessarily give the same results as field tests. The objective of this project was to test 18 transgenic lines in replicated trials in an inoculated FHB nursery. Several programs have developed barley lines expressing anti-fungal a...

  2. Designing an Online In-House Major Field Learning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilda, Agacer; Christofi, Andreas; Moliver, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Our paper provides some critical attributes of an online homegrown assessment test, which we labelled Major Field Learning Test (MFLT). These attributes are also valid for departmental tests, directly connected to coursework which makes up the MFLT. The paper provides helpful recommendations for online assessment of learning as well as retention…

  3. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  4. OPCW Proficiency Test: a practical approach also for interlaboratory test on detection and identification of pesticides in environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Konopski, Leszek; Liu, Pingfeng; Wuryani, Wuri; Sliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  5. OPCW Proficiency Test: A Practical Approach Also for Interlaboratory Test on Detection and Identification of Pesticides in Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Śliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  6. Field testing of the new 2400 Series gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Freen, P.D.; Palmer, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    The 2400 Series is a new line of engines produced by Cooper Energy Services. The following paper describes the four engine models of the 2400 Series and the field testing of the initial release of 5 eight-cylinder in-line models built specifically for that purpose. Operational experiences, inspection results and the impact on subsequent production designs, operator training programs, and maintenance recommendations are discussed. The field test program was an integral part of the development project. Carefully integrated with laboratory development, the program allowed for rapid design optimization for conditions that were not possible to duplicate with laboratory tests alone. The result was a more robust, field hardened engine design.

  7. Field test of two 16-element fiber optic seismometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Wanyu; Fu, Lixi; Zhang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Two 16-element fiber-optic seismometer arrays based on combined wavelength- and time domain multiplexing technology have been designed and investigated, followed by a field test, which is focused on the sensitivities of the sensors and correlation of the signal. The field test shows that the consistency of the sensitivities is pretty good, though the fluctuation of sensitivities at different frequencies should not be ignored. The method to calculate the correlation of two sensors is presented briefly and the results show an acceptable high level. The field test indicates that it's available to use the arrays in practical applications of micro-seismic.

  8. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

  9. Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

  10. Lacunarity Measures of Potential Fields in Covered Lithology Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettings, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Measure distributions, both multifractal and other kinds, are not unique, so spatial patterns with the same measure may have different appearances. Lacunarity analysis is a method of description of dispersion in spatial patterns across a range of scales, and is one way of descriminating clustering of similar values. Lacunarity of an image was calculated using a moving window across a range of scales as the ratio of the second moment divided by the square of the first moment for values within the window. This gives a curve of lacunarity versus resolution (scale); the curve is concave for highly clustered data, pseudolinear or convex for data with clusters at many scales such as multifractal simulations, and constant for uniformly spaced data. Breaks in slope of the curve indicate scales that are important in the structure of the spatial pattern. Gravity and magnetic field anomaly data are well known to be multifractal and thus calculated lacunarities of gridded datasets have been investigated to determine if the resulting curves are a useful measure of texture of the potential field data and helpful in identifying likely lithologies at depth beneath cover. Lacunarity is often calculated on binary data, but it can also be calculated using quantitative data. The quantitative data case lacunarity measure was computed for grids using a 25 by 25 km window moving over the grid, each window overlapping the previous one by 12.5 km. The data were the aeromagnetic and isostatic gravity anomaly grids for the state of Arizona at 0.5 km grid-interval, resulting in a lacunarity curves for gravity and aeromagnetic anomaly for each of approximately 2500 windows. The open-source software R was used for plotting a map of window center locations and lacunarity curves, and the map was loaded into Google Earth, together with maps of the gravity and magnetic field anomaly, porphyry copper deposit locations, and the geological map of Arizona. Windows were selected to compare lacunarity curves over various lithologies, mineralized versus unmineralized areas, and areas of cover with nearby areas of exposed lithostratigraphic units. Lacunarity curves for windows showed both clustered and scale-independent behaviors. Forty-one known porphyry copper deposits, mined or unmined, showed break-in-slope statistics in the gravity anomaly lacunarity curves of the windows containing them of (2.7, 3.4, 4.5, 6.7 and 16.4 km) for minimum, first quartile, median, third quartile, and maximum (square) window sides. These dimensions describe the size of clusters of anomalies within the 25x25 km window containing the deposit and surrounding lithology. For windows nearby on similar lithologies but no known deposits, the statistics are (2.2, 3.7, 5.0, 8.8 and 33.1 km), and the lacunarity curves for deposit windows are generally distinct in amplitude or shape, suggesting that the lacunarity measure has some power of discrimination. Lacunarity plots on similar and differing lithologies overlap but show differences on average especially between different geologic domains. The variability in the lacunarity curves shows that the measure can be useful in discrimination of lithologies, especially when combined with other measures of the potential field data.

  11. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; LaTorre, V.R.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Nitao, J.J.; Towse, D.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Watwood, D.; Wilder, D.

    1989-07-26

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of using an RFID simulator that allows for faster evaluation of RFID-medical device EMC against a library of RFID test signals at various field strengths. Results The results of these tests demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of simulator testing and can be used to support its incorporation into applicable consensus standards. Conclusions This work can aid the medical device community in better assessing the risks associated with medical device exposure to RFID. PMID:25086451

  13. Emerging methodologies for pathogen identification in positive blood culture testing.

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Grégory; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) represent a major cause of death in developed countries and are associated with long-term loss of functions. Blood culture remains the gold standard for BSI diagnosis, as it is easy to perform and displays a good analytical sensitivity. However, its major drawback remains the long turnaround time, which can result in inappropriate therapy, fall of survival rate, emergence of antibiotic resistance and increase of medical costs. Over the last 10 years, molecular tools have been the alternative to blood cultures, allowing early identification of pathogens involved in sepsis, as well detection of critical antibiotic resistance genes. Besides, the advent of MALDI-TOF revolutionized practice in routine microbiology significantly reduced the time to result. Reviewed here are recent improvements in early BSI diagnosis and these authors' view for the future is presented, including innovative high-throughput technologies. PMID:26559655

  14. Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

    2006-08-01

    Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed. PMID:16844415

  15. Samejima Items in Multiple-Choice Tests: Identification and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Nazia

    2013-01-01

    Samejima hypothesized that non-monotonically increasing item response functions (IRFs) of ability might occur for multiple-choice items (referred to here as "Samejima items") if low ability test takers with some, though incomplete, knowledge or skill are drawn to a particularly attractive distractor, while very low ability test takers…

  16. Identification of the Temperature Field in Pulsatile Impinging Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

    2010-09-01

    The presented paper shows the possibility of using holographic interferometry and hot-wire anemometry in the research of heat transfer from impingement pulsatile flow. The intensity of heat transfer in the case of impingement flow is often measured with glue-on heat flux sensors, or by indirect methods such as naphthalene sublimation. All these methods have a response time too long for measuring instant values of the heat transfer coefficient on a surface cooled/heated by impingement pulsatile flow. This shortcoming should be overcome by using CTA glue-on probes or, preferably, by using optical methods such as holographic interferometry. It is necessary to employ a special holographic setup with double sensitivity instead of the commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the Mach-Zehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the holographic interferometry experiments will be compared with the temperature field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  17. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  18. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

  19. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these inexpensive detector-casing combinations statistical samples of the Rn-222 flux can be measured, elucidating the most communicative fractures (i.e. fractures that are actively transporting water and gasses). The Rn-222 measurements can then be used as an input to create a more accurate conceptual model to be used for transport modeling and related cleanup activities. If the team’s approach is demonstrated to be applicable to a wide variety of rock types and soil conditions it might potentially offer significant cost saving without a reduction in data quality at Monsanto Superfund and other sites underlain by fracture-dominated bedrock.

  20. Separability of test fields equations on the C -metric background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KofroÅ, David

    2015-12-01

    In the Kerr-Newman spacetime the Teukolsky master equation, governing the fundamental test fields, is of great importance. We derive an analogous master equation for the nonrotating C -metric which encompasses a massless Klein-Gordon field, neutrino field, Maxwell field, Rarita-Schwinger field and gravitational perturbations. This equation is shown to be separable in terms of "accelerated spin-weighted spherical harmonics." It is shown that, contrary to ordinary spin-weighted spherical harmonics, the "accelerated" ones are different for different spins. In some cases, the equations for eigenfunctions and eigenvalues are explicitly solved.

  1. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  2. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  3. Structural Monitoring and Field Test for Kao Ping Hsi Cable-Stayed Bridge in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chern-Hwa

    2010-05-01

    This work applies system identification techniques to analyze the measured data from structural monitoring system and field test for Kao Ping Hsi cable-stayed bridge in Taiwan. The continuous wavelet transform algorithm can be used to identify the dynamic characteristics of the cable-stayed bridge under environmental vibration. The identified results with traffic flow were compared with those obtained from ambient vibration test. The excellent agreement both the identified results from different traffic conditions indicates that the traffic flow would not significantly change the natural frequencies of the cable-stayed bridge. The modal parameters identified from the field vibration test will be compared with those used in the finite element analysis. The results obtained herein will be used as the damage detection for monitoring the long-term safety of the Kao Ping Hsi cable-stayed bridge by using structural monitoring system.

  4. Influence of grid bar shape on field cleaner performance - field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A test was conducted to evaluate the influence of grid bar cross sectional shape on cotton stripper field cleaner performance in terms of cleaning efficiency, seed cotton loss, and fiber and yarn quality. Three field cleaner configurations were tested on a cotton stripper harvester operating under f...

  5. Instrumental variables algorithm for modal parameter identification in flutter testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Gupta, N. K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the task of estimating modal parameters from system response measurement in aircraft flutter testing. A frequency-domain derivation of an instrumental-variables algorithm is presented for a linear time-invariant dynamic system of order n. Basically, this algorithm fits a set of poles and zeros to the measured transfer function. An illustrative example is provided regarding the application of the algorithm to aeroelasticity testing. It is shown that the algorithm can be implemented for on-line data reduction with a microcomputer-based analysis system. By using instrumental variables the sensitivity of the modal parameter estimates to noise in the system-response measurements is reduced greatly. The algorithm is expected to be a powerful and valuable tool for on-line estimation of modal parameters in flutter testing and should be useful in control system and structural dynamics tests.

  6. Seismological identification of the 1998 May 28 Pakistan nuclear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D.; Douglas, A.; Selby, N. D.; Marshall, P. D.; Porter, D.; Wallis, N. J.

    2002-07-01

    On 1998 May 28 Pakistan announced that it had conducted an underground nuclear test. Here we assess whether seismological data, recorded by the International Monitoring System (IMS) being set up to help verify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), can be used to identify the Pakistani test as a possible underground explosion. The prototype International Data Centre (pIDC) automatically determined the network-averaged body wave and surface wave magnitudes to be 4.9 and 3.6, respectively. One of the most reliable methods of identifying possible underground explosions is the mb : Ms criterion. However, mb : Ms is calibrated using conventional magnitudes from historical earthquakes and explosions. We calculate , in the conventional way, using P waves from the Pakistani test recorded by a simulated standard short-period seismograph and read by an experienced analyst. We also analyse the three components of the surface waves from the Pakistani test to confirm that these are correctly associated, and calculate . On mb : Ms the Pakistani test falls between the historical Eurasian underground explosion and earthquake populations. Thus, while the source may arouse suspicion on mb : Ms, its signature is typical of both explosions and deep-lithospheric Eurasian earthquakes. The vast majority of the seismic P signals from the Pakistani test, recorded at long range, are complex. However, simple P seismograms are recorded by at least three of the IMS stations. Analysis, using the relative amplitude method, of three of the simple P seismograms suggests that the source is shallow (less than 5 km). We conclude that the combination of the mb : Ms signature and shallow depth are sufficient to classify the Pakistani test as a possible explosion. Under the CTBT an on-site inspection would be required to determine whether the explosion was nuclear.

  7. Electrophysiological systems for neurotoxicity field testing: PEARL II and alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.; Hudnell, H.K.

    1989-02-10

    PEARL II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. The battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory, and visual), event-related slow brain potentials (CNV, P300), and associated behavioral measures. Field-testing capabilities have been demonstrated in pediatric lead studies. Several dozen PEARL II systems are currently being used in fixed-base laboratories. Factors which limit the use of PEARL II in neurotoxicity field testing include: operation and maintenance of the system requires a highly trained staff; PEARL II is a relatively expensive system; it is not commercially available or serviced; the hardware is obsolescent. Although sensory-evoked potential tests have proven to be very sensitive to chemical exposure in humans and animals, the effectiveness of such tests for neurotoxicity screening of exposed populations has not been demonstrated. Several commercial systems suitable for neurotoxicity field testing are reviewed briefly. Electrophysiological tests of visual toxicity currently under development are also described.

  8. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual…

  9. DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

  10. National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988. Field Test Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingels, Steven J.; And Others

    In anticipation of the base-year survey of the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), a field test of the questionnaire and test items was conducted in 1987. NELS:88 is a national, longitudinal study designed to provide trend data about the critical transitions of young people as they develop, attend school, and enter the work…

  11. Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect

  12. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil Ø.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain. PMID:26578887

  13. An observational test of magnetospheric field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.F.; Weiss, L.A.; McComas, D.J.; Moldwin, M.B.; Reeves, G.D.

    1994-07-01

    The configuration of the geomagnetic field is an indicator of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical magnetospheric field models are currently in use which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. Here, the global nature of the Tsyganenko 89 [Tsyganenko, 1989] magnetospheric magnetic field model is tested by comparison of the model-predicted field orientations with the field orientations derived simultaneously at two different locations in geosynchronous orbit from the axis of symmetry of the plasma electron distribution function (30 eV--40 keV). The results for the particular time interval studied are inconclusive because the Tsyganenko 89 model does not describe the field at one of the satellites well enough, but the procedure itself appears promising.

  14. Flight test design for CH-47 parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Vincent, J.

    1978-01-01

    The VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program is a significant experimental research program aimed at establishing a data base for rotorcraft operation in a terminal area environment. Work was undertaken to determine helicopter math models suitable for analyzing maneuvers along a VTOL trajectory and to apply these math models to determine the flight test procedures of greatest effectiveness in establishing helicopter dynamic characteristics in this mode of operation. As the principal result of this investigation, a flight test specification is presented for the CH-47 VALT aircraft operating along the specified VTOL trajectory of the VALT program.

  15. Comprehensive visual field test & diagnosis system in support of astronaut health and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Clark, Jonathan B.; Reisman, Garrett E.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    Long duration spaceflight, permanent human presence on the Moon, and future human missions to Mars will require autonomous medical care to address both expected and unexpected risks. An integrated non-invasive visual field test & diagnosis system is presented for the identification, characterization, and automated classification of visual field defects caused by the spaceflight environment. This system will support the onboard medical provider and astronauts on space missions with an innovative, non-invasive, accurate, sensitive, and fast visual field test. It includes a database for examination data, and a software package for automated visual field analysis and diagnosis. The system will be used to detect and diagnose conditions affecting the visual field, while in space and on Earth, permitting the timely application of therapeutic countermeasures before astronaut health or performance are impaired. State-of-the-art perimetry devices are bulky, thereby precluding application in a spaceflight setting. In contrast, the visual field test & diagnosis system requires only a touchscreen-equipped computer or touchpad device, which may already be in use for other purposes (i.e., no additional payload), and custom software. The system has application in routine astronaut assessment (Clinical Status Exam), pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring, and astronaut selection. It is deployable in operational space environments, such as aboard the International Space Station or during future missions to or permanent presence on the Moon and Mars.

  16. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  17. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR Parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  18. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... between the reporting requirements of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 and any reporting requirements associated with the methods listed in these tables, the provisions of 40 CFR parts 122 and 125 are controlling and..., § 136.5(a) through (d) or 40 CFR 401.13, other additional or alternate test procedures may be...

  19. Evaluating Gifted Identification Practice: Aptitude Testing and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael S.; Kirsch, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined individually administered IQ scores from an entire K-5 population (N = 432) of Limited English Proficient students referred for gifted program eligibility determination in a single large urban district in the southeastern United States. Of 8 IQ tests compared, only 1, the Stanford-Binet V, had scores appreciably lower than…

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  1. Supplementary rapid biochemical test panel for the API 20E bacterial identification system.

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, R C; Migneault, P C; Nolte, F S

    1985-01-01

    The API 20E Analytical Profile Index typically suggests three or four conventional biochemical tests to complete the identification of strains either identified to genus only or that have multiple genera consistent with the profile number. We compiled a simple panel of eight rapid (4-h) tests that can substitute for the supplementary biochemical tests recommended by Analytab Products (Plainview, N.Y.). The rapid test panel (RTP) consisted of adonitol, cellobiose, lactose, raffinose, rhamnose, and xylose utilization, lysine decarboxylase activity, and motility. A total of 114 consecutive clinical isolates that required additional tests to complete the identifications were each tested with the complete RTP, as well as with the recommended conventional biochemicals. All discordant identifications were resolved by using an expanded series of conventional biochemical tests. Overall, 110 (96%) strains were identified to the correct genus, and 109 (95%) strains were identified to the correct species by using the RTP, as compared with 105 (92%) identified to the correct genus and 90 (79%) identified to the correct species with the recommended tests. The identifications based on the two supplementary test systems did not agree for 7 (6.1%) strains. Four discrepancies were resolved in favor of the RTP, and three were resolved in favor of the recommended tests. We were unable to identify five (4.4%) strains with the recommended tests and only one (0.9%) with the RTP. A majority (86%) of the test strains were identified to the species level with the RTP after only 4 h of incubation. PMID:3905846

  2. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  3. Mud Pit Identification Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (September 2001, Rev. No. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NV

    2001-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection completed the Mud Pit Strategy, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (DOE/NV, 2001) to document a systematic process for identifying and categorizing potentially contaminated mud pits located on the NTS, and systematically evaluating them for inclusion in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The objectives of this report are to summarize the process used to define the six mud pit categories, identify mud pits, discuss the mud pits that do not meet FFACO entry criteria, identify mud pits for proposed FFACO entry, and describe the general mud pit distribution. Underground nuclear testing conducted since 1951 at the NTS has produced mud pits that were used for the transfer and collection of drilling mud, rock cuttings, and drilling fluids. This report documents the execution of the strategy document by examining the identification process and documenting these results. For clarification purposes, this document uses the term ''entry'' to indicate inclusion of mud pits into the FFACO and ''exclusion'' to indicate those mud pits which do not meet the ''entry'' criteria defined in this report. Based on this criteria, 257 mud pits identified that have been proposed for FFACO entry were found in 14 separate areas of the NTS. Each of the 257 mud pits proposed for FFACO entry will need to be located in the field, photographed, and documented during future Industrial Sites Project, Preliminary Assessment activities. If the field review determines that a mud pit was misidentified or improperly categorized, the appropriate FFACO modification request will be submitted for review and approval.

  4. A field validation of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Steven P; Cole, Faith A

    2002-07-01

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay (WA, USA). Sediment samples were collected at 30 stations with a 0.1 m2 grab from which subsamples were taken for sediment toxicity testing and geochemical and macrofaunal analyses. Standard 10-d sediment-amphipod toxicity tests were conducted with Rhepoxynius abronius and Leptocheiros plumulosus. Sediments were analyzed for 33 PAHs, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid-volatile sulfide, simultaneously extracted metals (Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni), total organic carbon, and grain size. Sediment temperature, oxygen-reduction potential, water depth, and interstitial water salinity were also measured. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, quantified as total PAH toxic units (TU(PAH)), were confirmed to be an important common causal agent of the changes in the two toxicity test (% survival R. abronius, % survival L. plumulosus) and five macrofaunal community (number of species, S; numerical abundance, A: total biomass, B: Swartz's dominance index, SDI; Brillouin's index, H) endpoints. Two other macrofaunal community metrics (the complement of Simpson's index, 1 - SI, and McIntosh's index, MI) were less sensitive to TU(PAH) than the two toxicity test endpoints. The sensitivities of R. abronius and L. plumulosus to TU(PAH) were statistically indistinguishable. Field validations were conducted by testing the association between or among each toxicity test endpoint, each of seven macrofaunal community metrics (S, A, B, SDI, H, 1 - SI, MI), and TU(PAH) by (1) Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation, (2) Kendall's coefficient of concordance, (3) G tests of independence, and (4) regression analysis. Some field validations based on multivariable tests of association (e.g., points 2 and 3) among toxicity test, field, and stressor endpoints produced false positive results. Both toxicity test endpoints were validated as indicators of changes in S, A, SDI, and H by all the methods tested. The resolution power of the relationships between the laboratory toxicity test and macrofaunal field endpoints was low (< or = three classes) but sufficient to discriminate ecologically important effects. We conclude that standard sediment-amphipod toxicity tests are ecologically relevant and that, under the proper conditions, their results can be used for lab-to-field extrapolation. PMID:12109743

  5. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  6. Red square test for visual field screening. A sensitive and simple bedside test.

    PubMed

    Mandahl, A

    1994-12-01

    A reliable bedside test for screening of visual field defects is a valuable tool in the examination of patients with a putative disease affecting the sensory visual pathways. Conventional methods such as Donders' confrontation method, counting fingers in the visual field periphery, of two-hand confrontation are not sufficiently sensitive to detect minor but nevertheless serious visual field defects. More sensitive methods requiring only simple tools are also described. In this study, a test card with four red squares surrounding a fixation target, a black dot, with a total test area of about 11 x 12.5 degrees at a distance of 30 cm, was designed for testing experience of red colour saturation in four quadrants, red square test. The Goldmann visual field was used as reference. 125 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma (159 eyes), craniopharyngeoma (9 eyes), meningeoma (21 eyes), vascular hemisphere lesion (40 eyes), hemisphere tumour (10 eyes) and hemisphere abscess (2 eyes) were examined. The Goldmann visual field and red square test were pathological in pituitary adenomas in 35%, in craniopharyngeomas in 44%, in meningeomas in 52% and in hemisphere tumours or abscess in 100% of the eyes. Among these, no false-normal or false-pathological tests were found. However, in vascular hemisphere disease the corresponding figures were Goldmann visual field 90% and red square test 85%. The 5% difference (4 eyes) was due to Goldmann visual field defects strictly peripheral to the central 15 degrees. These defects were easily diagnosed with two-hand confrontation and PMID:7747575

  7. Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, A.; Babzien, M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

    2011-09-01

    A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with ˜60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

  8. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  9. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  10. A new cultural adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; Doty, Richard L; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; de Rezende Pinna, Fábio; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Voegels, Richard Louis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a test of olfactory function that is widely used by otolaryngologists, geriatricians, and neurologists, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. In some instances, cultural and socioeconomic factors have necessitated changes in the odorant items or the response alternatives to make the test scores congruent with North American norms. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of Brazilian subjects on a new Portuguese language version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test with their performance on an earlier Portuguese language version of the test, as well as to assess the influences of gender, age, ethnicity, and economic status on the test scores. METHODS: Based on pilot data, several response alternatives of the earlier Portuguese language version of the test were altered in an effort to improve test performance. Forty-nine healthy Brazilian volunteers, who represented several economic classes, were tested. The test scores of the study cohort who received the newer version of the test were compared with those of a group of 25 subjects who received the earlier version of the test. RESULTS: The mean score for the new version [35 (2.1)] was significantly (p = 0.002) higher than that for the earlier version [32.5 (3.5)]. Although no apparent influence of socioeconomic status was observed, the female participants outperformed the male participants in the current subject cohort. CONCLUSION: The changes made in the new cultural adaptation of the Portuguese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test were effective in increasing the average test scores of the participants. Overall, the female subjects outperformed the male subjects on the test. PMID:23420159

  11. Direct identification and susceptibility testing by the AutoMicrobic system of gram-negative bacilli from urine specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Wellstood, S A

    1986-01-01

    A total of 1,800 urine specimens were screened by Gram stain to detect bacteriuria. Pellets of bacteria were obtained by centrifuging specimens containing greater than or equal to 1 gram-negative bacillus of a single morphological type per oil immersion field. Direct susceptibility tests and identifications were performed from pellets by using the AutoMicrobic system (AMS). Results were compared with culture results by routine AMS methods. Of the 145 specimens showing only gram-negative bacilli on Gram stain, 113 grew greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU of a single species per ml. Compared with routine AMS identifications, the direct method correctly identified 105 (92.9%) of the isolates. Identifications were available within 8 h for 77% of the isolates. When compared by MICs, 93.2% of the direct susceptibility test results agreed with routine AMS results within one twofold dilution. Comparisons by category call indicated that overall complete and essential agreements were 89.9 and 97.8%, respectively, with 1.0% very major, 1.0% major, and 8.1% minor errors. Cefamandole and cephalothin had the lowest correlations by both comparisons. Within 8 h, susceptibility results were available for 94.3% of the isolates. This method offers the advantage of rapid detection, prompt processing, and earlier reporting of complete results for positive urine specimens. PMID:3086375

  12. Field identification of birdseye in sugar maple (acer saccharum marsh. ). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.C.; Stokke, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is critical for two principal reasons: (1) it allows for the enumeration of a valuable resource that may influence management decisions, and (2) it may prevent improper manufacturing of logs at the job site. Both factors should help increase overall timber sale return. The objective of the paper is to provide a background on birdseye sugar maples and a detailed sequential methodology for field identification of birdseye in standing trees.

  13. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82) and bench press (rs = -0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83) and bench press (rs = -0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  14. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-12-01

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

  15. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  16. A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anita; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G

    2007-05-15

    This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of oocyst suspensions of known number of oocysts from Eimeria mitis, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella were prepared and ground using glass beads or mini-pestle. DNA was extracted from ruptured oocysts using commercial systems (GeneReleaser, Qiagen Stoolkit and Prepman) or phenol-chloroform DNA extraction, followed by identification of species-specific ITS-1 sequences by optimised single species PCR assays. The Stoolkit and Prepman protocols showed insufficient repeatability, and the former was also expensive and relatively time-consuming. In contrast, both the GeneReleaser protocol and phenol-chloroform protocols were robust and sensitive, detecting less than 0.4 oocysts of each species per PCR. Finally, we evaluated our new protocol on 68 coccidia positive field samples. Our data suggests that rupturing the oocysts by mini-pestle grinding, preparing the DNA with GeneReleaser, followed by optimised single species PCR assays, makes a robust and sensitive procedure for identifying chicken Eimeria species in field samples. Importantly, it also provides minimal hands-on-time in the pre-PCR process, lower contamination risk and no handling of toxic chemicals. PMID:17386979

  17. Wide-field camera 3 ground testing and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Baggett, S.; Brown, T.; Hartig, G. F.; Hilbert, B.; Hill, R. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Lupie, O.; MacKenty, J. W.; Reid, I. N.; Robberto, M.

    2006-06-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager being developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is now fully integrated and has undergone extensive ground testing at Goddard Space Flight Center, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum test environments. The thermal-vacuum testing marks the first time that both of the WFC3 UV/Visible and IR channels have been operated and characterized in flight-like conditions. The testing processes are completely automated, with WFC3 and the optical stimulus that is used to provide external targets and sources being commanded by coordinated computer scripts. All test data are captured and stored in the long-term Hubble Data Archive. A full suite of instrument calibration tests have been performed, including measurements of detector properties such as dark current, read noise, flat field response, gain, linearity, and persistence, as well as total system throughput, encircled energy, grism dispersions, IR thermal background, and image stability tests. Nearly all instrument characteristics have been shown to meet or exceed expectations and requirements. Solutions to all issues discovered during testing are in the process of being implemented and will be verified during future ground tests.

  18. Field joint protection system rain qualification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report documents the procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) rain test. This test was performed to validate that the flight configuration FJPS prevents the accumulation of moisture in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joints when subjected to simulated prelaunch natural rain environments. The FJPS test article was exposed to rain simulation for approximately 50 minutes. During the test, water entered through the open upper end of the systems tunnel and was funneled down between the tunnel and case. A sealant void at the moisture seal butt splice allowed this water to flow underneath the FJPS. The most likely cause of voids was improper bondline preparation, particularly on the moisture seal surface. In total, water penetrated underneath approximately 60 percent of the FJPS circumference. Because the test article was substantially different from flight configuration (no systems tunnel closeout), results of this test will not affect current flight motors. Due to the omission of systems tunnel covers and systems tunnel floor plate closeout, the test assembly was not representative of flight hardware and resulted in a gross overtest. It is therefore recommended that the test be declared void. It is also recommended that the test be repeated with a complete closeout of the systems tunnel, sealed systems tunnel ends, and improved adhesive bondline preparation.

  19. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  20. Assessing the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test among Incarcerated Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Schilling, Robert; Ivanoff, Andre; Chen, Duan-Rung; Hanson, Meredith

    1998-01-01

    Describes the results of administering the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) to 400 incarcerated drug-using women. Reports on AUDIT's utility, validity, and reliability. Results demonstrate that AUDIT can be used to identify problem drinkers among incarcerated, drug-using women. (MKA)

  1. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  2. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  3. Wide field camera 3 ground testing and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Baggett, S.; Bond, H.; Brown, T.; Deustua, S.; Hartig, G. F.; Hilbert, B.; Hill, R. J.; Kim-Quijano, J.; Kimble, R. A.; MacKenty, J. W.; Martel, A.; McCullough, P.; Petro, L.; Rinehart, S.; Robberto, M.

    2008-07-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is fully integrated with its flight detectors and has undergone several rounds of ground testing and calibration at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The testing processes are highly automated, with WFC3 and the optical stimulus, which is used to provide external targets and illumination, being commanded by coordinated computer scripts. All test data are captured and stored in the long-term Hubble Data Archive. A full suite of instrument characterization and calibration tests has been performed, including the measurement of key detector properties such as dark current, read noise, flat field response, gain, linearity, and persistence, as well as instrument-level properties like total system throughput, imaging quality and encircled energy, grism dispersions, IR thermal background, and image stability. Nearly all instrument characteristics have been shown to meet or exceed expectations and requirements.

  4. Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

  5. Modal identification based on continuous wavelet transform and ambient excitation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thien-Phu; Paultre, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    This paper deals with the use of the continuous wavelet transform for modal identification from ambient vibration tests. The wavelet analysis of the free responses of a linear mechanical system has been used to estimate its natural frequencies, viscous damping ratios, and mode shapes, using either the modulus or the phase of the wavelet transform with "ridge" and "skeleton" notions. This technique is extended in this paper, to the response from ambient excitation tests based on the equivalent formulation between the free response and the correlation function of a linear mechanical system under stationary stochastic excitation. The main novelties involve the new formulation of continuous wavelet transform and the use of the singular value decomposition algorithm for ridges and skeleton detection under the noisy conditions of ambient vibration tests. A complete procedure for modal identification of ambient response, including these new formulations, is presented and then applied to numerical examples and experimental test to illustrate its validity.

  6. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

    2007-04-01

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS™) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D®).

  7. Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

    2007-04-07

    Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D)

  8. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  9. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A.; Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management.

  10. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-12-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  11. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing for predicting sports performance and talent identification: Consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Williams, Alun; McNamee, Mike; Bouchard, Claude; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Ahmetov, Ildus; Ashley, Euan; Byrne, Nuala; Camporesi, Silvia; Collins, Malcolm; Dijkstra, Paul; Eynon, Nir; Fuku, Noriyuki; Garton, Fleur C; Hoppe, Nils; Holm, Søren; Kaye, Jane; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Maase, Kamiel; Moran, Colin; North, Kathryn N; Pigozzi, Fabio; Wang, Guan

    2015-01-01

    The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that claim to be able to identify children's athletic talents. Targeted consumers include mainly coaches and parents. There is concern among the scientific community that the current level of knowledge is being misrepresented for commercial purposes. There remains a lack of universally accepted guidelines and legislation for DTC testing in relation to all forms of genetic testing and not just for talent identification. There is concern over the lack of clarity of information over which specific genes or variants are being tested and the almost universal lack of appropriate genetic counselling for the interpretation of the genetic data to consumers. Furthermore independent studies have identified issues relating to quality control by DTC laboratories with different results being reported from samples from the same individual. Consequently, in the current state of knowledge, no child or young athlete should be exposed to DTC genetic testing to define or alter training or for talent identification aimed at selecting gifted children or adolescents. Large scale collaborative projects, may help to develop a stronger scientific foundation on these issues in the future. PMID:26582191

  12. Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s). PMID:22789017

  13. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  14. Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?

    PubMed Central

    Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

  15. Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field for Uav Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, R.; Jenerowicz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays the imagery data acquired from UAV sensors are the main source of all data used in various remote sensing applications, photogrammetry projects and in imagery intelligence (IMINT) as well as in other tasks as decision support. Therefore quality assessment of such imagery is an important task. The research team from Military University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy, Geodesy Institute, Department of Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry has designed and prepared special test field- The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field (PIQuAT) that provides quality assessment in field conditions of images obtained with sensors mounted on UAVs. The PIQuAT consists of 6 individual segments, when combined allow for determine radiometric, spectral and spatial resolution of images acquired from UAVs. All segments of the PIQuAT can be used together in various configurations or independently. All elements of The Portable Imagery Quality Assessment Test Field were tested in laboratory conditions in terms of their radiometry and spectral reflectance characteristics.

  16. A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

  17. 29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. ELEVATION OF ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF FACILITY, INCLUDING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK, AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-2. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151971. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie

    This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

  20. A New Sociology Course: Some Results of the Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahlfs, F. Lincoln

    An experimental version of the one semester high school sociology course, "Inquiry in Sociology," was taught by 222 teachers throughout the United States in the spring of 1969. The purpose of this field test was to learn something about its relative success in rural, small-town, suburban, and central city schools, and with students of various

  1. REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF WATTS NICKEL RINSE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a polyamide reverse-osmosis membrane in hollow fine fiber configuration for closed-loop treatment of rinse water from a Watts-type nickel bath. Performance of the membrane module was determined by measuring the prod...

  2. 27. AERIAL VIEW OF ARVFS FIELD TEST SITE AS IT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. AERIAL VIEW OF ARVFS FIELD TEST SITE AS IT LOOKED IN 1983. OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. BUNKER IS IN FOREGROUND, PROTECTIVE SHED FOR WFRP AT TOP OF IMAGE. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 83-574-12-1, TAKEN IN 1983. PHOTOGRAPHER: ROMERO. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,

  4. A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

    1977-01-01

    A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

  5. Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

  6. Design and testing of the LITE Variable Field Stop mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Field Stop (VFS) is a rotary mechanism that reliably positions any of four aperture plates in the optical path of a spaceflight experiment, limiting the amount of light reaching the detectors. This paper discusses the design, operation, and testing of the VFS.

  7. Soil test phosphorus and microbial biomass phosphorus in potato fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appropriate evaluation of soil phosphorus (P) availability is a prerequisite for best P management in potato production systems. Consequently, we evaluated soil test P and microbial biomass P in 10 rainfed and irrigated potato field soils which had three-year crop rotations. Ammonium oxalate extract...

  8. 76 FR 66032 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease Vaccine, H5 Subtype, Serotype 3, Live Marek's... assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  9. HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

  10. Flight test validation of a frequency-based system identification method on an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Orme, John S.; Hreha, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency-based performance identification approach was evaluated using flight data from the NASA F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control aircraft. The approach used frequency separation to identify the effectiveness of multiple controls simultaneously as an alternative to independent control identification methods. Fourier transformations converted measured control and response data into frequency domain representations. Performance gradients were formed using multiterm frequency matching of control and response frequency domain models. An objective function was generated using these performance gradients. This function was formally optimized to produce a coordinated control trim set. This algorithm was applied to longitudinal acceleration and evaluated using two control effectors: nozzle throat area and inlet first ramp. Three criteria were investigated to validate the approach: simultaneous gradient identification, gradient frequency dependency, and repeatability. This report describes the flight test results. These data demonstrate that the approach can accurately identify performance gradients during simultaneous control excitation independent of excitation frequency.

  11. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  12. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

  13. High performance CLSM field mixing and pumping test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N.; Langton, C.A.

    1997-05-14

    An improved low bleed water CLSM mix was field tested on May 13, 1997 at the Throop portable auger batching plant. Production and pumping tests were very successful. The four cubic yards of material pumped into a ply wood form where it flowed 48 feet (the entire length of the form). The CLSM slurry was very uniform, self leveling, cohesive, showed no segregation, and had no bleed water. Properties of the High Performance CLSM were the same for material collected at the auger and at the end of the pipeline except for the air content which was 5.5% at the auger and 3.2% at the end of the pipeline. This is exactly what was expected and indicates that this CLSM is easy to mix and pump in the Throop/BSRI equipment. CLSM Mix TW-10 is recommended for Tank Closure based on the field batching and pumping tests.

  14. Field verification of the direct view optics model for human facial identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghera, Sameer; Krapels, Keith; Hixson, Jonathan; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Driggers, Ronald G.

    2009-04-01

    Previous work by the Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate extended the Army's target acquisition performance models to include the task of facial identification in the visible band. In this work, additional field data for facial identification is used to validate the direct view optic (DVO) performance model. The target acquisition model for direct view optics is based on the contrast threshold function of the eye with a modification for the optics modulation transfer function (MTF) and the optics magnification. We also show that the current Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric can approximate the measured data, without using the full accuracy provided by the two-dimensional specific object method described in previous work.

  15. Developing and pilot testing practical measures of preanalytic surgical specimen identification defects.

    PubMed

    Bixenstine, Paul J; Zarbo, Richard J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Yenokyan, Gayane; Robinson, Raymond; Hudson, Daniel W; Prescott, Arlene M; Hubble, Ron; Murphy, Mary M; George, Chris T; D'Angelo, Rita; Watson, Sam R; Lubomski, Lisa H; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Accurate patient identification is a National Patient Safety Goal. Misidentification of surgical specimens is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. The authors developed 12 practical, process-based, standardized measures of surgical specimen identification defects during the preanalytic phase of pathology testing (from the operating room to the surgical pathology laboratory) that could be used to quantify the occurrence of these defects. The measures (6 container and 6 requisition identification defects) were developed by a panel of physicians, pathologists, nurses, and quality experts. A total of 69 hospitals prospectively collected data over 3 months. Overall, there were identification defects in 2.9% of cases (1780/60 501; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0%-4.4%), 1.2% of containers (1018/81 656; 95% CI = 0.8%-2.0%), and 2.3% of requisitions (1417/61 245; 95% CI = 1.2%-4.6%). Future research is needed to evaluate if hospitals are able to use these measures to assess interventions meant to reduce the frequency of specimen identification defects and improve patient safety. PMID:23322909

  16. IDENTIFICATIONS AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF THE 2 Ms CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Rafferty, D. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Brusa, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Bauer, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Vignali, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the {approx}2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 442 (95.7%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of {approx} 6.2%; we also selected four additional likely counterparts. The majority of the other 16 X-ray sources appear to be off-nuclear sources, sources associated with galaxy groups and clusters, high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or spurious X-ray sources. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). High accuracy in the derived photo-z's is accomplished owing to (1) the up-to-date photometric data covering the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the X-ray sources, (2) more accurate photometric data as a result of source deblending for {approx}10% of the sources in the infrared bands and a few percent in the optical and near-infrared bands, (3) a set of 265 galaxy, AGN, and galaxy/AGN hybrid templates carefully constructed to best represent all possible SEDs, (4) the Zurich Extragalactic Bayesian Redshift Analyzer used to derive the photo-z's, which corrects the SED templates to best represent the SEDs of real sources at different redshifts and thus improves the photo-z quality. The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of |{delta}z|/(1 + z) {approx} 1% and an outlier [with |{delta}z|/(1 + z)>0.15] fraction of {approx}1.4% for sources with spectroscopic redshifts. We performed blind tests to derive a more realistic estimate of the photo-z quality for sources without spectroscopic redshifts. We expect there are {approx}9% outliers for the relatively brighter sources (R {approx}< 26), and the outlier fraction will increase to {approx}15%-25% for the fainter sources (R {approx}> 26). The typical photo-z accuracy is {approx}6%-7%. The outlier fraction and photo-z accuracy do not appear to have a redshift dependence (for z {approx} 0-4). These photo-z's appear to be the best obtained so far for faint X-ray sources, and they have been significantly ({approx}>50%) improved compared to previous estimates of the photo-z's for the X-ray sources in the {approx}2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North and {approx}1 Ms CDF-S.

  17. Analysis of the intraseasonal stability of field test performances in young academy soccer players.

    PubMed

    Francioni, Fabio Massimo; Figueiredo, António José; Terribili, Marco; Tessitore, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to observe the intraseasonal stability of anthropometric, technical and functional test results in academy soccer players of different age categories. In total, 103 participants (age range: 7.7-13.4 years) by 5 age categories of the same academy were recruited for this study. Players were submitted to a field-test battery comprising 3 anthropometric measurements (body mass, stature and body mass index), 6 soccer technical tests (to assess the ability of ball control, ball control with the head, pass accuracy, shooting accuracy, dribbling and dribbling with pass) and 3 functional tests (countermovement jump with the hands on the hip, countermovement jump with free hands and 15-m linear sprint) that was administered in 4 test sessions during the same season. Though anthropometric results showed a clear increment in each age category across the season, the fluctuation of technical test results depended on age category and test session. Moreover, a significant increase in the results of functional tests was observed in most of the age categories, in particular, for the assessment of lower power limb. In conclusion, collecting repeated intraseason measurements permits the identification of players' fluctuations of performance across the season and allows coaches to make frequent adjustments of their programmes. PMID:26334112

  18. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  19. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  20. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... batch samples. (2) If you used dilution air, either analyze background samples or assume that background...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... air flow. (2) If the standard-setting part requires hot-start emission measurements, shut down...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... batch samples. (2) If you used dilution air, either analyze background samples or assume that background...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... air flow. (2) If the standard-setting part requires hot-start emission measurements, shut down...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... batch samples. (2) If you used dilution air, either analyze background samples or assume that background...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... air flow. (2) If the standard-setting part requires hot-start emission measurements, shut down...

  3. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  4. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadian, A.; Wood, R.; Coe, H.; Latham, J.

    2011-12-01

    A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. Abstract: The Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique (Latham et al 2008) hypothesizes that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre seawater particles can enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and increase cloud albedo. Here, we propose a set of field tests to critically assess the efficacy of the MCB geoengineering proposal over a limited area. The tests are de minimus with respect to their climate effects. The tests involve three phases, with increasing logistical complexity, each of which is designed to test one or more important components of the cloud brightening scheme. Each involves the introduction and monitoring of controlled aerosol perturbations from one or more ship-based seeding platforms up to a limited area of 100x100 km2. A suite of observational platforms of increasing number and complexity, including aircraft, ships and satellites, will observe the aerosol plume and in the later experiments the cloud and albedo responses to the aerosol perturbations. These responses must include the necessary cloud physical and chemical processes which determine the efficacy of the cloud brightening scheme. Since these processes are also central to the broader problem of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, such field tests would have significant benefits for climate science in addition to providing a critical test of the MCB hypothesis. Such field experiments should be designed and conducted in an objective manner within the framework of emerging geoengineering research governance structures. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137

  5. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  6. A test pattern identification algorithm and its application to CINRAD/SA(B) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan; Liu, Liping

    2014-03-01

    A variety of faulty radar echoes may cause serious problems with radar data applications, especially radar data assimilation and quantitative precipitation estimates. In this study, "test pattern" caused by test signal or radar hardware failures in CINRAD (China New Generation Weather Radar) SA and SB radar operational observations are investigated. In order to distinguish the test pattern from other types of radar echoes, such as precipitation, clear air and other non-meteorological echoes, five feature parameters including the effective reflectivity data percentage ( R Z), velocity RF (range folding) data percentage ( R RF), missing velocity data percentage ( R M), averaged along-azimuth reflectivity fluctuation and averaged along-beam reflectivity fluctuation are proposed. Based on the fuzzy logic method, a test pattern identification algorithm is developed, and the statistical results from all the different kinds of radar echoes indicate the performance of the algorithm. Analysis of two typical cases with heavy precipitation echoes located inside the test pattern are performed. The statistical results show that the test pattern identification algorithm performs well, since the test pattern is recognized in most cases. Besides, the algorithm can effectively remove the test pattern signal and retain strong precipitation echoes in heavy rainfall events.

  7. A pulsed magnetic field test facility for conductors and joints

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.; Minervini, J.V.; Camille, R.J. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and, in the US, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) fusion programs both require conductor and joint testing in a pulsed magnetic background field in order to demonstrate that these components can operate successfully in a simulated, fusion-machine environment. Here, a pulsed magnetic field test facility is under construction at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for testing large scale cable-in-conduit superconductor and joint samples. Separate, demountable split-pair solenoid and saddle coils provide a combination of fields which can be either transverse of parallel to the sample axis. The solenoid and saddle magnets together can provide transverse peak fields as high as 8.4 T. Peak parallel fields of 6.6 T can be generated with the solenoid alone. Ramp-up rates of 1.5 T/s and ramp-down rates of 20 T/s are possible. Sample currents up to 50 kA are provided by a superconducting current transformer. The sample is connected to the transformer secondary through a pair of low resistance joints. Supercritical helium is provided to the sample at flow rates up to 20 g/s, pressures up to 1 MPa, and temperatures from 4.7 to 10 K. Programmable logic controllers provide coordination of the magnetic field, sample current, and helium flow rate and temperature in the sample. Sample and facility instrumentation signals are processed and data is stored on a workstation-based data acquisition system with comprehensive data reduction capability. Facility details and status are described.

  8. Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

  9. Krafla geothermal field, Iceland. I. Analysis of well test data

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Sigurdsson, O.; Stefansson, V.; Eliasson, E.T.

    1984-11-01

    Extensive modeling studies of the Krafla geothermal field in Iceland are presented in a series of four papers. This first paper describes the geological settings of the field and the analysis of well test data. The geothermal system at Krafla is very complex, with a single-phase liquid reservoir overlying a two-phase reservoir. The reservoir rocks are volcanic with sequences of basalt flows, hyloclastics, and intrusions. The fluid flow in the reservoir is fracture dominated. Considerable pressure transient data from injection tests have been gathered from the Krafla wells. These data are analyzed to yield the transmissivity distribution in the reservoir system. As the data are complicated by various factors (wellbore effects, nonisothermal effects, two-phase flow, and fractured rocks) the applicability of conventional well test analysis methods is questionable. The authors have developed a methodology to analyze injection tests for such systems. The results obtained show that the transmissivity of the Krafla reservoir is low, averaging 2 Darcy meters (Dm). The average transmissivity of most commercially successful geothermal fields is an order of magnitude higher.

  10. Sensitivity of LCS identification to flow field resolution and random errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcay, Ali B.; Pottebaum, Tait S.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2009-11-01

    Ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields obtained from fluid flows provide separatrices that are transport barriers. These ridges, called Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs), can be used to identify vortex boundaries and study mixing processes in complex, time-dependent flows. The accuracy of LCS identification is inherently dependent on the accuracy of the underlying velocity field used to compute the FTLE field. To quantify the effect of velocity field errors, this study considers the two canonical flows: a steady 2D vortex pair and an axisymmetric vortex ring generated by a starting jet. The velocity field for the vortex pair was determined analytically while the vortex ring flow was obtained from CFD for jet Re = 1000. Velocity field errors were introduced by smoothing and sub-sampling the data (mimicking DPIV interrogation window size effects) and adding random noise. The results show that the LCS location can be shifted as much as 0.2D when sub-sampling the velocity field from a resolution of 0.01D to 0.125D (D is the vortex diameter) and the effect of noise on the mean LCS location is small compared to the resolution effect.

  11. Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs = −0.65 and −0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min−1) and relative (mL·kg−1·min−1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs = −0.79 to 0.55 and −0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg−1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  12. A field-test battery for elite, young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Hulse, M A; Morris, J G; Hawkins, R D; Hodson, A; Nevill, A M; Nevill, M E

    2013-04-01

    The validity and reliability of a battery of field-based performance tests was examined. The opinions of coaches, fitness professionals and players (n=170, 172 and 101 respectively) on the importance of performance testing were established using a questionnaire. On 2 occasions, separated by 7 days, 80 elite, young soccer players (mean±SD [and range]: age 13.2±2.6 [8.9-19.1] years; stature 1.59±0.18 m [1.32-1.91]; body mass 50.6±17.1 [26.5-88.7] kg) completed a battery of field-based tests comprised of heart rate response to a submaximal Multi-stage fitness test, 3 types of vertical jump, sprints over 10 and 20 m, and an agility test. Physical performance testing was considered important by coaches (97%), fitness professionals (94%) and players (83%). The systematic bias ratio and the random error components of the 95% ratio limits of agreement for the first and second tests, for the U9-U11 vs. U12-U14 vs. U15-U18 age groups, were [Systematic bias (*/÷ ratio limits)]: Heart rate (Level 5): 0.983 (*/÷ 1.044) vs. 0.969 (*/÷ 1.056) vs. 0.983 (*/÷ 1.055); Rocket jump: 0998 (*/÷ 1.112) vs. 0.999 (*/÷ 1.106) vs. 0.996 (*/÷ 1.093); 10 m sprint: 0.997 (*/÷ 1.038) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.033) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.038); Agility test: 1.010 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.014 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.002 (*/÷1.053). All tests, except heart rate recovery from the Multi-stage fitness test, were able to distinguish between different ability and age groups of players (p<0.05). Thus, the field-test battery demonstrated logical and construct validity, and was shown to be a reliable and objective tool for assessing elite, young soccer players. PMID:23143702

  13. Corrosion inhibitor screening tests and selection for field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Organic corrosion inhibitors have been widely used in oil and gas wells, pipelines, gathering lines and process facilities to inhibit corrosion for quite some time. This paper describes and discusses laboratory screening test parameters and methods for evaluating and selecting corrosion inhibitors for use in downhole and pipeline corrosion inhibitions or mitigations. Field application results of the laboratory selected inhibitors are presented to illustrate the consistency of the selected inhibitor in field applications. The inhibitor adverse effect in various conditions and environments are also discussed.

  14. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  15. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  16. Relationship of Role Identification, Self-Esteem, and Intelligence to Sex Differences in Field Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulfish, Sherry

    1978-01-01

    The relationships among perceptual field independence, biological sex, sex-role identity, self-esteem, and intelligence were explored in tests measuring these variables which were administered to 50 male and 50 female college students. (Author/PHR)

  17. Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wunan Lin

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test.

  18. Cross field transport of cosmic rays: Test particle simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, F.; Hada, T.

    We study cross-field transport of charged particles in a two dimensional space by performing test particle simulations. The time stationary, power-law magnetic field turbulence is given perpendicular to the simulation plane. We have performed simulation runs using different sets of random numbers for phases of the field turbulence Fourier modes. As a result, qualitatively distinct diffusion processes are observed depending on the ratio of particle Larmor radius (ρ) to the field fluctuation correlation length (L). When ρ/L 1, the diffusion is well described by the quasi-linear theory. On the other hand, when ρ/L 1, the diffusion is characterized by fractal structure of equi-contour lines of the magnetic field strength. When ρ and L are the same order, the diffusion is found to be composed of several different regimes with distinct statistical properties. We relate statistics of the field turbulence to that of the particle diffusion by invoking the Levy diffusion process. (a) Larmor motion (b) Guiding Center Random Walk (c) Percolation drift (d) Percolation Random Walk

  19. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

  1. Rapid testing and identification of actuator using dSPACE real-time emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Daocheng; Wang, Zhongwei; Zeng, Qinghua

    2011-10-01

    To solve the problem of model identification of actuator in control system design of aerocraft, testing system based on dSPACE emulator is established, sending testing signal and receiving feedback voltage are realized using dSPACE interactive cards, communication between signal generating equipment and feedback voltage acquisition equipment is synchronized. This paper introduces the hardware architecture and key technologies of the simulation system. Constructing, downloading and calculating of the testing model is finished using dSPACE emulator, D/A transfer of testing signal is realized using DS2103 card, DS2002 card transfer the feedback voltage to digital value. Filtering module is added to the signal acquisition, for reduction of noise interference in the A/D channel. Precision of time and voltage is improved by setting acquisition period 1ms. The data gathered is recorded and displayed with Controldesk tools. The response of four actuators under different frequency are tested, frequency-domain analysis is done using least square method, the model of actuator is identified, simulation data fits well with real response of the actuator. The testing system created with dSPACE emulator satisfies the rapid testing and identification of actuator.

  2. A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kapłon, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

    2013-12-01

    Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance. PMID:24161465

  3. Practical considerations for the field application of miniaturized portable Raman instrumentation for the identification of minerals.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G M

    2013-07-01

    The nondestructive identification of both inorganic and organic compounds without the need for chemical or mechanical sample preparation is an advantage of the Raman spectroscopic analytical technique when applied in situ using miniaturized equipment for the geosciences. This is critically assessed here for several real life geoscientific scenarios in which several groups of minerals were analyzed with emphasis on evaporites, carbonates, and selected types of dark minerals and weak Raman scatterers. The role of individual analytical instrumental parameters such as focal plane precision, exposure time, and ambient light conditions that can affect the acquisition and interpretation of spectroscopic data from these specimens in field conditions was also evaluated. PMID:23816130

  4. Disorder Identification in Hysteresis Data: Recognition Analysis of the Random-Bond-Random-Field Ising Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, O. S.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Bintacchit, P.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.

    2009-10-09

    An approach for the direct identification of disorder type and strength in physical systems based on recognition analysis of hysteresis loop shape is developed. A large number of theoretical examples uniformly distributed in the parameter space of the system is generated and is decorrelated using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA components are used to train a feed-forward neural network using the model parameters as targets. The trained network is used to analyze hysteresis loops for the investigated system. The approach is demonstrated using a 2D random-bond-random-field Ising model, and polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric capacitors.

  5. Incorporating Spatial Models in Visual Field Test Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Nikki J.; McKendrick, Allison M.; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a perimetric algorithm (Spatially Weighted Likelihoods in Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing [ZEST] [SWeLZ]) that uses spatial information on every presentation to alter visual field (VF) estimates, to reduce test times without affecting output precision and accuracy. Methods SWeLZ is a maximum likelihood Bayesian procedure, which updates probability mass functions at VF locations using a spatial model. Spatial models were created from empirical data, computational models, nearest neighbor, random relationships, and interconnecting all locations. SWeLZ was compared to an implementation of the ZEST algorithm for perimetry using computer simulations on 163 glaucomatous and 233 normal VFs (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2). Output measures included number of presentations and visual sensitivity estimates. Results There was no significant difference in accuracy or precision of SWeLZ for the different spatial models relative to ZEST, either when collated across whole fields or when split by input sensitivity. Inspection of VF maps showed that SWeLZ was able to detect localized VF loss. SWeLZ was faster than ZEST for normal VFs: median number of presentations reduced by 20% to 38%. The number of presentations was equivalent for SWeLZ and ZEST when simulated on glaucomatous VFs. Conclusions SWeLZ has the potential to reduce VF test times in people with normal VFs, without detriment to output precision and accuracy in glaucomatous VFs. Translational Relevance SWeLZ is a novel perimetric algorithm. Simulations show that SWeLZ can reduce the number of test presentations for people with normal VFs. Since many patients have normal fields, this has the potential for significant time savings in clinical settings. PMID:26981329

  6. On-site cell field test support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  7. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  8. Mathematical model of testing of pipeline integrity by thermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vaganova, Nataliia

    2014-11-18

    Thermal fields testing at the ground surface above a pipeline are considered. One method to obtain and investigate an ideal thermal field in different environments is a direct numerical simulation of heat transfer processes taking into account the most important physical factors. In the paper a mathematical model of heat propagation from an underground source is described with accounting of physical factors such as filtration of water in soil and solar radiation. Thermal processes are considered in 3D origin where the heat source is a pipeline with constant temperature and non-uniform isolated shell (with 'damages'). This problem leads to solution of heat diffusivity equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. Approaches to analysis of thermal fields are considered to detect damages.

  9. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haušild, Petr; Materna, Aleš; Kytka, Miloš

    2015-04-01

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  10. Use of Positive Blood Cultures for Direct Identification and Susceptibility Testing with the Vitek 2 System

    PubMed Central

    de Cueto, Marina; Ceballos, Esther; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Perea, Evelio J.; Pascual, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    In order to further decrease the time lapse between initial inoculation of blood culture media and the reporting of results of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests for microorganisms causing bacteremia, we performed a prospective study in which specially processed fluid from positive blood culture bottles from Bactec 9240 (Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, Md.) containing aerobic media were directly inoculated into Vitek 2 system cards (bio-Mérieux, France). Organism identification and susceptibility results were compared with those obtained from cards inoculated with a standardized bacterial suspension obtained following subculture to agar; 100 consecutive positive monomicrobic blood cultures, consisting of 50 gram-negative rods and 50 gram-positive cocci, were included in the study. For gram-negative organisms, 31 of the 50 (62%) showed complete agreement with the standard method for species identification, while none of the 50 gram-positive cocci were correctly identified by the direct method. For gram-negative rods, there were 50% categorical agreements between the direct and standard methods for all drugs tested. The very major error rate was 2.4%, and the major error rate was 0.6%. The overall error rate for gram-negatives was 6.6%. Complete agreement in clinical categories of all antimicrobial agents evaluated was obtained for 19 of 50 (38%) gram-positive cocci evaluated; the overall error rate was 8.4%, with 2.8% minor errors, 2.4% major errors, and 3.2% very major errors. These findings suggest that the Vitek 2 cards inoculated directly from positive Bactec 9240 bottles do not provide acceptable bacterial identification or susceptibility testing in comparison with corresponding cards tested by a standard method. PMID:15297523

  11. Automated reading of a microtitre plate: preliminary evaluation in antimicrobial susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification.

    PubMed Central

    Courcol, R J; Deleersnyder, H; Roussel-Delvallez, M; Martin, G R

    1983-01-01

    An automated microELISA Reader was evaluated for its ability to read and interpret microtitre plates. A total of 309 microtitre plates were investigated by automated and visual methods. There was disagreement between the methods in one hundred and twelve (0.6%) wells. However agreements between the two methods for susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification were respectively 98.8% and 89.3%. PMID:6338058

  12. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.; Miller, P.; Motau, C.; Stevens, F.

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  13. Parameter identification for vibration control of SCOLE. [apparatus for testing parameter identification techniques and control laws for large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, D. W., Jr.; Montgomery, R. C.; Elder, R. C.; Lenox, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    A least-squares identification method has been used to derive an empirical model of the vibrational dynamics of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment, an apparatus for testing parameter identification and control schemes for large flexible space structures. Testing is performed by exciting the structure with torque wheels. Linear least-squares analysis is employed to obtain the parameters that best fit the output of an autoregressive model to the data, and to determine the control effectiveness of the torque wheels using the excitation portion of the test data.

  14. Known-Groups and Concurrent Validity of the Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shufeng; Wong, Lena L. N.; Chen, Fei; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT) is a new test designed to assess the tone identification abilities of children with hearing impairment (HI). Evidence for reliability and sensitivity has been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the known-groups and concurrent validity of the MTIT. Design The MTIT and Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test (MPSI) were administered in quiet and in noise conditions. The known-groups validity was evaluated by comparing the performance of the MTIT on children with two different levels of HI. The MPSI was included to evaluate the concurrent validity of the MTIT. Study sample 81 children with HI were recruited in the present study. They were Mandarin-speaking children with profound HI (mean age = 9; 0, n = 41) and with moderate to severe HI (mean age = 8; 9, n = 40). Results Scores on the MTIT differed between the two groups with different hearing levels suggesting good known-groups validity. A strong relationship between tone and sentence perception both in quiet and in noise provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. Conclusions The present study confirmed that the MTIT has good known-groups validity and provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. The MTIT could be used to evaluate tone identification ability in children with HI with confidence. PMID:27191394

  15. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  16. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environments for sugarcane cultivars in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of test environments and classification of regional ecological zones are the two key issues in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analyzed by u...

  17. TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS: A SUBARU FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Dell'Antonio, Ian P. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: yousuke.utsumi@nao.ac.jp E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu

    2012-05-10

    We use a dense redshift survey in the foreground of the Subaru GTO2deg{sup 2} weak-lensing field (centered at {alpha}{sub 2000} = 16{sup h}04{sup m}44{sup s}; {delta}{sub 2000} = 43 Degree-Sign 11'24'') to assess the completeness and comment on the purity of massive halo identification in the weak-lensing map. The redshift survey (published here) includes 4541 galaxies; 4405 are new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. Among the weak-lensing peaks with a signal-to-noise greater than 4.25, 2/3 correspond to individual massive systems; this result is essentially identical to the Geller et al. test of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) field F2. The Subaru map, based on images in substantially better seeing than the DLS, enables detection of less massive halos at fixed redshift as expected. We demonstrate that the procedure adopted by Miyazaki et al. for removing some contaminated peaks from the weak-lensing map improves agreement between the lensing map and the redshift survey in the identification of candidate massive systems.

  18. Lessons Learned From Field Tests Of Planetary Surface Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.

    2003-04-01

    I review results and lessons learned from field tests of planetary surface rovers. Terrestrial field tests help to train scientists in rover capabilities, and guides developments to improve them. Key metrics of rover science performance include distance traveled and number of science targets studied using instrument placement or sample manipulation. Field tests show that traverse range is governed primarily by commanding frequency rather than a rover’s maximum speed. With real-time feedback, teleoperated rovers can traverse kilometers per day. With commanded operations, typical traverses are a few meters. Longer traverses are risky and error prone. Tasks requiring moving a few meters to a target followed by manipulation or instrument placement take several command cycles per target. Higher level autonomy for navigation and manipulation is needed to improve performance. Rovers are being called upon to play a key role in the search for evidence of life on Mars. Conditions on the Martian surface today appear to preclude living organisms, but more clement conditions in the past may have supported the formation of a fossil record. However, any fossil record on Mars is likely to be produced by microbial life, and to be extremely ancient. Finding unambiguous evidence of biogenic origin of putative fossil structures will require collecting high priority samples and returning them to Earth. Recognition of fossiliferous deposits using rover data is problematical. Information provided by a rover is of very low bandwidth and fidelity compared to that observed by a field geologist. Limitations arise in both quality and quantity of data transmitted to Earth. In a rover mission simulation performed in a fossil-rich terrestrial field site hosting dinosaur tracks and stromatolites, science teams did not find any evidence of fossils. However, living organisms such as endolithic microorganisms and lichens have been identified in field experiments using color imaging and spectroscopy. Field experiments show that interpretations of a site are heavily effected by what data is sampled by the rover, and due to sparse sampling, inevitably many important clues that guide correct and complete geologic interpretation are missed. Performance might be improved by autonomously recognizing science value onboard the rover.

  19. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  20. Marine seismic acquisition system field test of D-2 technology

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, R.A.; Lochridge, C.; Caputo, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center (Mobil), E-Systems (EMASS{reg_sign}), Convex Computer Corporation and Geco-Prakla/Schlumberger completed an extensive field test of D-2 helical scan recording technology to prove its viability, stability and field worthiness in a production marine seismic acquisition environment. D-2 helical scan video recording technology was proven in this test to be field worthy, stable and reliable. This technology has the desirable characteristics of very dense, compact storage, very low error rate, high data transfer rate affords a solution to one of the oil and gas industry`s most urgent needs -- control the exponentially increasing data media requirements in acquisition, processing and archival storage. Marine acquisition technology for the future will follow the trend toward more data channels sampled more densely in time and space recorded from more and longer streamer cables. Data volumes will continue to grow to unmanageable levels unless some new, dense, high data rate media is used from the raw data acquisition stage through the entire cycle to archival storage and management. D-2 feasibility and advantages were clearly demonstrated in this 59 day field test. 2,250 linear kilometers of data were recorded on 9 small D-2 cassettes and on 1,360 IBM-3480 cartridges from 90,050 shots of a mixture of 320, 480 and 960 channels each. The total data volume was 215 gigabytes, and the entire 2,250 kilometers of data recorded on 9 D-2 cassettes easily fit into a standard business brief case. This same volume of data recorded on 9 track 2,400 foot reels at 6,250 BPI would require 1,890 reels of tape weighing approximately 1,890 pounds.

  1. Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.

    The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

  2. Identification of Balance Deficits in People with Parkinson Disease; is the Sensory Organization Test Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Gera, G; Freeman, DL; Blackinton, MT; Horak, FB; King, L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease can affect any of the multiple systems encompassing balance control. Thus, identification of the specific deficit is crucial in customizing balance rehabilitation. The sensory organization test, a test of sensory integration for balance control, is sometimes used in isolation to identify balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease. More recently, the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test, a clinical scale that tests multiple domains of balance control, has begun to be used to assess balance in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of our study was to compare the use of Sensory Organization Test and Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test in identifying balance deficits in people with Parkinson’s disease. Methods 45 participants (27M, 18F; 65.2 ± 8.2 years) with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease participated in the cross-sectional study. Balance assessment was performed using the Sensory Organization Test and the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test. People were classified into normal and abnormal balance based on the established cutoff scores (normal balance: Sensory Organization Test >69; Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test >73). Results More subjects were classified as having abnormal balance with the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test (71% abnormal) than with the Sensory Organization Test (24% abnormal) in our cohort of people with Parkinson’s disease. There were no subjects with a normal Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test score but abnormal Sensory Organization Test score. In contrast, there were 21 subjects who had an abnormal Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test score but normal Sensory Organization Test scores. Discussion and Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that investigation of sensory integration deficits, alone, may not be able to identify all types of balance deficits found in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Thus, a comprehensive approach should be used to test of multiple balance systems to provide customized rehabilitation. PMID:27019859

  3. Geological Characterization of Remote Field Sites Using Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy: Results from the 1999 Marsokhod Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S. W.; Moersch, J.; Roush, T.; Horton, K.; Bishop, J.; Cabrol, N. A.; Cockell, C.; Gazis, P.; Newsom, H. E.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment (MFE) provided an opportunity to test the suitability of rover-borne visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared field spectrometers to contribute to the remote geological exploration of a Mars analog field site.

  4. Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

    1982-05-01

    Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

  5. Evaluation of an updated real-time RT-PCR test for the identification of the H7 subtype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid detection of avian influenza (AI) virus and identification of the H5 and H7 subtypes is critical for wild bird monitoring programs. A real-time RT-PCR test for identification of the H7 subtype in North America was first reported in 2002. With the recent surveillance in wild birds it was disc...

  6. The 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40)

    PubMed Central

    Freiherr, Jessica; Gordon, Amy R.; Alden, Eva C.; Ponting, Andrea L.; Hernandez, Monica F.; Boesveldt, Sanne; Lundström, Johan N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Most existing olfactory identification (ID) tests have the primary aim of diagnosing clinical olfactory dysfunction, thereby rendering them sub-optimal for experimental settings where the aim is to detect differences in healthy subjects’ odor ID abilities. Materials and methods We have developed an extended version of the olfactory ID subtest of the Sniffin’ Sticks test battery to better assess the variability in ID scores and thereby olfactory abilities of healthy, adult individuals. Twenty-four odorants, corresponding cue labels, and distractor labels were added to the existing 16-item Sniffin’ Sticks ID test to create the 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40). The MONEX-40 was administered to 259 healthy young subjects, of which 72 were retested on an average of 212 days (SD 112 days) later. Results The added odor items demonstrated good validity, as shown by a significant correlation of the results with the original 16-item ID test. In addition, the MONEX-40 achieved a significant test–retest and split-half reliability. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that the MONEX-40 is a reliable method for experimental assessment of odor ID ability in healthy, young individuals. Moreover, its use of a wider range of odors allows the experimenter to present subsets of the MONEX-40 within the same experiment while maintaining statistical power. PMID:22200409

  7. Extended well testing boosts prospects for development of marginal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, T.

    1997-08-25

    The future for oil and gas production in the North Sea appears bright. However, to maintain production and profitability, operators must find ways of bringing smaller and more marginal fields on stream while reducing development costs. Extended well testing (EWT) provides one route for both obtaining the data required to reduce the uncertainties--and thus the costs--of facilities design and reducing the uncertainties of reserves and productivity. In the right circumstances, it provides the key to unlocking untapped reserves and reducing the overall costs of field development. EWT can provide the bridge between conventional appraisal testing and commitment to full field development. Typically the principal objectives of an EWT are to: confirm the extent of reservoir connectivity around the producing well; confirm long-term well productivity; identify production chemistry and fluid processing issues and optimize solutions for future management; and reduce the overall cost of appraisal programs. The paper describes a typical EWT facility, production facility, storage facilities, rigless alternative, project schedules, and EWT`s track record.

  8. An observational test of magnetospheric magnetic field mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; Hones, E.W.; McComas, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    The distortion of the geomagnetic field is a key signature of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical models have been devised to estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. We describe a technique whereby the field-line mapping predicted by such models is tested by matching measurements of magnetospheric plasma energy spectra obtained by Los Alamos instruments at geosynchronous orbit with spectra obtained by instruments on the polar-orbiting DMSP satellites (at an altitude of about 800 km) at times when the two satellites are in approximate magnetic conjugacy. With up to three geosynchronous satellites and as many as four DMSP satellites in operation at any given time, there are a very large number of such two-satellite conjunctions, allowing the model mappings to be tested under a wide range of local times and geomagnetic activity. Preliminary results from the application of this technique are presented for one week of data from March, 1991.

  9. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  10. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this...) Firefighters; (iii) Protective force personnel, exclusive of those covered in paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  11. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  12. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  13. 10 CFR 707.7 - Random drug testing requirements and identification of testing designated positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (HRP), codified at 10 CFR part 712. HRP employees will be subject to the drug testing standards of this... Facility (FFTF); High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); K Production Reactor...

  14. Development of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a standardized microencapsulated test of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Doty, R L; Shaman, P; Dann, M

    1984-03-01

    The development of the first standardized "scratch 'n sniff" olfactory test is described. Over 1600 subjects participated in five experiments. In Experiment 1, 50 microencapsulated odorants were rated as to their intensity, pleasantness, irritation, coolness, and familiarity, and two procedures for releasing them were compared. In Experiment 2, the results of the first experiment and other data were used in the development of the test, which was administered to a large number of subjects. Using multiple regression analysis, scores on this test were shown to be significantly related to the subjects' gender, ethnic background, and smoking behavior. Average test scores decreased as a function of age, with the greatest decline occurring between the sixth and tenth decades of life. These age-related changes were not correlated with scores on the Wechsler Memory Scale. Women performed better than men within all age categories. In Experiment 3, the test was shown to differentiate between subjects with known olfactory disorders (e.g., Kallmann's syndrome; Korsakoff's syndrome) and normal controls, and to reliably detect persons instructed to feign total anosmia. In Experiment 4, the test-retest reliability was established (6-month interval; r = 0.918, p less than 0.001), and in Experiment 5 the test was shown to correlate thresholds with odor detection (r = -0.794, p less than 0.001). This self-administratered test now makes it possible to rapidly and accurately assess general olfactory function in the laboratory, clinic, or through the mail without complex equipment or space-consuming stores of chemicals. PMID:6463130

  15. Development of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a standardized microencapsulated test of olfactory function.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Doty RL; Shaman P; Dann M

    1984-03-01

    The development of the first standardized "scratch 'n sniff" olfactory test is described. Over 1600 subjects participated in five experiments. In Experiment 1, 50 microencapsulated odorants were rated as to their intensity, pleasantness, irritation, coolness, and familiarity, and two procedures for releasing them were compared. In Experiment 2, the results of the first experiment and other data were used in the development of the test, which was administered to a large number of subjects. Using multiple regression analysis, scores on this test were shown to be significantly related to the subjects' gender, ethnic background, and smoking behavior. Average test scores decreased as a function of age, with the greatest decline occurring between the sixth and tenth decades of life. These age-related changes were not correlated with scores on the Wechsler Memory Scale. Women performed better than men within all age categories. In Experiment 3, the test was shown to differentiate between subjects with known olfactory disorders (e.g., Kallmann's syndrome; Korsakoff's syndrome) and normal controls, and to reliably detect persons instructed to feign total anosmia. In Experiment 4, the test-retest reliability was established (6-month interval; r = 0.918, p less than 0.001), and in Experiment 5 the test was shown to correlate thresholds with odor detection (r = -0.794, p less than 0.001). This self-administratered test now makes it possible to rapidly and accurately assess general olfactory function in the laboratory, clinic, or through the mail without complex equipment or space-consuming stores of chemicals.

  16. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  17. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

  18. Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Two types of experimental bits were subjected to laboratory air drilling tests at 250/sup 0/C (482/sup 0/F) in cast iron. These tests indicated field testing could be conducted without danger to the hole, and that bearing wear would be substantially reduced. Six additional experimental bits, and eight conventional bits were then subjected to air drilling a 240/sup 0/C (464/sup 0/F) in Francisan Graywacke at The Geysers, CA. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction-pin wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. Geysers drilling performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling life was increased by 70%. All bits at The Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole over the conventional bits. These tests demonstrated a potential well cost reduction of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  19. Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

    1993-07-01

    A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

  20. Dark Ages Radio Explorer - Field Tests of a Prototype Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J. J.

    2012-05-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept designed to measure the sky-averaged redshifted HI 21-cm signal from the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization between 40 - 120 MHz (z = 11 - 35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the intense human-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) found on Earth. The science objectives of DARE include charting the history of the formation of the first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization, and end of the Dark Ages. A prototype science instrument has been constructed, consisting of bi-conical dipole antennas and a differential amplifier balun followed by a receiver and JPL-Caltech designed digital spectrometer. Extensive tests with this instrument are underway in order to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the overall DARE instrument. Here, we present results from preliminary field tests at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site in Green Bank, West Virginia. Further field tests will be performed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. This research has been supported by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR), headquartered at the University of Colorado Boulder and funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A. Part of this research was conducted at that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. M.; Vollendorf, W. C.

    1982-05-01

    The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measures were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy's) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Dracy's).

  2. Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Vollendorf, W.C.

    1982-05-01

    The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measurements were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy`s) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Darcy`s).

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF FREE-FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES USING NUPEC RECORDED GROUND MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Costantino, C.; Hofmayer, C.; Murphy, A.; Chokshi, N.; Kitada, Y.

    2001-03-22

    Over the past twenty years, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to investigate various aspects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects on nuclear power plant structures, including embedment and dynamic structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI) effects. As part of a collaborative agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NUPEC, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a numerical analysis to predict the free field soil profile using industry standard methods and the recorded free field responses to actual earthquake events. This paper describes the BNL free-field analyses, including the methods and the analysis results and their comparison to recorded data in the free field. The free-field soil profiles determined from the BNL analyses are being used for both the embedment and SSSI studies, the results of which will be made available upon their completion.

  4. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  5. Design and field testing of a Savonius windpump in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Smalera, A.; Kammen, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    One important means of improving water availability and reducing disease exposure from polluted or stagnant sources involves the design and diffusion of inexpensive and reliable water pumps. Modernized versions of the decades-old Savonius vertical axis windmill present one technology that can play an important role in this effort. To be successful, these systems must be tailored to exploit the local wind and hydrological resources, constructed and managed locally, and inexpensive to operate and maintain. We report here on our design efforts and cooperative field research with several Kenyan development organizations. Performance tests from 10-15 meter deep water pumping applications at two field sites are presented, as well as preliminary results of an analysis of the steps involved in disseminating such technology. Our research suggests that the combination of reliability and performance offered by the Savonius design make it a useful resource for community managed energy initiatives, particularly in developing nation settings.

  6. 77 FR 22283 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Interleukin-2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing... of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Interleukin-2 ] Immunomodulator, Live... risks associated with the field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that...

  7. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection of Environment... using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing an owner or operator to meet... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests,...

  8. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection of Environment... using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing an owner or operator to meet... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests,...

  9. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection of Environment... using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing an owner or operator to meet... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests,...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PEMS auxiliary equipment for field...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.910 PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...

  11. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or... requirements in the first phase of the facility permit, conditions for conducting the field tests or laboratory... demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection of...

  12. Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

  13. Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  15. Evaluation of a New System, VITEK 2, for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garrote, Fernando; Cercenado, Emilia; Bouza, Emilio

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the new automated VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci. The results obtained with the VITEK 2 system were compared to those obtained by reference methods: standard identification by the scheme of Facklam and Sahm [R. R. Facklam and D. F. Sahm, p. 308–314, in P. R. Murray et al., ed., Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 6th ed., 1995] and with the API 20 STREP system and, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, broth microdilution and agar dilution methods by the procedures of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The presence of vanA and vanB genes was determined by PCR. A total of 150 clinical isolates were studied, corresponding to 60 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Enterococcus faecium, 26 Enterococcus gallinarum, 5 Enterococcus avium, 2 Enterococcus durans, and 2 Enterococcus raffinosus isolates. Among those isolates, 131 (87%) were correctly identified to the species level with the VITEK 2 system. Approximately half of the misidentifications were for E. faecium with low-level resistance to vancomycin, identified as E. gallinarum or E. casseliflavus; however, a motility test solved the discrepancies and increased the agreement to 94%. Among the strains studied, 66% were vancomycin resistant (57 VanA, 16 VanB, and 26 VanC strains), 23% were ampicillin resistant (MICs, ≥16 μg/ml), 31% were high-level gentamicin resistant, and 45% were high-level streptomycin resistant. Percentages of agreement for susceptibility and resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin and for high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance were 93, 95, 97, 97, and 96%, respectively. The accuracy of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of enterococci with the VITEK 2 system, together with the significant reduction in handling time, will have a positive impact on the work flow of the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10834961

  16. A Review of Quality of Life after Predictive Testing for and Earlier Identification of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Nance, Martha; Kim, Ji-In; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Panegyres, Peter K.; Erwin, Cheryl; Goh, Anita; McCusker, Elizabeth; Williams, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of evidence suggesting that many neurodegenerative diseases can be detected years, if not decades, earlier than previously thought. To date, these scientific advances have not provoked any parallel translational or clinical improvements. There is an urgency to capitalize on this momentum so earlier detection of disease can be more readily translated into improved health-related quality of life for families at risk for, or suffering with, neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in neurodegenerative diseases and the importance of these “patient reported outcomes” for all clinical research. Next, we address HRQOL following early identification or predictive genetic testing in some neurodegenerative diseases: Huntington disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion diseases, hereditary ataxias, Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and Wilson's disease. After a brief report of available direct-to-consumer genetic tests, we address the juxtaposition of earlier disease identification with assumed reluctance towards predictive genetic testing. Forty-one studies examining health related outcomes following predictive genetic testing for neurodegenerative disease suggested that (a) extreme or catastrophic outcomes are rare; (b) consequences commonly include transiently increased anxiety and/or depression; (c) most participants report no regret; (d) many persons report extensive benefits to receiving genetic information; and (e) stigmatization and discrimination for genetic diseases are poorly understood and policy and laws are needed. Caution is appropriate for earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases but findings suggest further progress is safe, feasible and likely to advance clinical care. PMID:24036231

  17. Optimizing Field Campaigns Using A Hypothesis Testing Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harken, B. J.; Over, M. W.; Rubin, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Field campaigns in hydrogeology often aim to characterize aquifers for modeling and predicting flow and transport of contaminants to facilitate in some objective related to environmental protection or public health and safety. Many times these objectives depend on predicting the answer to a yes/no question, such as: will contaminant concentration in an aquifer surpass a threshold value? Will a contaminant reach a river outflow before it degrades? Is water from an extraction well safe for consumption? It remains difficult, however, to predict the extent to which a field campaign will improve modeling and prediction efforts or the chance of success in the original objective. Presented here is a method for designing field campaigns around the original objective by posing it in a hypothesis testing framework and optimizing campaigns with minimizing probability of error as the goal. The first step in this process is to formulate the null and alternative hypotheses, which represent the two possible outcomes of the yes/no question in the objective. The alternative hypothesis is the desirable outcome which requires a specified level of certainty to be accepted. The null hypothesis, on the other hand, is the "safe" fallback assumption, which is accepted if the alternative hypothesis lacks sufficient supporting evidence. Of key concern in designing field campaigns is the probability of making an error (Type I or Type II). A level of significance is chosen based on the severity of each type of error and the level of risk that is considered acceptable for each case. A field campaign can then be designed to gain enough information to reduce the probability of error to the acceptable level while expending as few resources as possible. A case study examined here is attempting to predict the arrival time of a contaminant in an aquifer. A scenario is first established in which a contaminant is travelling from a point source to a control plane, which could represent, for example, a water supply well or an environmentally sensitive area. In this case, the null hypothesis is that this arrival time is less than or equal to a specified critical value, while the alternative hypothesis is that the arrival time is greater than the critical value. In this case, the field campaign involves measuring conductivity at various locations throughout the aquifer. The campaign could vary both in the number of measurements and the location of the measurements. Estimating the probability of error resulting from a field campaign involves numerical simulations in which travel time is calculated on numerous fields that are physically and statistically plausible. The calculated travel time for each field is then compared to the hypothesis that would have been accepted via an analysis using only information ascertained by the field campaign in question. The result from each field falls into one of four categories: correctly accepting the null hypothesis, correctly accepting the alternative hypothesis, error of Type I, and error of Type II. Differing field campaign strategies can then be compared based on the frequency of errors resulting from each strategy.

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  19. Field exercise testing for assessing fitness in French standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Couroucé, A

    1999-03-01

    This review considers standardized exercise testing which is, routinely used for French Trotters in the field. Track testing provides a more limited range of measurements than treadmill testing, but has the advantage of being performed in the horse's natural environment. Various measurements such as heart rate during exercise and blood lactate concentration after exercise may be measured on the track and lead to the calculation of physiological variables such as V200 (velocity corresponding to a 200 bpm heart rate) and V4 (velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol/L blood lactate concentration). V4 is related to the onset of blood lactate accumulation and relates to the aerobic capacity of the horse, as horses with high values for V4 have higher aerobic capacities. Although V4 is calculated during submaximal intensity exercise, it is related to racing performance and seems to be the most important measurement to assess changes in fitness. V200 represents the cardiac capacity of the horse during exercise and is close to V4 in mature horses. To explain further the clinical usefulness of track testing, and to help interpret both V4 and V200 variables, examples of exercise tests in 3-year-old French Trotters are presented here. These results show that changes may occur in V4 and V200 according to different factors such as the horse's physical ability and either training or disease states. It underlines the importance of exercise tests for both trainers and veterinarians and how they may help in the evaluation of a horse's performance ability; in defining the intensity of a training program, and also in the early detection of underlying diseases. PMID:10204407

  20. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

  1. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  2. Real-time PCR Tests in Dutch Exotic Mosquito Surveys; Implementation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus Identification Tests, and the Development of Tests for the Identification of Aedes atropalpus and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Ibáñez-Justicia, A; Metz-Verschure, E; van Veen, E J; Bruil-Dieters, M L; Scholte, E J

    2015-05-01

    Since 2009, The Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority carries out surveys focusing on, amongst others, the presence of invasive mosquito species (IMS). Special attention is given to exotic container-breeding Aedes species Aedes aegypti (L.), Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes atropalpus (Coquillett), and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald). This study describes the implementation of real-time PCR tests described by Hill et al. (2008) for the identification of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and the development of two novel real-time PCR tests for the identification of Ae. atropalpus and Ae. j. japonicus. Initial test showed that optimization of elements of the Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus tests was needed. Method validation tests were performed to determine if the implemented and newly developed tests are fit for routine diagnostics. Performance criteria of analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, selectivity, repeatability, and reproducibility were determined. In addition, experiments were performed to determine the influence of environmental conditions on the usability of DNA extracted from mosquito specimens trapped in BG-Sentinel traps. The real-time PCR tests were demonstrated to be sensitive, specific, repeatable, reproducible, and are less prone to false negative results compared to partial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequencing owing to the DNA fragmentation caused by environmental influences. PMID:26334807

  3. Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

  4. System identification of the Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    The Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF), a laboratory-scale research project to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, has been developed. This system represents a scaled model of a planned Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LAMSTF consists of a small cylindrical permanent magnet suspended element which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The cylinder is a rigid body and can be controlled to move in five independent degrees of freedom. Six position variables are sensed indirectly by using infrared light-emitting diodes and light-receiving phototransistors. The motion of the suspended cylinder is in general nonlinear and hence only the linear, time-invariant perturbed motion about an equilibrium state is considered. One of the main challenges in this project is the control of the suspended element over a wide range of orientations. An accurate dynamic model plays an essential role in controller design. The analytical model is first derived and open-loop characteristics discussed. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control for system identification. Projection filters are first proposed to identify the state space model from closed-loop input/output test data in the time domain. This method is then extended to identify linear systems from the frequency test data. A canonical transformation matrix is also derived to transform the identified state space model into the physical coordinate. The LAMSTF system is stabilized by using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) feedback controller for closed-loop identification. The rate information is obtained by calculating the back difference of the sensed position signals. Only the closed-loop random input/output data are recorded. Preliminary results from numerical simulations demonstrate that the identified system model is fairly accurate from either time domain or frequency-domain data. Experiments will be performed to validate the proposed closed-loop identification algorithms.

  5. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  6. Characterization and identification of field ectomycorrhizae of Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer.

    PubMed

    Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; de Miguel, Ana María; Martínez-Peña, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Field ectomycorrhizae sampled under Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer have been characterized and described in detail based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The described ectomycorrhiza has traits typical of Boletales: whitish with three differentiated plectenchymatous layers in the mantle in plan view forming ring-like structures and rhizomorphs with highly differentiated hyphae. The inflated, smooth cystidia-like clavate end cells on the surface of the rhizomorphs and their slightly twisted external hyphae are additional characterizing features. The Hartig net occupies 1 1/2 rows of cortical cells, partly reaching the endodermis. Not all hyphae have clamps. The identification of the fungal symbiont as B. edulis was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequence comparison between mycorrhizas and sporocarps. The singularity of this symbiotic association, as well as its ecological and practical implications, are discussed. PMID:16800301

  7. Incorporating conditional random fields and active learning to improve sentiment identification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunpeng; Xie, Yusheng; Yang, Yi; Sun, Aaron; Liu, Hengchang; Choudhary, Alok

    2014-10-01

    Many machine learning, statistical, and computational linguistic methods have been developed to identify sentiment of sentences in documents, yielding promising results. However, most of state-of-the-art methods focus on individual sentences and ignore the impact of context on the meaning of a sentence. In this paper, we propose a method based on conditional random fields to incorporate sentence structure and context information in addition to syntactic information for improving sentiment identification. We also investigate how human interaction affects the accuracy of sentiment labeling using limited training data. We propose and evaluate two different active learning strategies for labeling sentiment data. Our experiments with the proposed approach demonstrate a 5%-15% improvement in accuracy on Amazon customer reviews compared to existing supervised learning and rule-based methods. PMID:24856246

  8. Limitation of the AccuProbe Coccidioides immitis Culture Identification Test: False-Negative Results with Formaldehyde-Killed Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzki, Sally G.; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2000-01-01

    The AccuProbe Coccidioides immitis culture identification test (CI test) yielded false-negative results with formaldehyde-killed C. immitis submitted to a reference laboratory. Further evaluation with pure or mixed cultures or stored, heat-killed cultures revealed the CI test to be highly sensitive and specific for C. immitis except when the cultures were pretreated with formaldehyde. PMID:10835023

  9. Generic RT-PCR tests for detection and identification of tospoviruses.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mehraban, A; Westenberg, M; Verhoeven, J T J; van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Kormelink, R; Roenhorst, J W

    2016-07-01

    A set of tests for generic detection and identification of tospoviruses has been developed. Based on a multiple sequence alignment of the nucleocapsid gene and its 5' upstream untranslated region sequence from 28 different species, primers were designed for RT-PCR detection of tospoviruses from all recognized clades, i.e. the American, Asian and Eurasian clades, and from the small group of distinct and floating species. Pilot experiments on isolates from twenty different species showed that the designed primer sets successfully detected all species by RT-PCR, as confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplicons. In a final optimized design, the primers were applied in a setting of five RT-PCR tests. Seven different tospoviruses were successfully identified from diagnostic samples and in addition a non-described tospovirus species from alstroemeria plants. The results demonstrate that the newly developed generic RT-PCR tests provide a relevant tool for broad detection and identification of tospoviruses in plant quarantine and diagnostic laboratories. PMID:27036502

  10. Update from the Laboratory: Clinical Identification and Susceptibility Testing of Fungi and Trends in Antifungal Resistance.

    PubMed

    Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sutton, Deanna A; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of new diagnostic assays and broad-spectrum antifungal agents, invasive fungal infections remain a significant challenge to clinicians and are associated with marked morbidity and mortality. In addition, the number of etiologic agents of invasive mycoses has increased accompanied by an expansion in the immunocompromised patient populations, and the use of molecular tools for fungal identification and characterization has resulted in the discovery of several cryptic species. This article reviews various methods used to identify fungi and perform antifungal susceptibility testing in the clinical laboratory. Recent developments in antifungal resistance are also discussed. PMID:26739605

  11. Identification of Propionibacterium acnes and Related Organisms by Precipitin Tests with Trichloroacetic Acid Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, C. S.

    1975-01-01

    The serological identification of Propionibacterium acnes, P. granulosum, and P. avidum, using trichloroacetic acid extracts, is described. With antisera prepared against reference strains, the method has been tested on 142 strains recently isolated from human skin. All except two of the strains could be identified serologically, and there was excellent agreement between the serological results and the fermentation pattern of the strains. Two serological types of P. acnes and two of P. avidum were identified, but only one of P. granulosum. Images PMID:972178

  12. The Concentric Square Field: a multivariate test arena for analysis of explorative strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Bengt J; Augustsson, Hanna; Berg, Marita; Roman, Erika

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we describe the behavior of laboratory rats in a recently developed observation arena, the Concentric Square Field (CSF). The CSF contains a number of areas designed to provoke exploration and behaviors associated with risk assessment, risk taking and security seeking in an environment not previously experienced. The model includes sheltered, open and elevated areas, a hole board device, areas with different light conditions, and wall-enclosed corridors. The rationale behind the CSF is to meet the demand for multivariate test situations that are not predictive in the sense of previous definition of a specific purpose of measuring a certain mental state. We define multivariate as being a free choice of where to stay in areas of different qualities. In the present study, identification of risky as opposed to safe areas is based on the retrieval behavior in lactating females and hoarding of food pellets in food-deprived males. Furthermore, we describe the effects of pre-trial food deprivation, immobilization, social stress, strain differences (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar and Lister Hooded males), sex differences (Sprague-Dawley) and repeated testing. Besides the conventional statistics, a principal component analysis (PCA) helped to discriminate between the various categories tested. Our conclusion is that the multivariate and non-predictive test situation (CSF) and the use of PCA provide a good tool for ethoexperimental analysis. PMID:16356558

  13. Fabrication and testing of a high field dipole mechanical model

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, S.

    2000-01-06

    As a first step towards the development of a high field Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting dipole for a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), a short mechanical model was built and tested at Fermilab. The aim of this work was to develop simpler fabrication techniques and test new structural materials to use in the dipole model. The coil design was based on a two-layer cos({theta}) approach. The end parts were designed using ROXIE magnet optimization program and manufactured using a 6-axis EDM machine. The two layers of each half-coil were wound using one piece of cable without any interlayer splices. After winding, a ceramic matrix was applied to the each half-coil and the coil was cured under compression at 150 C. The two half-coils were then assembled together in a reaction fixture for heat treatment at 450 C for 8 hours. After reaction, the coils were placed in a curing fixture for epoxy impregnation. Finally some mechanical and electrical tests were performed after which the coils were sectioned to check the cable positioning and impregnation quality. This paper summarizes the results and experience obtained from the mechanical model.

  14. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  15. Field testing of sound absorption coefficients in a classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettyjohn, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Formal procedures for determining the sound absorption coefficients of materials installed in the field do not exist. However, the U.S. Air Force requested such tests to prove that the sound-absorbing material used in classrooms at Beale AFB in Marysville, CA, met the specified NRC of 0.80. They permitted the use of two layers of 0.5-in. fiberboard or 1-in.-thick fiberglass panels to meet the specified NRC rating. Post-construction tests showed reverberation times longer than expected. Unrealistic sound-absorption coefficients for room finish materials had to be used with the Sabine equation to achieve agreement between the measured and predicted reverberation time. By employing the Fitzroy equation and generally published absorption coefficients for ceiling tile, carpet, and fiberboard, the model provided excellent agreement with the measured reverberation times. The NRC of the fiberboard was computed to be 0.35, agreeing with published data. Since this did not meet project specifications, the Fitzroy model was used to learn the type and quantity of material needed to meet design goals. Follow-up tests showed good agreement between the predicted and measured reverberation times with material added, and project specifications were met. Results are also compared with the requirements of ANSI 12.60.

  16. Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R; Tebbs, Joshua M

    2013-03-01

    Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as "retests", beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

  17. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel Dog Soil Test Kit.

  18. Rapid method for identification and susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli bacteriuria.

    PubMed Central

    Dennstedt, F E; Stager, C E; Davis, J R

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a rapid method for the identification and susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli bacteriuria by use of the Autobac urine screen (AUS), a 5-h indole test, and the AutoMicrobic system E. coli Susceptibility Card (AMS-ECSC). All specimens that were AUS negative at 3 and 5 h were reported as negative. All specimens that were AUS positive at 3 or 5 h were removed from the refrigerator and streaked to a MacConkey-blood agar biplate with a 0.001-ml calibrated loop and incubated at 35 degrees C. The standard method for identification and susceptibility testing consisted of inoculating isolated colonies into the AutoMicrobic system Enterobacteriaceae-Plus Biochemical Card and the AutoMicrobic system General Susceptibility Card. Of 915 specimens, 212 (23.2%) were AUS positive at 3 h, of which 112 (52.8%) were indole positive when tryptophan broth was tested at 5 h. The sensitivity and specificity of this screening method for E. coli bacteriuria were 78.8 and 72.2%, respectively. If contaminated cultures were excluded, specificity was 94.4%. When the indole test was positive, 10 microliters of growth from tryptophan broth was used as inoculum for the AMS-ECSC. AMS-ECSC results were final at 12 h. The sensitivity and specificity of the AMS-ECSC for identification of E. coli were 90.4 and 55.0%, respectively. If contaminated cultures were excluded, specificity was 100%. AMS-ECSC susceptibility results demonstrated an overall agreement of 94.3% with the standard method, with 0.5% very major, 3.4% major, and 1.8% minor discrepancies. The biplate was examined after overnight incubation, and when colonies compatible in morphology with E. coli were present in significant numbers, AMS-ECSC results were reported. When discrepancies were found between biplate and AMS-ECSC results, the biplate was processed in the conventional manner. A rapid method for identifying and performing susceptibility tests for approximately 70% of the specimens with E. coli bacteriuria is described. PMID:6350344

  19. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

  20. 76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing... environmental assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing, and then to field... risk analysis prepared to assess the risks associated with the field testing of this vaccine,...

  1. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling

  2. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

  3. Field test evaluation of solar-heated evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, G.R. )

    1992-08-01

    The cost of disposal of liquid industrial waste is of intense concern to all industrial waste generators, but especially so to smaller generators which are penalized by the economy of scale. As a last resort to on-site treatment or recycling, the smaller generator is forced to depend upon commercial waste disposal at costs approaching $6.00 per gallon. The use of solar energy to evaporate water from aqueous wastes is a potentially viable alternative if the containments are slats having low volatility. This paper describes a field test conducted with a small solar evaporator installed in a machine shop. A naturally vented, basin-type evaporator was used to evaporate water from a spent plating solution used to anodize aluminum. Measured evaporation data validated performance predictions made earlier using TRNSYS and TMY weather data. The data also indicated that accepted correlation models for predicting performance of solar stills underpredict evaporator performance by about 20 percent.

  4. Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

  5. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  6. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

  7. Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  8. Identification of buried landmines using electromagnetic induction spectroscopy: evaluation of a blind test against ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haoping; San Filipo, Bill; Norton, Steve; Won, I. J.

    2005-06-01

    The Geophex GEM-3 sensor was tested at a government test site comprised of 980 1-m squares containing buried landmines and clutter (metallic debris). Electromagnetic (EM) induction spectroscopy (EMIS) was used to discriminate between the landmines and clutter items. Receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) were constructed based on the results of the analysis. Approximately 92% of the landmines were correctly identified as such, with a false alarm rate of 12%. In this report, we present a comparison of our identification results against the ground truth. The EMIS method works well for high-metal mines for which the misfit threshold can be easily established, yielding a correct declaration in all cases without false alarms. For medium-metal mines, even though the misfit differences between the mines and clutter are not as clear as those for the high-metal mines, these mines were still identified at very low false alarm rates with the GEM-3 sensor. The low-metal mines may be discriminated from clutter if they yield reliable signals, but often at a much higher false alarm rate. The primary reason for this is that the EM signals from the low-metal mines are intrinsically weak and thus more subject to distortion by noise. There are several possibilities for improving the low-metal mine identification, including (1) increasing the upper limit of the frequency band to obtain a stronger signal and better defined spectra; (2) decreasing the size of the sensing head to further localize the region of sensitivity of the sensor; (3) displaying the spectral curves and performing the identification in real time to allow operator inspection of the spectral match; and (4) defining a generalized misfit that incorporates signal amplitude and possibly other spectral features such as the quadrature peak.

  9. Testing neoclassical competitive market theory in the field.

    PubMed

    List, John A

    2002-11-26

    This study presents results from a pilot field experiment that tests predictions of competitive market theory. A major advantage of this particular field experimental design is that my laboratory is the marketplace: subjects are engaged in buying, selling, and trading activities whether I run an exchange experiment or am a passive observer. In this sense, I am gathering data in a natural environment while still maintaining the necessary control to execute a clean comparison between treatments. The main results of the study fall into two categories. First, the competitive model predicts reasonably well in some market treatments: the expected price and quantity levels are approximated in many market rounds. Second, the data suggest that market composition is important: buyer and seller experience levels impact not only the distribution of rents but also the overall level of rents captured. An unexpected result in this regard is that average market efficiency is lowest in markets that match experienced buyers and experienced sellers and highest when experienced buyers engage in bargaining with inexperienced sellers. Together, these results suggest that both market experience and market composition play an important role in the equilibrium discovery process. PMID:12432103

  10. Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.; Glanz, Brian D.; Borek, Anita P.; Burger, Chad; Bhally, Hasan S.; Henciak, Susan; Flayhart, Diane

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to the CLSI guidelines, was the reference AST method. Essential and categorical agreements were determined. The overall levels of agreement for the genus- and species-level identifications were 95.6% and 94.4%, respectively. Fourteen isolates were incorrectly identified by the Phoenix system; 10 of these were incorrectly identified to the species level. Three of these were Enterobacter (Pantoea) species and four of these were Shigella spp. misidentified as Escherichia coli. For AST results, the essential and categorical agreements were 98.7% and 97.9%, respectively. The very major error, major error, and minor error rates were 0.38%, 0.33%, and 1.8%, respectively. Six isolates (three E. coli isolates and three Klebsiella isolates) were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers. All six were flagged by the Phoenix system expert rules. The Phoenix system compares favorably to traditional methods for ID and AST of Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:17021074

  11. Progressive Aerodynamic Model Identification From Dynamic Water Tunnel Test of the F-16XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Szyba, Nathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Development of a general aerodynamic model that is adequate for predicting the forces and moments in the nonlinear and unsteady portions of the flight envelope has not been accomplished to a satisfactory degree. Predicting aerodynamic response during arbitrary motion of an aircraft over the complete flight envelope requires further development of the mathematical model and the associated methods for ground-based testing in order to allow identification of the model. In this study, a general nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic model is presented, followed by a summary of a linear modeling methodology that includes test and identification methods, and then a progressive series of steps suggesting a roadmap to develop a general nonlinear methodology that defines modeling, testing, and identification methods. Initial steps of the general methodology were applied to static and oscillatory test data to identify rolling-moment coefficient. Static measurements uncovered complicated dependencies of the aerodynamic coefficient on angle of attack and sideslip in the stall region making it difficult to find a simple analytical expression for the measurement data. In order to assess the effect of sideslip on the damping and unsteady terms, oscillatory tests in roll were conducted at different values of an initial offset in sideslip. Candidate runs for analyses were selected where higher order harmonics were required for the model and where in-phase and out-of-phase components varied with frequency. From these results it was found that only data in the angle-of-attack range of 35 degrees to 37.5 degrees met these requirements. From the limited results it was observed that the identified models fit the data well and both the damping-in-roll and the unsteady term gain are decreasing with increasing sideslip and motion amplitude. Limited similarity between parameter values in the nonlinear model and the linear model suggest that identifiability of parameters in both terms may be a problem. However, the proposed methodology can still be used with careful experiment design and carefully selected values of angle of attack, sideslip, amplitude, and frequency of the oscillatory data.

  12. Forensic identification of urine using the DMAC test: a method validation study.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sandy Y; Wain, Adrian; Groombridge, Linda; Grimes, Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Forensic scientists may sometimes be asked to identify the presence of urine in cases such as harassment, rape or murder. One popular presumptive test method uses para-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC), favoured because it is simple, rapid and safe. This paper confirms that DMAC reacts with urea rather than creatinine, ammonia or uric acid. Sensitivity studies found that the 0.1% w/v DMAC solution currently used for urine identification detects levels of urea found in other body fluids, potentially resulting in false positives. A 0.05% w/v solution was found to be more appropriate in terms of sensitivity to urea however the test is still not specific for urine, giving positive reactions with a number of body fluids (saliva, semen, sweat and vaginal material) and other substances (foot lotion, hair removal cream and broccoli). PMID:22583500

  13. Spectral modeling for the identification and quantification of algal blooms: A test of approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malthus, T.J.; Grieve, L.; Harwar, M.D.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop and test a Monte Carlo modelling approach for the characterization of reflectance for different bloom-forming marine phytoplankton species. The model was tested on optical data for four species (Dunaliella salina, Pavlova pinguis, Emiliania huxleyi and Synechocystes spp.) and simulations performed over a range of chlorophyll concentrations. Discriminant analysis identified 10 key wavelengths which could be used to maximize the separation between the four species. The resulting wavelengths were combined in a neural network to show 100% accuracy in classifying species type. Further simulations were undertaken to investigate the effect of aquatic humus on reflectance characteristics and the change in wavelengths for algal discrimination. The implications for the development of algorithms for the identification of algal bloom species type by remote sensing are briefly discussed.

  14. Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test

    SciTech Connect

    Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc; Henri, Francillette

    2011-01-17

    This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

  15. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  16. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  17. Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimcak, Charles M.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1999-02-01

    We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite processing area, an estuarine marsh, a paint storage locker, and several indoor locations including chemical laboratory fume hoods and bathrooms. In addition, a group were set aside in a sealed enclosure for control purposes. The dosimeters were retrieved at monthly intervals and exposed to measured doses of hydrazine vapor to determine the effects of the field exposure on their hydrazine response. Our analysis indicated that 90% of the exposed dosimeters were able to sense hydrazine at a dose detectivity of less than 15 ppb-hr, a value that meets the current hydrazine sensing requirement. Consequently, we are planning to deploy a full scale, continuously operating fiber optic system for detecting potential hydrazine leaks during launch operations at Cape Canaveral.

  18. Field tracer-transport tests in unsaturated fractured tuff.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Salve, R; Stringfellow, W T; Wang, J S

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a field investigation in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, NV. This investigation included a series of tests during which tracer-laced water was released into a high-permeability zone within a horizontal injection borehole. The tracer concentration was monitored in the seepage collected in an excavated slot about 1.6 m below the borehole. Results showed significant variability in the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix. Analyses of the breakthrough curves suggest that flow and transport pathways are dynamic, rather than fixed, and related to liquid-release rates. Under high release rates, fractures acted as the predominant flow pathways, with limited fracture-matrix interaction. Under low release rates, fracture flow was comparatively less dominant, with a noticeable contribution from matrix flow. Observations of tracer concentrations rebounding in seepage water, following an interruption of flow, provided evidence of mass exchange between the fast-flowing fractures and slow- or non-flowing regions. The tests also showed the applicability of fluorinated benzoate tracers in situations where multiple tracers of similar physical properties are warranted. PMID:11530924

  19. Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs

    PubMed Central

    Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope’s gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females’ signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

  20. Understanding spike-triggered covariance using Wiener theory for receptive field identification

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Roman A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-01-01

    Receptive field identification is a vital problem in sensory neurophysiology and vision. Much research has been done in identifying the receptive fields of nonlinear neurons whose firing rate is determined by the nonlinear interactions of a small number of linear filters. Despite more advanced methods that have been proposed, spike-triggered covariance (STC) continues to be the most widely used method in such situations due to its simplicity and intuitiveness. Although the connection between STC and Wiener/Volterra kernels has often been mentioned in the literature, this relationship has never been explicitly derived. Here we derive this relationship and show that the STC matrix is actually a modified version of the second-order Wiener kernel, which incorporates the input autocorrelation and mixes first- and second-order dynamics. It is then shown how, with little modification of the STC method, the Wiener kernels may be obtained and, from them, the principal dynamic modes, a set of compact and efficient linear filters that essentially combine the spike-triggered average and STC matrix and generalize to systems with both continuous and point-process outputs. Finally, using Wiener theory, we show how these obtained filters may be corrected when they were estimated using correlated inputs. Our correction technique is shown to be superior to those commonly used in the literature for both correlated Gaussian images and natural images. PMID:26230978

  1. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    In Phase II, the analyzers were deployed in field conditions at three diferent USGS sites. The measured nitrate concentrations were compared to discrete (reference) samples analyzed by the Direct UV method on a Shimadzu UV1800 bench top spectrophotometer, and by the National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI) method I-2548-11 at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. The first deployment at USGS site 0249620 on the East Pearl River in Hancock County, Mississippi, tested the ability of the TriOs ProPs (10-mm path length), Hach NITRATAX (5 mm), Satlantic SUNA (10 mm), and the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5 mm) to accurately measure low-level (less than 2 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations while observing the effect turbidity and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) would have on the analyzers' measurements. The second deployment at USGS site 01389005 Passaic River below Pompton River at Two Bridges, New Jersey, tested the analyzer's accuracy in mid-level (2-8 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations. This site provided the means to test the analyzers' performance in two distinct matrices—the Passaic and the Pompton Rivers. In this deployment, three instruments tested in Phase I (TriOS, Hach, and SUNA) were deployed with the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (35 mm) already placed by the New Jersey Water Science Center (WSC). The third deployment at USGS site 05579610 Kickapoo Creek at 2100E Road near Bloomington, Illinois, tested the ability of the analyzers to measure high nitrate concentrations (greater than 8 mg-N/L) in turbid waters. For Kickapoo Creek, the HIF provided the TriOS (10 mm) and S::CAN (5 mm) from Phase I, and a SUNA V2 (5 mm) to be deployed adjacent to the Illinois WSC-owned Hach (2 mm). A total of 40 discrete samples were collected from the three deployment sites and analyzed. The nitrate concentration of the samples ranged from 0.3–22.2 mg-N/L. The average absolute difference between the TriOS measurements and discrete samples was 0.46 mg-N/L. For the combined data from the Hach 5-mm and 2-mm analyzers, the average absolute difference between the Hach samples and the discrete samples was 0.13 mg-N/L. For the SUNA and SUNA V2 combined data, the average absolute difference between the SUNA samples and the discrete samples was 0.66 mg-N/L. The average absolute difference between the S::CAN samples and the discrete samples was 0.63 mg-N/L.

  2. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  3. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  4. Temperature measurements from the prototype engineered barrier system field test

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Ramirez, A.L.; Watwood, D.

    1991-07-01

    A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The maximum temperature on the surface of the heater can was about 340{degrees}C; the maximum temperature at the bottom of the heater borehole wall was about 240{degrees}C, which is similar to that expected in the rock adjacent to a real nuclear waste package. The measured temperatures agree with the results of a model, assuming heat conduction as the heat transfer mechanism. The measured temperatures also agree with a scoping calculation that was performed using a model which investigates the transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in fractured porous media. Our results indicate that the temperature field might be affected by the initial moisture content of the rock, the fractures in the rock, the distance from the free surface of the alcove wall, and the temperature distribution on the heater surface. Higher initial moisture content, higher fracture density, and cooling from the alcove wall tend to decrease the measured temperature. The temperature on top of the horizontal heater can was about 30{degrees}C greater than at the bottom throughout most of the heating phase, causing the rock temperatures above the heater to be greater than those below. Along a radius from the center of the heater, the heating created a dry zone, followed by a boiling zone and a condensation zone. Gravity drainage of the condensed water in the condensation zone had a strong effect on the boiling process in the test region. The temperatures below and to the side of the heater indicated a region receiving liquid drainage from an overlying region of condensation. We verified that a thermocouple in a thin-wall measures the same temperature as one grouted in a borehole. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  5. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Species of "Difficult-to-Identify" Human-Pathogenic Corynebacteria: Implications for Better Identification Tests.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Luis G C; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Santos, Carolina S; Veras, Adonney A O; Guimarães, Luis C; Abreu, Vinícius; Pereira, Felipe L; Soares, Siomar C; Dorella, Fernanda A; Carvalho, Alex F; Leal, Carlos G; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Ramos, Juliana N; Vieira, Veronica V; Farfour, Eric; Guiso, Nicole; Hirata, Raphael; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2015-01-01

    Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium species have been increasingly recognized as the causative agents of infections in humans. Differential identification of these bacteria in the clinical microbiology laboratory by the most commonly used biochemical tests is challenging, and normally requires additional molecular methods. Herein, we present the annotated draft genome sequences of two isolates of "difficult-to-identify" human-pathogenic corynebacterial species: C. xerosis and C. minutissimum. The genome sequences of ca. 2.7 Mbp, with a mean number of 2,580 protein encoding genes, were also compared with the publicly available genome sequences of strains of C. amycolatum and C. striatum. These results will aid the exploration of novel biochemical reactions to improve existing identification tests as well as the development of more accurate molecular identification methods through detection of species-specific target genes for isolate's identification or drug susceptibility profiling. PMID:26516374

  7. GSR2005--continuity of the ENFSI proficiency test on identification of GSR by SEM/EDX.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, Ludwig; Andrasko, Jan; Biegstraaten, Jan; Gunaratnam, Lawrence; Steffen, Sylvia; Uhlig, Steffen; Antoni, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of the ENFSI Expert Working Group "Firearms" a proficiency test on the detection and identification of GSR by energy-dispersive scanning electron microanalysis (SEM/EDX) is carried out in a 2 years term. The latest test was performed in 2005/2006 and was denoted as GSR2005. Seventy-five laboratories from 28 countries participated in this proficiency test and submitted in total 83 independent data-sets. The participating laboratories were requested to determine the total number of PbSbBa containing particles on a synthetic test sample following their own laboratory specific methods of automated GSR particle search and detection by SEM/EDX. Furthermore size and position of the detected particles had to be reported by the laboratories and were evaluated statistically. The results were compiled by means of z-scores according to the IUPAC and EURACHEM guidelines-assessing individual laboratory achievements (inter-laboratory) as well as intra-laboratory performance-and were compared to the results of the previous proficiency test run GSR2003 (1). The comparison shows that there is a noticeable improvement in the method's detection capability. PMID:18005006

  8. Comparison of SVM RBF-NN and DT for crop and weed identification based on spectral measurement over corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is important to find an appropriate pattern-recognition method for in-field plant identification based on spectral measurement in order to classify the crop and weeds accurately. In this study, the method of Support Vector Machine (SVM) was evaluated and compared with two other methods, Decision ...

  9. Identification of new IS711 insertion sites in Brucella abortus field isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., a group of highly homogeneous bacteria. The insertion sequence IS711 is characteristic of these bacteria, and occurs in variable numbers and positions, but always constant within a given species. This species-associated polymorphism is used in molecular typing and identification. Field isolates of B. abortus, the most common species infecting cattle, typically carry seven IS711 copies (one truncated). Thus far, IS711 transposition has only been shown in vitro and only for B. ovis and B. pinnipedialis, two species carrying a high number of IS711 copies, but never in other Brucella species, neither in vitro nor in field strains. Results We found several B. abortus strains isolated from milk and aborted fetuses that carried additional IS711 copies in two hitherto undescribed insertion sites: one in an intergenic region near to the 3' end of a putative lactate permease gene and the other interrupting the sequence of a marR transcriptional regulator gene. Interestingly, the second type of insertion was identified in isolates obtained repeatedly from the same herd after successive brucellosis outbreaks, an observation that proves the stability and virulence of the new genotype under natural conditions. Sequence analyses revealed that the new copies probably resulted from the transposition of a single IS711 copy common to all Brucella species sequenced so far. Conclusions Our results show that the replicative transposition of IS711 can occur under field conditions. Therefore, it represents an active mechanism for the emergence of genetic diversity in B. abortus thus contributing to intra-species genetic polymorphism. PMID:21813003

  10. (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting for the classification and identification of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from bovine milk and teat apices: a comparison of type strains and field isolates.

    PubMed

    Braem, G; De Vliegher, S; Supré, K; Haesebrouck, F; Leroy, F; De Vuyst, L

    2011-01-10

    Due to significant financial losses in the dairy cattle farming industry caused by mastitis and the possible influence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) in the development of this disease, accurate identification methods are needed that untangle the different species of the diverse CNS group. In this study, 39 Staphylococcus type strains and 253 field isolates were subjected to (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting to construct a reference framework for the classification and identification of different CNS from (sub)clinical milk samples and teat apices swabs. Validation of the reference framework was performed by dividing the field isolates in two separate groups and testing whether one group of field isolates, in combination with type strains, could be used for a correct classification and identification of a second group of field isolates. (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting achieved a typeability of 94.7% and an accuracy of 94.3% compared to identifications based on gene sequencing. The study shows the usefulness of the method to determine the identity of bovine Staphylococcus species, provided an identification framework updated with field isolates is available. PMID:20599332

  11. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  12. Field tests of X-ray backscatter mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Shope, S.L.; Wehlburg, J.C.; Selph, M.M.; Jojola, J.M.; Turman, B.N.; Jacobs, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    The implementation of a backscattered X-ray landmine detection system has been demonstrated in laboratories at both Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of Florida (UF). To assess the system`s response to a variety of objects, buried plastic and metal antitank landmines, surface plastic antipersonnel landmines, and surface metal fragments were used as targets. The X-ray machine used for the field test system was an industrial X-ray machine which was operated at 150 kV and 5 mZ and collimated to create a 2 cm diameter X-ray spot on the soil. The detectors used were two plastic scintillation detectors: one collimated to respond primarily to photons that have undergone multiple collision and the other uncollimated to respond primarily to photons that have had only one collision. To provide motion, the system was mounted on a gantry and rastered side-to-side using a computer-controlled stepper motor with a come-along providing the forward movement. Data generated from the detector responses were then analyzed to provide the images and locations of landmines. A new analysis method that increases resolution was used. Changing from the lab environment to the field did not decrease the system`s ability to detect buried or obscured landmines. The addition of rain, blowing dust, rocky soil and native plant-life did not lower the system`s resolution or contrast for the plastic or the metal landmines. Concepts for a civilian mine detection system based on this work using commercial off the shelf (COTS) equipment were developed.

  13. A psychometric study of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended in a Norwegian sample.

    PubMed

    Sletteng, Ruben; Harnang, Andreas K; Hoxmark, Ellen; Friborg, Oddgeir; Aslaksen, Per M; Wynn, Rolf

    2011-10-01

    Motivation is a widely used concept in substance use treatment, and is commonly seen as a premise for change during treatment. Different measures of motivation have been suggested. A relatively new instrument is the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended (DUDIT-E), developed in Sweden. This instrument has recently been introduced in Norway. The present study examined the Motivational Index of the Norwegian version of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended (DUDIT-E). We tested whether the three-factor model ("Positive aspects of substance abuse"; "Negative aspects of substance abuse"; and "Treatment readiness") suggested by previous studies could be replicated in a sample of Norwegian inpatients. Responses to the DUDIT-E were obtained from 105 patients admitted to inpatient substance abuse treatment in Northern Norway. Exploratory common factor analyses were used to compare the factor structure from the current sample with the Swedish sample of mainly detoxification patients and prison inmates. The current sample did not include prison inmates, and it consisted of more women than the Swedish sample. The samples did not differ according to age or substance dependency. The analyses suggested that six primary factors was the most efficient way of combining the item scores, and not 11 as in the Swedish sample. A second-order factor analysis found best support for a two-factor solution, and hence, did not replicate the previously suggested three-factor model either. Several regression analyses comparing the efficiency of the different ways of combining the DUDIT scores in primary or secondary factor scores indicated that the model involving six sum scores had best merit and should be explored further. PMID:22238864

  14. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  15. Progress in crosswell induction imaging for EOR: field system design and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkendall, B A; Lewis, J P; Hunter, S L; Harben, P E

    1999-03-04

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we are continuing our effort to develop improved crosswell low-frequency electromagnetic imaging techniques, which are used to map in situ steamflood and waterflood movement during enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. Toward this effort, we procured two new borehole-logging field vehicles, and developed and integrated new crosswell electromagnetic transmitter and receiver data acquisition and control systems into these vehicles. We tested this new acquisition system by conducting a suite of background measurements and repeatability experiments at the Richmond Field Station in Richmond, California. Repeatability of a given scan in which the receiver was fixed and the transmitter position was varied over 60 m in 0.2-m increments resulted in amplitude differences of less than 0.6% and phase differences of less than 0.54 deg. Forward modeling produced a resistivity map fully consistent with well log data from the Richmond Field Station. In addition, modeling results suggest (1) that residual high-conductivity saltwater, injected in 1993 and pumped out in 1995, is present at the site and (2) that it has diffused outward from the original target strata. To develop crosswell electromagnetic imaging into a viable commercial product, our future research must be a two-fold approach: (1) improved quantification of system noise through experiments such as ferromagnetic core characterization as a function of temperature, and (2) development of procedures and codes to account for steel-cased hole scenarios.

  16. The Vitek analyser for routine bacterial identification and susceptibility testing: protocols, problems, and pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, N; Hill, G; Ridgway, G L

    1998-01-01

    Automated and semiautomated technology in microbiology has seen great advances in recent years. The choice of automated equipment for the identification and susceptibility testing of bacteria in a routine diagnostic laboratory depends on speed, accuracy, ease of use, and cost factors. The Vitek analyser (bioMerieux, UK) was installed in a busy diagnostic teaching hospital laboratory in London. This report describes one year's experience. Changes to work practice as a result of incorporating the equipment into the laboratory, and the advantages and disadvantages of automation in key areas are described in detail, together with possible solutions to problems. The Vitek analyser was found to be valuable for the speed and accuracy with which results were available for the common bacterial pathogens. Results of susceptibility testing were standardised according to NCCLS guidelines and used breakpoint MICs to ascertain susceptibility and resistance; they were an improvement on disc testing. This equipment is not a reference facility for difficult to identify organisms and many manual techniques, including some disc susceptibility testing, will have to be retained by the laboratory. PMID:9659247

  17. Optimization and testing of mass spectral library search algorithms for compound identification.

    PubMed

    Stein, S E; Scott, D R

    1994-09-01

    Five algorithms proposed in the literature for library search identification of unknown compounds from their low resolution mass spectra were optimized and tested by matching test spectra against reference spectra in the NIST-EPA-NIH Mass Spectral Database. The algorithms were probability-based matching (PBM), dot-product, Hertz et al. similarity index, Euclidean distance, and absolute value distance. The test set consisted of 12,592 alternate spectra of about 8000 compounds represented in the database. Most algorithms were optimized by varying their mass weighting and intensity scaling factors. Rank in the list of candidatc compounds was used as the criterion for accuracy. The best performing algorithm (75% accuracy for rank 1) was the dot-product function that measures the cosine of the angle between spectra represented as vectors. Other methods in order of performance were the Euclidean distance (72%), absolute value distance (68%) PBM (65%), and Hertz et al. (64%). Intensity scaling and mass weighting were important in the optimized algorithms with the square root of the intensity scale nearly optimal and the square or cube the best mass weighting power. Several more complex schemes also were tested, but had little effect on the results. A modest improvement in the performance of the dot-product algorithm was made by adding a term that gave additional weight to relative peak intensities for spectra with many peaks in common. PMID:24222034

  18. Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

  19. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    PubMed

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions. PMID:24364681

  20. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  1. Lessons Learnt from the Dynamic Identification / Qualification Tests on the ESC-A Upper stage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittweger, A.; Beuchel, W.; Eckhardt, K.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modelling approach made at the beginning of the development. The upper composite of the ARIANE 5, consisting of upper stage, vehicle equipment bay, payload carrying structures, payload dummies and fairing, was modal tested to validate the mathematical model of the launcher. Additionally, transfer functions were measured for Pogo investigations. Validated mathematical launcher models are the basis to predict the launcher global responses in the low frequency domain with sufficient confidence. The predicted global axial and lateral responses for selected sections at the stage represent the flight loads for these sections. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. The verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro shock) a stage separation test was performed. All the equipment was qualified separately for its dynamic (sine, random and shock excitation) and thermal environment to proof its structural and functional integrity. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine-vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electrodynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 150 Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experiences which were made - the comparison between prediction and test results shows the ability and good quality of analysis but - the advantage of combined analysis of shaker table and stage model for test prediction - local effects observed in test - the dependency of damping on the load level - the efficiency of the so called SARO-Damping Device

  2. Guiding Older Children as Tutors: A Report on the Field Test. Technical Report No. 325.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajano, Nancy; Hubbard, W. Donald

    A field test of "Guiding Older Children As Tutors," one of the four motivational-instructional procedures of Individually Guided Motivation (IGM), was used in two Milwaukee, Wisconsin schools. A total of 34 tutees, 22 tutors, and 24 adults participated in the field test during the 1972-73 school year. The field test objectives sought an increase…

  3. Field testing of the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System for drugs in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Lacey, John

    2013-06-01

    A preliminary field evaluation of a second-generation handheld oral fluid testing device, the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System (DDS2), is described. As part of a larger study, drivers were randomly stopped at various locations across California (in 2012) and asked to submit voluntarily to a questionnaire regarding their drug and alcohol use, a breath alcohol test and collection of oral fluid with the Quantisal device. The Quantisal-collected oral fluid samples were sent for laboratory-based analyses. At one location, 50 drivers were asked to submit an additional oral fluid sample using the DDS2 collection device; these samples were analyzed by using the DDS2 mobile test system. Thirty-eight donors (76%) provided specimens that were successfully run on the mobile system; in 12 cases (24%), the device failed to provide a valid result. Thirty-two of the 38 collected samples were negative for all drugs; five were positive for tetrahydrocannabinol and one was positive for methamphetamine using the mobile device. These results corresponded exactly with the laboratory-based results from the Quantisal oral fluid collection. PMID:23558436

  4. The killing field of Khao Lak: forensic odontology in Thailand tsunami victim identification.

    PubMed

    Tan, Peng-Hui

    2005-12-01

    Forensic odontology is the science of dental identification. This paper describes the contribution of forensic odontology to tsunami victim identification in Thailand, with particular reference to the Singaporean victims. Thirteen Singaporeans were reported missing in Phuket following the Indian ocean tsunami on 26 December 2004. To date, 10 victims have been found and identified, eight of whom were identified by dental records. The author travelled twice to southern Thailand and spent 5 weeks there. First, in December 2004 as part of a Singapore Police Force Disaster Victim Identification team deployed in Khao Lak, and later in July 2005 at the Thai Tsunami Victim Identification Information Management Centre in Phuket. PMID:16438268

  5. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  6. Immune function tests for hazard identification: a paradigm shift in drug development.

    PubMed

    Gore, Elizabeth R

    2006-04-01

    Routine immune function testing in preclinical drug development was established as a regulatory requirement in June of 2000 under the Committee of Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) Note for Guidance on Repeated Dose Toxicity (CPMP/SWP/1042/99). The purpose of the more stringent approach to immunotoxicology testing was to better identify unintended immunosuppression; however, the requirement was met with much discussion and debate. At the center of the discussion was an attempt to reconcile opposing regulatory directives from agencies outside of Europe that adhere to a more selective, weight-of-evidence approach to functional evaluations. Uncertainty over the predictive value of the recommended immune function tests relative to conventional toxicology parameters prompted an investigation by the International Committee on Harmonization (ICH). The results of a preliminary, industry-wide survey indicated that only a low percentage of pharmaceuticals adversely affect immune function without alterations to standard toxicology parameters. Expected ICH guidelines will ultimately determine to what extent and for what purpose immune function tests will be conducted. In the meantime, optimization of the recommended immune function tests is ongoing. The T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) by either conventional Sheep Red Blood Cell (SRBC) plaque assay or by the modified ELISA method using either SRBC or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as antigen is being extensively evaluated to determine best practices and procedures for preclinical immunotoxicity evaluations. This review addresses some aspects of the debate concerning the appropriateness of immune function tests for hazard identification, along with recommendations for optimizing TDAR methodology to ensure adequate sensitivity and predictability in risk assessments for immunotoxicity. PMID:16623854

  7. Prediction System for Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes Based on Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B.; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J.

    2012-01-01

    A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as “unknown” by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

  8. The Sex Attractant Pheromone of Male Brown Rats: Identification and Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Takács, Stephen; Gries, Regine; Zhai, Huimin; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-05-10

    Trapping brown rats is challenging because they avoid newly placed traps in their habitat. Herein, we report the identification of the sex pheromone produced by male brown rats and its effect on trap captures of wild female brown rats. Collecting urine- and feces-soiled bedding material of laboratory-kept rats and comparing the soiled-bedding odorants of juvenile and adult males, as well as of adult males and females, we found nine compounds that were specific to, or most prevalent in, the odor profiles of sexually mature adult males. When we added a synthetic blend of six of these compounds (2-heptanone, 4-heptanone, 3-ethyl-2-heptanone, 2-octanone, 2-nonanone, 4-nonanone) to one of two paired food-baited trap boxes, these boxes attracted significantly more laboratory-strain female rats in laboratory experiments, and captured ten times more wild female rats in a field experiment than the corresponding control boxes. Our data show that the pheromone facilitates captures of wild female brown rats. PMID:27060700

  9. Prediction system for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J

    2012-05-01

    A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as "unknown" by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

  10. Field comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction and bacterial culture for identification of bovine mastitis bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, M T; Wellenberg, G J; Sampimon, O C; Holopainen, J; Rothkamp, A; Salmikivi, L; van Haeringen, W A; Lam, T J G M; Pyörälä, S

    2010-12-01

    Fast and reliable identification of the microorganisms causing mastitis is important for management of the disease and for targeting antimicrobial treatment. Methods based on PCR are being used increasingly in mastitis diagnostics. Comprehensive field comparisons of PCR and traditional milk bacteriology have not been available. The results of a PCR kit capable of detecting 11 important etiological agents of mastitis directly from milk in 4h were compared with those of conventional bacterial culture (48h). In total, 1,000 quarter milk samples were taken from cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis, or from clinically healthy quarters with low somatic cell count (SCC). Bacterial culture identified udder pathogens in 600/780 (77%) of the clinical samples, whereas PCR identified bacteria in 691/780 (89%) of the clinical samples. The PCR analysis detected major pathogens in a large number of clinical samples that were negative for the species in culture. These included 53 samples positive for Staphylococcus aureus by PCR, but negative by culture. A total of 137 samples from clinical mastitis, 5 samples from subclinical mastitis, and 1 sample from a healthy quarter were positive for 3 or more bacterial species in PCR, whereas culture identified 3 or more species in 60 samples from clinical mastitis. Culture identified a species not targeted by the PCR test in 44 samples from clinical mastitis and in 9 samples from subclinical mastitis. Low SCC samples provided a small number of positive results both in culture (4/93; 4.3%) and by PCR (7/93; 7.5%). In conclusion, the PCR kit provided several benefits over conventional culture, including speed, automated interpretation of results, and increased sensitivity. This kit holds much promise as a tool to complement traditional methods in identification of pathogens. In conventional mastitis bacteriology, a sample with 3 or more species is considered contaminated, and resampling of the cow is recommended. Further study is required to investigate how high sensitivity of PCR and its quantitative features can be applied to improve separation of relevant udder pathogens from likely contaminants in samples where multiple species are detected. Furthermore, increasing the number of species targeted by the PCR test would be advantageous. PMID:21094742

  11. Cultivar Evaluation and Essential Test Locations Identification for Sugarcane Breeding in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai

    2014-01-01

    The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

  12. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  13. X-ray identifications of FIRST radio sources in the XBoötes field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouchefry, K.

    2009-07-01

    With the goal of investigating the nature and the environment of the faint radio sources (at mJy level), here are presented results of X-ray identifications of Faint Imaging Radio Survey at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) in the 9 deg2 Boötes field of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS), using data from the Chandra XBoötes survey. A total of 92 (10 per cent) FIRST radio sources are identified above the X-ray flux limit fX(0.5-7)keV = 8 × 10-15ergs-1cm-2, and 79 optical counterparts are common to both the radio and X-ray sources. Spectroscopic identifications [obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) survey] were available for 22 sources (27 per cent). The majority of these sources (59 per cent) are classified as broad line active galactic nuclei (BLAGNs), and 18 per cent as low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), 14 per cent as star-forming galaxies and one source classified as BL Lac object. Multiwavelength optical/infrared photometric data (Bw ~ 25.5 mag, R ~ 25.8 mag, I ~ 25.5 mag and K ~ 19.4 mag) were available for this field and were used to derive photometric redshift for the remaining 57 sources without spectroscopic information. Most of the radio-X-ray matches are optically extended objects in the R band with a red colour, their radio emission is associated with AGN activity hosted in massive early type host galaxies with a photometric redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.7. Based on the hardness ratio and X-ray luminosity, 37 sources (89 per cent) were classified as AGN-1, 19 as AGN-2, 12 as quasi-stellar object 1 (QSO-1), two as QSO-2 and nine sources as normal galaxies. While the majority of these sources have a hard X-ray luminosity LX(2-7) keV > 1042ergs-1, about one third of the sources have LX(2-7) keV > 1044ergs-1 and therefore classified as QSO-1, 92 per cent of these objects are spectroscopically identified as QSOs. I found good agreement between the X-ray classification scheme and the classical AGN classification based on optical spectroscopic diagnostics. The majority (68 per cent) of the radio-X-ray matched population are found to have logfX/fopt within 0.0 +/- 1 region indicative of AGNs (Stocke et al.), 23 per cent with high X-ray to optical flux ratio (logfX/fopt > 1), suggesting high redshift and/or dust obscured AGN, and 11 per cent of the radio-X-ray matches that are X-ray faint optically bright sources with logfX/fopt < -1, and most of these sources are optically extended. These objects are low z, normal galaxies or low-luminosity AGNs (LINERs). Five sources of the radio-X-ray matches are associated with the so called extremely red object (ERO) having a colour of R - K > 5. No clear correlation has been found between the R - K colour and the hardness ratio. The very hard radio-X-ray matches (ignoring QSOs) all have low R - K colour which could be a consequence of the correlation found between the hardness ratio and redshift, and the fact that low R - K galaxies are mostly at low redshift.

  14. Organizational Identification and Social Motivation: A Field Descriptive Study in Two Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barge, J. Kevin

    A study examined the relationships between leadership conversation and its impact upon organizational members' levels of organizational identification and behavior. It was hypothesized (1) that effective leader conversation would be associated with higher levels of role, means, goal and overall organizational identification, and (2) that…

  15. Identification and prioritization of rail squat defects in the field using rail magnetisation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2015-04-01

    Inevitably, rail squats and studs are continuing to be a serious problem for railway organisations around the world in the 21st century. They are typically classified as the growth of any cracks that have grown longitudinally through the subsurface and some of the cracks propagating to the bottom of rails transversely, and have branched from initial longitudinal cracks with a depression of rail surface. The horizontal crack, which results in a depression of rail surface, induces increased maintenance level, more frequent monitoring, compromised rail testing (as the crack shields the signal echoes), and possible broken rails. This paper presents field investigations using a magnetised-rail testing device developed by MRX Technologies to identify and prioritise the rail squats. Most of the in situ squats were found on the high rail of the transition (variable-radius curved track), which is associated with rolling contact fatigue (RCF). This investigation highlights the field performance of the MRX's surface crack detection technology in comparison with the traditional ultrasonic method and detailed walking inspection. Visually, it was found in the field that the size of the RCF squats varies from very small to moderate. The predicted crack data were obtained by scanning the magnitised rails. The comparison of the actual crack depths (ultrasonic) and the predicted crack depths (MRX device) shows: • A possible correlation for small RCF/ squat cracks. • Poor interpretation of larger defects and welds. The field assessment also suggests some practical issues required for further development, including the detection of rail spalling, deep transverse crack, welding, and so on.

  16. Does Field Independence Relate to Performance on Communicative Language Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2006-01-01

    Recent language testing research investigates factors other than language proficiency that may be responsible for systematic variance in language test performance. One such factor is the test takers' cognitive styles. The present study was carried out with the aim of finding the probable effects of Iranian EFL learners' cognitive styles on their…

  17. Applicability of subchronic toxicity test with Hyalella azteca for toxicity identification evaluation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, A.E.; Jop, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    A series of screening tests including the short-term chronic exposure of Ceriodaphnia dubia to sediment pore waters, 10-day exposures of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to bulk sediments and a bioaccumulation study with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment of Plow Shop Pond, Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Chronic endpoints such as reproduction and growth indicated sediment toxicity, however, a toxicity identification evaluation program was initiated to further define the source and extent of the toxicity. A short-term chronic exposure with C. dubia was a logical choice for the TIE, however, since amphipods are epibenthic organisms, they are a better surrogate of sediment dwelling organisms than a water column species such as C. dubia. Observations performed during H. azteca culture suggested that this species of amphipod could thrive in the water column for up to three weeks. Therefore, 7-day old H. azteca were exposed to pore water samples under static-renewal conditions for 10 days. Survival and growth (i.e., dry weight) were determined at the termination of each exposure. Laboratory control group performance consistently averaged a {>=}90% survival and {>=}43 {micro}g of dry weight per amphipod. Growth of amphipods used in each exposure generally exceeded two times the initial body weight after 10 days of exposure. Previous studies have indicated that the growth and reproductive response of H. azteca are positively correlated for a given set of exposure conditions. The results of these 10-day subchronic exposures with H. azteca provide a consistent and reliable measure of the chronic sediment toxicity with a benthic invertebrate for toxicity identification evaluation programs.

  18. Field performance and identification capability of the Innsbruck PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last one and a half decades Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) [1, 2] has gained recognition as fast on-line sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere. Sample collection is very straight forward and the fact that no pre-concentration is needed is of particular advantage for compounds that are notoriously difficult to pre-concentrate and/or analyze by gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Its ionization method is very versatile, i.e. all compounds that perform exothermic proton transfer with hydronium ions - and most VOCs do so - are readily ionized, producing quasi-molecular ions VOC.H+. In the quasi-molecular ion the elemental composition of the analyte compound is conserved and allows, in combination with some background knowledge of the sample, conclusions about the identity of that compound. De Gouw and Warneke (2007) [3] summarized the applicability of PTR-MS in atmospheric chemistry but they also pointed out shortcomings in the identification capabilities. Goldstein and Galbally (2007) [4] addressed the multitude of VOCs potentially present in the atmosphere and they emphasized the gasphase-to-aerosol partitioning of organic compounds (volatile and semi-volatile) in dependence of carbon-chain length and oxygen containing functional groups. In collaboration with Ionicon and assisted by TOFWERK we developed a PTR time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instrument that allows for the identification of the atomic composition of oxygenated hydrocarbons by exact-mass determination. A detection limit in the low pptv range was achieved at a time resolution of one minute, one-second detection limit is in the sub-ppbv range. In 2008 the Innsbruck PTR-TOF was field deployed in the icebreaker- and helicopter based Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) to characterize the organic trace gas composition of the High Arctic atmosphere. During the six-week field campaign the PTR-TOF was run without problems even under harsh conditions in the open water and during ice breaking. Continuous time-series of full mass spectra with a one minute time resolution were recorded throughout the campaign between August 2nd and September 7th 2008 running up to a net VOC data set of 745 hours. Over 370 mass peaks have been separated, about 340 show signal intensities above the 30 minute detection limit of ~3pptv. Additionally we analyzed samples from nine helicopter based soundings providing vertical VOC profiles up to 3000 m.a.s.l. The performance of the newly developed instrument will be discussed and ASCOS data will be shown. Acknowledgment: The ASCOS expedition was arranged by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat (SPRS) and was an effort within the framework of SWEDARCTIC 2008. For more information on ASCOS see http://ascos.se/. We thank the ASCOS organizers - Caroline Leck and Michael Tjernström - all ASCOS participants, the SPRS and the Oden crew for the excellent team work and Armin Wisthaler for his assistance in planning and preparations. The TOF-MS system was funded by the University of Innsbruck (Uni Infrastruktur Programm). The development project was financially supported by the Austrian Research Funding Association (FFG). [1] Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes 1995, 149-150, 609-619. [2] Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.; Jordan, A. Chemical Society Review 1998, 27, 347-375. [3] De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C. Mass Spectrometry Reviews 2007, 26, 223-257. [4] Goldstein, A. H.; Galbally, I. E. Environmental Science and Technology 2007, 41, 154-1521.

  19. Uncertainty in identification of blood group A subtypes by agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Davé, V; Prchal, J

    1985-01-01

    Identification of the blood group A subtypes, i.e. A1, A2, and A1-A2 intermediate (Aint), by agglutination test, particularly in AB red cells, is ambiguous. The expressions of A subtypes in red blood cells are the consequences of diverse formations of the A substances by the action of three types of blood group N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-transferases controlled by A1, A2, and Aint genes. Therefore, the A subtypes are more directly identified by examining the kinetic characters of A-enzymes existing in plasma. Several Black AB subjects classified as non-A1 by the agglutination test were identified as A1B and AintB on the enzyme basis. A subject serologically classified as A1 had A2-enzyme in her plasma, i.e. she is genetically A2O or A2A2. The present and previous studies indicate that red cell A2 status is occasionally expressed as a result of the combination of Aint and B, and of A1 and superactive B. The imbalance between A1/A2 and A1B/A2B observed in some Black populations could be attributed to high frequencies of the Aint and B. sup. genes in Blacks. PMID:3918931

  20. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  1. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  2. Closed-loop tomographic control on HOMER wide-field AO bench: experimental results and identification issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Amelie; Costille, Anne; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2010-07-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) has a limited corrected field of view because of the anisoplanatism effect. Wide Field AO (WFAO) concepts, such as Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO), have been developed to overcome this limitation. These complex WFAO systems raise critical challenges such as tomographic control and calibrations. We present new results obtained in closed-loop configuration with the laboratory bench HOMER which is devoted to implementation and validation of these WFAO concepts in the perspective of future VLT/ELT AO systems. Turbulence is generated with rotating phase screens and multi-directional analysis is performed. Tomographic control relies on Linear Quadratic Gaussian control (LQG). The correction can be applied thanks to two Deformable Mirrors (DM). We also focus on calibration issues and models identification. We investigate in particular identification of relative geometry of the wave front sensors, DM altitude and asterism and its impact on performance.

  3. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  4. 75 FR 54589 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing... purpose of field testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed foot-and-mouth disease vaccine, live... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  5. Exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Munsters, Carolien C B M; van Iwaarden, Alexandra; van Weeren, René; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2014-10-01

    Regular exercise testing in Warmblood sport horses may, as in racing, potentially help to characterise fitness indices in different disciplines and at various competition levels and assist in understanding when a horse is 'fit to compete'. In this review an overview is given of the current state of the art of exercise testing in the Olympic disciplines of eventing, show jumping and dressage, and areas for further development are defined. In event horses, a simple four-step incremental exercise test measuring heart rate (HR), lactate concentration (LA) and velocity (V) is most often used. In dressage and riding horses, a wide variety of exercise tests have been developed, including incremental exercise tests, indoor riding tests and lunging tests. In show jumping, the use of a five-step incremental exercise test and exercise tests evaluating technical skills and fatigue of the horse has been reported. The velocity at a plasma LA of 4 mmol/L (VLA4) and HR recovery during submaximal exercise intensity have been shown to be the best parameters in event horses for predicting performance and impending injuries. In riding horses, the fitness level of horses is also an important determinant of injuries. Implementation of regular exercise testing and monitoring of training sessions may have important added value in the assessment of performance ability and potential future injuries in Warmblood sport horses. However, there is an urgent need to standardise methodologies and outcome parameters in order to make results comparable. PMID:25172838

  6. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Protective barrier test results (FY 1990, the third year)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) was constructed to test protective barriers for isolating low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes from the biosphere. Protective barriers are specially configured earth materials placed over near-surface wastes to prevent intrusion of water, plants, and animals. Low-level radioactive waste is stored in near-surface repositories at the Hanford Site and can be transported into the biosphere by water, plants, and animals. The purpose of the FLTF is to measure water balance within barriers as precipitation is partitioned to evaporation (including transpiration), storage, and drainage. Runoff was prevented by raised edges on the lysimeters. Water balance in protective barriers depends on the water-holding capacity of the soil, the gradient of a potential, and the conductivity of the underlying capillary barrier. Current barrier design uses soil with a high water storage capacity and a capillary barrier underlying the soil to increase its water storage capacity. This increased storage capacity is to hold water, which would normally drain, near the the surface where evaporation can cycle it back to the atmosphere. 7 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. 77 FR 43087 - Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens... identify electrophilic substances that have the potential to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD... CONTACT: Dr. William S. Stokes, Director, NICEATM, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, Mail Stop: K2-16,...

  8. Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is

  9. An Investigation into the Use of Cognitive Ability Tests in the Identification of Gifted Students in Design and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twissell, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether MidYIS and YELLIS cognitive ability tests (CATs) are appropriate methods for the identification of giftedness in Design and Technology. A key rationale for the study was whether CATs and able to identify those students with the aptitudes considered of importance to identifying giftedness in Design and Technology and…

  10. Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

  11. The Administrative Experiment: A Special Case of Field Testing or Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Charles W. N.; Rath, Gustave J.

    This paper describes administrative experimentation--a particular strategy and method of field testing or evaluation. Administrative experimentation can best be described as a specialized form of field testing, field experimentation or evaluation which emphasizes the dual role of administrator and experimenter. This method is first defined in…

  12. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Que, Youxiong; Zhang, Hua; Grisham, Michael Paul; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Test environments and classification of regional ecological zones into mega environments are the two key components in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. This study aims to provide the theoretical basis for test environment evaluation and ecological zone division for sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analysed using both analysis of variance (ANOVA) and heritability adjusted-genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (HA-GGE) biplot. The results showed that among the interactive factors, the GE interaction had the greatest impact, while the genotype and year interaction showed the lowest impact. Kaiyuan, Lincang and Baoshan of Yunnan, Zhangzhou and Fuzhou of Fujian, and Hechi, Liuzhou and Chongzuo of Guangxi, and Lingao of Hainan were ideal test environments with a demonstrated high efficiency in selecting new cultivars with a wide adaptability, whereas Baise of Guangxi was not. Based on HA-GGE biplot analysis, there are three ecological sugarcane production zones in China, the Southern China Inland Zone, the Southwestern Plateau Zone, and the Southern Coastal Zone. The HA-GGE biplot analysis here presents the ideal test environments and also identifies the mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China. PMID:26489689

  13. Biplot evaluation of test environments and identification of mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Que, Youxiong; Zhang, Hua; Grisham, Michael Paul; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Test environments and classification of regional ecological zones into mega environments are the two key components in regional testing of sugarcane cultivars. This study aims to provide the theoretical basis for test environment evaluation and ecological zone division for sugarcane cultivars. In the present study, sugarcane yield data from a three-year nationwide field trial involving 21 cultivars and 14 pilot test locations were analysed using both analysis of variance (ANOVA) and heritability adjusted-genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (HA-GGE) biplot. The results showed that among the interactive factors, the GE interaction had the greatest impact, while the genotype and year interaction showed the lowest impact. Kaiyuan, Lincang and Baoshan of Yunnan, Zhangzhou and Fuzhou of Fujian, and Hechi, Liuzhou and Chongzuo of Guangxi, and Lingao of Hainan were ideal test environments with a demonstrated high efficiency in selecting new cultivars with a wide adaptability, whereas Baise of Guangxi was not. Based on HA-GGE biplot analysis, there are three ecological sugarcane production zones in China, the Southern China Inland Zone, the Southwestern Plateau Zone, and the Southern Coastal Zone. The HA-GGE biplot analysis here presents the ideal test environments and also identifies the mega-environment for sugarcane cultivars in China. PMID:26489689

  14. Retrospective evaluation of the impact of functional immunotoxicity testing on pesticide hazard identification and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Gehen, Sean C; Blacker, Ann M; Boverhof, Darrell R; Hanley, Thomas R; Hastings, Charles E; Ladics, Gregory S; Lu, Haitian; O'Neal, Fredrick O

    2014-05-01

    Conduct of a T-cell-dependent antibody response (TDAR) assay in rodents according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Test Guideline OPPTS 870.7800 is now required for chemical pesticide active ingredients registered in the United States. To assess potential regulatory impact, a retrospective analysis was developed using TDAR tests conducted on 78 pesticide chemicals from 46 separate chemical classes. The objective of the retrospective analysis was to examine the frequency of positive responses and determine the potential for the TDAR to yield lower endpoints than those utilized to calculate reference doses (RfDs). A reduction in the TDAR response was observed at only the high-dose level in five studies, while it was unaltered in the remaining studies. Importantly, for all 78 pesticide chemicals, the TDAR no-observed-adverse-effect levels (TDAR NOAELs) were greater than the NOAELS currently in use as risk assessment endpoints. The TDAR NOAELs were higher than the current EPA-selected endpoints for the chronic RfD, short-term, intermediate and long-term exposure scenarios by 3-27,000, 3-1,688, 3-1,688 and 4.9-1,688 times, respectively. Based on this analysis, conduct of the TDAR assay had minimal impact on hazard identification and did not impact human health risk assessments for the pesticides included in this evaluation. These data strongly support employment of alternative approaches including initial weight-of-evidence analysis for immunotoxic potential prior to conducting functional immunotoxicity testing for pesticide active ingredients. PMID:24601769

  15. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification By Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2014-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV γ-ray photons that result from a positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons, and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype, adaptable to a space-flight design, was designed, built, and tested. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV γ rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has since been exposed to beams of energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at Massachusetts General Hospital's Francis H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Center and positrons and electrons (up to ~10 MeV) at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We will present a summary of modeling calculations and analysis of data taken at the accelerator tests. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G.

  16. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-04-10

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

  17. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

  18. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  19. Field test of a center pivot irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniformity of water distribution of a variable rate center pivot irrigation system was evaluated. This 4-span center pivot system was configured with 10 water application zones along its 233 m-long lateral. Two experiments were conducted for the uniformity tests. In one test, a constant water applic...

  20. STRESS GERMINATION RING TEST WITH IIRB AND FIELD VALIDATION IN MICHIGAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This test was conducted to validate field emergence on lines selected by European breeding companies for a ‘ring test’ to evaluate the water germination stress test developed at East Lansing for predicting relative field emergence. Water and hydrogen peroxide germination tests were conducted prior t...

  1. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment... Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New York, North...

  2. Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. ); Cooper, G.A. ); Curry, D.A. ); McCann, D. )

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

  3. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

  4. 78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing... testing of the following unlicensed product: Requester: Bayer HealthCare LLC, Animal Health Division... prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization to ship for the purpose of field testing,...

  5. A Study of Field Independent Biased Mental Ability Tests in Community College Science Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Linda W.; Piper, Martha Kime

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of mental ability tests for grouping science students. Describes a study which investigated the analytical skill items on the Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Test for field independent bias. Results indicated that the test is biased in favor of individuals with field independent perceptual orientation. (TW)

  6. Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

  7. 40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing. 1065.910 Section 1065.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.910 PEMS auxiliary equipment...

  8. A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, D.; Nithya, M.; Singh, K. D.; Bharti, Rishikesh

    2013-02-01

    This work illustrates the efficiency of field spectroscopy for rapid identification of minerals in ore body, alteration zone and host rocks. The adopted procedure involves collection of field spectra, their processing for noise, spectral matching and spectral un-mixing with selected library end-members. Average weighted spectral similarity and effective peak matching techniques were used to draw end-members from library. Constrained linear mixture modelling technique was used to convolve end-member spectra. Linear mixture model was optimized based on root mean square error between field- and modelled-spectra. Estimated minerals and their abundances were subsequently compared with conventional procedures such as petrography, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence for accuracy assessment. The mineralized zone is found to contain azurite, galena, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, marcacite, gahnite, hematite, goethite, anglesite and malachite. The alteration zone contains chlorite, kaolinite, actinolite and mica. These mineral assemblages correlate well with the petrographic measurements ( R 2 = 0.89). Subsequently, the bulk chemistry of field samples was compared with spectroscopically derived cumulative weighted mineral chemistry and found to correlate well ( R 2 = 0.91-0.98) at excellent statistical significance levels (90-99%). From this study, it is evident that field spectroscopy can be effectively used for rapid mineral identification and abundance estimation.

  9. Automated field testing of a track-type tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Lay, Keith; Struble, Joshua; Allen, William; Subrt, Michael

    2003-09-01

    During the design process, earthmoving manufacturers routinely subject machines to rigorous, long-term tests to ensure quality. Automating portions of the testing process can potentially reduce the cost and time to complete these tests. We present a system that guides a 175 horsepower track-type tractor (Caterpillar Model D6R XL) along a prescribed route, allowing simple tasks to be completed by the automated machine while more complex tasks, such as site clean up, are handled by an operator. Additionally, the machine can be operated manually or via remote control and observed over the internet using a remote supervisor program. We envision that safety would be handled using work procedures, multiple over-ride methods and a GPS fence. The current system can follow turns within a half meter and straight sections within a quarter meter. The controller hardware and software are integrated with existing on-board electronic modules and allow for portability. The current system successfully handles the challenges of a clutch-brake drive train and has the potential to improve control over test variables, lower testing costs and enable testing at higher speeds allowing for higher impact tests than a human operator can tolerate.

  10. Objectives and first results of the NASA SETI Sky Survey field tests at Goldstone, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Olsen, E. T.; Crow, R. B.; Downs, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives and preliminary results of the initial field tests of the prototype hardware and software for the NASA SETI program are reviewed with emphasis on the Sky Survey component of the NASA search strategy. In particular, attention is given to field test instrumentation, sky pixelation, sky survey field tests, baseline tests, antenna control tests, and radio frequency interference survey. The test results and observational experience will be used to finalize the design of the SETI Sky Survey processing system and to optimize the observational strategy and procedures in time to begin a full-scale Microwave Observing Program in 1990.

  11. Field test of 70 MW class superconducting generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Imai, Y.

    2002-03-01

    Super-GM and the Kansai Electric Power Co., tested a 70 MW class model superconducting generator in actual power system. The model machine, operated as a rotary condenser, was connected to a 77 kV commercial power grid through 77/6.6 kV transformers. It supplied 40 MVar of leading reactive power to the electric power system. The model machine showed an ability to operate steadily through all the tests and various load changes in the commercial electric power system. The test results proved that the small synchronous reactance of the superconducting generator enhances voltage stabilization and their leading reactive capacity is larger, compared with conventional generators.

  12. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  13. The German remote monitoring field test -- First results

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.; Neumann, G.; Rudolf, K.; Schink, F.J.; Johnson, C.S.; Martinez, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency strives to increase the efficiency of its safeguards by reducing the inspection effort without losing safeguards effectiveness. Remote data transmission may have a potential to automate routine safeguards. The German government sponsors a field trial to study technical and non-technical issues related to the remote transmission of safeguards and status data as well as mailing-in of data carriers. Major technical issues of the field trial are the authenticity and confidentiality of the remotely received data as well as the reliability of the transmission techniques and data storage on removable data carriers. Non-technical issues are related to the release of data including the timing of data transmissions. The field trial takes place in the commercial Ahaus Dry Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel with participation of Sandia National Laboratories. The paper describes the first results.

  14. Testing chameleon theories with light propagating through a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Mota, David F.

    2007-10-15

    It was recently argued that the observed PVLAS anomaly can be explained by chameleon field theories in which large deviations from Newton's law can be avoided. Here we present the predictions for the dichroism and the birefringence induced in the vacuum by a magnetic field in these models. We show that chameleon particles behave very differently from standard axionlike particles (ALPs). We find that, unlike ALPs, the chameleon particles are confined within the experimental setup. As a consequence, the birefringence is always bigger than the dichroism in PVLAS-type experiments.

  15. Introduction to Analog Field Testing - Duration: 9 minutes, 10 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  16. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Resor, Brian R.; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  17. Field tests of a circuit breaker synchronous control

    SciTech Connect

    Rajotte, R.J.; Charpentier, C.; Breault, S.; Le, H.H.; Huynh, H.; Desmarais, J.

    1995-07-01

    A circuit breaker synchronous control interface which controls the point-on-wave at which shunt reactor circuit breakers open or close has been developed and tested on Hydro-Quebec`s 735-kV power system. It takes into account the influence of outdoor temperature on the breaker closing and opening times. It is also equipped with a reignition and a high-inrush-current detection system. Opening tests at different preset arcing times were conducted and the arcing time range where there are no re-ignitions in air-blast breakers was established. The tests showed that the interface is a valuable device for the elimination of re-ignitions associated with the interruption of small inductive currents. Closing tests have shown that the interface is also useful for the limitation of high inrush currents by selecting an appropriate point-on-wave for circuit breaker closing.

  18. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for... endorsed). (7) A report, containing the measurements, their analysis and other results of the survey...

  19. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... will be unmodulated except for the transmission of a test-pattern on a visual TV transmitter, and for... endorsed). (7) A report, containing the measurements, their analysis and other results of the survey...

  20. Effects of spatially limited external magnetic fields on short sample tests of large-scale superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato; Takahata, Kazuya; Iwamoto, Akifumi; Satow, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junya; Hirano, Naoki

    1996-07-01

    To design a superconducting conductor for a large-scale superconducting coil, it is necessary to test short samples of a conductor made on a preproduction basis. For short sample tests of large-scale superconductors, it is difficult to get sufficient spatial uniformity using external magnetic fields because of the size limitations of test facilities. The effects of spatially limited external magnetic fields on short sample tests are discussed by comparing the test results for narrow and broad external magnetic fields. The authors tested short samples of pool-cooled 10 kA class superconductors using two kinds of split coils which are different in bore size. The measured recovery currents for the narrow external field are more than twice those for the broad field. It shows that the insufficient spatial distribution of the external field biases the stability measurements of superconductors.

  1. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  2. Experience with a mouse intranasal test for the predictive identification of respiratory sensitization potential of proteins.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, L; Basketter, D A

    1999-08-01

    The predictive identification of respiratory allergenic potential is an important primary step in the safety evaluation of (novel) proteins, such as the enzymes used in a range of consumer laundry products. In the past this has been achieved by assessing the relative ability of proteins to give rise to the formation of anaphylactic antibody in the guinea pig. Recently, an alternative model has been proposed which assesses the formation of specific IgG1 antibody in a mouse intranasal test (MINT), the assumption being that specific IgG1 antibody is a surrogate for anaphylactic antibody in the mouse. This procedure has undergone successful initial intralaboratory and interlaboratory assessment. In the present work, the MINT has been evaluated in a more thorough intralaboratory study using eight enzymes plus ovalbumin. While the data generated with a reference enzyme protein, Alcalase, showed good reproducibility, results with the remaining eight proteins led to estimates of their relative antigenic or sensitization potential several of which were at variance from those derived from the guinea pig/ human experience. In consequence, it is concluded that the MINT requires substantial further investigation before it can be adopted as a model for the assessment of the relative ability of proteins to behave as respiratory allergens. PMID:10506013

  3. Psychometric evaluation of the adolescent and parent versions of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT).

    PubMed

    Vadlin, Sofia; Åslund, Cecilia; Rehn, Mattias; Nilsson, Kent W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT) and its parent version (GAIT-P), in a representative community sample of adolescents and parents in Västmanland, Sweden. Self-rated and parent-rated gaming addictive symptoms identified by GAIT and GAIT-P were analyzed for frequency of endorsement, internal consistency, concordance, factor structure, prevalence of Internet gaming disorder (IGD), concurrence with the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents, 7-item version (GAS) and the parent version of GAS (GAS-P), and for sex differences. The 12-month prevalence of IGD was found to be 1.3% with GAIT and 2.4% with GAIT-P. Results also indicate promising psychometric results within this population, with high internal consistency, and high concurrent validity with GAS and GAS-P. Concordance between adolescents and parents ratings was high, although moderate in girls. Although exploratory factor analysis indicated poor model fit, it also indicated unidimensionality and high factor loadings in all analyses. GAIT and GAIT-P are suitable for continued use in measuring gaming addiction in adolescents, and, with the additional two items, they now cover all nine IGD criteria. PMID:26440139

  4. Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

  5. An Explication and Test of Communication Network Content and Multiplexity as Predictors of Organizational Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

    1991-01-01

    Examines the relationship between identification and communication using organizational identification (OI) as a theoretical framework for studying communication networks among incoming graduate students in three university departments of communication. Concludes that, irrespective of initial OI, stronger initial multiplexity predicts the growth…

  6. Laboratory and field testing of commercial rotational seismometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nigbor, R.L.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    There are a small number of commercially available sensors to measure rotational motion in the frequency and amplitude ranges appropriate for earthquake motions on the ground and in structures. However, the performance of these rotational seismometers has not been rigorously and independently tested and characterized for earthquake monitoring purposes as is done for translational strong- and weak-motion seismometers. Quantities such as sensitivity, frequency response, resolution, and linearity are needed for the understanding of recorded rotational data. To address this need, we, with assistance from colleagues in the United States and Taiwan, have been developing performance test methodologies and equipment for rotational seismometers. In this article the performance testing methodologies are applied to samples of a commonly used commercial rotational seismometer, the eentec model R-1. Several examples were obtained for various test sequences in 2006, 2007, and 2008. Performance testing of these sensors consisted of measuring: (1) sensitivity and frequency response; (2) clip level; (3) self noise and resolution; and (4) cross-axis sensitivity, both rotational and translational. These sensor-specific results will assist in understanding the performance envelope of the R-1 rotational seismometer, and the test methodologies can be applied to other rotational seismometers.

  7. Vegetative propagation of kura clover: a field-scale test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kura clover is a potentially valuable forage legume, but it has been underutilized. A major reason is the difficulty of establishing it from seed. Since kura is rhizomatous, there have been attempts to propagate it vegetatively, but no reports of success at the field scale. Two harvesting methods we...

  8. FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

  9. Laboratory and Field Tests of Ultrasonic Sensors for Precision Sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable function of sensors under rough field conditions is required for the development of variable-rate sprayers to deliver pest control agents to tree liners in ornamental nurseries. Two ultrasonic sensors were examined to identify how their durability and detection stability would be influenced...

  10. CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

  11. A field test of recursive calculation of crop evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods to calculate the evapotranspiration (ET) rate from field crops have been proposed, but few have convincingly demonstrated to be usefully accurate. The direct measurement of ET requires weighable lysimeters. However, the use of a surface energy balance to calculate ET requires a corr...

  12. Predictors of Olfactory Dysfunction in Rhinosinusitis Using the Brief Smell Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jeremiah A.; Mace, Jess C.; Buniel, Maria C. F.; Soler, Zachary M.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Associations between olfactory function to quality-of-life (QOL) and disease severity in patients with rhinosinusitis is poorly understood. We sought to evaluate and compare olfactory function between subgroups of patients with rhinosinusitis using the Brief Smell Identification Test (BSIT). Study Design Cross-sectional evaluation of a multi-center cohort. Methods Patients with recurrent acute sinusitis (RARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with and without nasal polyposis were prospectively enrolled from three academic tertiary care sites. Each subject completed the BSIT, in addition to measures of disease-specific QOL. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and clinical measures of disease severity were compared between patients with normal (BSIT; ≥9) and abnormal (BSIT; <9) olfaction scores. Regression modeling was used to identify potential risk factors associated with olfactory impairment. Results Patients with rhinosinusitis (n=445) were found to suffer olfactory dysfunction as measured by the BSIT (28.3%). Subgroups of rhinosinusitis differed in the degree of olfactory dysfunction reported. Worse disease severity, measured by computed tomography and nasal endoscopy, correlated to worse olfaction. Olfactory scores did not consistently correlate with Rhinosinusitis Disability Index or Sinonasal Outcome Test scores. Regression models demonstrated nasal polyposis was the strongest predictor of olfactory dysfunction. Recalcitrant disease and aspirin intolerance were strongly predictive of worse olfactory function. Conclusion Olfactory dysfunction is a complex, multi-factorial process found to be differentially expressed within subgroups of rhinosinusitis. Olfaction was associated with disease severity as measured by imaging and endoscopy, with only weak associations to disease-specific QOL measures. PMID:24402746

  13. Identification and field evaluation of pear fruit volatiles attractive to the oriental fruit moth, Cydia molesta.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng-Fei; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2012-08-01

    Plant volatiles play a key role in host plant location of phytophagous insects. Cydia molesta is an important pest of pear fruit late in the growing season. We identified and quantified volatiles from immature and mature fruits of six pear varieties by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Attractiveness of synthetic blends to adults based on gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) activity was investigated in both field and laboratory. Consistent electroantennographic activity was obtained for 12 compounds from headspace collections of the mature fruits of the six pear varieties. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among six odor profiles. Among the six mixtures, the mixture of 1-hexanol, nonanal, ethyl butanoate, butyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, hexyl butanoate, and farnesene (different isomers) with a 1:1:100:70:7:5:1:4 ratio from the variety Jimi and the mixture of nonanal, ethyl butanoate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, and farnesene with a 1:100:1:32:1:2 ratio from the variety Huangjin were highly attractive to both sexes in the field. However, male captures were much higher than those of females. Further wind tunnel tests proved that both sexes exhibited upwind flight to the lures, but only males landed on the source. Our finding indicates that mixtures mimicking Jimi and Huangjin volatiles attract both females and males of C. molesta, and these host volatiles may be involved in mate finding behavior. PMID:22730107

  14. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  15. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  16. Effects of Age and Cognition on a Cross-Cultural Paediatric Adaptation of the Sniffin' Sticks Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Marilisa Mantovani; Lees, Andrew John; Warner, Thomas T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of age and cognition on the performance of children aged 3 to 18 years on a culturally adapted version of the 16 item smell identification test from Sniffin' Sticks (SS16). Methods A series of pilots were conducted on 29 children aged 3 to 18 years old and 23 adults to produce an adapted version of the SS16 suitable for Brazilian children (SS16-Child). A final version was applied to 51 children alongside a picture identification test (PIT-SS16-Child) to access cognitive abilities involved in the smell identification task. In addition 20 adults performed the same tasks as a comparison group. Results The final adapted SS16-Child was applied to 51 children with a mean age of 9.9 years (range 3-18 years, SD=4.25 years), of which 68.3% were girls. There was an independent effect of age (p<0.05) and PIT-SS16-Child (p<0.001) on the performance on the SS16-Child, and older children reached the ceiling for scoring in the cognitive and olfactory test. Pre-school children had difficulties identifying items of the test. Discussion/Conclusions A cross-culturally adapted version of the SS16 can be used to test olfaction in children but interpretation of the results must take age and cognitive abilities into consideration. PMID:26267145

  17. Accuracy of phenotypic and genotypic testing for identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae and description of Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Arbique, Judy C; Poyart, Claire; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Quesne, Gilles; Carvalho, Maria da Glória S; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Morey, Roger E; Jackson, Delois; Davidson, Ross J; Facklam, Richard R

    2004-10-01

    We have identified an unusual group of viridans group streptococci that resemble Streptococcus pneumoniae. DNA-DNA homology studies suggested that a subset of these isolates represent a novel species that may be included in the S. oralis-S. mitis group of viridans group streptococci. We suggest that this novel species be termed Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae. A combination of phenotypic and genetic reactions allows its identification. S. pseudopneumoniae strains do not have pneumococcal capsules, are resistant to optochin (inhibition zones, less than 14 mm) when they are incubated under an atmosphere of increased CO2 but are susceptible to optochin (inhibition zones, >14 mm) when they are incubated in ambient atmospheres, are not soluble in bile, and are positive by the GenProbe AccuProbe Pneumococcus test. The bile solubility test is more specific than the optochin test for identification of S. pneumoniae. Genetic tests for pneumolysin (ply) and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (sodA) and identification tests with a commercial probe, AccuProbe Pneumococcus, do not discriminate between the new species and S. pneumoniae. PMID:15472328

  18. Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

  19. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  20. Identification of hyperelastic properties of passive thigh muscle under compression with an inverse method from a displacement field measurement.

    PubMed

    Affagard, Jean-Sébastien; Feissel, Pierre; Bensamoun, Sabine F

    2015-11-26

    The mechanical behavior of muscle tissue is an important field of investigation with different applications in medicine, car crash and sport, for example. Currently, few in vivo imaging techniques are able to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle. Thus, this study presents an in vivo method to identify a hyperelatic behavior from a displacement field measured with ultrasound and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques. This identification approach was composed of 3 inter-dependent steps. The first step was to perform a 2D MRI acquisition of the thigh in order to obtain a manual segmentation of muscles (quadriceps, ischio, gracilis and sartorius) and fat tissue, and then develop a Finite Element model. In addition, a Neo-Hookean model was chosen to characterize the hyperelastic behavior (C10, D) in order to simulate a displacement field. Secondly, an experimental compression device was developed in order to measure the in vivo displacement fields in several areas of the thigh. Finally, an inverse method was performed to identify the C10 and D parameters of each soft tissue. The identification procedure was validated with a comparison with the literature. The relevance of this study was to identify the mechanical properties of each investigated soft tissues. PMID:26602374

  1. Wide-field-of-view imaging spectrometer (WFIS) engineering model laboratory tests and field demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haring, Robert E.; Pollock, Randy; Cross, Richard M.

    2003-12-01

    The Wide Field-of View Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS) is a patented optical design allowing horizon to horizon imaging of the earth and earth"s atmosphere in the pushbroom-imaging mode from an aircraft or space platform. The design couples a fast, F/2.8, unobstructed all reflective telescope to an all-reflective three element imaging spectrometer using a unique field coupling mirror arrangement. Early laboratory demonstrations of the technology covered fields of view exceeding 70 degrees. The latest instrument, the incubator WFIS, demonstrate the field of view can be extended to 120 degrees. This paper summarizes the current ongoing work with the engineering model WFIS covering this field of view and a spectral range from 360 nm to 1000 nm. Also presented are the results of the latest laboratory and field demonstrations. The paper also identifies specific applications the technology is now addressing.

  2. Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

  3. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Stations Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technologys efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  4. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  5. Far-Field Antenna Pattern From a Near-Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plane/polar geometry simplifies measurement of near-field data for this antenna and allows a determination of far-field pattern by Jacobi-Bessel series expansion of data. Measuring probe is an undersized, dielectrically loaded and open-ended waveguide with a far-field pattern similar to that of a small magnetic dipole in its forward directions, making it unnecessary to rotate probe in direction similar to antenna rotation.

  6. Identification of normal and pathological posterior inter-malleolar ligament with dedicated high-field vs low-field MRI. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sutera, Raffaello; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonino; Padulo, Johnny; Thomas, Ewan; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim: the aim of the study was to determine an objective measure of detection of posterior inter-malleolar ligament (PIML) through a magnetic resonance (MRI) of the ankle with two dedicated scanners: high-field (1-Tesla: HMF) and low-field (0.2-Tesla: LMF). Methods: two-hundred subjects were randomly recruited for the study and then divided in two groups (HMF and LMF). We retrospectively evaluated the MRI of the ankle in the two groups of patients. PIML evaluation was performed globally and separately using different scan planes. Results: in HMF and LMF, the PIML was identified respectively in 55 and 11% of cases. PIML was classified as “indeterminate” in 28 and 57% of patients, and “absent” in 17 and 32% of patients. In HMF and LMF the isolated evaluation on the coronal, axial and sagittal planes allowed PIML identification respectively in 100 and 100%, 67.27 and 45.45%, 45.45 and 12.4% of cases. In 5 cases (4/5 of HMF) we also observed a posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) determined by the PIML, with ligament changes (5/5) and associated synovial reactions (1/5), and an arthroscopic confirmation was obtained in 3/5 cases. Conclusion: the presence of the PIML seems to be a possible cause of PAIS and the use of a high-field MR scanner seems optimal for its identification. PMID:25878981

  7. Sex Attractants of the Banana Moth, Opogona sacchari Bojer (Lepidoptera: Tineidae): Provisional Identification and Field Evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The banana moth, Opogona sacchari Bojer, is a ployphagous agricultural pest in many tropical areas of the world. The identification of an attractant for male O. sacchari could offer new methods for detection, study and control. RESULTS: A male electroantennographically active compound w...

  8. Combine computer simulation and field testing to solve problems

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzolo, A.B.

    1986-05-01

    The plant maintenance engineer faces the formidable task of ensuring that piping systems, foundations, machinery trains, process gases and liquids, etc., all interact in a safe, reliable and productive manner, when combined to perform a specific function. Unique problems often arise which only occur due to the interaction between various machines and structures. This article presents an approach to aid the plant engineer with problems of these types. The approach combines test and simulation, each complementing the other, to produce an effective, economical solution. The tools of testing include the familiar array of data loggers, analyzers and transducers. The tools of simulation are the powerful finite element programs such as ANSYS, NASTRAN, STARDYNE, SAP, and the powerful analog simulators such as the SGA compressor pulsation simulator.

  9. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  10. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  11. Pressure-interference testing of the Sumikawa geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Ariki, K.; Kawano, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Pressure interference tests have been used to determine the permeability structure of the Sumikawa reservoir. Interference tests between wells S-4 and KY-1 have indicated the presence of a very high permeability (140 md) north-south channel in the altered andesite layer. Pressure buildup data from well SN-7D have provided indications of a high transmissivity (kh {approx} 18 darcy-meters) reservoir located in the granodiorite layer, lack of pressure response in nearby shutin Sumikawa wells implies that the reservoir penetrated by SN-7D is isolated from the shallower reservoir in the altered andesites. The ''altered andesite'' and the ''granodiorite'' formations constitute the principal geothermal aquifers at Sumikawa. Pressure interference tests (wells KY-1 and SB-2, and wells KY-2 and SB-3) have also confirmed the presence of moderately high transmissivity ({approx} 2 darcy-meters) dacitic layers in the ''marine-volcanic complex'' formation. Because of its low vertical permeability, the ''marine volcanic complex'' formation constitutes an attractive target for the reinjection of waste geothermal fluids.

  12. Characterization of floating element balance for field panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsucker, J. Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Swain, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Multiple experiments were performed to investigate and characterize the uncertainty and bias of a through-hull flush mounted floating element balance designed to measure the hydrodynamic drag forces of biofouling and marine coatings on 25 x 30 cm test panels. The instrument is located in a wet well on the aft portion of a 27' Chris Craft Commander. Testing occurs over a series of speeds ranging from a Froude number of 0.50-2.20 on calm days (force 3 or less) in waters along the central east coast of Florida. Recent modifications have been made to the instrumentation in an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the system. This study compares frictional drag measurements of the floating element balance to those obtained using the Clauser chart and Preston tube methods for a smooth surface. Boundary layer velocity profiles are examined to understand the nature of the flow over the testing section. Roughness function values for 60 and 220 grit sandpaper were calculated from data obtained using the floating element balance. These values were compared with previous work to examine the overall bias of the methodology. Repeat measurements for a smooth panel were analyzed to characterize the overall uncertainty in the system. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research under grants N00014-10-1-0919 and N00014-11-1-0915.

  13. A Permutation Test for Unbalanced Paired Comparisons of Global Field Power.

    PubMed

    Files, Benjamin T; Lawhern, Vernon J; Ries, Anthony J; Marathe, Amar R

    2016-05-01

    Global field power is a valuable summary of multi-channel electroencephalography data. However, global field power is biased by the noise typical of electroencephalography experiments, so comparisons of global field power on data with unequal noise are invalid. Here, we demonstrate the relationship between the number of trials that contribute to a global field power measure and the expected value of that global field power measure. We also introduce a statistical testing procedure that can be used for multi-subject, repeated-measures (also called within-subjects) comparisons of global field power when the number of trials per condition is unequal across conditions. Simulations demonstrate the effect of unequal trial numbers on global field power comparisons and show the validity of the proposed test in contrast to conventional approaches. Finally, the proposed test and two alternative tests are applied to data collected in a rapid serial visual presentation target detection experiment. The results show that the proposed test finds global field power differences in the classical P3 range; the other tests find differences in that range but also at other times including at times before stimulus onset. These results are interpreted as showing that the proposed test is valid and sensitive to real within-subject differences in global field power in multi-subject unbalanced data. PMID:26936593

  14. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  15. Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

  16. Field tests for rational drug use in twelve developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hogerzeil, H V; Bimo; Ross-Degnan, D; Laing, R O; Ofori-Adjei, D; Santoso, B; Azad Chowdhury, A K; Das, A M; Kafle, K K; Mabadeje, A F

    1993-12-01

    Increasing efforts are being made to improve drug-use practices and prescribing behaviour in developing countries. An essential tool for such work is an objective and standard method of assessment. We present here a set of drug-use indicators produced and tested in twelve developing countries. We describe practical applications, which include the use of indicators to increase awareness among prescribers in Malawi and Bangladesh, to identify priorities for action (eg, polypharmacy in Indonesia and Nigeria, overuse of injections in Uganda, Sudan, and Nigeria, and low percentage of patients who understood the dosage schedule in Malawi), and to quantify the impact of interventions in Yemen, Uganda, Sudan, and Zimbabwe. PMID:7901689

  17. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  18. Analysis of field test data on residential heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, S. G.

    1980-12-01

    The computer program using field site data collected on 48 homes located in six cities in different climatic regions of the United States is discussed. In addition, a User's Guide was prepared for the computer program which is contained in a separate two-volume document entitled User's Guide for REAP: Residential Energy Analysis Program. Feasibility studies were conducted pertaining to potential improvements for REAP, including: the addition of an oil-furnace model; improving the infiltration subroutine; adding active and/or passive solar subroutines; incorporating a thermal energy storage model; and providing dual HVAC systems (e.g., heat pump-gas furnace). The purpose of REAP is to enable building designers and energy analysts to evaluate how such factors as building design, weather conditions, internal heat loads, and HVAC equipment performance, influence the energy requirements of residential buildings.

  19. Oil mining field test to start in East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    See, M.

    1996-11-01

    Before year-end 1996, PetroTech Resources Corp. (PRC) of Fort Worth, Texas, will begin mobilizing for construction of a non-conventional quaternary-oil-recovery project in Corsicana field, in Navarro County, Texas, some 50 miles SSE of Dallas. The project will involve construction of large-diameter vertical and horizontal access shafts for people and equipment to some 70 feet below the bottom of the 820-ft deep reservoir, then upward drilling of multiple oil production boreholes into the reservoir and collection of oil moving to a subterranean manifold by gravity drainage. PRC calls the process Mining-Assisted Petroleum Development (MAPD). Project background and the developer`s objectives are explained here, along with an overview of principal features of the proprietary process and basic equipment to be used by several contractors.

  20. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall... grant agreement. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0027)...

  1. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall... grant agreement. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0027)...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall... grant agreement. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0027)...

  3. Training Probation and Parole Officers to Provide Substance Abuse Treatment: A Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, John A.; Herie, Marilyn; Martin, Garth; Turner, Bonnie J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of field-testing a substance-abuse treatment protocol are reported. Ten probation and parole officers were trained in Structured Relapse Prevention, and 55 clients were treated. Incentives and barriers to treatment are highlighted. The use of this type of field test as a dissemination technique is discussed. (EMK)

  4. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  5. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. 35.2211 Section 35.2211 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee...

  6. The Major Field Test in Business: A Solution to the Problem of Assurance of Learning Assessment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jeffrey J.; Stone, Courtenay Clifford; Zegeye, Abera

    2014-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being asked by numerous sources to provide assurance of learning assessments of their students and programs. Colleges of business have responded by using a plethora of assessment tools, including the Major Field Test in Business. In this article, the authors show that the use of the Major Field Test in Business for…

  7. Evaluation of the Field Test of Project Information Packages: Volume III--Resource Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Salam, Nabeel; And Others

    The third of three volumes evaluating the first year field test of the Project Information Packages (PIPs) provides a cost analysis study as a key element in the total evaluation. The resource approach to cost analysis is explained and the specific resource methodology used in the main cost analysis of the 19 PIP field-test projects detailed. The…

  8. Wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer’s farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  9. The Major Field Test in Business: A Solution to the Problem of Assurance of Learning Assessment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jeffrey J.; Stone, Courtenay Clifford; Zegeye, Abera

    2014-01-01

    Colleges and universities are being asked by numerous sources to provide assurance of learning assessments of their students and programs. Colleges of business have responded by using a plethora of assessment tools, including the Major Field Test in Business. In this article, the authors show that the use of the Major Field Test in Business for

  10. Wireless GPS system for module fiber quality mapping: System improvement and field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless GPS system for module-level fiber quality mapping has been developed at Texas A&M University. In its complete form, it includes subsystems for harvesters, boll buggies, and module builders. The system was field tested on a producer's farm near Plains, Texas, in 2006. The field test identi...

  11. Field Test of Fiber-Optic Voltage and Current Sensors Applied to Gas Insulated Substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Y.; Abe, Y.; Kuwahara, H.; Yoshinaga, K.

    1986-08-01

    The fiber-optic voltage and current sensors applied for 84kV three phase type gas insulated substation (GIS) were tested in order to see the advantages of these sensors practically in adverse field condition. The application technologies and field endurance test results of the sensors are described in this paper.

  12. Field tests with a prototype duplicate microprocessor based governor for a hydro turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Ye, L.; Wei, S. ); Malik, O.P.; Hope, G.S.; Hancock, G.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Field tests have been conducted with a prototype duplicate microprocessor-based governor for a hydro-turbine. The control strategy used in the governor determines the control parameters using an intelligent self-improvement procedure for no-load and loaded conditions. A brief description of the control strategy and implementation, and the results of the field tests are described in this paper.

  13. Multibar sawless lint cleaner: fiber quality analysis after 3rd year of field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After two years of field testing a prototype spiked-tooth lint cleaner, the Multibar Sawless Lint Cleaner (MBSLC), a final year of field evaluation was conducted at commercial cotton gin in West Texas located approximately 30 miles Southwest of Lubbock, Texas.The cotton lint cleaner was tested in a ...

  14. Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

  15. Bias magnetic field and test period dependences of magnetoelectric hysteresis of particulate multiferroic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Hao-Miao; Ye, You-Xiang; Jiao, Zhi-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoelectric hysteresis behavior for four particulate multiferroic composites with different coercivities of magnetic hysteresis loops has been investigated, and the results show that the magnetoelectric hysteresis are deeply affected by the bias magnetic field and test period. The bias magnetic field dependence of ME hysteresis loops is associated with magnetic hysteresis loops, and the sample with large coercivity of magnetic hysteresis loops has high coercive field of magnetoelectric hysteresis loops. The test time hysteresis caused by fast varying bias magnetic field can be eliminated by prolonging test period. These findings provide some ideas not only for practical applications but also for the examination of magnetoelectric effect.

  16. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  17. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2012-01-01

    Many configurations proposed for the next generation of aircraft rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from the observers on the ground. However, the ability to predict the shielding effect and any new noise sources that arise from the high-speed jet flow interacting with a hard surface is currently limited. Furthermore, quality experimental data from jets with surfaces nearby suitable for developing and validating noise prediction methods are usually tied to a particular vehicle concept and, therefore, very complicated. The Jet/Surface Interaction Test was intended to supply a high quality set of data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions and jet flows to researchers developing aircraft noise prediction tools. During phase one, the goal was to measure the noise of a jet near a simple planar surface while varying the surface length and location in order to: (1) validate noise prediction schemes when the surface is acting only as a jet noise shield and when the jet/surface interaction is creating additional noise, and (2) determine regions of interest for more detailed tests in phase two. To meet these phase one objectives, a flat plate was mounted on a two-axis traverse in two distinct configurations: (1) as a shield between the jet and the observer (microphone array) and (2) as a reflecting surface on the opposite side of the jet from the observer.

  18. Validation of a field test to determine the maximal aerobic power in triathletes and endurance cyclists

    PubMed Central

    González‐Haro, C; Galilea, P A; Drobnic, F; Escanero, J F

    2007-01-01

    Objective To validate a field test to assess the maximal and submaximal exercise aerobic adaptation under specific conditions, for endurance modality cyclists and triathletes. Methods 30 male and 4 female endurance modality cyclists and triathletes, with heterogeneous performance levels, performed three incremental tests: one in the laboratory and two in the field. Assessment of the validity of the field protocol was carried out by the Student's t test, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) of the maximal variables (maximal aerobic speed (MAS), maximal aerobic power (MAP), maximal heart rate (HRmax), maximal blood lactate concentration ([La−]max) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)) and submaximal variables (heart rate, HR) measured in each one of the tests. The errors in measurement were calculated. The repeatability of the field tests was assessed by means of the test–retest of the two field tests, and the validity by means of the test–retest of the laboratory test with respect to the mean of the two field tests. Results No significant differences were found between the two field tests for any of the variables studied, but differences did exist for some variables between the laboratory tests with respect to the field tests (MAP, [La−]max, humidity (H), barometric pressure (Pb) and some characteristics of the protocols). The ICC of all the variables was high and the CV for the MAP was small. Furthermore, the measurement errors were small and therefore, assumable. Conclusions The incremental protocol of the proposed field test turned out to be valid to assess the maximal and submaximal aerobic adaptation. PMID:17178775

  19. Validation of a microRNA-based qRT-PCR test for accurate identification of tumor tissue origin.

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, Shai; Gilad, Shlomit; Benjamin, Sima; Lebanony, Danit; Dromi, Nir; Faerman, Alexander; Benjamin, Hila; Tamir, Ronen; Ezagouri, Meital; Goren, Eran; Barshack, Iris; Nass, Dvora; Tobar, Ana; Feinmesser, Meora; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Leizerman, Ilit; Ashkenazi, Karin; Spector, Yael; Chajut, Ayelet; Aharonov, Ranit

    2010-06-01

    Identification of the tissue of origin of a tumor is vital to its management. Previous studies showed tissue-specific expression patterns of microRNA and suggested that microRNA profiling would be useful in addressing this diagnostic challenge. MicroRNAs are well preserved in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, further supporting this approach. To develop a standardized assay for identification of the tissue origin of FFPE tumor samples, we used microarray data from 504 tumor samples to select a shortlist of 104 microRNA biomarker candidates. These 104 microRNAs were profiled by proprietary quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on 356 FFPE tumor samples. A total of 48 microRNAs were chosen from this list of candidates and used to train a classifier. We developed a clinical test for the identification of the tumor tissue of origin based on a standardized protocol and defined the classification criteria. The test measures expression levels of 48 microRNAs by qRT-PCR, and predicts the tissue of origin among 25 possible classes, corresponding to 17 distinct tissues and organs. The biologically motivated classifier combines the predictions generated by a binary decision tree and K-nearest neighbors (KNN). The classifier was validated on an independent, blinded set of 204 FFPE tumor samples, including nearly 100 metastatic tumor samples. The test predictions correctly identified the reference diagnosis in 85% of the cases. In 66% of the cases the two algorithm predictions (tree and KNN) agreed on a single-tissue origin, which was identical to the reference diagnosis in 90% of cases. Thus, a qRT-PCR test based on the expression profile of 48 tissue-specific microRNAs allows accurate identification of the tumor tissue of origin. PMID:20348879

  20. Test plan for the field evaluation and demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Winberg, M.R.; Thompson, D.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes test details of a full demonstration of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a mobile trailer capable of employing the use of soil fixatives, dust suppression agents, misting, and vacuum systems. These systems can perform a large number of contamination control functions to support the Office of Waste Technology Development (OTD) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) projects, transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval operations, and emergency response for hazardous and radioactive materials incidents. The demonstration will include both performance testing at the North Holmes Laboratory Facility (NHLF) and field testing in conjunction with the Remote Excavation System Demonstration at the Cold Test Pit. The NHLF will test operational parameters using water only, and the field demonstration at the Cold Test Pit involves full scale operation of vacuum, fixant, misting, and dust suppression systems. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the field demonstration are included in this test plan.