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1

A simple field test for identification of night-blindness  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple and replicable field test to measure dark adaptation time has been developed. It required a darkened room with a\\u000a 5 watt bulb covered with a piece of black cloth, a spherical white object of 22 cm diameter suspended vertically from a horizontal\\u000a string, a stool, a black curtain, a Maxwell electronic photographic flash unit and a stopwatch. The

Poonal Patel; Tara Gopaldas; Ira Pant

1989-01-01

2

Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

2007-08-01

3

The role of laboratory and field leaching tests in hazard identification for solid materials.  

PubMed

The use of various in vitro toxicity assays for testing environmental solid samples is dependent on the availability of reliable methods for the sampling and pretreatment of the material. This study focuses on the evaluation of leaching behaviour as a first step in the context of the toxicity testing of solid environmental matter. Spent shale, from oil shale retorting, was chosen as a suitable example of deposited solid waste material. For the generation of leachate in the laboratory setting, a standard two-stage batch-leaching test was applied to the samples of technogenic waste. In the field, a new type of lysimeter, which does not disturb the surface, was used for in situ leachate collection. The chemical composition of water extracts was found to be different under field conditions, as compared with the laboratory experiments. Thus, the hazard identification of a solid technogenic waste by in vitro toxicological tests applied to laboratory leachates would not be the best solution. The content of hazardous ingredients could be underestimated if only laboratory tests are used. For risk assessment concerned with solid waste materials, the generation of leachate by using field lysimeters is recommended. PMID:17411360

Kirso, Uuve; Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Urb, Gary; Laja, Margit

2007-03-01

4

Multi-level slug tests in highly permeable formations: 2. Hydraulic conductivity identification, method verification, and field applications  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.Using the developed theory and modified Springer-Gelhar (SG) model, an identification method is proposed for estimating hydraulic conductivity from multi-level slug tests. The computerized algorithm calculates hydraulic conductivity from both monotonic and oscillatory well responses obtained using a double-packer system. Field verification of the method was performed at a specially designed fully penetrating well of 0.1-m diameter with a 10-m screen in a sand and gravel alluvial aquifer (MSEA site, Shelton, Nebraska). During well installation, disturbed core samples were collected every 0.6 m using a split-spoon sampler. Vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity were produced on the basis of grain-size analysis of the disturbed core samples. These results closely correlate with the vertical profile of horizontal hydraulic conductivity obtained by interpreting multi-level slug test responses using the modified SG model. The identification method was applied to interpret the response from 474 slug tests in 156 locations at the MSEA site. More than 60% of responses were oscillatory. The method produced a good match to experimental data for both oscillatory and monotonic responses using an automated curve matching procedure. The proposed method allowed us to drastically increase the efficiency of each well used for aquifer characterization and to process massive arrays of field data. Recommendations generalizing this experience to massive application of the proposed method are developed.

Zlotnik, V. A.; McGuire, V. L.

1998-01-01

5

Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

1986-01-01

6

Field study on moving force identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A field measurement to validate a moving force identification method was carried out on an existing prestressed concrete highway bridge with a span length of 28 m. The test bridge is located at Ma Tau Wai, Kowloon, Hong Kong. A heavy 2-axle truck with known axle loads was used as a control vehicle. Besides the control vehicle, axle load data of in-service vehicles were also collected. The bridge responses acquired for the identification were indirectly measured using strain gauges. Results show that dynamic axle loads induced from both control and in-service vehicles can be identified indicating the method is valid for identification of moving forces.

Chan, Hung-tin Tommy; Yung, Tak H.; Law, S. S.

2001-08-01

7

Color identification testing device  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

1970-01-01

8

The female sex pheromone of sugarcane stalk borer, Chilo auricilius identification of four components and field tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four pheromonal components have been detected in ovipositor washings and volatiles from female sugarcane stalk borers,Chilo auricilius Dudgeon (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), using combined gas chromatography-electroantennography. The components have been identified as (I) (Z)-7-do-decenyl acetate, (II) (Z)-8-tridecenyl acetate, (III) (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate, and (IV) (Z)-10-pentadecenyl acetate by comparison of their gas chromatographic behavior with that of synthetic standards. In field tests carried out

Brenda F. Nesbitt; P. S. Beevor; A. Cork; D. R. Hall; H. David; V. Nandagopal

1986-01-01

9

The female sex pheromone of sugarcane stalk borer,Chilo auricilius identification of four components and field tests.  

PubMed

Four pheromonal components have been detected in ovipositor washings and volatiles from female sugarcane stalk borers,Chilo auricilius Dudgeon (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), using combined gas chromatography-electroantennography. The components have been identified as (I) (Z)-7-do-decenyl acetate, (II) (Z)-8-tridecenyl acetate, (III) (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate, and (IV) (Z)-10-pentadecenyl acetate by comparison of their gas chromatographic behavior with that of synthetic standards. In field tests carried out in northern India during 1982-1984, a combination of II, III, and IV in their naturally occurring ratio (8?4?1) was shown to provide a highly attractive synthetic source for trap use. (Z)-7-Dodecenyl acetate was found to reduce catches of maleC. auricilius, both when dispensed with the other three components and when released from dispensers surrounding a trap baited with the other three components. PMID:24307117

Nesbitt, B F; Beevor, P S; Cork, A; Hall, D R; David, H; Nandagopal, V

1986-06-01

10

Integrating field methodology and web-based data collection to assess the reliability of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT).  

PubMed

Field methodologies offer a unique opportunity to collect ecologically valid data on alcohol use and its associated problems within natural drinking environments. However, limitations in follow-up data collection methods have left unanswered questions regarding the psychometric properties of field-based measures. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the reliability of self-report data collected in a naturally occurring environment - as indexed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) - compared to self-report data obtained through an innovative web-based follow-up procedure. Individuals recruited outside of bars (N=170; mean age=21; range 18-32) provided a BAC sample and completed a self-administered survey packet that included the AUDIT. BAC feedback was provided anonymously through a dedicated web page. Upon sign in, follow-up participants (n=89; 52%) were again asked to complete the AUDIT before receiving their BAC feedback. Reliability analyses demonstrated that AUDIT scores - both continuous and dichotomized at the standard cut-point - were stable across field- and web-based administrations. These results suggest that self-report data obtained from acutely intoxicated individuals in naturally occurring environments are reliable when compared to web-based data obtained after a brief follow-up interval. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the feasibility, utility, and potential of integrating field methods and web-based data collection procedures. PMID:21724340

Celio, Mark A; Vetter-O'Hagen, Courtney S; Lisman, Stephen A; Johansen, Gerard E; Spear, Linda P

2011-12-01

11

FIELD DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TEST  

EPA Science Inventory

The EPA's OHMSETT facility has developed a rapid field test that includes some of the theoretical aspects and conditions of dispersion at sea. This Field Dispersant Effectiveness Test (FDET) has been used to evaluate the dispersibility of various commonly-transported oils and mak...

12

Automatic car identification: Tests in the Japanese national railways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two types of technologies of automatic car identification (ACI) under test in the Japanese National Railways are reported. Both of them use microwave at 2.45 GHz. In one year of field tests they yielded good results. The technologies are considered practicable as applied to all types of freight cars.

H. Inoue; Tetsuya Yuge

1982-01-01

13

Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection  

SciTech Connect

One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

2002-01-01

14

Automated bacterial identification by angle resolved dark-field imaging  

PubMed Central

We propose and demonstrate a dark-field imaging technique capable of automated identification of individual bacteria. An 87-channel multispectral system capable of angular and spectral resolution was used to measure the scattering spectrum of various bacteria in culture smears. Spectra were compared between various species and between various preparations of the same species. A 15-channel system was then used to prove the viability of bacterial identification with a relatively simple microscope system. A simple classifier was able to identify four of six bacterial species with greater than 90% accuracy in bacteria-by-bacteria testing.

Wilson, Benjamin K.; Vigil, Genevieve D.

2013-01-01

15

FSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

1981-01-01

16

Agent Identification and Preclinical Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter provides an overview of the preclinical screening assays and animal efficacy testing models currently utilized\\u000a by the drug discovery and development program of the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP), National Cancer Institute (NCI)\\u000a to identify chemical agents or natural biological products which may be efficacious in preventing human cancers. The first\\u000a step of the drug discovery process involves

James A. Crowell; Cathy J. Holmes

17

Identification of Progressive Glaucomatous Visual Field Loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

In normal individuals, visual field measures are not perfectly repeatable and individual test locations exhibit both short- and long-term sensitivity variations. This physiologic variability is greatly increased in glaucoma and confounds detection of real progressive loss in visual function. Distinguishing progressive glaucomatous visual field loss from test variability therefore represents a complex task. Procedures used for detection of glaucomatous visual

Paul G. D Spry; Chris A Johnson

2002-01-01

18

Multinomial group testing models with incomplete identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study reliable multinomial probabilistic group testing models with incomplete identification. We assume that every of the pooled items has none or some of k attributes, one of them causing contamination. Any group possessing this latter attribute is discarded, while the others are collected and separated according to the attributes that were found in them. The objective is to choose

Shaul K. Bar-Lev; Wolfgang Stadje; Frank A. van der Duyn Schouten

2005-01-01

19

Subcritical flutter testing and system identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Treatment is given of system response evaluation, especially in application to subcritical flight and wind tunnel flutter testing of aircraft. An evaluation is made of various existing techniques, in conjuction with a companion survey which reports theoretical and analog experiments made to study the identification of system response characteristics. Various input excitations are considered, and new techniques for analyzing response are explored, particularly in reference to the prevalent practical case where unwanted input noise is present, such as caused by gusts or wind tunnel turbulence. Further developments are also made of system parameter identification techniques.

Houbolt, J. C.

1974-01-01

20

LSA field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

Jaffe, P.

1980-01-01

21

CLASSIFICATION TOOLS FOR EFFICIENT IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF IMPAIRMENT: A FIELD TEST OF GEOGRAPHICALLY-DEPENDENT VS. THRESHOLD-BASED GEOGRAPHICALLY-INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES  

EPA Science Inventory

Current monitoring strategies for iotic ecosystems have focused on identification of either specific impaired stream reaches or regional incidence of impaired stream reaches, with little or no ancillary data collected to facilitate diagnosis of impairment, or extrapolation of res...

22

Identification of aircraft by Rockwell test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large number of tests were made on tubes of 1025 and 4130X steel, in various diameters and wall thicknesses, and after diverse heat treatments. The Rockwell B scale was employed, as being the best suited to the ranges of hardness encountered. Only satisfactory chrome molybdenum tubes were found to show a hardness in excess of 90-B after normalizing. The method therefore provided the desired means of identification of chrome molybdenum steel. It is a qualitative test only. The conditions of a satisfactory test are as follows. 1) The tubing must be normalized. 2) It must be clean inside and out at the point where the test is to be made. 3) The tube must be held in correct alignment with the penetrator and must not move during the test. 4) For thin-walled tubes, the anvil must extend within the tube so as to support the wall.

Knerr, Horace

1930-01-01

23

Identification of Aircraft by Rockwell Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large number of tests were made on tubes of 1025 and 4130X steel, in various diameters and wall thicknesses, and after diverse heat treatments. The Rockwell B scale was employed, as being the best suited to the ranges of hardness encountered. Only satisfactory chrome molybdenum tubes were found to show a hardness in excess of 90-B after normalizing. The method therefore provided the desired means of identification of chrome molybdenum steel. It is a qualitative test only. The conditions of a satisfactory test are as follows. 1) The tubing must be normalized. 2) It must be clean inside and out at the point where the test is to be made. 3) The tube must be held in correct alignment with the penetrator and must not move during the test. 4) For thin-walled tubes, the anvil must extend within the tube so as to support the wall.

Knerr, Horace

1930-01-01

24

Identification of progressive glaucomatous visual field loss.  

PubMed

In normal individuals, visual field measures are not perfectly repeatable and individual test locations exhibit both short- and long-term sensitivity variations. This physiologic variability is greatly increased in glaucoma and confounds detection of real progressive loss in visual function. Distinguishing progressive glaucomatous visual field loss from test variability therefore represents a complex task. Procedures used for detection of glaucomatous visual field progression may be broadly grouped into four categories: 1) clinical judgment, which consists of simple subjective observation of sequential visual field test results; 2) defect classification systems, whereby specific criteria are used to stratify field loss by discrete score and define progression as score change over time, such as the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study scoring system; 3) trend analyses, which follow test parameters sequentially over time to determine the magnitude and significance of patterns within the data, for example linear regression; and 4) event analyses, which identify single events of significant change relative to a reference examination. All of these methods demonstrate distinct benefits and drawbacks, making each useful in specific circumstances, although no single method appears universally ideal. At the present time the best method of detection of progression may be to rely upon confirmation of change at successive examinations and also by correlation of visual field changes with other clinical observations. Alternative analysis methods may become available in the near future to help identify cases of progressive loss. PMID:11918896

Spry, Paul G D; Johnson, Chris A

2002-01-01

25

The North Carolina Field Test  

SciTech Connect

The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

1990-08-01

26

Useful field of view test.  

PubMed

The useful field of view test was developed to reflect the visual difficulties that older adults experience with everyday tasks. Importantly, the useful field of view test (UFOV) is one of the most extensively researched and promising predictor tests for a range of driving outcomes measures, including driving ability and crash risk as well as other everyday tasks. Currently available commercial versions of the test can be administered using personal computers; these measure the speed of visual processing for rapid detection and localization of targets under conditions of divided visual attention and in the presence and absence of visual clutter. The test is believed to assess higher-order cognitive abilities, but performance also relies on visual sensory function because in order for targets to be attended to, they must be visible. The format of the UFOV has been modified over the years; the original version estimated the spatial extent of useful field of view, while the latest version measures visual processing speed. While deficits in the useful field of view are associated with functional impairments in everyday activities in older adults, there is also emerging evidence from several research groups that improvements in visual processing speed can be achieved through training. These improvements have been shown to reduce crash risk, and can have a positive impact on health and functional well-being, with the potential to increase the mobility and hence the independence of older adults. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:24642933

Wood, Joanne M; Owsley, Cynthia

2014-01-01

27

Identification of corn fields using multidate radar data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Airborne C- and L-band radar data acquired over a test site in western kansas were analyzed to determine corn-field identification accuracies obtainable using single-channel, multichannel, and multidate radar data. An automated pattern-recognition procedure was used to classify 144 fields into three categories: corn, pasture land, and bare soil (including wheat stubble and fallow). Corn fields were identified with accuracies ranging from 85 percent for single channel, single-date data to 100 percent for single-channel, multidate data. The effects of radar parameters such as frequency, polarization, and look angle as well as the effects of soil moisture on the classification accuracy are also presented.

Shanmugan, K. S.; Ulaby, F. T.; Narayanan, V.; Dobson, C.

1983-01-01

28

Performance Recertification Field Test Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These performance recertification field-test guidelines were developed for the State of Arizona. The functions of the performance recertification program are as follows: a) the determination of teacher effectiveness by student behavior and growth, utilizing performance objectives, b) the determination of teacher effectiveness utilizing other types…

Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

29

Field testing the wide-field-of-view imaging spectrometer(WFIS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide Field-of-view Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS), a high-performance pushbroom hyperspectral imager designed for atmospheric chemistry and aerosols measurement from an aircraft or satellite, underwent initial field testing in 2004. The results of initial field tests demonstrate the all-reflective instrument's imaging performance and the capabilities of data processing algorithms to render hyperspectral image cubes from the field scans. Further processing results in spectral and photographic imagery suitable for identification, analysis, and discrimination of subjects in the images. The field tests also reveal that the WFIS instrument is suited for other applications, including in situ imaging and geological remote sensing.

Haring, Robert E.; Pollock, Randy; Cross, Richard M.; Sutin, Brian M.

2004-11-01

30

Descent advisor preliminary field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

1995-01-01

31

Cryopumping field joint can testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

Johnson, Wesley; Fesmire, James; Meneghelli, Barry

2012-06-01

32

Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

2011-01-01

33

Pescara benchmark: overview of modelling, testing and identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The `Pescara benchmark' is part of the national research project `BriViDi' (BRIdge VIbrations and DIagnosis) supported by the Italian Ministero dell'Universitá e Ricerca. The project is aimed at developing an integrated methodology for the structural health evaluation of railway r/c, p/c bridges. The methodology should provide for applicability in operating conditions, easy data acquisition through common industrial instrumentation, robustness and reliability against structural and environmental uncertainties. The Pescara benchmark consisted in lab tests to get a consistent and large experimental data base and subsequent data processing. Special tests were devised to simulate the train transit effects in actual field conditions. Prestressed concrete beams of current industrial production both sound and damaged at various severity corrosion levels were tested. The results were collected either in a deterministic setting and in a form suitable to deal with experimental uncertainties. Damage identification was split in two approaches: with or without a reference model. In the first case f.e. models were used in conjunction with non conventional updating techniques. In the second case, specialized output-only identification techniques capable to deal with time-variant and possibly non linear systems were developed. The lab tests allowed validating the above approaches and the performances of classical modal based damage indicators.

Bellino, A.; Brancaleoni, F.; Bregant, L.; Carminelli, A.; Catania, G.; Di Evangelista, A.; Gabriele, S.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.; Sorrentino, S.; Spina, D.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

2011-07-01

34

Digital Audio Radio Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

Hollansworth, James E.

1997-01-01

35

Digital image correlation and biaxial test on composite material for anisotropic damage law identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the work is to extend the use of non-conventional tests and full field measurements to the identification of an anisotropic damage law. A Digital Image Correlation technique based on a finite element discretization is used to extract planar displacement fields. The reconditioned Equilibrium Gap Method is then used to retrieve a damage law that accounts for shear

Jean Noël Périé; Hugo Leclerc; Stéphane Roux; François Hild

2009-01-01

36

Field tests using radioactive matter.  

PubMed

During recent years, the assessment of possible radiological consequences of a terrorist attack associated with a release of radioactive substances (RaS) has been in the focus of interest of emergency preparedness and radiation protection specialists, as well as experts dealing with the dispersion of harmful substances in the atmosphere. Suitable tools for these analyses are applications of mathematical and physical models and simulation of this attack under 'realistic' conditions. The work presented here summarises the results of four tests, in which a RaS (a Tc-99 m solution) was dispersed over a free area with the use of an industrial explosive. Detection methods and techniques employed in these tests are described and values characterising the RaS dispersion--dose rates, surface activities in horizontal and vertical directions, volume activities, their space and time distributions and mass concentrations of aerosols produced after the explosion are presented and compared. These data will be applied to a comparison of outcomes of models used for the assessment of radiation accidents as well as in future field tests carried out under conditions of more complex geometry (indoor environment, terrain obstacles, etc.). PMID:20089512

Prouza, Z; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Michalek, V; Rulik, P; Skrkal, J; Hovorka, J

2010-06-01

37

DISTANT GALAXY IDENTIFICATION TECHNIQUE IN HUBBLE FIELD  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Series of four panels that illustrate the distant-galaxy identification technique. Four panels that show (top to bottom, or right to left when rotated correctly) F814W filter, F606W filter, F450W filter, and F300W filter images, or near-infrared through near-ultraviolet images. The identified galaxy is prominent in the near-infrared image but totally absent in any of the other images. It is this spectroscopic signature that identifies this galaxy as a very distant object. Credit: Ken Lanzetta and Amos Yahil (State University of New York at Stony Brook), and NASA

2002-01-01

38

Missile Aerodynamic Parameter and Structure Identification from Flight Test Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An extended Kalman filter algorithm for aerodynamic parameter identification from missile postflight data is developed and verified for realistic test conditions. The algorithm includes a general purpose six-degrees-of-freedom missile airframe model suita...

J. E. Kain C. M. Brown J. G. Lee

1977-01-01

39

Termiticide Field Tests-1989 Update.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For several years, organophosphate and pyrethroid termiticides have undergone field evaluation as treatments to soil for control of subterranean termites. These termiticides remained effective at some application rates for 5 or more years. Field data are ...

B. M. Kard J. K. Mauldin

1990-01-01

40

Improved Field Water Analysis Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three dip tests which had previously been developed for a candidate kit reported on in Technical Report No. LWL-CR-03B69 were sent to TECOM for testing. These tests were for chloride, alkalinity and hardness. The chloride and alkalinity partially met the ...

H. Rosen

1974-01-01

41

XG Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Field Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the results of field testing of the XG Radio system. In August 2006, the XG Radio system was field tested at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, in the laboratory, and at field locations in Northern Virginia. The XG Radio system uses dynamic spectrum sharing technology to determine locally unused spectrum, and then operates on these channels without causing

M. McHenry; E. Livsics; Thao Nguyen; N. Majumdar

2007-01-01

42

Field Project: Fossil Collection, Identification, and Report Writing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The primary purposes of this exercise are to assemble a collection of fossils in the field, to gain experience in fossil identification, to interpret the mode of life and environment in which the organisms lived, and to present this in a written format . This exercise is designed to sharpen the observational skills that are steadily developed during lab and integrate them with lecture concepts.

Leslie, Steve

43

Reinstatement of Context in a Field Experiment on Eyewitness Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This field experiment examines the impact of reinstating contextual information on eyewitness identification performance. Naive store clerks were asked to identify a previously encountered customer from an array of photographs. Context was reinstated by providing physical cues from the customer encounter and by instructing the clerk to privately recall the events leading up to the customer's purchase. When the customer's

Carol Krafka; Steven Penrod

1985-01-01

44

Inertia Parameter Identification from Base Excitation Test Dat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the purpose to further investigate and improve a method for the identification of inertia parameters, tests with flexible test structures have been carried out. Reference data for the inertia parameters were obtained from a Finite Element model and from conventional weighing and pendulum measurements. For the realization of the base excitation a six-axis vibration simulator was utilized. The base forces were recorded with a special Force Measurement Device (FMD), and the base accelerations of the test structures were measured by accelerometers. Each of the 3 translational and 3 rotational axes of the multi-axial test facility was driven by a sine sweep signal with an appropriate base acceleration input. The application of the identification algorithm to the measured data showed that an acceptable identification of mass and mass moments of inertia is possible. However, a highly accurate identification of the center of gravity location could not be achieved. The results of the analyses are discussed and the advantages and limits of the present method are pointed out. Recommendations for the practical application and improved center of gravity identification are given. Keywords: Inertia parameters, base excitation, multi- axial test facilities, vibration testing.

Fuellekrug, U.; Schedlinski, C.

2004-08-01

45

Collective Protection (ColPro) Field Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides the standard process for preparation, planning, conduct, and reporting for field testing of collective protection (ColPro) systems. This process is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of mobile and stationa...

2011-01-01

46

Assessment of odor identification function in Asia using a modified “Sniffin’ Stick” odor identification test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Odor familiarity is an important factor for odor identification but varies profoundly in different areas. The “Sniffin’ Stick”\\u000a odor identification test originates from Europe. Modification should be made before it can be used to assess olfactory function\\u000a in Asia. Replacement of some odorants with more familiar ones is a direct method of modification. The purpose of this study\\u000a was to

Chih-Hung Shu; Ben-Chih Yuan

2008-01-01

47

Contribution of Kinematical and Thermal Full-field Measurements for Identification of High Cycle Fatigue Properties of Steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Using kinematical and thermal full-field measurements for identification of mechanical parameters has become a very promising\\u000a area of experimental mechanics. The purpose of this work is to extend the use of non-conventional tests and full field measurements\\u000a (kinematical and thermal) to the identification of the fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel. A particular attention is\\u000a paid to the influence of

R. Munier; C. Doudard; S. Calloch; B. Weber

48

Identification of Blimp Dynamics via Flight Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A blimp is introduced as a stable platform for remote-sensing instruments required for unmanned aerial observation and surveillance. In order to develop flight control systems for a blimp, two series of experiments were conducted to identify flight dynamics: constrained flight tests, and indoor free-flight tests. This paper addresses the blimp configuration, experimental set-up, method for identifying dynamics, and the results

Takeshi Yamasaki; Norihiro Goto

2004-01-01

49

Candidate odours for a short form odorant identification test.  

PubMed

Measurement of olfactory function is difficult and despite the availability of validated olfactory tests these are not in common use in general clinical practice. The mismatch between self-reported olfactory function and objective test response is well known, thus the need for adequate assessment of olfaction is not disputed. We aimed to determine which if any odour in a commercially available olfactory test could be identified by 70 % or more of normal subjects with a view to developing a shortened screening test for use in general otolaryngology and non-specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. Hospital staff and medical students, under 50 years of age were recruited. The tests were undertaken in a quiet room of neutral odour. Subjects were asked to self-identify 12 odorants presented consecutively and to record how strongly they perceived the odorants on a 4-point scale. One hundred and four participants correctly identified the odorant in 466 (37.3 %) of the 1,248 individual odorant identification tests. Peppermint, fish and coffee odours were identified by 88.5, 79.8 and 69.7 % of participants, respectively, without the advantage of a choice of name prompt. These supra-threshold test odour stimuli were perceived as present in all of the individual odour identification tests, but correct identification of the test odour was very much lower for the other nine test stimuli. Peppermint, fish and coffee are odours that should be evaluated further for inclusion in a short form olfactory identification test in a British population. PMID:23389328

Mal, Ranjit K; Webber, Chris; Nunez, Desmond A

2013-09-01

50

Hypervariable regions of DNA for parentage testing and individual identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Four kinds of DNA probes that recognize hypervariable regions (HVR) were studied for parentage testing and individual identification. Allele frequencies and their confidence intervals among unrelated Japanese individuals were obtained. Codominant segregation of the polymorphism was confirmed in family studies. Two a priori probabilities were calculated for each HVR locus: the exclusion probabilities for an alleged father\\/mother\\/ child trio

Tsuyoshi Yokoi; Masayuki Nata; Toru Odaira; Kaoru Sagisaka

1990-01-01

51

Hypervariable regions of DNA for parentage testing and individual identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four kinds of DNA probes that recognize hypervariable regions (HVR) were studied for parentage testing and individual identification. Allele frequencies and their confidence intervals among unrelated Japanese individuals were obtained. Codominant segregation of the polymorphism was confirmed in family studies. Two a priori probabilities were calculated for each HVR locus: the exclusion probabilities for an alleged father\\/mother\\/child trio and for

Tsuyoshi Yokoi; Masayuki Nata; Toru Odaira; Kaoru Sagisaka

1990-01-01

52

Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify ...

J. S. Ahrens

1997-01-01

53

The "Sniffin' Kids" Test - A 14-Item Odor Identification Test for Children  

PubMed Central

Tools for measuring olfactory function in adults have been well established. Although studies have shown that olfactory impairment in children may occur as a consequence of a number of diseases or head trauma, until today no consensus on how to evaluate the sense of smell in children exists in Europe. Aim of the study was to develop a modified “Sniffin' Sticks” odor identification test, the “Sniffin' Kids” test for the use in children. In this study 537 children between 6-17 years of age were included. Fourteen odors, which were identified at a high rate by children, were selected from the “Sniffin' Sticks” 16-item odor identification test. Normative date for the 14-item “Sniffin' Kids” odor identification test was obtained. The test was validated by including a group of congenital anosmic children. Results show that the “Sniffin' Kids” test is able to discriminate between normosmia and anosmia with a cutoff value of >7 points on the odor identification test. In addition the test-retest reliability was investigated in a group of 31 healthy children and shown to be ??=?0.44. With the 14-item odor identification “Sniffin' Kids” test we present a valid and reliable test for measuring olfactory function in children between ages 6–17 years.

Schriever, Valentin A.; Mori, Eri; Petters, Wenke; Boerner, Carolin; Smitka, Martin; Hummel, Thomas

2014-01-01

54

Strategy for genotoxicity testing: Hazard identification and risk assessment in relation to in vitro testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes the proceedings of the September 9–10, 2005 meeting of the Expert Working Group on Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment in Relation to In Vitro Testing, part of an initiative on genetic toxicology. The objective of the Working Group was to develop recommendations for interpretation of results from tests commonly included in regulatory genetic toxicology test batteries, and

V. Thybaud; M. Aardema; J. Clements; K. Dearfield; S. Galloway; M. Hayashi; D. Jacobson-Kram; D. Kirkland; J. T. MacGregor; D. Marzin; W. Ohyama; M. Schuler; H. Suzuki; E. Zeiger

2007-01-01

55

Testing Large Structures in the Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

2009-01-01

56

Field Testing of Electrical Grounding Rods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 7-year program of field testing metal rods for electrical grounding was conducted. Single rods of galvanized steel, copper-clad steel, Ni-Resist cast iron, type 302 stainless steel, type 304 stainless-clad steel, zinc, magnesium, and aluminum were teste...

R. W. Drisko A. E. Hanna

1970-01-01

57

Field Testing Selected Micro Computer Software.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a study to test the feasibility of expanding computer use within the Montana business community, computer systems were field tested in four Montana small businesses. The four businesses were a newspaper, an advertising agency, a sheep and cattle ranch, and a private investment company. The companies employed from 3 to 20 persons. Three…

ECO Northwest, Ltd., Helena, MT.

58

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25

59

Identification of low density polyurethane foam properties by DIC and the virtual fields method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the identification of the mechanical behavior of low density polyurethane foam using digital image correlation (DIC) and the virtual fields method (VFM). First the so-called Iosipescu like bending/flexion tests in range of elastic deformation are presented, the elastic parameters will be extracted by a matlab toolbox called CAMFIT (download for free from www.camfit.fr), developed by authors' LMPF research group. Then the material in great deformation behavior is studied by a regular compression test on a rectangular block specimen. Many steps of load and deformed surface of the specimen will be recorded. The Ogden's law is applied to descript the kind of property. For all these kinds of tests, the full displacement fields are calculated by DIC software CORRELI, and the parameters will be achieved by using the virtual fields method.

Guo, Baoqiao; Pierron, Fabrice; Rotinat, René

2008-11-01

60

Field testing of aquifer thermal energy storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of field and laboratory studies of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) indicate both the problems and promise of the concept. Geohydrothermal modeling and field testing demonstrated the ability to recover substantial quantities of aquifer stored energy. However, the local hydrologic conditions play an important role in determining the recovery temperature and storage efficiency. Geochemistry is also an important factor, particularly for higher temperature ATES systems.

Kannberg, L. D.; Allen, R. D.

1984-03-01

61

Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation.

Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

1980-09-22

62

SOCK skimmer-performance and field tests  

SciTech Connect

The spilled oil cleanup kit (SOCK) skimmer has been developed to recover oil efficiently at sea under realistic sea conditions. It was designed to operate with typical oilfield work or supply vessels and to operate in seas with wave heights up to at least 8 ft (2.4 m). Field tests offshore New Jersey in April 1980 confirmed conclusions from 31/2 months' operating experience in a major offshore oil spill in 1979. In addition, the field tests were able to define more quantitatively the performance characteristics and efficiency of operation of this skimmer.

Fraser, J.P.; Clark, L.M.C.

1984-03-01

63

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement...Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as follows: (1) If...in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head...

2009-07-01

64

40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement...Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as follows: (1) If...in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head...

2010-07-01

65

Identification of Candida glabrata by a 30-Second Trehalase Test  

PubMed Central

Rapid (30-s) trehalase tests done with material from colonies of 482 yeasts suspended in a drop of trehalose solution on a commercially supplied glucose test strip were positive for 225 (99.1%) of 227 Candida glabrata isolates grown on either of two differential media, Candida ID medium or CandiSelect medium. The test was positive for only 3 (1.2%) and 12 (4.7%) of 255 isolates of other medically important yeast species grown on the same two media, respectively. A rapid maltase test done with a subset of 255 yeast isolates was negative for all but 1 of 64 trehalase-positive C. glabrata isolates, raising the specificity of the rapid testing for C. glabrata to 98.4 to 100%, depending on the isolation medium used. Rapid trehalase and maltase tests done independently in two laboratories with 217 yeast isolates showed sensitivities of 96.0 to 98.0% and specificities of 98.2 to 99.4% for identification of C. glabrata from colonies grown on Candida ID medium. The specificity was much lower because of frequent false-positive trehalose test results when the source of colonies was Sabouraud agar formulated with 4% glucose. We conclude that direct recognition of C. albicans as blue colonies on Candida ID isolation medium coupled with the performance of the 30-s trehalase and maltase tests for C. glabrata among the white colonies on this medium will allow the rapid presumptive identification of the two yeast species most commonly encountered in clinical samples.

Freydiere, A.-M.; Parant, F.; Noel-Baron, F.; Crepy, M.; Treny, A.; Raberin, H.; Davidson, A.; Odds, F. C.

2002-01-01

66

Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuel: Field Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes phase 2 of a Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) research project examining technical issues related to the usage of biodiesel in the state. The results of a small-scale field test involving the use of 20 percent biodiesel (B...

C. Strong D. Shukla

2004-01-01

67

Travinfo Field Operational Test Evaluation Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

TravInfo is a Field Operational Test (FOT) sponsored by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration. The goal of the project is to implement a centralized traveler information center to collect, integrate, and broadly disseminate timely and accurate traveler information in the San Francisco Bay Area. This evaluation plan describes the scope, methods, and procedures to measure the effectiveness of the project.

Randolph Hall; Y. B. Yim; Asad Khattak; Mark Miller; Stein Weissenberger

1995-01-01

68

External Flat Fields for Focus Tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This test is designed to take "uniform illuminated" pictures of the earth. These data will be used to characterize the WF/PC instrument signature for flat field corrections. Six frames are taken to try to obtain data with the proper exposure.

Westphal, J.

1990-07-01

69

Volunteers in Vocational Education. Field Test Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes four projects designed to expand the use of volunteers to improve vocational education in urban areas. Following an introduction, four sections look at the 12-month projects in Albuquerque, Philadelphia, Dade County (Florida), and Chicago that field tested a handbook for the design, implementation, and evaluation of…

Katz, Douglas S.

70

HVDC Circuit Breaker Development and Field Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growth of direct current transmission, the need and scope of application for a high voltage direct current circuit breaker have increased. This paper reports on the development of two different dc breaker prototypes and full scale field tests of these breakers on the ±400-kV, 1360-km long Pacific DC Intertie.

J. J. Vithayathil; A. L. Courts; W. G. Peterson; N. G. Hingorani; S. Nilsson; J. W. Porter

1985-01-01

71

First Astronaut- Rover Interaction Field Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first Astronaut - Rover (ASRO) Interaction field test was conducted successfully on February 22-27, 1999, in Silver Lake, Mojave Desert, California in a representative planetary surface terrain. This test was a joint effort between the NASA Ames Research Center , Moffett Field, California and the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. As prototype advanced planetary surface space suit and rover technologies are being developed for human planetary surface exploration , it has been determined that it is important to better understand the potential interaction and benefits of an EVA astronaut interacting with a robotic rover . This interaction between an EVA astronaut and a robotic rover is seen as complementary and can greatly enhance the productivity and safety of surface excursions . This test also identified design requirements and options in an advanced space suit and robotic rover. The test objectives were: 1. To identify the operational domains where the EVA astronauts and rover are complementary and can interact and thus collaborate in a safe , productive and cost- effective way, 2. To identify preliminary requirements and recommendations for advanced space suits and rovers that facilitate their cooperative and complementary interaction, 3. To develop operational procedures for the astronaut-rover teams in the identified domains, 4. To test these procedures during representative mission scenarios during field tests by simulating the exploration of a planetary surface by an EVA crew interacting with a robotic rover, 5. To train a space suited test subject, simulated Earth-based and l or lander-based science teams, and robotic vehicle operators in mission configurations, and 6. To evaluate and understand socio-technical aspects of the astronaut - rover interaction experiment in order to guide future technologies and designs. Test results and areas for future research in the design of planetary space suits will be discussed .

Kosmo, Joseph J.; Ross, Amy; Cabrol, Nathalie A.

2000-01-01

72

Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks...

A. Waters D. Weirup H. Hall A. Dougan D. Trombino

2004-01-01

73

Field testing of aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent field and laboratory studies of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) indicate both the problems and promise of the concept. Geohydrothermal modeling and field testing have demonstrated the ability to recover substantial quantities of aquifer-stored energy. However, the local hydrologic conditions play an important role in determining the recovery temperature and storage efficiency. Geochemistry is also an important factor, particularly for higher temperature ATES systems. Whereas available hydrothermal models are adequate to estimate the thermal performance of ATES systems, geochemical ATES models are still in their infancy.

Kannberg, L.D.; Allen, R.D.

1984-03-01

74

Tests identify oil-field polymers  

SciTech Connect

To help choose or monitor polymers for drilling and completing oil and gas wells, convenient test methods are available for the qualitative and, in some cases, quantitative assay of the major oil field polymers. A wide range of water-soluble polymers are being used in the oil field. Each polymer has its own particular application, attribute, and limitation. This paper discusses how the widespread use of tradenames and blends has led to the need for procedures that can both determine the qualitative composition in the product or blend and monitor the polymer level in the fluid.

Best, G.H.; Baird, J. (Kelco Div. of Merck and Co. Inc., San Diego, CA (US))

1989-10-01

75

RESULTS OF APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and are focusing on three toxicant groups (amm...

76

APPLYING TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES TO FIELD COLLECTED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Identification of specific causes of sediment toxicity can allow for much more focused risk assessment and management decision making. We have been developing toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods for contaminated sediments and focusing on three toxicant groups (ammoni...

77

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hietala, J. (Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Wendland, R.D. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Collins, F. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01

78

Ice slurry cooling development and field testing  

SciTech Connect

A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-07-01

79

Radiation detection field test at the Federal Express (FedEx) air cargo facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid

Amy Waters; Dave Weirup; Howard Hall; Arden Dougan; Dave Trombino; Gary Mattesich; Ethan L. Hull; Sally Bahowick; Alex Loshak; Jeremiah Gruidl

2004-01-01

80

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01

81

Bistatic radar sea state monitoring field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent advances in understanding the physical phenomena controlling the interaction of electromagnetic energy with the ocean surface have revealed the possiblity of remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean using bistatic radar techniques. The basic feasibility of such a technique operating at frequencies in the HF region (3 to 30 MHz) was examined during previous studies and hardware for an experimental verification experiment was specified. The activities have resulted in a determination of the required hardware and system parameters for both satellite and aircraft systems, the development, assembly, and testing of hardware for an experimental aircraft system, the development and initial testing of data processing procedures, and the conduct of an initial flight test experiment. Activities were devoted to completing the assembly and testing of the experimental hardware, completing the experiment planning, conducting a field test experiment, and the processing and analysis of the experimental data. Even though directional spectrum maps of the test area cannot be generated from the measured data, the hardware concept employed appears viable, and solutions to the problems encountered have been identified.

Ruck, G. T.; Kirchbaum, G. K.; Everly, J. O.

1975-01-01

82

Field tests using radioactive matter 2.  

PubMed

Results of field tests with explosive dispersal of a radioactive substance (RaS) are presented. The paper deals with tests exploiting artificial obstacles as a continuation and expansion of the tests used in this study performed in free area described previously. The essential goal of the tests was to estimate the distribution of the released RaS in the case of intentional abuse of radioactive sources and to get a set of data applicable to testing physical or mathematical models of propagation. Effects of different geometrical and meteorological conditions on the distribution of dispersed RaS were studied via the assessment of dose rate, surface and volume activities, aerosol mass and activity aerodynamic diameters. The principal results can be summarised as follows: the prevalent proportion of the activity of the radionuclide dispersed by an explosion (born by the blast wave and by air convection) is transferred to the detection system/collecting pads essentially within the first minute. Enhanced aerosol mass concentrations were also detected within the same period. The RaS carried by the blast wave passed through the polygon (50 m) within <1 s. An expected crucial impact of meteorological conditions at the moment of the explosion and shortly after was proved by the tests. PMID:22923250

Rulik, P; Prouza, Z; Hovorka, J; Beckova, V; Cespirova, I; Fronka, A; Helebrant, J; Hulka, J; Kuca, P; Skrkal, J

2013-04-01

83

Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR  

PubMed Central

The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans.

Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otavio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Silvia Dias

2010-01-01

84

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned

1992-01-01

85

Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

2001-01-01

86

Identification of Medically Relevant Nocardia Species with an Abbreviated Battery of Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several

Deanna L. Kiska; Karen Hicks; David J. Pettit

2002-01-01

87

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08

88

Development of a multiplex PCR test for identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7, and 12.  

PubMed

A PCR assay for simultaneous species identification and separation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 7 and 12 was developed. Primers specific for genes involved in biosynthesis of the capsular polysaccharides (cps genes) of serovars 1, 7, and 12 were combined with a species-specific PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with the serovar reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 183 Danish field isolates. For all typable strains, a complete correspondence was found between results obtained with the multiplex PCR test and results from the traditional serotyping methods. Among eight serologically cross-reacting strains designated K1:O7, seven isolates produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 1 and one isolate produced amplicons of similar sizes as serovar 7. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated using a collection of 126 strains representing 25 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae including 45 field strains of the phylogenetically affiliated species Actinobacillus lignieresii. All these isolates tested negative for the cps genes by the multiplex PCR test except for 6 isolates of A. lignieresii. Five of these isolates produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 7, whereas one isolate produced an amplicon identical to the cps gene of serovar 1. In addition, four isolates of Actinobacillus genomospecies 1 tested positive for the omlA gene but negative for the cps genes. The test represents a convenient and specific method for serotyping A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:18572332

Angen, Oystein; Ahrens, Peter; Jessing, Stine G

2008-12-10

89

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04

90

A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of

Anita Haug; Per Thebo; Jens G. Mattsson

2007-01-01

91

Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

Deficits in odor identification have been the most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predict these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ.

Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G.

2014-01-01

92

Sniff magnitude test: relationship to odor identification, detection, and memory tests in a clinic population.  

PubMed

Recently a novel measure of olfactory function, the Sniff Magnitude Test (SMT), was developed that relies on changes in inhalation in response to an odor. The relationship of this unique test to that of other olfactory tests has received little investigation. In this study, we assessed, in 132 patients presenting to a chemosensory disorders clinic, the relationship of SMT scores to those from 3 standardized psychophysical tests: the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a phenyl ethyl alcohol odor detection threshold test, and a short-term odor memory/discrimination test. SMT scores were roughly related to olfactory dysfunction categories defined for the UPSIT and correlated moderately with the other tests. Malodors (1% and 3% methylthiobutyrate [MTB], 1% ethyl 3-mercaptoproprionate) exhibited stronger correlations than nonmalodors (3% phenyl ethyl alcohol [PEA], 3% amyl acetate, 3% n-butanol) and elicited greater sniff suppression. In a principal component analysis, the SMT measures loaded on components different from those of the other tests, which loaded on a separate component. Anticipatory responses (i.e., smaller sniffs) occurred across trials for the first malodor (1% MTB), but not for the first nonmalodor (3% PEA), that was encountered. These results, along with those of an earlier factor analysis, suggest that sniff magnitude is influenced by odorant quality and intensity, as well as by cognitive factors. PMID:17488746

Tourbier, Isabelle A; Doty, Richard L

2007-07-01

93

Efficacies of rapid agglutination tests for identification of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains as Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed Central

Four commercially available rapid agglutination tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus were compared with the tube coagulase test for the identification of 300 methicillin-resistant isolates of staphylococci. Isolates tested included 207 methicillin-resistant S. aureus and 93 coagulase-negative staphylococci, collected from five medical centers. Strain variability was documented by phage typing and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results of rapid identification tests ranged between 82 and 86% sensitivity, significantly poorer than the 98% sensitivity which the tube coagulase test provided.

Piper, J; Hadfield, T; McCleskey, F; Evans, M; Friedstrom, S; Lauderdale, P; Winn, R

1988-01-01

94

Integrated Maintenance Information System: User Field Demonstration and Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of a field test and demonstration of the Integrated Maintenance Information System (IMIS). The IMIS project was an advanced development demonstration project which developed and field tested the technology to provide the m...

D. L. Thomas

1995-01-01

95

30 CFR 18.14 - Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof enclosures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.14 Identification of tested noncertified explosion-proof...

2013-07-01

96

Discrimination and Identification of UXO by Geophysical Inversion. Phase II: Inversion of Total-Field Magnetics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A dipole inversion method was developed and successfully applied to the discrimination and identification of unexploded ordnance using total-field magnetometry. A black-white classification of anomalies as ordnance/non-ordnance is not possible using magne...

S. D. Billings L. R. Pasion D. W. Oldenburg

2002-01-01

97

Long Range Science Rover (Rocky 7) Mojave Desert Field Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes current rover field testing activities of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and p resents results obtained to-date. These field tests were c ollaborative ac tivities between JPL engineers and a team of scientists from several universities and NASA centers. The broad objective of these field tests is to simulate, as closely as possible, realistic mission scenarios for

Samad Hayati

1997-01-01

98

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31

99

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field System for Nondestructive Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The device is for detecting subsurface irregularities in a metal sample. Pulsed electromagnetic fields of alternate long and short time duration are transmitted into the sample through a mask. A receiving coil detects the reflected pulsed fields from the ...

C. J. Renken

1966-01-01

100

Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

1981-09-01

101

The Mehrum Coalfire Test Field (MCTF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spontaneous self ignition of coal causes an immense emission of climate relevant gases and affects regional groundwater conditions in such a large scale, that it could not be even rough estimated. This problem occurs all over the world where coal is mined, stored or processed. Keeping these things and also global warming problems in mind, the extinction of such fires becomes a significant task for future climate and environmental protection. In the big arid coal mining belt of the northwest PR China the necessity of environmental as well as resource protection is now realized, leading to increased fire fighting activities. Mostly, the burning coal is partially removed, the surface is insufficiently sealed from oxygen and fire-zones are cooled with valuable fresh water. Such cooling of fire centers is often not sustainable because oxygen rich air may keep on penetrating through the soil surface and reach the cooled down coal which subsequently starts to burn again. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" numerical models are developed to simulate the propagation of underground coal fires in realistic scenarios. These models will be adapted to new data from lab and field experiments including multiphase transport and phase transition processes. The Mehrum test site is used to set up a small scale in situ coal fire experiment in order to validate and verify the codes as well as to better understand the coal fire genesis. The experiment will be carried out under usage of two coal heaps with a total volume of about 1 m3. At the bottom, a layer of hydraulic conductive coarse gravel has been built in. Within this layer, a special ventilation system for air supplying has been embedded. The exact amount of led in air is measured by high resolution flow rate devices. The coal lies directly above the coarse gravel layer. The heating source is located in the lower forth of the coal layer. Positions of other sensors (temperature sensors, electrodes for geoelectrical measurements, gas probing tubes) are based on first numerical results. The coverage consists of a 10 cm to 15 cm strong layer of sand (middle to fine sand). Extinction of the fire by application of water with additives (e. g. salt) and its implication for the underground convection can finally be tested with these installations.

Halisch, M.; Wuttke, M. W.; Hesse, Ph.; Han, J.; Kessels, W.

2009-04-01

102

A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

1988-01-01

103

The Smell Identification Test as a Measure of Olfactory Identification Ability in Schizophrenia and Healthy Populations: A Rasch Psychometric Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT; R. L. Doty, 1995) performance in 133 controls and 54 chronic, medicated outpatients with schizophrenia (SZ) using item-response theory modeling. Results show that UPSIT items contribute to 1 factor, cover a range of 8 standard errors of measurement, and articulate 3 ability levels. Although it is not difficult enough to

Kelly L. Minor; Benjamin D. Wright; Sohee Park

2004-01-01

104

Field Test of Two Spill Treating Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory effectiveness tests are described for four classes of spill-treating agents; solidifiers, demulsifying agents, surface-washing agents and dispersants. Many treating agents in these four categories have been tested for effectiveness and the resu...

1988-01-01

105

Nevada Test Site Field Trip Guidebook 1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was established in 1950 as an area for testing nuclear devices. Various geologic studies performed in conjunction with these activities as well as recent work on a proposed radioactive waste reposito...

H. A. Dockery F. M. Byers P. P. Orkild

1985-01-01

106

Wind load identification using wind tunnel test data by inverse analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The method for modal wind load identification from across-wind load responses using Kalman filter is presented and verified using the wind tunnel test data. The Kalman filter is utilized for the inverse identification from limited measured responses and the closed-form of Kalman filter gain in modal space is derived for different types of measured response solving the Riccati equation. The

Jae-Seung Hwang; Ahsan Kareem; Hongjin Kim

2011-01-01

107

A resource for constructing customized test suites for molecular biology entity identification systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a data source and methodology for producing customized test suites for molecular biology entity identification systems. The data consists of: (a) a set of gene names and symbols classified by a taxonomy of features that are relevant to the performance of entity identification systems, and (b) a set of sentential environments into which names and symbols are

K. Bretonnel Cohen; Lorraine Tanabe; Shuhei Kinoshita; Lawrence Hunter

108

Qualitative color test for rapid identification of the clay mineral groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

A color test based on the adsorption and oxidation of p-amino phenol on clay mineral surfaces has been developed for routine identification of the principal clay mineral groups, the montmorillonoid, illite or hydrous mica, and kaolin families. The new test has been found to compare favorably with other staining and color tests currently in use. The test procedure involves the

W. W. Hambleton; C. G. Dodd

1953-01-01

109

Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown that XYZ data derived from UAV photogrammetry has a similar practical accuracy to RTK GPS, which is commonly used for cadastral, topographic and engineering survey work. This means that UAV photogrammetry can, for the most part, replace GPS surveying as the main method of data capture for engineering projects, boundary mapping and topographical surveying. Aerial Photogrammetry, in conjunction with RTK GPS, can now be used for projects with a 1:200 map scale accuracy requirement.

Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

2013-08-01

110

The resolution of field identification fixed points in diagonal coset theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fixed point resolution problem is solved for diagonal coset theories. The primary fields into which the fixed points are resolved are described by submodules of the branching spaces, obtained as eigenspaces of the automorphisms that implement field identification. To compute the characters and the modular S-matrix we use ‘orbit Lie algebras’ and ‘twining characters’, which were introduced in a

Jürgen Fuchs; Bert Schellekens; Christoph Schweigert

1996-01-01

111

Developing, Field Testing and Calibrating a Word Analysis Skill Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rasch Model was used to define the word analysis skill variable and to develop, field test, and calibrate a corresponding test for grades 2-12: the Emory Word Analysis Skill Inventory (EWASI). Word analysis objectives focusing on content and hierarchical levels of difficulty were identified and field tested with 78 students, grades 2-12,…

Avant, Glen R.; O'Brien, Michael L.

112

STATE-OF-THE-ART FOR FIELD PERMEABILITY TESTING PROCEDURES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents the available technical information on field hydraulic conductivity test methods for soil liners. he methods discussed are currently used and readily available for determining the hydraulic conductivity of soils compacted ill the field. Hydraulic conductivit...

113

Industrial Sound Level Meter Magnetic Field Sensitivity Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The test procedure determines the effect of a magnetic field on industrial sound level meter measurements. Reported results include the magnetic field strength up to 1 oersted required to produce a zero reading at each attenuator setting of the industrial...

R. J. Koshut A. L. Dieffenbach

1976-01-01

114

Field Index Test for Estimating Liquefaction Potential.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of using a vane shear device as an in situ index test for evaluating the susceptibility of sands to earthquake-induced liquefaction was investigated. The behavior of sands placed at known densities in a laboratory test cell equipped with a...

D. R. Shields G. Castro J. W. France

1982-01-01

115

EAVE-East Field Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

EAVE-East is an untethered autonomous submersible being developed by the Marine systems Engineering Laboratory (MSEL) at the University of New Hampshire. The submersible underwent intensive development testing during the summer and fall of 1983. Results of these tests will be presented to specifically address the following: 1. Vehicle navigation capability; 2. Vehicle controllability; 3. Mass data storage and retrieval. The

J. Jalbert

1984-01-01

116

Nevada Test Site field trip guidebook 1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was established in 1950 as an area for testing nuclear devices. Various geologic studies performed in conjunction with these activities as well as recent work on a proposed radioactive waste repository are reported in detail in this guidebook and include studies on the structure, stratigraphy, geochemistry, and physical properties of the

H. A. Dockery; F. M. Jr. Byers; P. P. Orkild

1985-01-01

117

Organizational identification: Development and testing of a conceptually grounded measure  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is continuing debate in the literature as to how organizational identification (OID) should be conceptualized and operationalized. We present a new six-item measure of OID that includes both cognitive and affective components and that integrates the main dimensions of OID found in the literature. The new measure comprises three main subcomponents: self-categorization and labelling, sharing of organizational goals and

Martin R. Edwards; Riccardo Peccei

2007-01-01

118

Field Testing Robotic Follow-Up for Exploration Field Work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2010, we conducted a simulation of a robotic follow-up mission with a robot at Haughton Crater and mission control at NASA Ames. The test improved our understanding of how robots can help increase productivity and complement human crews.

Deans, M. C.; Bualat, M. G.; Fong, T.; Heggy, E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K. V.; Lee, P.

2011-03-01

119

Field tests of the mobile robot Sherpa.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper summarizes recent demonstrations of the transport capabilities, inside nuclear buildings, of the six egged robot SHERPA, developed by the CEA (Atomic Energy Commission) robotic team. Results of the tests carried out at Chooz-B and Trino Vercell...

P. Beaucourt P. Garrec P. Morganti B. Trouville P. Lucibello

1995-01-01

120

ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS FOR NEUROTOXICITY FIELD TESTING: PEARL II AND ALTERNATIVES  

EPA Science Inventory

Pearl II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. he battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event related slow brain potentials (CNV,P30O), and associated ...

121

Electrophysiological Systems for Neurotoxicity Field Testing: PEARL II and Alternatives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

PEARL II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. The battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event-related slow brain potentials (...

D. A. Otto H. K. Hudnell

1989-01-01

122

A Lightweight Pneumatic Coring Device: Design and Field Test.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A lightweight pneumatic coring device for use from relatively small research vessels was developed and field tested. The device consists of an aluminum frame supporting a core barrel surmounted by a pneumatic industrial vibrator. Tests of a number of pair...

J. A. Fuller E. P. Meisburger

1982-01-01

123

Field Testing of an Orthotropic Bridge.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field measurements of static live-load strains and deflections of an 88-ft 4-in simple-span orthotropic-plate-deck bridge are compared with a theoretical analysis that represents the structure as a planar grid. Design values based upon the AISC design man...

R. J. Kissane

1975-01-01

124

Analysis of a reactive agility field test.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to evaluate a reactive agility test by determining the relationships between the total time recorded for the test and various components. A tester used side-step movements to provide a stimulus for the athlete to change direction. By using electronic timing and high speed video analysis of the test, three times were recorded. These were the time taken for the tester to display the stimulus to change direction (tester time), the time taken by the participant to respond to the stimulus (decision time), and the time taken by the participant to change direction and sprint to the left or right (response movement time). Thirty-one semi-professional Australian Rules football players were assessed by analysing the mean of eight trials of the reactive agility test. The greatest correlation with total time was r=0.77 for decision time (p=0.00), with movement time and tester time producing coefficients of 0.59 (p=0.00) and 0.37 (p=0.04), respectively. The coefficient of variation for the mean tester time was 5.1%. It was concluded that perceptual skill as measured by decision time is an important component of the reactive agility test and the tester time should be controlled by using high speed video recordings to isolate its influence. PMID:19576850

Young, Warren B; Willey, Ben

2010-05-01

125

Rotorcraft derivative identification from analytical models and flight test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A general procedure is presented for systematic development of rotorcraft models for use in systems identification, which includes fuselage and rotor degrees of freedom (DOF). Formulations for rigid blade flap and lag as well as the normal mode representation of an elastic blade are developed for hingeless and articulated rotor systems. The method of multiblade coordinates is used to obtain linear constant coefficient state variable models of various levels of approximation. Two of the approximate models, a 6 DOF, are identified from a nonlinear articulated helicopter computer simulation. The results demonstrate the accuracy attainable for each model. Advanced results outline the status of rotorcraft modeling and systems identification and indicate areas that require further investigation.

Molusis, J. A.

1975-01-01

126

Field Tests, Balloons, Aircraft, and Upcoming Missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 1964, two engineers from Martin Marietta ran in circles through a Colorado wheat field with a handmade balsa wood and paper\\u000a glider. The model was a perfectly scaled mock-up of a reentry vehicle they had been working on for several months. Their stubby\\u000a “lifting-body” was a precursor to the modern space shuttles, and they wanted to see how it

Michael Carroll

127

Field testing of a crossflow water turbine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to design, construct and test a small low-cost crossflow water turbine with the possibility of introducing a similar design to rural villages in the tropics. The turbine was constructed out of discarded aluminum plates. It was designed with an interchangeable runner. Four 6-inch runners with 10, 15, 20 and 30 blades each were constructed.

Tongco

1988-01-01

128

Field additivity of the middle-wavelength cone pathway under various test and field configurations.  

PubMed

The field additivity of the M-cone pathway was measured with psychometric functions at 10 times absolute threshold on monochromatic fields and their mixtures. Observers detected a 500 nm test on 530 or 610 nm fields, and a 530 nm test on 481 or 622 nm fields. For both sets of wavelengths, field additivity held with the 1 deg test, 10 deg field condition which defines II-4 and with the 3.6 min are test on a 8.6 min arc field used to isolate the M fundamental by Stockman [(1983) Ph. D. thesis, Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge]. Sub-additivity occurred for a 1 deg test on a 1 deg field, a condition for Foster's "spectral sharpening" which may evince opponency. PMID:7900299

Schirillo, J A; Reeves, A

1995-03-01

129

Magnetic Field Exposure in a Nondestructive Testing Operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nondestructive testing is any technique used to inspect the integrity of a manufactured item without diminishing its future usefulness. Magnetic particle inspection is one type of nondestructive testing that uses electromagnetism in the inspection procedure, thus potentially exposing the operator to magnetic fields. During magnetic particle inspection, investigators took peak magnetic field measurements of 8 turbine engine shafts at a

Julia F. Lippert; Steven E. Lacey; Kathleen J. Kennedy; Nurtan A. Esmen; Jeanine M. Buchanich; Gary M. Marsh

2007-01-01

130

Optimal Group Testing with Processing Times and Incomplete Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the group testing problem for a finite population of possibly defective items with the objective of sampling a prespecified demanded number of nondefective items at minimum cost. Group testing means that items can be pooled and tested together; if the group comes out clean, all items in it are nondefective, while a “contaminated” group is scrapped. Every test

Shaul K. Bar-Lev; Wolfgang Stadje; Frank A. van der Duyn Schouten

2004-01-01

131

Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

2011-05-01

132

OPCW Proficiency Test: a practical approach also for interlaboratory test on detection and identification of pesticides in environmental matrices.  

PubMed

An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

Konopski, Leszek; Liu, Pingfeng; Wuryani, Wuri; Sliwakowski, Maciej

2014-01-01

133

Identification and Characterization of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates by PCR and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis  

PubMed Central

Approximately 550 to 600 yersiniosis patients are reported annually in Sweden. Although pigs are thought to be the main reservoir of food-borne pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, the role of pork meat as a vehicle for transmission to humans is still unclear. Pork meat collected from refrigerators and local shops frequented by yersiniosis patients (n = 48) were examined for the presence of pathogenic Yersinia spp. A combined culture and PCR method was used for detection, and a multiplex PCR was developed and evaluated as a tool for efficient identification of pathogenic food and patient isolates. The results obtained with the multiplex PCR were compared to phenotypic test results and confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 118 pork products (91 raw and 27 ready-to-eat) were collected. Pathogenic Yersinia spp. were detected by PCR in 10% (9 of 91) of the raw pork samples (loin of pork, fillet of pork, pork chop, ham, and minced meat) but in none of the ready-to-eat products. Isolates of Y. enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3 were recovered from six of the PCR-positive raw pork samples; all harbored the virulence plasmid. All isolates were recovered from food collected in shops and, thus, none were from the patients' home. When subjected to PFGE, the six isolates displayed four different NotI profiles. The same four NotI profiles were also present among isolates recovered from the yersiniosis patients. The application of a multiplex PCR was shown to be an efficient tool for identification of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates in naturally contaminated raw pork.

Thisted Lambertz, S.; Danielsson-Tham, M.-L.

2005-01-01

134

FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

1983-01-01

135

Nevada Test Site field trip guidebook 1984  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was established in 1950 as an area for testing nuclear devices. Various geologic studies performed in conjunction with these activities as well as recent work on a proposed radioactive waste repository are reported in detail in this guidebook and include studies on the structure, stratigraphy, geochemistry, and physical properties of the rocks at NTS. The oldest sequence of rocks exposed in the NTS region is comprised of late Precambrian to Permian miogeoclinal rocks which were subsequently deformed during Jura-Cretaceous contraction, probably related to the Sevier orogeny. These rocks were then locally intruded by late Mesozoic (approx.93 m.y.BP) plutonic rocks related to the Sierra Nevada batholith. Voluminous calcalkaline ash-flow tuffs and associated volcanic rocks originating from the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex were extruded over much of NTS and adjacent areas from approx.16 to 10 m.y.BP. Peralkaline rocks intercalated in the volcanic sequence issued from both Silent Canyon (15 to 13 m.y.BP) and Black Mountain (9 to 7 m.y.BP) volcanic centers. The youngest igneous rocks at NTS are composed of basaltic rocks, primarily hawaiite, the older of which are associated with the evolving silicic volcanic centers and the younger associated with Cenozoic regional extension. Late Tertiary to Recent alluvium derived from the ranges form large, coalescing fans which fill the basins with sediments and reach thicknesses of over 1 km. 45 refs., 21 figs.

Dockery, H.A.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Orkild, P.P. (comps.)

1985-04-01

136

FSA field test report, 1980-1982  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is rgained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150/sup 0/C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

Maxwell, H.G.; Grimmett, C.A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P.O.; Amy, J.A.

1983-04-15

137

Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

1993-01-01

138

Identification of Flutter Derivatives of Bridge Dec ks in Wind Tunnel Test by Stochastic Subspace Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problem statement: Flutter derivatives are the essential parameters i n the estimations of the flutter critical wind velocity and the response s of long-span cable supported bridges. These derivatives can be experimentally estimated from wi nd tunnel test results. Generally, wind tunnel test methods can be divided into free decay test and buf feting test. Compared with the free decay

T. Janesupasaeree; V. Boonyapinyo

2009-01-01

139

Group Testing Models with Processing Times and Incomplete Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider the group testing problem for a finite population of possibly defective items with the objective of sampling a prespecified demanded number of nondefective items at minimum cost.Group testing means that items can be pooled and tested together; if the group comes out clean, all items in it are nondefective, while a \\

S. K. Bar-Lev; W. Stadje

2002-01-01

140

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collision with terawatt pulses of 1,054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Physics Dept.; E-144 Collaboration

1996-10-01

141

Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

2002-01-01

142

A low-power CMOS integrated circuit for field-powered radio frequency identification tags  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cheap, compact radio frequency identification (RFID) tags will make a wide range of new applications cost-effective. Minimum cost can be achieved only in a passive tag (that acquires operating power from the interrogating RF field). A compact tag form factor demands a small tag antenna, that in turn demands either external components or a high-frequency RF carrier for effective tag

D. Friedman; H. Heinreich; D.-W. Duan

1997-01-01

143

Identification of large masses of citrus fruit and rice fields in eastern Spain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ERTS-1 imagery has been successfully used for the identification of large areas of citrus groves and rice fields in the Valencia region of Eastern Spain. Results are encouraging and will facilitate the elaboration of a land use map with a fair degree of definition once methods prove to be fully operational.

Desagredo, F. L.; Salinas, F. G.

1973-01-01

144

DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING FIELD PORTABLE AND AIRBORNE REMOTE IMAGING SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Remote sensing technologies are a class of instrument and sensor systems that include laser imageries, imaging spectrometers, and visible to thermal infrared cameras. These systems have been successfully used for gas phase chemical compound identification in a variety of field e...

145

Gifted Identification Beyond the IQ Test: Rating Scales and Other Assessment Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes rating scales and other tests and procedures used in gifted identification aside from traditional intelligence\\u000a tests (see Newman, this volume, for discussion of IQ tests). The chapter highlights how a psychologist’s conception of giftedness\\u000a should guide the particular tests and procedures that one selects in conducting a gifted evaluation. The chapter very briefly\\u000a describes a variety of

Steven I. Pfeiffer; Samara Blei

146

Developmental validation of a novel lateral flow strip test for rapid identification of human blood (Rapid Stain Identification--Blood).  

PubMed

Human blood is the body fluid most commonly encountered at crime scenes, and blood detection may aid investigators in reconstructing what occurred during a crime. In addition, blood detection can help determine which items of evidence should be processed for DNA-STR testing. Unfortunately, many common substances can cause red-brown stains that resemble blood. Furthermore, many current human blood detection methods are presumptive and prone to false positive results. Here, the developmental validation of a new blood identification test, Rapid Stain Identification--Blood (RSID--Blood), is described. RSID--Blood utilizes two anti-glycophorin A (red blood cell membrane specific protein) monoclonal antibodies in a lateral flow strip test format to detect human blood. We present evidence demonstrating that this test is accurate, reproducible, easy to use, and highly specific for human blood. Importantly, RSID--Blood does not cross-react with ferret, skunk, or primate blood and exhibits no high-dose hook effect. Also, we describe studies on the sensitivity, body fluid specificity, and species specificity of RSID--Blood. In addition, we show that the test can detect blood from a variety of forensic exhibits prior to processing for DNA-STR analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that RSID--Blood is effective and useful for the detection of human blood on forensic exhibits, and offers improved blood detection when compared to other currently used methods. PMID:19083828

Schweers, Brett A; Old, Jennifer; Boonlayangoor, P W; Reich, Karl A

2008-06-01

147

Multiple boundary condition test (MBCT) - Identification with mode shapes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multiple boundary condition test (MBCT) approach is a ground test method to test a class of large flexible structures which cannot be ground tested by state-of-the-art test methods due to the adverse terrestrial environment. The ultimate objective of a ground test is considered to be the validation and update of a mathematical model of the structure. The research to date has indicated the MBCT does work on numerical simulations and on experimental laboratory hardware. To date only the eigenvalue has been used in the model correlation/update by inclusion of the information in the nonlinear terms resulting from the difference between the analytical and measured eigenvectors. This paper presents the results of utilizing additional information, namely the difference in the analytical and the test eigenvectors, in the validation and update of the mathematical model.

Kuo, C. P.; Wada, B. K.

1988-01-01

148

Specific incremental field test for aerobic fitness in tennis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To compare metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses between subjects undergoing incremental treadmill (non-specific) and tennis field based (sport specific) tests.Methods: Nine junior competitive tennis players randomly performed two incremental protocols to exhaustion: a treadmill test (TT) and a tennis specific fitness test (FT). The FT consisted of repeated displacements replicating the game of tennis at increasing speed on a court.

O Girard; R Chevalier; F Leveque; J P Micallef; G P Millet

2006-01-01

149

Adaptive cruise control field operational test—the learning phase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) provides extended functionality in comparison to conventional cruise control. A radar sensor makes it possible to regulate the distance to preceding vehicles automatically.A field operational test with 15 test persons was performed, in which each participant used a prototype test vehicle over a period of four weeks.Different methods were used for data acquisition. Questionnaires and interviews

Markus Weinberger; Hermann Winner; Heiner Bubb

2001-01-01

150

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

SciTech Connect

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Gestionale, Politecnico di Bari, Viale Japigia 182, 70126 Bari (Italy); Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Rue Saint Dominique, BP508, 51006 Chalons en Champagne (France)

2011-01-17

151

Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto-plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

Tattoli, F.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Casavola, C.; Pappalettere, C.

2011-01-01

152

Evaluation of the VITEK 2 gram positive (GP) microbial identification test card: collaborative study.  

PubMed

A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the VITEK 2 Gram Positive (GP) identification card for use with the VITEK 2 automated microbial identification system. The GP test card is used in the identification of selected Gram positive organisms, including Listeria and Staphylococcus species. The VITEK 2 GP card is based on 43 biochemical tests measuring carbon source utilization, inhibition and resistance, and enzymatic activities. A total of 20 laboratories representing government, industry, and private testing laboratories throughout the United States participated. In this study, 720 Gram-positive inclusivity isolates were analyzed by the GP Identification method. Of the 720 well-characterized isolates, 714 were identified correctly, zero were misidentified, zero were unidentified, and six were not characterized as a Gram-positive organism by the VITEK 2 GP method. Additionally, 120 strains exclusive of Gram-positive organisms were screened by Gram stain. A total of 106 isolates were correctly excluded. Fourteen organisms were incorrectly characterized by Gram stain procedures, thus resulting in improper analysis and misidentification by VITEK GP. The VITEK 2 GP identification method is an acceptable automated method for the rapid identification of selected Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23175976

Crowley, Erin; Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Goetz, Katherine; Boyle, Megan; Benzinger, M Joseph; Juenger, Marc; Agin, James; Goins, David; Johnson, Ronald L

2012-01-01

153

Biochemical and Susceptibility Tests Useful for Identification of Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Rods  

PubMed Central

Six hundred nineteen strains of nonfermenting gram-negative rods were tested for alkaline phosphatase, benzyl-arginine arylamidase, pyrrolidonyl arylamidase, ethylene glycol acidification, and susceptibility to desferrioxamine and colistin. The results were highly discriminant. Therefore, the proposed tests may be helpful for the identification of this group of organisms.

Laffineur, Kim; Janssens, Michele; Charlier, Jacqueline; Avesani, Veronique; Wauters, Georges; Delmee, Michel

2002-01-01

154

Development of a polymerase chain reaction-probe test for identification of Alloiococcus otitis.  

PubMed Central

A rapid polymerase chain reaction test was developed for specific identification of the human middle ear pathogen Alloiococcus otitis. Primers for the enzymatic amplification reaction were designed from highly specific sequences within the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, a confirmatory test based on hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction products to a specific internal probe was developed. Images

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1992-01-01

155

A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.  

PubMed

The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol. PMID:24237835

Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

2013-11-01

156

FERA in parameter identification with application in low speed wind tunnel test  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new approach which consists of a fuzzified eigensystem realization algorithm (FERA) to identify the parameters of the designed mini-UAV model performance in the low speed wind tunnel (LSWT) power on testing system. On the basis of the identification scheme, it is able to reduce system operational cost of wind tunnel tests and provide a tool for

Ching-Huei Huang; Chun-Liang Lin; Maw-Jy Chao

2011-01-01

157

Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In today's educational system, most science and engineering graduate students enter teaching careers with little or no teaching experience, and then are buried with so many competing responsibilities that their teaching skills take many years to improve. At the same time, incoming college students bring years of accumulated learning experiences (and attitudes) to their learning expectations. This Website offers classroom-tested methods for assessing the learning environment in college classrooms -- the first step to better teaching AND learning. Provided by the National Institute for Science Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the FLAG Website is intended for college and university instructors in the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) disciplines. The Guide offers up-to-date assessment tools "for instructors who have an interest in sharing and implementing new approaches to evaluating student learning, attitudes and performance." Four main sections encompass the site's main objectives and resources. For an explanation of why assessment is useful and necessary, see Getting Started. Setting course goals and matching those goals with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT)s are described in the subsequent sections; discipline-specific assessment techniques are contained in Searchable Tools; and the Resources section provides additional materials on assessment. This Website offers excellent and much-needed material, and will be useful to any educators (new or seasoned) who wish to improve their class learning levels.

158

Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

2006-01-01

159

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2009-07-01

160

40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...equipment for field testing. For field testing you may use various...exhaust flow rate expected, the field test system's flexible connectors...pressure changes. (3) Electromagnetic radiation. (4) Mechanical...where applicable. (d) Field testing may require...

2010-07-01

161

Identification procedures for strapdown-sensor-parameters by laboratory testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes laboratory test procedures to determine static and dynamic parameters of the gyro and accelerometer performance model. The error models for dynamically dry tuned two-axes gyros and for single-axis accelerometers are considered. These models represent the basis for various system tests during which the model parameters can be determined. The output signals of sensors have to be compensated

U. Krogmann

1979-01-01

162

Relationship of Field Tests to Laboratory Tests of Muscular Strength and Endurance, and Maximal Aerobic Power.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study evaluate the relationship between established laboratory tests of selected physical fitness components and a field tests battery (EXPRES) presently used annually to evaluate the physical fitness of Canadian Force personnel. Muscular strength, m...

D. G. Bell I. Jacobs

1986-01-01

163

One Design Waterwall Engineering Field Test. Final Report. Draft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The three most promising thermal mass designs are the subject of this field engineering work. The following are covered: basic customer and building code needs, production line design, prototype fabrication, structural engineering and testing, code compli...

1981-01-01

164

STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 11}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CTE measurements are made using the "internal sparse field test", along the parallel axis. The new "POS=" optional parameter is used to provide off-center MSM positionings of some slits. All exposures are internals.

Goudfrooij, Paul

2002-07-01

165

STIS Sparse Field CTE test-internal {Cycle 12}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CTE measurements are made using the "internal sparse field test", along the parallel axis. The "POS=" optional parameter, introduced during cycle 11, is used to provide off-center MSM positionings of some slits. All exposures are internals.

Goudfrooij, Paul

2003-07-01

166

Review of Field and Laboratory Tests on Riprap.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two earlier documents (CIRIA Technical Note 101 and Hydraulics Research Station Report IT213) are reviewed with regard to design implications. Both the extent of agreement and anomalies in behavior between the field and laboratory tests in these publicati...

J. D. Pitt P. Ackers

1982-01-01

167

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

168

Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification  

SciTech Connect

The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

1996-12-01

169

Evaluation of a caffeic acid-ferric citrate test for rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.  

PubMed Central

An evaluation of a rapid caffeic acid-ferric citrate paper disk test for the identification of Cryptococcus neoformans, using 474 isolates of yeasts and yeastlike organisms, showed that 96.6, 97.7, and 98.3% of 176 isolates of C. neoformans produced brown to dark-brown pigment on disks incubated for 6 h at room temperature, 30 degrees C, and 37 degrees C, respectively. All C. neoformans produced brown to dark-brown pigment within 24 h. However, nonspecific pigmentation was encountered at all temperatures of incubation with one isolate of Trichosporon cutaneum and, at room temperature only, with one isolate of C. luteolus after 6 h. Other genera of yeasts produced similar pigmentation after 24 h at all temperatures. The age of the cultures tested or the types of media used before testing did not significantly affect the ability of C. neoformans to produce pigmentation at 37 degrees C. A positive test may prove useful for presumptive identification of C. neoformans, but a negative reaction should not be used to rule out an identification of this yeast. Since a number of false-negative and false-positive tests occur, it is necessary to confirm, by other biochemical tests, the identification of all organisms suspected of being C. neoformans, to reduct the serious risk of missing or misidentifying this important pathogen.

Wang, H S; Zeimis, R T; Roberts, G D

1977-01-01

170

Optimization and testing of mass spectral library search algorithms for compound identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five algorithms proposed in the literature for library search identification of unknown compounds from their low resolution\\u000a mass spectra were optimized and tested by matching test spectra against reference spectra in the NIST-EPA-NIH Mass Spectral\\u000a Database. The algorithms were probability-based matching (PBM), dot-product, Hertz et al. similarity index, Euclidean distance,\\u000a and absolute value distance. The test set consisted of 12,592

Stephen E. Stein; Donald R. Scott

1994-01-01

171

Field Testing Vocational Education Curriculum Specialist Materials. Final Technical Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program for trained vocational education curriculum specialists (VECS), consisting of 16 modules, was written, revised, and field tested at 15 sites nationwide. The instructional materials were written to deliver the highest rated competencies based on a field survey of vocational educators and review by a national advisory panel of vocational…

Hamilton, Jack A.; Claudy, Carolyn B.

172

Field Testing Vocational Education Curriculum Specialist Materials. Summary Abstract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program for trained vocational education curriculum specialists (VECS), consisting of 16 modules, was written, revised, and field tested at 15 sites nationwide. The instructional materials were written to deliver the highest rated competencies based on a field survey of vocational educators and review by a national advisory panel of vocational…

American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

173

Field and laboratory tests of a high volume cascade impactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of three different configurations of a recently developed high volume cascade impactor (HVCI) system was tested in both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, the HVCI was run simultaneously with a virtual impactor and a low pressure impactor using a 3- or 4-day sampling duration. The study was carried out in downtown Helsinki between June and September

Markus Sillanpää; Risto Hillamo; Timo Mäkelä; Arto S Pennanen; Raimo O Salonen

2003-01-01

174

Stability of Visual Field Measures with Repeated Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Vitamin supplementation and deficiencies may affect the size of the area in which the human eye can see (visual field). Before using this measure, however, it is important to determine how reliable visual field testing is over several sessions. The size o...

C. L. Schlichting R. Rodriguez

1983-01-01

175

SMALL HYBRID SOLAR POWER SYSTEM: FIRST FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents field tests of an original concept of a small hybrid solar power plant integrating three technologies: hermetic volumetric scroll expander- generators installed in two superposed Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC), a (bio-)Diesel engine with heat recovery exchangers and a solar field made of two rows of sun following flat plate concentrators with vacuumed isolated collector tubes. The basic

Samuel Martin; Malick Kane; Daniel Favrat

176

The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

1995-01-01

177

Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials: A simulated field exposure study using a test wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

The corrosiveness of various residential thermal insulation materials was tested under simulated field conditions in a test wall structure. The test was conducted under controlled conditions typical of winter in the absence of a vapor barrier to create relatively severe moisture transport and possible condensation. The house-wall simulation was achieved by constructing a test panel containing 50 compartments into which

K. Sheppard; R. Weil; A. Desjarlais

1988-01-01

178

Flight test design for CH-47 parameter identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program is a significant experimental research program aimed at establishing a data base for rotorcraft operation in a terminal area environment. Work was undertaken to determine helicopter math models suitable for analyzing maneuvers along a VTOL trajectory and to apply these math models to determine the flight test procedures of greatest effectiveness in establishing helicopter dynamic characteristics in this mode of operation. As the principal result of this investigation, a flight test specification is presented for the CH-47 VALT aircraft operating along the specified VTOL trajectory of the VALT program.

Hall, W. E., Jr.; Vincent, J.

1978-01-01

179

Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

2013-01-01

180

Field Tests of the Liberty-Mead Transmission System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Summarized are results of the October 1977 field tests of the 383-km(238-mi), 345-kV, series-capacitor-compensated Liberty-Mead transmission line of the Western Area Power Administration. The test series included routine capacitor bypass and insertion tes...

L. E. Eilts

1979-01-01

181

Stress field determinations in France by hydraulic tests in boreholes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study determines the stress field at eight different sites in France (four in crystalline or metamorphic rocks and four in sedimentary formations) by hydraulic tests in boreholes. It is shown that in homogeneous rock masses the hydraulic tests on preexisting fractures the stress determination method yields satisfactory values. The two methods yield comparable results for the orientation of the

F. H. Cornet; D. Burlet

1992-01-01

182

DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

183

Field testing of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a field test to quantify the performance of high-efficiency supermarket refrigeration. The initial work on this project was presented in EPRI report CU-6268 Supermarket Refrigeration Modeling and Field Demonstration.'' The information given here was generated through continued testing at the field test site. The field test was conducted at a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., that was located in Menlo Park, CA. Testing was performed with the existing conventional refrigeration system and a high-efficiency multiplex refrigeration system that was installed for these tests. The results of the testing showed that the high-efficiency multiplex system reduced refrigeration energy consumption by 23.9% and peak electric demand for refrigeration by 30.0%. Analyses of these savings showed that the largest portion was due to the use of high-efficiency compressors (29.5% of total saving). Floating head pressure control, ambient and mechanical subcooling, compressor multiplexing and hot gas defrost accounted for 50% of total savings. The remainder of the savings (20.5%) were attributed to the use of an evaporative condenser. Tests were also conducted with several retrofit technologies. The most promising results were obtained with external liquid-suction heat exchangers installed at the outlets of the display cases. Favorable paybacks were calculated for these exchangers when they were used with very low and low temperature refrigeration.

Walker, D. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-12-01

184

Commercial building water-loop heat pump field test  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed field test to study the operating characteristics of a water-loop heat pump (WLHP) system was conducted in a commercial building typical of those wherein this generic system finds advantageous application. The location in Stamford, CT, experiences cold winters, warm to hot summers, and appreciable shoulder seasons so that results are applicable to a variety of weather. The test

C. Brunner; K. Barrett; E. A. Kush

1993-01-01

185

Assessment to Rate Principal Leadership to Be Field-Tested  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Starting next month, 300 schools nationwide will take part in a field test of a new way to gauge principals' effectiveness. Known as VAL-ED, for the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education, the tool has been developed by a team of leadership and testing experts at Vanderbilt University and the University of Pennsylvania to measure…

Olson, Lynn

2008-01-01

186

An observational test of magnetospheric field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

The configuration of the geomagnetic field is an indicator of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical magnetospheric field models are currently in use which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. Here, the global nature of the Tsyganenko 89 [Tsyganenko, 1989] magnetospheric magnetic field model is tested by comparison of the model-predicted field orientations with the field orientations derived simultaneously at two different locations in geosynchronous orbit from the axis of symmetry of the plasma electron distribution function (30 eV--40 keV). The results for the particular time interval studied are inconclusive because the Tsyganenko 89 model does not describe the field at one of the satellites well enough, but the procedure itself appears promising.

Thomsen, M.F.; Weiss, L.A.; McComas, D.J.; Moldwin, M.B.; Reeves, G.D.

1994-07-01

187

[Establishment of an algorithm for serological testing of syphilis identification].  

PubMed

Serological methods are widely used for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis or for screening purposes. The aim of this study was to determine an algorithm for the application of laboratory tests that will provide accurate diagnosis of syphilis in a cheap, fast and practical way. A total of 162 serum samples were evaluated by the following tests: VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory; Omega Diagnostic, UK), TPHA (Treponema pallidum Hemagglutination Test; Omega Diagnostic, UK), ELISA IgG + IgM (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay; DiaPro Diagnostic Bioprobes, Italy), FTA-ABS (Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption; IgG, Euroimmun, Germany) and WB (Western Blot; IgG Euroimmun, Germany). When the gold standard was considered as FTA-ABS test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for VDRL were 77.1%, 100% 100% an 80.6%; for TPHA were 92.8%, 98.7%, 98.7% and 92.9%, for ELISA 98.8%, 98.7%, 98.8% and 98.7%, and for WB 98.8%, 100%, 100% and 98.7%, respectively. When the results of screening with VDRL together with TPHA were compared with FTA-ABS, it was observed that if both VDRL and TPHA results were positive, then there was 100% concordance between the tests. However, when both of the test results were negative, 1.3% of them yielded positive result with FTA-ABS. If either one of VDRL or TPHA results were positive (n = 24), 95.8% (n = 23) was positive with FTA-ABS. Therefore, inconsistent results obtained by VDRL and TPHA requires verification by another method. When ELISA or WB tests were used, the borderline results need verification, however, positive or negative results would be reported. The determination of an algorithm for laboratory tests also depend on the number of patients, cost, cost per positive patient and workload of the laboratory. Thus, ELISA could be selected when the number of cases is high and the results should be reported unless they are suspicious. When the number of cases is low, VDRL/TPHA should be selected, and the results should be verified if they are inconsistent. However, the demographic characteristics of patient groups are also important in test selection and work flow. False positive results are troublesome in case of marriage pre-screening and false negative results in sex workers. When all these factors are taken into consideration it may be suggested that either ELISA or VDRL together with TPHA should be performed and the results should be confirmed by a reference test in case of borderline results in ELISA or inconsistency between VDRL and TPHA results. Although screening for syphilis in the setting of blood banking is a matter of debate, if it is to be performed, then ELISA would be better since the work load is high. In case of pregnancy inconsistent VDRL and TPHA results should be verified since no risk could be afforded. PMID:20455397

Karaca, Yilmaz; Cöplü, Nilay; Gözalan, Ay?egül; Oncül, Ozgür; Akin, Levent; Esen, Berrin

2010-01-01

188

A new cultural adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a test of olfactory function that is widely used by otolaryngologists, geriatricians, and neurologists, has been translated into more than a dozen languages. In some instances, cultural and socioeconomic factors have necessitated changes in the odorant items or the response alternatives to make the test scores congruent with North American norms. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of Brazilian subjects on a new Portuguese language version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test with their performance on an earlier Portuguese language version of the test, as well as to assess the influences of gender, age, ethnicity, and economic status on the test scores. METHODS: Based on pilot data, several response alternatives of the earlier Portuguese language version of the test were altered in an effort to improve test performance. Forty-nine healthy Brazilian volunteers, who represented several economic classes, were tested. The test scores of the study cohort who received the newer version of the test were compared with those of a group of 25 subjects who received the earlier version of the test. RESULTS: The mean score for the new version [35 (2.1)] was significantly (p?=?0.002) higher than that for the earlier version [32.5 (3.5)]. Although no apparent influence of socioeconomic status was observed, the female participants outperformed the male participants in the current subject cohort. CONCLUSION: The changes made in the new cultural adaptation of the Portuguese version of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test were effective in increasing the average test scores of the participants. Overall, the female subjects outperformed the male subjects on the test.

Fornazieri, Marco Aurelio; Doty, Richard L; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; de Rezende Pinna, Fabio; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Voegels, Richard Louis

2013-01-01

189

Magnetic field exposure in a nondestructive testing operation.  

PubMed

Nondestructive testing is any technique used to inspect the integrity of a manufactured item without diminishing its future usefulness. Magnetic particle inspection is one type of nondestructive testing that uses electromagnetism in the inspection procedure, thus potentially exposing the operator to magnetic fields. During magnetic particle inspection, investigators took peak magnetic field measurements of 8 turbine engine shafts at a turbine engine overhaul and repair center. They recorded 95 peak magnetic field measurements, ranging from < 0.1 to 29.27 mT. The exposure values measured were among the highest reported in the occupational setting. Further work is needed to characterize magnetic field exposures in magnetic particle inspection operations--in particular, by differentiating magnetic field magnitude by current frequency--and to understand exposure as it relates to different types of magnetic particle inspection devices. PMID:18458022

Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Kennedy, Kathleen J; Esmen, Nurtan A; Buchanich, Jeanine M; Marsh, Gary M

2007-01-01

190

Phase IIB Qualification Test Plan and Procedures of Commercially Available Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems for Baggage Identification, Tracking and Security Applications. Continental Airlines Trial.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Operational Test for the Continental Airlines Trial will be used to evaluate those RFID systems that have the potential to accomplish baggage identification, tracking and security requirements in an operational environment utilizing handheld readers, ...

A. T. Cerino

1999-01-01

191

The extensive CCD-observations of asteroids: Their testing and identification in interactive mode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CERES software package developed at the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy and LAPLACE software created at the Pulkovo Observatory were used to test and identify the celestial bodies observed with Spacewatch Telescope during February 1995 -- March 1995 (1027 objects in all). The method to solve the identification problem was elaborated. It requares an one date asteroid's normal place and

N. O. Komarova

1997-01-01

192

Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor  

SciTech Connect

A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

Smith, Desmond J. (Oakland, CA); Rubin, Edward M. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01

193

Assessing the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test among Incarcerated Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the results of administering the World Health Organization's Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) to 400 incarcerated drug-using women. Reports on AUDIT's utility, validity, and reliability. Results demonstrate that AUDIT can be used to identify problem drinkers among incarcerated, drug-using women. (MKA)

El-Bassel, Nabila; Schilling, Robert; Ivanoff, Andre; Chen, Duan-Rung; Hanson, Meredith

1998-01-01

194

Analytical modeling of the acoustic field during a direct field acoustic test.  

SciTech Connect

The acoustic field generated during a Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT) has been analytically modeled in two space dimensions using a properly phased distribution of propagating plane waves. Both the pure-tone and broadband acoustic field were qualitatively and quantitatively compared to a diffuse acoustic field. The modeling indicates significant non-uniformity of sound pressure level for an empty (no test article) DFAT, specifically a center peak and concentric maxima/minima rings. This spatial variation is due to the equivalent phase among all propagating plane waves at each frequency. The excitation of a simply supported slender beam immersed within the acoustic fields was also analytically modeled. Results indicate that mid-span response is dependent upon location and orientation of the beam relative to the center of the DFAT acoustic field. For a diffuse acoustic field, due to its spatial uniformity, mid-span response sensitivity to location and orientation is nonexistent.

Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Rouse, Jerry W.; Mesh, Mikhail

2010-12-01

195

Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results  

SciTech Connect

A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with {approx}60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

Temnykh A.; Babzien M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

2010-11-10

196

Rapid identification and antibiotic sensitivity testing of bacteria isolated from clinical infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 834 bacterial strains isolated from urine were subjected to rapid biochemical and serological identification and rapid antimicrobial sensitivity testing using Autobac 1. For enterobacteria (742 strains) six tests (acetoin-,?-galactosidase-, hydrogensulphide-, indole-, ornithin-decarboxylase- and urease-production) correctly identified to genus or species level more than 99% of the strains within four hours. Staphylococci and streptococci (92 strains) were identified

Alf A. Lindberg; Carl-Erik Nord; Ann Dahlbäck

1977-01-01

197

Behaviour model identification based on inverse modeling and using Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM): application on rubber and steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biaxial properties of materials (polymer or steel) used in many industrial processes are often difficult to measure. However, these properties are useful for the numerical simulations of plastic-processing operations like blow moulding or thermoforming for polymers and superplastic forming or single point incremental forming for steels. Today, Optical Full Field Measurements (OFFM) are promising tools for experimental analysis of materials. Indeed, they are able to provide a very large amount of data (displacement or strain) spatially distributed. In this paper, a mixed numerical and experimental investigation is proposed in order to identify multi-axial constitutive behaviour models. The procedure is applied on two different materials commonly used in forming processes: polymer (rubber in this first approach) and steel. Experimental tests are performed on various rubber and steel structural specimens (notched and open-hole plate samples) in order to generate heterogeneous displacement field. Two different behaviour models are considered. On the one hand, a Money-Rivlin hyperelastic law is investigated to describe the high levels of strain induced in tensile test performed on a rubber open-hole specimen. On the other hand, Ramberg-Osgood law allows to reproduce elasto-plastic behaviour of steel on a specimen that induces heterogeneous strain fields. Each parameter identification is based on a same Finite Element Model Updated (FEMU) procedure which consists in comparing results provided by the numerical simulation (ABAQUS™) with full field measurements obtained by the DISC (Digital Image Stereo-Correlation) technique (Vic-3D®).

Velay, V.; Robert, L.; Schmidt, F.; Hmida, S.; Vallet, T.

2007-04-01

198

Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?  

PubMed Central

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=??0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=??0.82) and bench press (rs?=??0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=??0.83) and bench press (rs?=??0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=??0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=??0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity.

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

199

Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?  

PubMed

Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N?=?8) and part-time (N?=?10) male firefighters and civilian men (N?=?8) and women (N?=?12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs?=?0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs?=?0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs?=?-0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs?=?-0.82) and bench press (rs?=?-0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs?=?0.75) and bench press (rs?=?0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs?=?-0.83) and bench press (rs?=?-0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs?=?-0.58) and upright barbell row (rs?=?-0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs?0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

2014-01-01

200

Utility of the Germ Tube Test for Direct Identification of Candida albicans from Positive Blood Culture Bottles  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared the germ tube test for the direct identification of Candida albicans from positive blood culture bottles, with results obtained from subcultured colonies. The direct germ tube test was 87.1% sensitive and 100% specific for the identification of C. albicans when the results obtained from fungal colonies were compared. Recent evidence has suggested that early institution of ap- propriate

Donald C. Sheppard; Marie-Claude Locas; Christiane Restieri; Michel Laverdiere

201

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION: EFFICIENCY OF SHORT-TERM TESTS IN IDENTIFYING GERM CELL MUTAGENS AND PUTATIVE NONGENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. he efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been ex...

202

Statistical Hypothesis Testing and Variance Analysis for Radio Frequency Interference Identification in Solar Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents an effective algorithm for radio frequency interference (RFI) identification using dynamic power spectrum statistics in the frequency domain. Statistical signal processing techniques such as hypothesis testing and variance analysis are utilized to derive a test statistic for effective and efficient RFI identification. Starting from the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT), we formulate the problem systematically and propose a practical test statistic T(x;f), shown to be F distributed, for RFI identification. A threshold approach working on this test statistic is developed to identify the presence of narrowband RFI in the power spectrum with additive Gaussian noise and/or solar flare background, corresponding to a desired constant false alarm rate (CFAR). Detailed analysis on detector performance and effect of RFI duty cycle are also provided. The proposed statistical test is applied to experimental solar data collected by our frequency-agile solar radio telescope (FASR) subsystem testbed (FST) to demonstrate the robustness and scalability of the algorithm, as well as its capability for real-time implementation.

Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Hongya; Gary, Dale E.; Nita, Gelu M.

2009-10-01

203

Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

1983-12-01

204

Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

Bindschadler, Robert

1987-01-01

205

Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects  

SciTech Connect

In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

NONE

1999-07-01

206

Field joint protection system rain qualification test report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the procedures, performance, and results obtained from the Field Joint Protection System (FJPS) rain test. This test was performed to validate that the flight configuration FJPS prevents the accumulation of moisture in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) field joints when subjected to simulated prelaunch natural rain environments. The FJPS test article was exposed to rain simulation for approximately 50 minutes. During the test, water entered through the open upper end of the systems tunnel and was funneled down between the tunnel and case. A sealant void at the moisture seal butt splice allowed this water to flow underneath the FJPS. The most likely cause of voids was improper bondline preparation, particularly on the moisture seal surface. In total, water penetrated underneath approximately 60 percent of the FJPS circumference. Because the test article was substantially different from flight configuration (no systems tunnel closeout), results of this test will not affect current flight motors. Due to the omission of systems tunnel covers and systems tunnel floor plate closeout, the test assembly was not representative of flight hardware and resulted in a gross overtest. It is therefore recommended that the test be declared void. It is also recommended that the test be repeated with a complete closeout of the systems tunnel, sealed systems tunnel ends, and improved adhesive bondline preparation.

Cook, M.

1989-01-01

207

Evaluation of a multiplex PCR test for simultaneous identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6.  

PubMed

Serotype-specific DNA regions involved in the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides (cps region) were used to develop a multiplex PCR test for the simultaneous species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6. Primers specific for serotypes 2, 5, and 6 were combined with the already existing species-specific primers used in a PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with serotype reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 182 Danish field isolates previously serotyped by latex agglutination or immunodiffusion. For all serologically typeable strains, a complete correspondence was found between the results obtained by the multiplex PCR test and the results obtained by the traditional serotyping methods. Six of eight serologically nontypeable strains could be allocated to a serotype on the basis of the multiplex PCR results. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated with a collection of 93 strains representing 29 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as species normally found in the respiratory tracts of swine. All of these strains were negative by the multiplex PCR test, including 50 field isolates of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii. When the multiplex PCR test was used to test Danish field strains, it was able to identify the serotypes of approximately 94% of all strains isolated from swine with clinical disease. More than 90% of the isolates that cross-reacted by the latex agglutination test were of serotype 2, 5, or 6. Determination of the serotype by PCR represents a convenient and specific method for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:12958231

Jessing, Stine G; Angen, Øystein; Inzana, Tomas J

2003-09-01

208

Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Test for Simultaneous Identification and Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotypes 2, 5, and 6  

PubMed Central

Serotype-specific DNA regions involved in the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides (cps region) were used to develop a multiplex PCR test for the simultaneous species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 2, 5, and 6. Primers specific for serotypes 2, 5, and 6 were combined with the already existing species-specific primers used in a PCR test based on the omlA gene. The PCR test was evaluated with serotype reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as 182 Danish field isolates previously serotyped by latex agglutination or immunodiffusion. For all serologically typeable strains, a complete correspondence was found between the results obtained by the multiplex PCR test and the results obtained by the traditional serotyping methods. Six of eight serologically nontypeable strains could be allocated to a serotype on the basis of the multiplex PCR results. The species specificity of the assay was evaluated with a collection of 93 strains representing 29 different species within the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as species normally found in the respiratory tracts of swine. All of these strains were negative by the multiplex PCR test, including 50 field isolates of the phylogenetically closely related species Actinobacillus lignieresii. When the multiplex PCR test was used to test Danish field strains, it was able to identify the serotypes of approximately 94% of all strains isolated from swine with clinical disease. More than 90% of the isolates that cross-reacted by the latex agglutination test were of serotype 2, 5, or 6. Determination of the serotype by PCR represents a convenient and specific method for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories.

Jessing, Stine G.; Angen, ?ystein; Inzana, Tomas J.

2003-01-01

209

Identification of powered parafoil-vehicle dynamics from modelling and flight test data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the final approach and landing phase of the X-38/Crew Return Vehicle, a steerable parafoil is used to maneuver and land at a targeted ground base under autonomous control. To simulate and verify performance of the onboard Parafoil Guidance, Navigation and Control system (PGNC), a commercial powered parafoil-vehicle, called the Buckeye consisting of a parafoil and vehicle two-body system like the X-38/CRV was modified to accommodate the avionics and scale-downed parafoil for aerodynamic similarity and a series of flight tests were conducted. Dynamic modelling and system identification results for the Buckeye are described in this dissertation. The vehicle dynamics are modelled as all 8 degrees-of-freedom system comprising 6 states for the parafoil and 2 states for the relative pitch and yaw motion of the vehicle with respect to the parafoil. Modal analysis for the linearized model from the nonlinear model shows the number and order of dynamic modes as well as the system is controllable and observable. For system identification, the overparameterized Observer/Kalman Filter Identification (OKID) method is applied to identify a linear model of the Buckeye two-body system from the flight data assuming that disturbances at a calm day are represented as periodic disturbances. The identification results show that the overparameterized OKID works well for powered parafoil-vehicle two-body system identification under calm day conditions using flight data. For the data with possible discrete gusts the OKID shows limitation to identify a linearized model properly. Several sensor packages including airdata and Inertial Measurement Unit are designed and installed for the parameters for identification. The sensor packages successfully supply data of the parameters for identification and suggest a feasible, low cost method for the parafoil-vehicle two-body dynamic parameters.

Hur, Gi-Bong

210

Project DEEP STEAM preliminary field test, Bakersfield, California  

SciTech Connect

A successful field test of the DEEP STEAM technology has been conducted. A direct contact steam generator was operated in the Kern River reservoir in cooperation with Chevron USA. The objectives of the test were demonstration of long term operation of a downhole steam generator, investigation of reservoir response, and the environmental consequences of the technology. The test was extensively instrumented to provide data on generator performance and reservoir response. The results show that the system is capable of long term operation in the oil field. It was demonstrated that substantial environmental improvements over surface steam production can be expected from injection of combustion products with steam in the downhole steam concept. The reservoir character was not altered by the test injection and appeared the same as that for pure steam injection.

Mulac, A.J.; Beyeler, J.A.; Clay, R.G.; Darnall, K.R.; Donaldson, A.B.; Donham, T.D.; Fox, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Maxwell, R.L.

1981-04-01

211

Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

1993-12-01

212

Plasma wake field acceleration: A proposed experimental test  

SciTech Connect

The prospect of achieving very high accelerating fields has led to proposals for using electrostatic plasma waves to accelerate charged particles for high energy physics. It has been predicted theoretically that these plasma waves can be driven by the wake fields of short bunches, or trains of bunches, of charged particles, to accelerate a subsequent bunch; the longitudinal electric fields possible could be of the order of a few GV/m. This note presents an outline of a proposed experimental test of this principle.

Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cline, D.B.; Dexter, R.N.; Larson, D.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Mengelt, K.R.; Sprott, J.C.; Mills, F.E.; Cole, F.T.

1985-07-15

213

Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

Schaeffer, J. S.; Haas, R. C.; Diana, J. S.; Breck, J. E.

1999-01-01

214

Developing and pilot testing practical measures of preanalytic surgical specimen identification defects.  

PubMed

Accurate patient identification is a National Patient Safety Goal. Misidentification of surgical specimens is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. The authors developed 12 practical, process-based, standardized measures of surgical specimen identification defects during the preanalytic phase of pathology testing (from the operating room to the surgical pathology laboratory) that could be used to quantify the occurrence of these defects. The measures (6 container and 6 requisition identification defects) were developed by a panel of physicians, pathologists, nurses, and quality experts. A total of 69 hospitals prospectively collected data over 3 months. Overall, there were identification defects in 2.9% of cases (1780/60 501; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0%-4.4%), 1.2% of containers (1018/81 656; 95% CI = 0.8%-2.0%), and 2.3% of requisitions (1417/61 245; 95% CI = 1.2%-4.6%). Future research is needed to evaluate if hospitals are able to use these measures to assess interventions meant to reduce the frequency of specimen identification defects and improve patient safety. PMID:23322909

Bixenstine, Paul J; Zarbo, Richard J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Yenokyan, Gayane; Robinson, Raymond; Hudson, Daniel W; Prescott, Arlene M; Hubble, Ron; Murphy, Mary M; George, Chris T; D'Angelo, Rita; Watson, Sam R; Lubomski, Lisa H; Berenholtz, Sean M

2013-01-01

215

U.S. field testing programs and results  

SciTech Connect

The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

Wicks, G.G.

2000-06-09

216

EVALUATION AND FIELD LOAD TESTING OF TIMBER RAILROAD BRIDGE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several spans of a 60-year-old open-deck timber railroad bridge on the Southern Pacific Railroad Line (now the Union Pacific) in Southwest Texas were field tested. The tests were conducted with the sponsorship and cooperation of the Association of American Railroads to determine the vertical live load distribution characteristics of the superstructure. The bridge was originally constructed with Douglas-fir larch solid

Terry Wipf; Michael Ritter; Douglas Wood

2000-01-01

217

Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project  

SciTech Connect

The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

Leshikar, G.A.

1997-05-16

218

Field and laboratory testing in young elite soccer players  

PubMed Central

Aim: To determine if there are correlations between the physical fitness of young soccer players assessed by field and laboratory testing. Methods: Thirty four male soccer players took part in the study (mean (SD) age 17.5 (1.1) years, height 177.8 (6.7) cm, weight 70.5 (6.4) kg). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2MAX) during treadmill running and vertical jump height on a force platform were measured in the laboratory. Field tests consisted of a soccer specific endurance test (Bangsbo test) and 30 m sprint with 10 m lap times. Results: The Bangsbo test correlated with the lowest velocity associated with VO2MAX (vVO2MAX; R2 = 0.55, p<0.001), but not with VO2MAX. Sprint times at 30 m and 20 m were related to peak extension velocity and peak extension force measured during vertical jumping, but not to vertical jump height per se. The jumping force and velocity could explain 46% of the 30 m sprint performance (R2 = 0.46, p<0.001). Conclusion: The Bangsbo test and 30 m sprint test correlate with vVO2MAX and vertical jump force and velocity respectively. The Bangsbo test does not give a good estimate of VO2MAX in young soccer players.

Chamari, K; Hachana, Y; Ahmed, Y; Galy, O; Sghaier, F; Chatard, J; Hue, O; Wisloff, U

2004-01-01

219

Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol.

Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

2013-01-01

220

Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h(-1)) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l(-1)). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key pointsT-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests.T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness.In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

Carminatti, Lorival J; Possamai, Carlos A P; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F; de Lucas, Ricardo D; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G A

2013-01-01

221

Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

Morris, A. Terry

1996-01-01

222

Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will

M. W. Grant; C. A. Langton; S. B. Oblath; D. W. Pepper; R. M. Wallace; E. L. Wilhite; W. W. F. Yau

1987-01-01

223

Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1972-1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field test of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was conducted jointly by the Falconer Central School, St. Mary's Elementary School in Dunkirk, New York, and the Teacher Education Research Center at the State University College in Fredonia, New York. DMP is a research-based, innovative, process-oriented elementary mathematics…

Schall, William E.; And Others

224

Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP). Field Test Evaluation, 1973-1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program was field-tested in the kindergarten and first three grades of one parochial and five public schools. DMP is an activity-based program developed around a comprehensive list of behavioral objectives. The program is concerned with the development of intuitive geometric concepts as well as…

Schall, William; And Others

225

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF WATTS NICKEL RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

A field test was conducted to determine the feasibility of using a polyamide reverse-osmosis membrane in hollow fine fiber configuration for closed-loop treatment of rinse water from a Watts-type nickel bath. Performance of the membrane module was determined by measuring the prod...

226

Infrared smoke field testing system based on computer calculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to study the infrared smoke interference performance in the field experiment, a set of infrared smoke testing system is introduced and discussed. The System works during the whole process of observation, from the smoke formation to its dissipation. According to the thermal image, the system could evaluate the interference performance of smoke screen to the target through computer calculation on Matlab program.

Tang, Runze; Li, Shichuan; Cui, Yuling; Dong, Ningyu; Zhang, Tonglai; Zhou, Zunning

2014-02-01

227

A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

228

Field Test of the Grade Severity Rating System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of the study was to test the field effectiveness of the Grade Severity Rating System (GSRS), via application of weight-specific signs to control truck speeds on downgrades. Before-after sign effects were evaluated in terms of speed differenc...

F. R. Hanscom

1985-01-01

229

Correlation Between Laboratory Test & Field Part Failure Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Japan, failure rates for non high-reliability electronic parts, obtained from laboratory tests, are generally about ten times those obtained in the field. The reasons for this difference have been analysed by using part failure-rate data collected from major part suppliers, equipment manufacturers, and public users in Japan. This paper numerically analyses transistor data. The two main causes of the

Joji Yasuda

1977-01-01

230

A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

2011-01-01

231

REVERSE OSMOSIS FIELD TEST: TREATMENT OF COPPER CYANIDE RINSE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field tests of reverse osmosis (RO) were conducted on copper cyanide rinse waters at two different sites: Whyco Chromium Co. and New England Plating Co. At both sites, closed-loop treatment was used with plating chemicals recycled to the bath and purified water recycled to the ri...

232

Thin-Film Module Field Test Results in Japan  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

(&3;T.Ishii&3;et&3;al,&3;Prog.&3;Photovolt:&3;Res.&3;Appl.&3;19&3;(2011)&3;170&3;) The&3;field&3;test&3;is&3;still&3;going&3;on&3;(20132),&3;but&3;so&3;far&3;(after&3;nearly&3;8&3;years): no&3;significant&3;"failures"&3;obs...

233

MISSISSIPPI COTTON YIELD MONITOR: THREE YEARS OF FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mississippi cotton yield monitor, which is based on an optical cotton-flow sensor comprised of emitters and detectors in one unit that can be affixed to only one side of a pneumatic duct, has been under development at Mississippi State University since 1999. One prototype of the yield monitor was field tested that year in Mississippi. In 2000, three prototypes

J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui

234

Development of a PCR test for identification of Haemophilus somnus in pure and mixed cultures.  

PubMed

Based on the 16S rRNA sequences of a collection of well-characterized strains of Haemophilus somnus a set of primers was selected as candidates for a species-specific PCR test. All investigated H. somnus strains were found positive in the test, including 12 strains earlier found to represent H. somnus by DNA-DNA hybridization as well as representatives of the 16 ribotypes previously described within this species. The specificity of the test was evaluated on a broad collection of strains within the family Pasteurellaceae and on other Gram positive and negative species. None of these strains gave rise to an amplicon in the PCR test. The performance of the test on mixed cultures was evaluated by adding P. multocida to serial dilutions of H. somnus and incubating the agarplates for 1 and 2 days. This showed that the PCR test applied to the harvest from an agarplate can be expected to detect a single colony of H. somnus in the presence of 10(9) CFU of P. multocida even after 2 days of incubation. In conclusion, the present PCR test has been shown to represent a specific test for identification of H. somnus both in pure and mixed cultures. It represents a quick, sensitive and reliable method for identification of bacteria belonging to this phenotypically heterogeneous and often slow growing species. PMID:9810620

Angen, O; Ahrens, P; Tegtmeier, C

1998-08-28

235

IDENTIFICATIONS AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF THE 2 Ms CHANDRA DEEP FIELD-SOUTH SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

We present reliable multiwavelength identifications and high-quality photometric redshifts for the 462 X-ray sources in the {approx}2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. Source identifications are carried out using deep optical-to-radio multiwavelength catalogs, and are then combined to create lists of primary and secondary counterparts for the X-ray sources. We identified reliable counterparts for 442 (95.7%) of the X-ray sources, with an expected false-match probability of {approx} 6.2%; we also selected four additional likely counterparts. The majority of the other 16 X-ray sources appear to be off-nuclear sources, sources associated with galaxy groups and clusters, high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs), or spurious X-ray sources. A likelihood-ratio method is used for source matching, which effectively reduces the false-match probability at faint magnitudes compared to a simple error-circle matching method. We construct a master photometric catalog for the identified X-ray sources including up to 42 bands of UV-to-infrared data, and then calculate their photometric redshifts (photo-z's). High accuracy in the derived photo-z's is accomplished owing to (1) the up-to-date photometric data covering the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the X-ray sources, (2) more accurate photometric data as a result of source deblending for {approx}10% of the sources in the infrared bands and a few percent in the optical and near-infrared bands, (3) a set of 265 galaxy, AGN, and galaxy/AGN hybrid templates carefully constructed to best represent all possible SEDs, (4) the Zurich Extragalactic Bayesian Redshift Analyzer used to derive the photo-z's, which corrects the SED templates to best represent the SEDs of real sources at different redshifts and thus improves the photo-z quality. The reliability of the photo-z's is evaluated using the subsample of 220 sources with secure spectroscopic redshifts. We achieve an accuracy of |{delta}z|/(1 + z) {approx} 1% and an outlier [with |{delta}z|/(1 + z)>0.15] fraction of {approx}1.4% for sources with spectroscopic redshifts. We performed blind tests to derive a more realistic estimate of the photo-z quality for sources without spectroscopic redshifts. We expect there are {approx}9% outliers for the relatively brighter sources (R {approx}< 26), and the outlier fraction will increase to {approx}15%-25% for the fainter sources (R {approx}> 26). The typical photo-z accuracy is {approx}6%-7%. The outlier fraction and photo-z accuracy do not appear to have a redshift dependence (for z {approx} 0-4). These photo-z's appear to be the best obtained so far for faint X-ray sources, and they have been significantly ({approx}>50%) improved compared to previous estimates of the photo-z's for the X-ray sources in the {approx}2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North and {approx}1 Ms CDF-S.

Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Rafferty, D. A.; Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brusa, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Alexander, D. M.; Lehmer, B. D. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna (Italy); Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Silverman, J. D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna (Italy)

2010-04-01

236

Reliability of the colistin disk test in identification of Serratia marcescens and Serratia liquefaciens.  

PubMed

Resistance to polymycin B or E (colistin) in the disk test, which is used as a means of identification, was tested in 43 strains of Serratia marcescens and 26 of Serratia liquefaciens. While all strains had MIC values greater than 32 mg/l for colistin, false susceptibility to both polymyxins was encountered in the 24 h disk test in 9% of Serratia marcescens and 12-96% of Serratia liquefaciens strains, depending on the kind of polymyxin, temperature and duration of incubation. Using colistin disks and incubation at 25 degrees C for 48 h, the percentage of false susceptible results could be minimized. PMID:3032610

von Graevenitz, A; Zollinger-Iten, J

1987-02-01

237

Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed.

Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

1998-01-01

238

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Test Project: Honeywell Technology Strategy Center. Final report, Volume 2. Engineering field test  

SciTech Connect

The SOLERAS solar cooling system at Arizona Public Service Company in Phoenix, Arizona, was subjected to engineering field testing for a period of 18 months. Although some problems arose, which is typical with a new engineering model, the system generally ran well. This document describes the work completed in all three phases of this program, which included the preliminary analysis and detailed design of the solar cooling system, installation, testing, and data analysis.

Not Available

1982-01-01

239

Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT); Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT.

Ramirez, A.L. [ed.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

1991-08-01

240

Infrared sensor system (IRSS) laboratory and field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed an infrared search and track (IRST) demonstrator system named the infrared sensor system (IRSS). This technology-base sensor was successfully developed and tested both in the laboratory and at-sea. IRSS now is being transitioned to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAUSEA) IRST Engineering and Manufacturing Development (E&MD) Program, where it will serve, with appropriate modifications, as the engineering development model (EDM) and will be fielded aboard a U.S. Navy ship. This paper summarizes the process of developing and fielding IRSS, describes test results accomplished at sea during 1996, and discusses the technical and engineering lessons associated with design, development and testing of IRSS. Results are presented covering the areas of sensor component and overall system radiometrics (e.g., sensitivity and dynamic range), channel uniformity, stabilization, and optical, electrical and information (i.e., signal processing/track) resolution.

Ax, George R.; Buss, James R.

1997-08-01

241

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification  

PubMed Central

Abstract A feasibility test of molecular identification of European fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences – almost 20% of the total – this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification.

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-01-01

242

78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant AGENCY: Animal and Plant...and then to field test, an unlicensed DNA Immunostimulant recommended for reduction...LLC, Animal Health Division. Product: DNA Immunostimulant. Possible Field Test...

2013-09-24

243

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the field test or laboratory analyses, or as...the field tests, or laboratory analyses, and design, construction operation...the field tests or laboratory analyses. These permit...conditions will include design and operating...

2010-07-01

244

40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the field test or laboratory analyses, or as...the field tests, or laboratory analyses, and design, construction operation...the field tests or laboratory analyses. These permit...conditions will include design and operating...

2009-07-01

245

Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect

Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

1996-09-01

246

A European perspective on alternatives to animal testing for environmental hazard identification and risk assessment.  

PubMed

Tests with vertebrates are an integral part of environmental hazard identification and risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, pharmaceuticals, biocides, feed additives and effluents. These tests raise ethical and economic concerns and are considered as inappropriate for assessing all of the substances and effluents that require regulatory testing. Hence, there is a strong demand for replacement, reduction and refinement strategies and methods. However, until now alternative approaches have only rarely been used in regulatory settings. This review provides an overview on current regulations of chemicals and the requirements for animal tests in environmental hazard and risk assessment. It aims to highlight the potential areas for alternative approaches in environmental hazard identification and risk assessment. Perspectives and limitations of alternative approaches to animal tests using vertebrates in environmental toxicology, i.e. mainly fish and amphibians, are discussed. Free access to existing (proprietary) animal test data, availability of validated alternative methods and a practical implementation of conceptual approaches such as the Adverse Outcome Pathways and Integrated Testing Strategies were identified as major requirements towards the successful development and implementation of alternative approaches. Although this article focusses on European regulations, its considerations and conclusions are of global relevance. PMID:24161465

Scholz, Stefan; Sela, Erika; Blaha, Ludek; Braunbeck, Thomas; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; García-Franco, Mauricio; Guinea, Joaquin; Klüver, Nils; Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Tobor-Kap?on, Marysia; Witters, Hilda; Belanger, Scott; Benfenati, Emilio; Creton, Stuart; Cronin, Mark T D; Eggen, Rik I L; Embry, Michelle; Ekman, Drew; Gourmelon, Anne; Halder, Marlies; Hardy, Barry; Hartung, Thomas; Hubesch, Bruno; Jungmann, Dirk; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Léonard, Marc; Küster, Eberhard; Lillicrap, Adam; Luckenbach, Till; Murk, Albertinka J; Navas, José M; Peijnenburg, Willie; Repetto, Guillermo; Salinas, Edward; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Spielmann, Horst; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Whale, Graham; Wheeler, James R; Winter, Matthew J

2013-12-01

247

Comparative evaluation of AccuProbe culture identification test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other rapid methods.  

PubMed Central

The AccuProbe chemiluminescent culture identification test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gen-Probe Inc., San Diego, Calif.) was assessed in a comparative evaluation with other rapid methods by using 269 isolates of oxidase-positive, gram-negative diplococci. Chemiluminescence was read with a PAL luminometer, and results were expressed as PAL light units (PLUs): the cutoff value for a positive identification was 1,500 PLUs. All 200 isolates of gonococci confirmed by carbohydrate utilization and serotyped with monoclonal antibodies were identified correctly by AccuProbe on initial testing. The API Quadferm system (Bio Merieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) identified 95% (n = 190) of the gonococci correctly on initial testing and 99.5% (n = 199) on repeat testing, while the Phadebact Monoclonal GC test (Kara Bio Diagnostics AB, Huddinge, Sweden) identified 95.5% (n = 191) of the gonococci on both initial and repeat testing; 8 of the Phadebact-negative isolates were all of the same rare serovar (serovar 1B-17). The mean PLU for the gonococcal isolates was 9,014 (range 2,264 to 10,845) compared with a mean of 51 (range, 8 to 109) for the 69 nongonococcal isolates. We conclude that the AccuProbe culture confirmation test provides a rapid and accurate objective means of identifying cultured N. gonorrhoeae isolates.

Young, H; Moyes, A

1993-01-01

248

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01

249

Reliability of field-based fitness tests in youth.  

PubMed

The objective of this systematic review was to study the reliability of the existing field-based fitness tests intended for use with children and adolescents. The medical electronic databases MEDLINE, SCOPUS and SPORTS DISCUS were screened for papers published from January 1990 to December 2009. Each study was classified as high, low or very low quality according to the description of the participants, the time interval between measurements, the description of the results and the appropriateness of statistics. 3 levels of evidence were constructed according to the number of studies and the consistency of the findings. 32 studies were finally included in the present review. The reliability of tests assessing cardiorespiratory fitness (9 studies), musculoskeletal fitness (12 studies), motor fitness (3 studies), and body composition (10 studies) was investigated. Although some fitness components warrant further investigation, this review provides an evidence-based proposal for most reliable field-based fitness tests for use with children and adolescents: 20-m shuttle run test to measure cardiorespiratory fitness; handgrip strength and standing broad jump tests to measure musculoskeletal fitness; 4×10 m shuttle run test for motor fitness; and height, weight, BMI, skinfolds, circumferences and percentage body fat estimated from skinfold thickness to measure body composition. PMID:21165805

Artero, E G; España-Romero, V; Castro-Piñero, J; Ortega, F B; Suni, J; Castillo-Garzon, M J; Ruiz, J R

2011-03-01

250

Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

Littell, Justin D.

2010-01-01

251

Taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (sekisetsu chiku no koen). (Photovoltaic power system field test program at park in snowy district).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A photovoltaic power system was built in FY1994, on a trial basis, in Mawaki Ruins Park in Noto-machi, Ishikawa Pref., and the field tests have been conducted under commercial loads for an extended period, to produce various data, and to demonstrate its v...

H. Yamase

1996-01-01

252

Two confirmatory tests for identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from primary culture.  

PubMed Central

We compared a fluorescent monoclonal antibody and a DNA probe for identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) from primary genital cultures of presumptive GC and selected bacterial isolates other than GC. The monoclonal antibody was sensitive (94%) and specific (100%) enough to identify GC in selective primary genital culture. The DNA probe was sensitive (95%) but not adequately specific (65%) to function as a confirmatory test.

Ridderhof, J C; Vaughan, M; Tinney, A; Meier, F A; Dalton, H P

1990-01-01

253

Automated reading of a microtitre plate: preliminary evaluation in antimicrobial susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification.  

PubMed Central

An automated microELISA Reader was evaluated for its ability to read and interpret microtitre plates. A total of 309 microtitre plates were investigated by automated and visual methods. There was disagreement between the methods in one hundred and twelve (0.6%) wells. However agreements between the two methods for susceptibility tests and Enterobacteriaceae identification were respectively 98.8% and 89.3%.

Courcol, R J; Deleersnyder, H; Roussel-Delvallez, M; Martin, G R

1983-01-01

254

Field test of a high efficiency, automatic defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the market evaluation and field test portion of a program to design, develop, and demonstrate a high efficiency, automatic defrosting refrigerator-freezer for the residential market. After the successful completion of Phase I of the program, which concentrated on the design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) high-efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, Phase II was initiated in February 1979 to evaluate the sales potential and performance of the high-efficiency refrigerator concept under field conditions, as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. In Phase I, a survey of food consumption and storage trends, family size, and consumer buying habits led to a sales-weighted average-capacity forecast for 1985 of approximately 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) and identification of the top-mount, automatic defrosting refrigerator as the projected sales leader. To meet this market demand, a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) top-mount was selected as the baseline for the Phase I design and development. In Phase II, a 509 1 (18 ft/sup 3/) unit using Phase I technology was chosen for the field test, since the slightly larger model better fit the participating manufacturer's new product development efforts and market.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01

255

CESSNA Citation II Flight Tests. Flight Test Execution, Elementary Data Processing and Aerodynamic Model Identification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Within the disciplinary group of Stability and Control, there was demand for accurate flight test data of the TUD/NLR Cessna Citation II Laboratory aircraft. Flight tests were to be performed to provide flight test data which can be used to determine an a...

J. K. Sridhar E. M. P. Sneekes S. Hulshoff J. A. Mulder

1997-01-01

256

Disorder Identification in Hysteresis Data: Recognition Analysis of the Random-Bond-Random-Field Ising Model  

SciTech Connect

An approach for the direct identification of disorder type and strength in physical systems based on recognition analysis of hysteresis loop shape is developed. A large number of theoretical examples uniformly distributed in the parameter space of the system is generated and is decorrelated using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA components are used to train a feed-forward neural network using the model parameters as targets. The trained network is used to analyze hysteresis loops for the investigated system. The approach is demonstrated using a 2D random-bond-random-field Ising model, and polarization switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric capacitors.

Ovchinnikov, O. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bintacchit, P.; Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2009-10-09

257

Field Tests for Evaluating the Aerobic Work Capacity of Firefighters  

PubMed Central

Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter’s ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters’ aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (rs?=??0.65 and ?0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL·min?1) and relative (mL·kg?1·min?1) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (rs?=??0.79 to 0.55 and ?0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters’ work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s·kg?1), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter’s aerobic work capacity.

Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Desiree; Malm, Christer

2013-01-01

258

Upgraded Near-Field Antenna-Testing System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Upgraded system for near-field testing of large microwave antenna built around commercial automated network analyzer (HP8510) designed for measurement and characterization of microwave circuits and components. Contains highly capable microwave receiver also suitable for far-field and radar-cross-section measurements. Receiver operates in fast-data-acquisition mode at rate of one new data point every millisecond without averaging. Also operates with greater sensitivity by use of averaging feature at time penalty of 0.2 ms per average. Time-domain option added to analyzer enables it to perform time-domain reflectometry.

Kunath, Richard R.; Garrett, Michael J.

1994-01-01

259

A field-test battery for elite, young soccer players.  

PubMed

The validity and reliability of a battery of field-based performance tests was examined. The opinions of coaches, fitness professionals and players (n=170, 172 and 101 respectively) on the importance of performance testing were established using a questionnaire. On 2 occasions, separated by 7 days, 80 elite, young soccer players (mean±SD [and range]: age 13.2±2.6 [8.9-19.1] years; stature 1.59±0.18 m [1.32-1.91]; body mass 50.6±17.1 [26.5-88.7] kg) completed a battery of field-based tests comprised of heart rate response to a submaximal Multi-stage fitness test, 3 types of vertical jump, sprints over 10 and 20 m, and an agility test. Physical performance testing was considered important by coaches (97%), fitness professionals (94%) and players (83%). The systematic bias ratio and the random error components of the 95% ratio limits of agreement for the first and second tests, for the U9-U11 vs. U12-U14 vs. U15-U18 age groups, were [Systematic bias (*/÷ ratio limits)]: Heart rate (Level 5): 0.983 (*/÷ 1.044) vs. 0.969 (*/÷ 1.056) vs. 0.983 (*/÷ 1.055); Rocket jump: 0998 (*/÷ 1.112) vs. 0.999 (*/÷ 1.106) vs. 0.996 (*/÷ 1.093); 10 m sprint: 0.997 (*/÷ 1.038) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.033) vs. 0.994 (*/÷ 1.038); Agility test: 1.010 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.014 (*/÷1.050) vs. 1.002 (*/÷1.053). All tests, except heart rate recovery from the Multi-stage fitness test, were able to distinguish between different ability and age groups of players (p<0.05). Thus, the field-test battery demonstrated logical and construct validity, and was shown to be a reliable and objective tool for assessing elite, young soccer players. PMID:23143702

Hulse, M A; Morris, J G; Hawkins, R D; Hodson, A; Nevill, A M; Nevill, M E

2013-04-01

260

Comparison of two commercially available test methods with conventional coagulase tests for identification of Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed Central

The API STAPHase (Analytab Products, Inc., Plainview, N.Y.) and SeroSTAT Staph (Scott Laboratories, Fiskville, R.I.) tests were compared to the conventional tube coagulase test and a slide coagulase test by using fresh isolates of members of the family Micrococcaceae. The 4-h, 24-h, and combined readings of the tube coagulase test detected 94.5, 99.5 and 100%, respectively, of 219 Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The API STAPHase, SeroSTAT Staph, and slide coagulase tests detected 95.9, 95.4 and 95.9% of the isolates of S. aureus, respectively. There were no false-positive results with any of the systems when tested with 103 strains of members of the family Micrococcaceae other than S. aureus. We concluded that the STAPHase and SeroSTAT Staph tests were equal in accuracy to the slide coagulase and 4-h tube coagulase tests and were suitable for use in the clinical microbiology laboratory. However, SeroSTAT Staph gave faster results than the API STAPHase, and the test was easier to perform. Also, the false-negative rate was high enough with the STAPHase, SeroSTAT Staph, and the slide coagulase tests that all negative reactions should be confirmed with a tube test.

Jungkind, D L; Torhan, N J; Corman, K E; Bondi, J M

1984-01-01

261

The 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin' Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40)  

PubMed Central

Background Most existing olfactory identification (ID) tests have the primary aim of diagnosing clinical olfactory dysfunction, thereby rendering them sub-optimal for experimental settings where the aim is to detect differences in healthy subjects’ odor ID abilities. Materials and methods We have developed an extended version of the olfactory ID subtest of the Sniffin’ Sticks test battery to better assess the variability in ID scores and thereby olfactory abilities of healthy, adult individuals. Twenty-four odorants, corresponding cue labels, and distractor labels were added to the existing 16-item Sniffin’ Sticks ID test to create the 40-item Monell Extended Sniffin’ Sticks Identification Test (MONEX-40). The MONEX-40 was administered to 259 healthy young subjects, of which 72 were retested on an average of 212 days (SD 112 days) later. Results The added odor items demonstrated good validity, as shown by a significant correlation of the results with the original 16-item ID test. In addition, the MONEX-40 achieved a significant test–retest and split-half reliability. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that the MONEX-40 is a reliable method for experimental assessment of odor ID ability in healthy, young individuals. Moreover, its use of a wider range of odors allows the experimenter to present subsets of the MONEX-40 within the same experiment while maintaining statistical power.

Freiherr, Jessica; Gordon, Amy R.; Alden, Eva C.; Ponting, Andrea L.; Hernandez, Monica F.; Boesveldt, Sanne; Lundstrom, Johan N.

2013-01-01

262

A new outlier identification test for method comparison studies based on robust regression.  

PubMed

The identification of outliers in method comparison studies (MCS) is an important part of data analysis, as outliers can indicate serious errors in the measurement process. Common outlier tests proposed in the literature usually require a homogeneous sample distribution and homoscedastic random error variances. However, datasets in MCS usually do not meet these assumptions. In this work, a new outlier test based on robust linear regression is proposed to overcome these special problems. The LORELIA (local reliability) residual test is based on a local, robust residual variance estimator, given as a weighted sum of the observed residuals. The new test is compared to a standard test proposed in the literature by a Monte Carlo simulation. Its performance is illustrated in examples. PMID:21191861

Rauch, Geraldine; Geistanger, Andrea; Timm, Jürgen

2011-01-01

263

Field test of a DFB fiber laser geophone system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we report the first stage field test results of a novel DFB fiber laser geophone system in Shengli oilfield. Two distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser geophones are wavelength multiplexed and the space between them is 50m. The performance of DFB fiber laser geophones are tested by weak seismic signals stimulated by explosions together with conventional 20DX moving-coil geophones. The results show that the DFB fiber laser geophones have highly similarity with conventional geophones and higher bandwidth. The DFB fiber laser geophone system is promising in micro-seismic monitoring of unconventional oil and gas hydraulic fracturing.

Sun, Zhihui; Zhang, Faxiang; Li, Shujuan; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding; Li, Hongguo; Wu, Xuebing

2013-12-01

264

Resonant-test-field model of fluctuating nonlinear waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Hamiltonian system of nonlinear dispersive waves is used as a basis for generalizing the test-wave model to a set of resonantly interacting waves. The resonant test field (RTF) is shown to obey a nonlinear generalized Langevin equation in general. In the Markov limit a Fokker-Planck equation is obtained and the exact steady-state solution is determined. An algebraic expression for the power spectral density is obtained in terms of the number of resonantly interacting waves (n) in the RTF, the interaction strength (Vk), and the dimensionality of the wave field (d). For gravity waves on the ocean surface a k-4 spectrum is obtained, and for capillary waves a k-8 spectrum, both of which are in essential agreement with data.

West, Bruce J.

1982-03-01

265

Rapid Identification of Candida glabrata with a New Commercial Test, GLABRATA RTT  

PubMed Central

The GLABRATA RTT test (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois Perret, France) is based on the ability of Candida glabrata to hydrolyze trehalose but not maltose. It requires an inoculum of only four to six colonies, and the results are available within 20 min. We tested GLABRATA RTT with 330 stock isolates grown in subcultures on four different primary fungal isolation media and obtained a sensitivity of 94 to 98% (depending on the medium used) and a specificity of 97.3 to 98.6%. The false-positive results corresponded to C. tropicalis, C. famata, and C. lusitaniae. GLABRATA RTT thus offers rapid and reliable identification of C. glabrata.

Freydiere, A.-M.; Robert, R.; Ploton, C.; Marot-Leblond, A.; Monerau, F.; Vandenesch, F.

2003-01-01

266

Field testing of sound absorption coefficients in a classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formal procedures for determining the sound absorption coefficients of materials installed in the field do not exist. However, the U.S. Air Force requested such tests to prove that the sound-absorbing material used in classrooms at Beale AFB in Marysville, CA, met the specified NRC of 0.80. They permitted the use of two layers of 0.5-in. fiberboard or 1-in.-thick fiberglass panels

Steve Pettyjohn

2005-01-01

267

Field and in-situ rock-mechanics testing manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Standardized field and in situ rock mechanics testing procedures for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program were prepared. Equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria are compared. The procedures incorporate existing standards represent the current state of the art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design is incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

Shuri, F. S.; Feves, M. L.; Peterson, G. L.; Foster, K. M.; Kiele, C. F., Jr.

1981-10-01

268

Lidar tracking of multiple fluorescent tracers: Method and field test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

1992-01-01

269

On-site cell field test support program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

1982-09-01

270

Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Miller, P. [Natural Resources Defense Council (United States); Motau, C. [South African Center for Essential Community Services (South Africa); Stevens, F. [Durban Metro Water (South Africa)

1997-09-01

271

Development and field test of deformation sensors for concrete embedding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our laboratories have developed a measurement system called SOFO, based on low-coherence interferometry in singlemode optical fibers and allowing the measurement of deformations of the order of 1/100 mm. This system is especially useful for the long-term monitoring of civil structures such as bridges, tunnels, dams and geostructures. The SOFO system requires the installation of two fibers in the structure to be monitored. The first fiber should be in mechanical contact with the structure in its active region and follow the structure deformation in both elongation and shortening. The second fiber has to be installed freely in a pipe near the first one. This fiber acts as a reference and compensates for the temperature dependence of the index of refraction in the measurement fiber. This contribution presents the design process as well as the lab and field tests of a sensor responding to these requirements and adapted to the installation in concrete structures. The active region can be between 25 cm and 8 m in length, while the passive region can reach at least 20 m. While the reference is free, the measurement fiber (installed in the same pipe) is pre-stressed between two glue-points at each end of the active region. The glue was chosen in order to avoid any creeping problems even at temperatures up to 160 degree(s)C and elongation up to 2%. The sensor was tested in laboratory and field conditions. The lab tests included survival to concreting, high temperatures, freezing, thermal cycling, vibrations, cracking and corrosion; response to elongation and compression, measurement range and creeping of the glue points at high temperatures and high tensions. The field tests included installation of a number of these sensors in a bridge deck and in a tunnel vault. In these applications we tested the ease of use, the rapidity of installation and the survival rate.

Inaudi, Daniele; Vurpillot, Samuel; Casanova, Nicoletta; Osa-Wyser, Annette

1996-05-01

272

A new integrated neutron/gamma radioisotope identification device evaluated under mixed radiation fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hand-Held RadioIsotope Identification Devices (HHRIID) are defined as a new class of portable neutron/gamma radiation detectors with specifications presented in the ANSI Standards N42.33 and N42.34. We have proposed a novel HHRIID design concept which uses a single photosensor to detect light emitted by two optically separated scintillator materials, one optimized for gamma detection and the other optimized for neutron detection. This work describes the performance of a modified charge integration discrimination method developed to test the viability of the new design. The scintillators chosen for the experiment were LYSO and ZnS:Ag/LiF.

Ivan, Adrian; Clothier, Brent A.; McDevitt, Daniel B.; Williams, James

2008-05-01

273

Method for the identification of the field configuration in presence of the localized perturbation observed in RFP toroidal plasma devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for the identification of the magnetic field configuration inside a RFP plasma, affected by a localized nonaxisymmetric perturbation, is presented. The knowledge of the magnetic field on a closed surface located around the plasma torus, together with a simplified plasma model, assures a unique solution for this inverse problem

G. Chitarin

1999-01-01

274

Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

1993-07-01

275

Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

Burke, Edmund J.

276

trnL-F is a powerful marker for DNA identification of field vittarioid gametophytes (Pteridaceae)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims The gametophyte phase of ferns plays an important role in habitat selection, dispersal, adaptation and evolution. However, ecological studies on fern gametophytes have been impeded due to the difficulty of species identification of free-living gametophytes. DNA barcoding provides an alternative approach to identifying fern gametophytes but is rarely applied to field studies. In this study, an example of field vittarioid gametophyte identification using DNA barcoding, which has not been done before, is given. Methods A combination of distance-based and tree-based approaches was performed to evaluate the discriminating power of three candidate barcodes (matK, rbcL and trnL-F) on 16 vittarioid sporophytes. Sequences of the trnL-F region were generated from 15 fern gametophyte populations by tissue-direct PCR and were compared against the sporophyte dataset, using BLAST. Key Results trnL-F earns highest primer universality and discriminatory ability scores, whereas PCR success rates were very low for matK and rbcL regions (10·8 % and 41·3 %, respectively). BLAST analyses showed that all the sampled field gametophytes could be successfully identified to species level. Three gametophyte populations were also discovered to be living beyond the known occurrence of their sporophyte counterparts. Conclusions This study demonstrates that DNA barcoding (i.e. reference databasing, tissue-direct PCR and molecular analysis), especially the trnL-F region, is an efficient tool to identify field gametophytes, and has considerable potential in exploring the ecology of fern gametophytes.

Chen, Cheng Wei; Huang, Yao Moan; Kuo, Li Yaung; Nguyen, Quoc Dat; Luu, Hong Truong; Callado, John Rey; Farrar, Donald R.; Chiou, Wen Liang

2013-01-01

277

Specific Identification of Staphylococcus aureus by Staphychrom II, a Rapid Chromogenic Staphylocoagulase Test  

PubMed Central

We compared the performance of Staphychrom II (International Microbio, Signes, France), a rapid (2-h) chromogenic staphylocoagulase test that uses human prothrombin and protease inhibitors, with those of the reference tube coagulase test (TCT) and the latex agglutination test (LAT) Slidex Staph Plus for the rapid identification of S. aureus. Prospective evaluation with 293 fresh clinical isolates yielded sensitivities, specificities, and predictive and negative predictive values of 98.1, 100, 100, and 95.1%, respectively, for the Staphychrom II test; 98.6, 98.7, 99.6, and 96.3%, respectively, for LAT; and 97.6, 98.7, 99.5, and 93.9%, respectively, for TCT. The perfect specificity of the Staphychrom II test was confirmed by testing 193 collection strains selected because of their potential testing pitfalls. The Staphychrom II test was positive for 90% of the 215 S. aureus strains tested after only 1 h of incubation. The Staphychrom II test was as sensitive as the reference TCT and was 100% specific.

Fonsale, Nathalie; Bes, Michele; Verdier, Isabelle; Carricajo, Anne; Ploton, Christine; Aubert, Gerald; Etienne, Jerome; Vandenesch, Francois; Freydiere, Anne Marie

2004-01-01

278

NUMERICAL TESTS OF FAST RECONNECTION IN WEAKLY STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS  

SciTech Connect

We study the effects of turbulence on magnetic reconnection using three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. This is the first attempt to test a model of fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of weak turbulence proposed by Lazarian and Vishniac. This model predicts that weak turbulence, which is generically present in most astrophysical systems, enhances the rate of reconnection by reducing the transverse scale for reconnection events and by allowing many independent flux reconnection events to occur simultaneously. As a result, the reconnection speed becomes independent of Ohmic resistivity and is determined by the magnetic field wandering induced by turbulence. We test the dependence of the reconnection speed on turbulent power, the energy injection scale, and resistivity. We apply the open and experiment with the outflow boundary conditions in our numerical model and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of various setups. To test our results, we also perform simulations of turbulence with the same outflow boundaries but without a large-scale field reversal, thus without large-scale reconnection. To quantify the reconnection speed we use both an intuitive definition, i.e., the speed of the reconnected flux inflow, and a more sophisticated definition based on a formally derived analytical expression. Our results confirm the predictions of the Lazarian and Vishniac model. In particular, we find that the reconnection speed is proportional to the square root of the injected power, as predicted by the model. The dependence on the injection scale for some of our models is a bit weaker than expected, i.e., l{sup 3/4}{sub inj}, compared to the predicted linear dependence on the injection scale, which may require some refinement of the model or may be due to effects such as the finite size of the excitation region, which are not a part of the model. The reconnection speed was found to depend on the expected rate of magnetic field wandering and not on the magnitude of the guide field. In our models, we see no dependence on the guide field when its strength is comparable to the reconnected component. More importantly, while in the absence of turbulence we successfully reproduce the Sweet-Parker scaling of reconnection, in the presence of turbulence we do not observe any dependence on Ohmic resistivity, confirming that the reconnection of the weakly stochastic field is fast. We also do not observe a dependence on anomalous resistivity, which suggests that the presence of anomalous effects, e.g., Hall MHD effects, may be irrelevant for astrophysical systems with weakly stochastic magnetic fields.

Kowal, Grzegorz; Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Vishniac, E. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Otmianowska-Mazur, K. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Orla 171, 30-244 Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: kowal@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: otmian@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: ethan@mcmaster.ca

2009-07-20

279

Evaluation of possibilities in identification and susceptibility testing for Candida glabrata clinical isolates with the Integral System Yeast Plus (ISYP).  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate possibilities of correct identification and susceptibility testing of C. glabrata clinical isolates with Integral System Yeast Plus (ISYP). For species identification, as the reference method, API Candida test and species-specific PCR reactions were used. The potential of antifungal susceptibility testing by the ISYP test was compared with the Sensititre Yeast One. Whilst the reference methods confirmed that the received population (n = 65 isolates) represented only C. glabrata, identification with the ISYP system showed correct data only in the case of 18 strains tested (27.7%). Species identification of the other 47 strains with the ISYP test was not possible at all. Significant differences were also observed for drug susceptibility testing carried out by the ISYP and the Sensititre Yeast One. The highest level of disagreement in classifying strains as resistant or susceptible estimated, as 73.9% and 40.0%, was observed for itraconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Satisfactory results were only obtained for 5-fluorocytosine with 93.8% agreement between both methods. In our opinion the idea of the ISYP system is certainly good. The combination of identification ability and drug susceptibility testing in one test is very important, especially from a clinical point of view. However, the current version of the ISYP has many disadvantages. We would like to encourage the manufacturer to make an effort and develop a new, more accurate version of the test. PMID:24939684

Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Naumiuk, Lukasz; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierzanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Milewski, Slawomir

2014-06-01

280

77 FR 43087 - Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for Comments and Data...have the potential to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). NICEATM also requests...where feasible. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. William S. Stokes,...

2012-07-23

281

Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing  

SciTech Connect

Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

2000-01-01

282

System structure identification and adaptive control of a seismic isolator test rig  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is focused on the modelling, the system identification and the adaptive control design of an unidirectional hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig. The plant, constituted by the hydraulic actuation system and the isolator under test, is characterized by a non-linear behaviour and parametric uncertainties caused by the operating conditions and the unknown characteristics of the device to be tested. Therefore, a model reference adaptive approach is adopted for the position controller synthesis. To this end, a first order non-linear model is proposed and its structure identified. Experimental results and simulations highlight the goodness of the proposed model and the effectiveness of the designed control for the hydraulically actuated isolator test rig.

Di Massa, Giandomenico; Russo, Riccardo; Strano, Salvatore; Terzo, Mario

2013-11-01

283

Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

1982-05-01

284

Experiments and Material Parameter Identification Using Finite Elements. Uniaxial Tests and Validation Using Instrumented Indentation Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we focus our attention on the relation between instrumented indentation tests and the prediction by means\\u000a of finite element calculations. To this end, a finite strain viscoplasticity model of Perzyna-type with non-linear isotropic\\u000a and kinematic hardening is calibrated at experimental data of steel S690QL. A particular concept for conducting uniaxial tensile\\u000a and compression tests is taken up

S. Hartmann; J. Gibmeier; B. Scholtes

2006-01-01

285

Testing for optic ataxia in a blind field  

PubMed Central

Optic ataxia is a component of Balint's syndrome and is a disorder that results from damage to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) leading to deficits in reaching and grasping objects presented in the visual field opposite to the damaged hemisphere. It is also often the case that Balint's syndrome is accompanied by visual field defects due to the proximity of parietal and occipital cortices and also due to the subcortical pathway relaying visual information from the retina to the visual cortex passing underneath the parietal cortex. The presence of primary visual defects such as hemianopia often prevents clinicians from diagnosing higher-level visual deficits such as optic ataxia; the patient cannot reach to targets he/she cannot see. Here, we show that through the use of a paradigm that takes advantage of remapping mechanisms, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. We measured reach endpoints of a patient presenting with left optic ataxia as well as a quadrantanopia in the left lower visual field in eye-static and eye-dynamic conditions. In static conditions, we first asked the patient to reach to targets viewed in her non-optic ataxic intact right visual field (fixating on the left of the target array). In this case, the patient showed undershoots equivalent to controls. Next, we asked her to reach to (the same) targets viewed in the upper left optic ataxic but intact visual field (fixating to the right of the target array). The undershooting pattern increased greatly, consistent with unilateral left optic ataxia. In dynamic conditions, we asked her to view targets in her good (right lower) visual field before reorienting her line of sight to the opposite side, causing the internal representation of the target to be updated into the opposite (ataxic) blind visual field. The patient then reached to the remembered (and updated) location of the target. We found errors typical of optic ataxia for reaches guided toward the quadrantanopic field. This confirmed that reaching errors depended on the updated internal representation of the target and not on where the target was viewed initially. In both the patient and the controls, the updating of target location was partial, with reaching errors observed subsequent to an eye movement made from left to right fixation positions being intermediate between the left and right static conditions. Thus, using this remapping paradigm, we were able to observe optic ataxia in the blind field. In conclusion, this remapping paradigm would allow clinicians to test for visuo-manual transformation deficits (optic ataxia) even when it is associated with hemianopia.

Khan, Aarlenne Z.; Pisella, Laure; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves

2013-01-01

286

A review of quality of life after predictive testing for and earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases.  

PubMed

The past decade has witnessed an explosion of evidence suggesting that many neurodegenerative diseases can be detected years, if not decades, earlier than previously thought. To date, these scientific advances have not provoked any parallel translational or clinical improvements. There is an urgency to capitalize on this momentum so earlier detection of disease can be more readily translated into improved health-related quality of life for families at risk for, or suffering with, neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in neurodegenerative diseases and the importance of these "patient reported outcomes" for all clinical research. Next, we address HRQOL following early identification or predictive genetic testing in some neurodegenerative diseases: Huntington disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion diseases, hereditary ataxias, Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and Wilson's disease. After a brief report of available direct-to-consumer genetic tests, we address the juxtaposition of earlier disease identification with assumed reluctance toward predictive genetic testing. Forty-one studies examining health-related outcomes following predictive genetic testing for neurodegenerative disease suggested that (a) extreme or catastrophic outcomes are rare; (b) consequences commonly include transiently increased anxiety and/or depression; (c) most participants report no regret; (d) many persons report extensive benefits to receiving genetic information; and (e) stigmatization and discrimination for genetic diseases are poorly understood and policy and laws are needed. Caution is appropriate for earlier identification of neurodegenerative diseases but findings suggest further progress is safe, feasible and likely to advance clinical care. PMID:24036231

Paulsen, Jane S; Nance, Martha; Kim, Ji-In; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Panegyres, Peter K; Erwin, Cheryl; Goh, Anita; McCusker, Elizabeth; Williams, Janet K

2013-11-01

287

Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

2000-01-01

288

Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system`s ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites.

Reed, S. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Christy, C.E. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Heath, R.E. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-01

289

A Pilot Study Comparing Two Field Tests with the Treadmill Run Test in Soccer Players  

PubMed Central

This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST) and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET), with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT), in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players’ performance (i.e. distance covered) in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Players’ performance in the YIET was not significantly correlated with the measured VO2max obtained in the same YIET nor with the measured VO2max obtained in the MST and in the TRT (all p > 0.05). In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players’ performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05); and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06). The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players’ intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player’s endurance performance. Key PointsBoth the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test and 20m multistage shuttle run test are valid measures of aerobic exertion in soccer playersMeasured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players’ intermittent endurance performance.In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player’s endurance performance.

Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Tan, Frankie H. Y.; Teh, Kong Chuan

2005-01-01

290

Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments  

SciTech Connect

The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

1994-08-01

291

Dark Ages Radio Explorer - Field Tests of a Prototype Instrument  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept designed to measure the sky-averaged redshifted HI 21-cm signal from the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization between 40 - 120 MHz (z = 11 - 35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the intense human-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) found on Earth. The science objectives of DARE include charting the history of the formation of the first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization, and end of the Dark Ages. A prototype science instrument has been constructed, consisting of bi-conical dipole antennas and a differential amplifier balun followed by a receiver and JPL-Caltech designed digital spectrometer. Extensive tests with this instrument are underway in order to improve the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the overall DARE instrument. Here, we present results from preliminary field tests at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site in Green Bank, West Virginia. Further field tests will be performed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. This research has been supported by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR), headquartered at the University of Colorado Boulder and funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A. Part of this research was conducted at that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Bowman, J. D.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J. J.

2012-05-01

292

System identification of the Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF), a laboratory-scale research project to demonstrate the magnetic suspension of objects over wide ranges of attitudes, has been developed. This system represents a scaled model of a planned Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LAMSTF consists of a small cylindrical permanent magnet suspended element which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The cylinder is a rigid body and can be controlled to move in five independent degrees of freedom. Six position variables are sensed indirectly by using infrared light-emitting diodes and light-receiving phototransistors. The motion of the suspended cylinder is in general nonlinear and hence only the linear, time-invariant perturbed motion about an equilibrium state is considered. One of the main challenges in this project is the control of the suspended element over a wide range of orientations. An accurate dynamic model plays an essential role in controller design. The analytical model is first derived and open-loop characteristics discussed. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control for system identification. Projection filters are first proposed to identify the state space model from closed-loop input/output test data in the time domain. This method is then extended to identify linear systems from the frequency test data. A canonical transformation matrix is also derived to transform the identified state space model into the physical coordinate. The LAMSTF system is stabilized by using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) feedback controller for closed-loop identification. The rate information is obtained by calculating the back difference of the sensed position signals. Only the closed-loop random input/output data are recorded. Preliminary results from numerical simulations demonstrate that the identified system model is fairly accurate from either time domain or frequency-domain data. Experiments will be performed to validate the proposed closed-loop identification algorithms.

Huang, Jen-Kuang

1994-01-01

293

Identification of Branhamella catarrhalis in 2.5 min with an indoxyl butyrate strip test.  

PubMed Central

Branhamella catarrhalis, an occasional cause of human respiratory infections, unlike most other members of the family Neisseriaceae, produces a butyrate esterase. This is capable of breaking the ester linkage between butyryl groups and carrier molecules. B. caviae and B. ovis, which are rarely encountered in pathological specimens, also produce butyrate esterase. This property can be used as a rapid test in the identification of B. catarrhalis. The recently reported rapid test for butyrate esterase relies on the release of methylumbelliferate, which can be detected only by using UV light after 5 min of incubation. In the rapid test described here, indoxyl is liberated from indoxyl butyrate by butyrate esterase and spontaneously forms indigo in the presence of oxygen. B. catarrhalis can be distinguished from other oxidase-positive, gram-negative cocci after 2.5 min by inoculating the organism onto a filter paper strip containing this compound.

Dealler, S F; Abbott, M; Croughan, M J; Hawkey, P M

1989-01-01

294

Half-embryo test for identification of irradiated citrus fruit: collaborative study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A collaborative study on the use of the half-embryo test for the detection of irradiated citrus fruit was undertaken. Collaborative samples of seeds removed from citrus fruit, which were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.2 and 0.5 kGy, were examined by 12 participating laboratories. The percentage of correct identifications, whether irradiated or unirradiated, was 92% of 48 samples after 4 days incubation and 98% after 7 days incubation. Only one sample, irradiated with 0.2 kGy, was incorrectly identified. This collaborative study shows that irradiated citrus fruit can be identified using the half-embryo test and that the test can be applied in practice.

Kawamura, Yoko; Sugita, Takiko; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

1996-11-01

295

Intended and unintended effects of explicit warnings on eyewitness suggestibility: evidence from source identification tests.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that source identification (ID) tests reduce, and in some cases eliminate, eyewitness suggestibility errors. The present study showed that the suggestibility errors participants committed on a source ID test were further reduced when they were given the explicit postwarning that the experimenter was trying to trick them. These postwarnings reduced suggestibility to the same extent as prewarnings, and they did so for both once and repeatedly suggested items. In addition, the benefits of the pre- and postwarnings persisted when participants were retested 1 week later, but only if the suggestions had been repeated. For once-suggested items, the warning had the unintended effect of improving old/new recognition of the suggested information at retest, an effect that offset the improvements in source discrimination accuracy conferred by the warning. The advantages of using source ID tests for investigating group differences in eyewitness suggestibility are discussed. PMID:11913748

Chambers, K L; Zaragoza, M S

2001-12-01

296

Test Observations and Plans For the Hubble Deep Field - South  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will discuss the planning process, scheduling constraints, and scientific considerations which we have studied and undertaken thus far for the southern Hubble Deep Field observations which are to be performed in October of 1998. Observations from a 3-orbit test program taken in October 1997 at the same position angle and with the same guide stars will be presented to the community for comment and for informational purposes. Planning is constrained in part by CVZ passages, by solar avoidance, zodiacal light, effective use of filters and gratings minimizing effects of scattered earthshine, SAA avoidance, avoidance of bright stars, and availability of suitable guide stars. In particular, it is crucial to test the same guide stars that will be used for the full set of observations. This preview of science data on the field will also allow us to fine-tune any other aspects of the program which may be better optimized scientifically. The HDF-S test observations will consist of one orbit of STIS 50CCD clear aperture imaging to image the field around the QSO, and two orbits of STIS NUV-MAMA G230L spectroscopy on the QSO to obtain a low resolution spectrum. In addition, three orbits of WFPC2 F606W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 6.2 arc minutes from the QSO, and three orbits of NIC3 F160W imaging will be obtained in parallel on a field about 8.7 arc minutes from the QSO. The actual HDF-S observations next October are currently planned to include the same complement of filters for WFPC2 as was used in the original HDF-N ( F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W ). Other options yet to be determined will be pursued for STIS and NICMOS for the full campaign. For more information, see our HDF-South Web site at the URL http://www.stsci.edu/ftp/science/hdf/hdfsouth/hdfs.html.

Williams, R. E.; Baum, S. A.; Blacker, B. S.; Carollo, M.; Casertano, S.; Dickinson, M. E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilliland, R. L.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Madau, P.; Postman, M.; Stiavelli, M.

1997-12-01

297

Sensitivity of Lagrangian coherent structure identification to flow field resolution and random errors.  

PubMed

The effect of spatial and temporal resolutions and random errors on identification of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) from Eulerian velocity fields is evaluated using two canonical flows: a two-dimensional vortex pair and a vortex ring formed by transient ejection of a jet from a tube. The flow field for the vortex pair case was steady and obtained analytically while the transient vortex ring flow was simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To evaluate resolution and random error effects, the flow fields were degraded by locally smoothing the flow and sampling it on a sparser grid to reduce spatial resolution, adding Gaussian distributed random noise to provide random errors, and/or subsampling the time series of vector fields to reduce the temporal resolution (the latter applying only for the vortex ring case). The degradation methods were meant to emulate distortions and errors introduced in common flow measurement methods such as digital particle image velocimetry. Comparing the LCS corresponding to the vortex boundary (separatrix) obtained from the degraded velocity fields with the true separatrix (obtained analytically for the vortex pair case or from high resolution, noise-free velocity fields for the vortex ring case) showed that noise levels as low as 5%-10% of the vortex velocity can cause the separatrix to significantly deviate from its true location in a random fashion, but the "mean" location still remained close to the true location. Temporal and spatial resolution degradations were found to primarily affect transient portions of the flow with strong spatial gradients. Significant deviations in the location of the separatrix were observed even for spatial resolutions as high as 2% of the jet diameter for the vortex ring case. PMID:20370296

Olcay, Ali B; Pottebaum, Tait S; Krueger, Paul S

2010-03-01

298

Field Lysimeter Test Facility for protective barriers: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

This document was first written in October 1986 and has been used to guide the design of the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) and to promote discussions between research and engineering staff regarding the selection of barrier treatments for inclusion in the FLTF. The construction of the lysimeter facility was completed June 28, 1987. This document describes the facility, the treatments placed in each lysimeter, types of measurements made in each lysimeter, and a brief discussion of project activities related to quality assurance, safety, and funding requirements. The treatment description and figures have been updated to reflect the lysimeter facility as constructed. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.; Downs, J.L.

1987-12-01

299

University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Field Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Field Test Facility became operational. Experiments demonstrated that the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer will accept injection of 300 gpm (18.9 1 sec (-1)) at reasonable pressures with a heat buildup in the injection well of about 44 psi (31.6 m) over 8 days. Heating of the ground water caused precipitation of carbonate in the piping and injection well, but with proper water conditioning, the system will work satisfactorily at elevated temperatures.

Walton, M.; Hoyer, M. C.

1982-12-01

300

Field test of an autonomous wind-diesel power plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An autonomous power plant composed of a wind energy converter and a diesel generator was tested in laboratory and in the field to assess the wind energy supply as a noninfluenceable parameter in the regulation of the mono and bivalent operation of the power plant, for control of the dynamic behavior of the electrical components, for tuning of the regulation expenditure with comfort requirements, and for model evaluation of energy cost analysis. The interaction between meteorological, technical, economic and energy policy aspects was assessed. The relationship between economical use and comfort limits technical improvement. Development of the concept of a bivalent power supply with wind and diesel is recommended.

Fritzsche, A.; Knoebel, U.; Ruckert, W.

1985-09-01

301

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

302

Wavefront dislocations and testing of coherent optical fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown, that spiral interferograms can be used for diagnostics of screw dislocations. The connection between the type of spiral line, the type of defect and the values of wavefronts curvatures of interfering beams is established. The spherical wave is considered as reference wavefront. The results of analysis for isolated dislocation are integrated on case of defects set. It is shown, that the diagnostics of coherent fields with defects as screw dislocation requires the preliminary study of wavefront topology. The outline of execution of such testing is offered.

Bobrov, Boris D.

1996-04-01

303

Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

2008-01-01

304

Field testing results of downhole scale inhibitor injection  

SciTech Connect

The first field tests on the addition of scale inhibitors to geothermal brines were carried out in Italy between 1981 and 1985 at Cesano and at Latera. A long-term experiment was recently performed in the Latera 2 well to check the feasibility of the downhole inhibitor injection technique as a reliable solution to the carbonate scaling problem. A plastic-lined injection pipe was used to solve the corrosion problems caused by the inhibitor itself. Two different scale inhibitors have been tested down to minimum concentrations of 10 ppm. Downhole injection was performed at about 750 m depth using a 4.6 mm 0D flexible pipe freely lowered in the 9 5/'' casing and with total flow rates of 300 t/h for three months.

Pieri, S.; Sabatelli, F.; Tarquini, B. (ENEL - National Geothermal Unit, Via Andrea Pisano 120, 56100 Pisa (IT))

1989-01-01

305

Method for direct and rapid identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial susceptibility testing from positive blood cultures  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

Methods of the invention include the isolation of intact, viable microorganism(s) from positive blood culture ("PBC") samples for use in downstream analyses such as identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing ("AST"). The methods involve collecting a portion of the PBC sample, adding a choline-containing solution, lysing the blood cells, isolating the viable microorganism, and performing downstream analysis of the isolated, viable microorganism. The methods can be applied to a variety of gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and/or yeast, and particularly to strains of S. pneumoniae.

2013-12-10

306

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01

307

Optimizing Field Campaigns Using A Hypothesis Testing Framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field campaigns in hydrogeology often aim to characterize aquifers for modeling and predicting flow and transport of contaminants to facilitate in some objective related to environmental protection or public health and safety. Many times these objectives depend on predicting the answer to a yes/no question, such as: will contaminant concentration in an aquifer surpass a threshold value? Will a contaminant reach a river outflow before it degrades? Is water from an extraction well safe for consumption? It remains difficult, however, to predict the extent to which a field campaign will improve modeling and prediction efforts or the chance of success in the original objective. Presented here is a method for designing field campaigns around the original objective by posing it in a hypothesis testing framework and optimizing campaigns with minimizing probability of error as the goal. The first step in this process is to formulate the null and alternative hypotheses, which represent the two possible outcomes of the yes/no question in the objective. The alternative hypothesis is the desirable outcome which requires a specified level of certainty to be accepted. The null hypothesis, on the other hand, is the "safe" fallback assumption, which is accepted if the alternative hypothesis lacks sufficient supporting evidence. Of key concern in designing field campaigns is the probability of making an error (Type I or Type II). A level of significance is chosen based on the severity of each type of error and the level of risk that is considered acceptable for each case. A field campaign can then be designed to gain enough information to reduce the probability of error to the acceptable level while expending as few resources as possible. A case study examined here is attempting to predict the arrival time of a contaminant in an aquifer. A scenario is first established in which a contaminant is travelling from a point source to a control plane, which could represent, for example, a water supply well or an environmentally sensitive area. In this case, the null hypothesis is that this arrival time is less than or equal to a specified critical value, while the alternative hypothesis is that the arrival time is greater than the critical value. In this case, the field campaign involves measuring conductivity at various locations throughout the aquifer. The campaign could vary both in the number of measurements and the location of the measurements. Estimating the probability of error resulting from a field campaign involves numerical simulations in which travel time is calculated on numerous fields that are physically and statistically plausible. The calculated travel time for each field is then compared to the hypothesis that would have been accepted via an analysis using only information ascertained by the field campaign in question. The result from each field falls into one of four categories: correctly accepting the null hypothesis, correctly accepting the alternative hypothesis, error of Type I, and error of Type II. Differing field campaign strategies can then be compared based on the frequency of errors resulting from each strategy.

Harken, B. J.; Over, M. W.; Rubin, Y.

2012-12-01

308

Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal.  

PubMed

Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as "retests", beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols. PMID:23401252

Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R; Tebbs, Joshua M

2013-03-01

309

Group testing regression model estimation when case identification is a goal  

PubMed Central

Group testing is frequently used to reduce the costs of screening a large number of individuals for infectious diseases or other binary characteristics in small prevalence situations. In many applications, the goals include both identifying individuals as positive or negative and estimating the probability of positivity. The identification aspect leads to additional tests being performed, known as “retests,” beyond those performed for initial groups of individuals. In this paper, we investigate how regression models can be fit to estimate the probability of positivity while also incorporating the extra information from these retests. We present simulation evidence showing that significant gains in efficiency occur by incorporating retesting information, and we further examine which testing protocols are the most efficient to use. Our investigations also demonstrate that some group testing protocols can actually lead to more efficient estimates than individual testing when diagnostic tests are imperfect. The proposed methods are applied retrospectively to chlamydia screening data from the Infertility Prevention Project. We demonstrate that significant cost savings could occur through the use of particular group testing protocols.

Zhang, Boan; Bilder, Christopher R.; Tebbs, Joshua M.

2013-01-01

310

TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

Kermis, William J.

311

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01

312

Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) field test installations  

SciTech Connect

The MIMS program is funded by the Department of Energy under the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The program objective is to develop cost effective, modular, multi-sensor monitoring systems. Both in-plant and ground based sensors are envisioned. It is also desirable to develop sensors/systems that can be fielded/deployed in a rapid fashion. A MIMS architecture was selected to allow modular integration of sensors and systems and is based on LonWorks technology, commercially developed by Echelon Corporation. The first MIMS fieldable hardware was demonstrated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The field test, known within the DOE as the Item Tracking and Transparency (IT&I) demonstration, involved the collaboration and cooperation of five DOE laboratories (Sandia (SNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Pacific Northwest (PNL), Los Alamos (LANL), and Oak Ridge (ORNL)). The IT&T demonstration involved the monitoring of special nuclear material as it was transported around the facility utilizing sensors from the participating labs. The scenario was programmed to ignore normal activity in the facility until entry into the room where the material was stored. A second demonstration, which involved three separate scenarios, was conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The participants included representatives from SNL, LLNL, PNL, and INEL. DOE has selected INEL as the long term testbed for MIMS developed sensors, systems, and scenarios. This paper will describe the installation, intended purpose, and results of the field demonstrations at LLNL and INEL under the MIMS program.

Martinez, R.L.; Waymire, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fuess, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-07-01

313

The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

1989-02-01

314

Field testing of new-technology ambient air ozone monitors.  

PubMed

Multibillion-dollar strategies control ambient air ozone (O3) levels in the United States, so it is essential that the measurements made to assess compliance with regulations be accurate. The predominant method employed to monitor O3 is ultraviolet (UV) photometry. Instruments employ a selective manganese dioxide or heated silver wool "scrubber" to remove O3 to provide a zero reference signal. Unfortunately, such scrubbers remove atmospheric constituents that absorb 254-nm light, causing measurement interference. Water vapor also interferes with the measurement under some circumstances. We report results of a 3-month field test of two new instruments designed to minimize interferences (2B Technologies model 211; Teledyne-API model 265E) that were operated in parallel with a conventional Thermo Scientific model 49C O3 monitor. The field test was hosted by the Houston Regional Monitoring Corporation (HRM). The model 211 photometer scrubs O3 with excess nitric oxide (NO) generated in situ by photolysis of added nitrous oxide (N2O) to provide a reference signal, eliminating the need for a conventional O3 scrubber. The model 265E analyzer directly measures O3-NO chemiluminescence from added excess NO to quantify O3 in the sample stream. Extensive quality control (QC) and collocated monitoring data are assessed to evaluate potential improvements to the accuracy of O3 compliance monitoring. Implications: Two new-technology ozone monitors were compared with a conventional monitor under field conditions. Over 3 months the conventional monitor reported more exceedances of the current standard than the new instruments, which could potentially result in an area being misjudged as "nonattainment." Instrument drift can affect O3 data accuracy, and the same degree of drift has a proportionally greater compliance effect as standard stringency is increased. Enhanced data quality assurance and data adjustment may be necessary to achieve the improved accuracy required to judge compliance with tighter standards. PMID:23926854

Ollison, Will M; Crow, Walt; Spicer, Chester W

2013-07-01

315

Laboratory and field assessment of arsenic testing field kits in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India.  

PubMed

High concentrations of arsenic in ground waters in West Bengal and Bangladesh have become a major cause for concern in recent years. Given the enormity and the severity of the problem of arsenic poisoning, a task of evaluating the commercially available arsenic detection field kits for their capabilities was undertaken. In the light of the findings, generic specifications were recommended which could form the basis for indigenous manufacture of these kits in the arsenic affected countries. This article presents the results of the laboratory and field evaluation conducted in Bangladesh and West Bengal of five arsenic testing field kits. The salient features of the kits, their merits and limitations have been brought out. Based on the criteria of kit design, quality of chemicals used, colour comparator charts, detection range, time required for analysis, cost etc., a comparative ranking of the kits has been made to facilitate the choice of the kit to meet specific requirements. PMID:11336408

Pande, S P; Deshpande, L S; Kaul, S N

2001-04-01

316

Rapid paper disk test for identification of Helicobacter pylori in mixed cultures of gerbil gastric homogenates.  

PubMed

A method denominated rapid paper disk test (RPDT) was developed to identify H. pylori colonies in complex cultures obtained from gerbil gastric homogenates. Identification is based on a characteristic reaction pattern (RP) for H. pylori colonies given by the combination of the urease-oxidase activities on a paper disk. Compared to the RPs obtained from gerbil's intestinal tract isolated bacteria, H. pylori RP is completely distinguishable, even from those of bacteria that share one or both activities as are Aerococcus urinae, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus brevis, Corynebacterium pseudogenitalium, and Staphylococcus simulans, as well as from those produced by collection strains Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This method allows the practical quantification of H. pylori colonies in highly contaminated plates. RPDT has the following advantages over other methodologies that use indicators in the medium: it employs two of the three routinely used H. pylori biochemical identification tests, the reagents do not interfere with bacterial viability, there are no restrictions in relation to the medium used, and it is a simple, fast, and low-cost method. PMID:20624429

Castillo-Juarez, Israel; Rangel-Vega, Adrian; Romero, Irma

2010-10-01

317

Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Enterobacteriaceae  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the accuracy of the BD Phoenix system for the identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of 251 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae representing 31 species. Organisms were inoculated onto the Phoenix panel according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results from conventional biochemical tests were used for the reference method for ID. Agar dilution, performed according to the CLSI guidelines, was the reference AST method. Essential and categorical agreements were determined. The overall levels of agreement for the genus- and species-level identifications were 95.6% and 94.4%, respectively. Fourteen isolates were incorrectly identified by the Phoenix system; 10 of these were incorrectly identified to the species level. Three of these were Enterobacter (Pantoea) species and four of these were Shigella spp. misidentified as Escherichia coli. For AST results, the essential and categorical agreements were 98.7% and 97.9%, respectively. The very major error, major error, and minor error rates were 0.38%, 0.33%, and 1.8%, respectively. Six isolates (three E. coli isolates and three Klebsiella isolates) were extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producers. All six were flagged by the Phoenix system expert rules. The Phoenix system compares favorably to traditional methods for ID and AST of Enterobacteriaceae.

Carroll, Karen C.; Glanz, Brian D.; Borek, Anita P.; Burger, Chad; Bhally, Hasan S.; Henciak, Susan; Flayhart, Diane

2006-01-01

318

An integrated approach to monitoring a field test of in situ contaminant destruction  

SciTech Connect

The development of in situ thermal remediation techniques requires parallel development of techniques capable of monitoring the physical and chemical changes for purposes of process control. Recent research indicates that many common contaminants can be destroyed in situ by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), eliminating the need for costly surface treatment and disposal. Steam injection, combined with supplemental air, can create the conditions in which HP0 occurs. Field testing of this process, conducted in the summer of 1997, indicates rapid destruction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previous work established a suite of underground geophysical imaging techniques capable of providing sufficient knowledge of the physical changes in the subsurface during thermal treatment at sufficient frequencies to be used to monitor and guide the heating and extraction processes. In this field test, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) and temperature measurements provided the primary information regarding the temporal and spatial distribution of the heated zones. Verifying the in situ chemical destruction posed new challenges. We developed field methods for sampling and analyzing hot water for contaminants, oxygen, intermediates and products of reaction. Since the addition of air or oxygen to the contaminated region is a critical aspect of HPO, noble gas tracers were used to identify fluids from different sources. The combination of physical monitoring with noble gas identification of the native and injected fluids and accurate fluid sampling resulted in an excellent temporal and spatial evaluation of the subsurface processes, from which the amount of in situ destruction occurring in the treated region could be quantified. The experimental field results constrain the destruction rates throughout the site, and enable site management to make accurate estimates of total in situ destruction based on the recovered carbon. As of October, 1998, over 400,000 kg (900,000 lb) of contaminant have been removed from the site; about 18% of this has been destroyed in situ.

Aines, R D; Carrigan, C; Chiarappa, M; Eaker, C; Elsholtz, A; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

1998-12-01

319

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1993-01-01

320

Forensic identification of urine using the DMAC test: a method validation study.  

PubMed

Forensic scientists may sometimes be asked to identify the presence of urine in cases such as harassment, rape or murder. One popular presumptive test method uses para-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC), favoured because it is simple, rapid and safe. This paper confirms that DMAC reacts with urea rather than creatinine, ammonia or uric acid. Sensitivity studies found that the 0.1% w/v DMAC solution currently used for urine identification detects levels of urea found in other body fluids, potentially resulting in false positives. A 0.05% w/v solution was found to be more appropriate in terms of sensitivity to urea however the test is still not specific for urine, giving positive reactions with a number of body fluids (saliva, semen, sweat and vaginal material) and other substances (foot lotion, hair removal cream and broccoli). PMID:22583500

Ong, Sandy Y; Wain, Adrian; Groombridge, Linda; Grimes, Eileen

2012-06-01

321

Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

2012-01-01

322

Benchmarking Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of the study was to benchmark the geometric accuracy of mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems using a permanent test field under good coverage of GNSS. Mobile laser scanning, also called mobile terrestrial laser scanning, is currently a rapidly developing area in laser scanning where laser scanners, GNSS and IMU are mounted onboard a moving vehicle. MLS can be considered to fill the gap between airborne and terrestrial laser scanning. Data provided by MLS systems can be characterized with the following technical parameters: a) point density in the range of 100-1000 points per m2 at 10 m distance, b) distance measurement accuracy of 2-5 cm, and c) operational scanning range from 1 to 100 m. Several commercial, including e.g. Riegl, Optech and others, and some research mobile laser scanning systems surveyed the test field using predefined driving speed and directions. The acquired georeferenced point clouds were delivered for analyzing. The geometric accuracy of the point clouds was determined using the reference targets that could be identified and measured from the point cloud. Results show that in good GNSS conditions most systems can reach an accuracy of 2 cm both in plane and elevation. The accuracy of a low cost system, the price of which is less than tenth of the other systems, seems to be within a few centimetres at least in ground elevation determination. Inaccuracies in the relative orientation of the instruments lead to systematic errors and when several scanners are used, in multiple reproductions of the objects. Mobile laser scanning systems can collect high density point cloud data with high accuracy. A permanent test field suits well for verifying and comparing the performance of different mobile laser scanning systems. The accuracy of the relative orientation between the mapping instruments needs more attention. For example, if the object is seen double in the point cloud due to imperfect boresight calibration between two scanners, this will make especially the automatic modelling of the object much more challenging.

Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Hyyppä, J.; Jaakkola, A.

2012-07-01

323

Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Medically Relevant Gram-Positive Cocci  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to evaluate the new VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) for identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of gram-positive cocci. Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (n 100), coagulase- negative staphylococci (CNS) (n 100), Enterococcus spp. (n 89), Streptococcus agalactiae (n 29), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n 66) were examined with the ID-GPC identification card and with the AST-P515 (for staphylococci),

Marco Ligozzi; Cinzia Bernini; Maria Grazia Bonora; Maria de Fatima; Jessica Zuliani; Roberta Fontana

2002-01-01

324

Evaluation of an immunofluorescent-antibody test for rapid identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in blood cultures.  

PubMed Central

An immunofluorescent-antibody test was developed for rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in blood cultures. The test uses a murine monoclonal antibody specific for all strains of P. aeruginosa. In initial tests, bright uniform immunofluorescence signals were seen when each of the 17 international serotypes, as well as 14 additional isolates of P. aeruginosa, were examined. No immunofluorescent staining was observed when 37 other gram-negative and 15 gram-positive species were studied. In a clinical study, the assay was applied to broth smears of 86 gram-negative bacilli isolated from 74 bacteremic patients and 28 additional clinical isolates of Pseudomonas sp. and other oxidase-positive gram-negative bacilli recovered from various body sites. Smears were made directly from blood cultures which were positive for gram-negative bacilli by Gram staining. Eleven (15%) of 74 patients with gram-negative bacteremia had a positive test for P. aeruginosa. Including the results of these 11 isolates recovered in a prospective study and an additional 10 isolates from a retrospective study, we obtained a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (21 positive specimens and 103 negative specimens, respectively). These preliminary results suggest that this is a useful reagent for rapid presumptive identification of P. aeruginosa in blood cultures. With the immunofluorescent-antibody test, P. aeruginosa could be identified within 1 h of Gram stain evidence of gram-negative bacteremia. Images

Counts, G W; Schwartz, R W; Ulness, B K; Hamilton, D J; Rosok, M J; Cunningham, M D; Tam, M R; Darveau, R P

1988-01-01

325

Identification of armature, field, and saturated parameters of a large steam turbine-generator from operating data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a step by step identification procedure of armature, field and saturated parameters of a large steam turbine-generator from real time operating data. First, data from a small excitation disturbance is utilized to estimate armature circuit parameters of the machine. Subsequently, for each set of steady state operating data, saturable mutual inductances Lads and Laqs are estimated. The

H. Bora Karayaka; Ali Keyhani; Baj L. Agrawal; Douglas A. Selin; Gerald Thomas Heydt

2000-01-01

326

Non-contact rail flaw detection system: first field test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers at UCSD, with the initial support of NSF and the current support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), have been working on a flaw detection prototype for rails that uses non-contact ultrasonic probing and robust data processing algorithms to provide high speed and high reliability defect detection in these structures. Besides the obvious advantages of non-contact probing, the prototype uses ultrasonic guided waves able to detect and quantify transverse cracks in the rail head, notoriously the most dangerous of all rail track defects. This paper will report on the first field test which was conducted in Gettysburg, PA in March 2006 with the technical support of ENSCO, Inc. Good results were obtained for the detection of both surface-breaking and internal cracks ranging in size from 2% cross-sectional head area (H.A.) reduction to 80% H.A. reduction.

Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Bartoli, Ivan; Fateh, Mahmood

2007-05-01

327

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Jastrow, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wickliff, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01

328

Results of field testing of radioactive waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

The Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program is obtaining informaiton on the performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms fabricated using ion-exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters employed in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station are being tested to develop a low-level waste data base and to obtain information on survivability of waste forms in a disposal environment. In this paper, radionuclide releases from waste forms in the first six years of sampling are presented and discussed. Application of lysimeter data to use in performance assessment models is presented. Initial results from use of data in a performance assessment model are discussed.

McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-08-01

329

Field tests of interspecific resource-based competition among phytoplankton  

PubMed Central

The hypothesis that interspecific resource-based competition caused the spring and summer vertical segregation of phytoplankton species was tested in Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada). Two species (Cyclotella glomerata Bachmann and Synedra radians Kütz.) became dominant at different depth intervals (0-30 m and 60-90 m, respectively). Experimental transplants of assemblages between depths demonstrated asymmetrical competition. In the phosphate-limited region near the surface, growth of S. radians declined in the presence of C. glomerata. However, growth of C. glomerata was not affected by the presence of S. radians in the light-limited region at depth. This study provides field verification of resource-based competition theory. Images

Carney, Heath J.

1987-01-01

330

Field tests of interspecific resource-based competition among phytoplankton.  

PubMed

The hypothesis that interspecific resource-based competition caused the spring and summer vertical segregation of phytoplankton species was tested in Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada). Two species (Cyclotella glomerata Bachmann and Synedra radians Kütz.) became dominant at different depth intervals (0-30 m and 60-90 m, respectively). Experimental transplants of assemblages between depths demonstrated asymmetrical competition. In the phosphate-limited region near the surface, growth of S. radians declined in the presence of C. glomerata. However, growth of C. glomerata was not affected by the presence of S. radians in the light-limited region at depth. This study provides field verification of resource-based competition theory. PMID:16593853

Carney, H J

1987-06-01

331

Field testing industrial and medical excimer laser systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Testing of ultraviolet lasers with field portable notebook PC's is accomplished with UV SensorCards responding to wavelengths from 450 nm to 8 angstroms. Beam sizes from over 5 inches to less than one micron have been measured in applications including laser annealing of flat panel displays, multichip module via hole drilling, ink jet cartridge manufacturing, semiconductor lithography, and medical eye surgery. Both instant UV SensorCard and direct camera observation have been employed. The former offers submicron resolution over large areas. The latter offers real time (30 Hz) display and capture of images. UV diffractive beam splitters have been employed to allow simultaneous measurement of absolute laser power and beam profile; including absolute fluence measurement. Among the common problems in laser system operation revealed are beam misalignment, shot to shot spatial energy variation, deterioration of optics, and streaming due to gas impurities.

Forrest, Gary T.

1996-04-01

332

Rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus directly from Bactec blood culture broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus test.  

PubMed

The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth. PMID:24153135

Qian, Qinfang; Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E

2014-01-01

333

Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Bactec Blood Culture Broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus Test  

PubMed Central

The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth.

Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E.

2014-01-01

334

Development of a polymerase chain reaction test for specific identification of the urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae.  

PubMed Central

A polymerase chain reaction test was developed for identification of the gram-positive urinary tract pathogen Aerococcus urinae. Oligonucleotide primers were based on highly specific sequences within the small-subunit rRNA gene. A confirmatory test based on hybridization of the amplified products to a highly specific internal probe was also developed. Images

Aguirre, M; Collins, M D

1993-01-01

335

Spatial release from masking in a free-field source identification task by gray treefrogs.  

PubMed

Humans and other animals often communicate acoustically in noisy social groups, in which the background noise generated by other individuals can mask signals of interest. When listening to speech in the presence of speech-like noise, humans experience a release from auditory masking when target and masker are spatially separated. We investigated spatial release from masking (SRM) in a free-field call recognition task in Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis). In this species, reproduction requires that females successfully detect, recognize, and localize a conspecific male in the noisy social environment of a breeding chorus. Using no-choice phonotaxis assays, we measured females' signal recognition thresholds in response to a target signal (an advertisement call) in the presence and absence of chorus-shaped noise. Females experienced about 3 dB of masking release, compared with a co-localized condition, when the masker was displaced 90° in azimuth from the target. The magnitude of masking release was independent of the spectral composition of the target (carriers of 1.3 kHz, 2.6 kHz, or both). Our results indicate that frogs experience a modest degree of spatial unmasking when performing a call recognition task in the free-field, and suggest that variation in signal spectral content has small effects on both source identification and spatial unmasking. We discuss these results in the context of spatial unmasking in vertebrates and call recognition in frogs. PMID:22240459

Nityananda, Vivek; Bee, Mark A

2012-03-01

336

Testing neoclassical competitive market theory in the field  

PubMed Central

This study presents results from a pilot field experiment that tests predictions of competitive market theory. A major advantage of this particular field experimental design is that my laboratory is the marketplace: subjects are engaged in buying, selling, and trading activities whether I run an exchange experiment or am a passive observer. In this sense, I am gathering data in a natural environment while still maintaining the necessary control to execute a clean comparison between treatments. The main results of the study fall into two categories. First, the competitive model predicts reasonably well in some market treatments: the expected price and quantity levels are approximated in many market rounds. Second, the data suggest that market composition is important: buyer and seller experience levels impact not only the distribution of rents but also the overall level of rents captured. An unexpected result in this regard is that average market efficiency is lowest in markets that match experienced buyers and experienced sellers and highest when experienced buyers engage in bargaining with inexperienced sellers. Together, these results suggest that both market experience and market composition play an important role in the equilibrium discovery process.

List, John A.

2002-01-01

337

Reliability and field testing of distributed strain and temperature sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distributed fiber optic sensing presents unique features that have no match in conventional sensing techniques. The ability to measure temperatures and strain at thousands of points along a single fiber is particularly interesting for the monitoring of large structures such as pipelines, flow lines, oil wells, dams and dikes. Sensing systems based on Brillouin and Raman scattering have been used for example to detect pipeline leakages, verify pipeline operational parameters, prevent failure of pipelines installed in landslide areas, optimize oil production from wells and detect hot-spots in high-power cables. The measurement instruments have been vastly improved in terms of spatial, temperature and strain resolution, distance range, measurement time, data processing and system cost. Analyzers for Brillouin and Raman scattering are now commercially available and offer reliable operation in field conditions. New application opportunities have however demonstrated that the design and production of sensing cables is a critical element for the success of any distributed sensing instrumentation project. Although standard telecommunication cables can be effectively used for sensing ordinary temperatures, monitoring high and low temperatures or distributed strain present unique challenges that require specific cable designs. This contribution presents three cable designs for high-temperature sensing, strain sensing and combined strain and temperature monitoring as well as the respective testing procedures during production and in the field.

Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko

2006-04-01

338

Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

2004-02-11

339

Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite processing area, an estuarine marsh, a paint storage locker, and several indoor locations including chemical laboratory fume hoods and bathrooms. In addition, a group were set aside in a sealed enclosure for control purposes. The dosimeters were retrieved at monthly intervals and exposed to measured doses of hydrazine vapor to determine the effects of the field exposure on their hydrazine response. Our analysis indicated that 90% of the exposed dosimeters were able to sense hydrazine at a dose detectivity of less than 15 ppb-hr, a value that meets the current hydrazine sensing requirement. Consequently, we are planning to deploy a full scale, continuously operating fiber optic system for detecting potential hydrazine leaks during launch operations at Cape Canaveral.

Klimcak, Charles M.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.

1999-02-01

340

Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

1997-02-01

341

FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

Unknown

2001-05-31

342

Comparison of the MUREXC. albicans, Albicans-Sure, and BactiCard Candida Test Kits with the Germ Tube Test for Presumptive Identification ofCandida albicans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MUREXC. albicans(MC) (Murex Diagnostics), Albicans-Sure (AS) (Clinical Standards Laboratories), and BactiCard Candida (BC) (Remel) test kits were compared with the germ tube (GT) test for the rapid, presumptive identification ofCandida albicans. All three test kits detect the enzymes L-proline aminopeptidase and b-galactosaminidase in yeast cells grown on culture media and are based on the principle thatC. albicans produces both

ARTHUR E. CRIST; THERESA J. DIETZ

1996-01-01

343

78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment, which is...Inc. Product: Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations:...

2013-05-21

344

Lessons Learnt from the Dynamic Identification / Qualification Tests on the ESC-A Upper stage Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic qualification of the new cryogenic upper stage ESC-A of the ARIANE 5 is supported by several tests in order to verify the assumptions and the modelling approach made at the beginning of the development. The upper composite of the ARIANE 5, consisting of upper stage, vehicle equipment bay, payload carrying structures, payload dummies and fairing, was modal tested to validate the mathematical model of the launcher. Additionally, transfer functions were measured for Pogo investigations. Validated mathematical launcher models are the basis to predict the launcher global responses in the low frequency domain with sufficient confidence. The predicted global axial and lateral responses for selected sections at the stage represent the flight loads for these sections. The stage contains a large amount of equipment such as propellant lines, acceleration rockets, batteries, fluid control equipment etc. The verification of the equipment responses in the integrated state was done by a sine vibration test, excited to levels representing the predicted flight loads including a qualification factor. Acoustic tests with the upper stage were performed to verify the random vibration responses in the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. To verify the shock response level induced by stage separation (pyro shock) a stage separation test was performed. All the equipment was qualified separately for its dynamic (sine, random and shock excitation) and thermal environment to proof its structural and functional integrity. The paper concentrates on the experience made with the modal identification and sine-vibration test of the stage. For the sine vibration test an electrodynamic multi-shaker table was used. It was able to produce the required input precisely up to 150 Hz as specified, not an easy task for a test set-up of 20 tons weight. The paper presents the approach how the dynamic qualification was reached successfully and highlights the experiences which were made - the comparison between prediction and test results shows the ability and good quality of analysis but - the advantage of combined analysis of shaker table and stage model for test prediction - local effects observed in test - the dependency of damping on the load level - the efficiency of the so called SARO-Damping Device

Rittweger, A.; Beuchel, W.; Eckhardt, K.

2002-01-01

345

Field-Testing of an Active Laser Tracking System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comprehensive space surveillance demands a more accurate technique in tracking multi-dimensional state vector (3D coordinate, velocity, vibration, etc.) of the space objects. RF radiometric techniques typically can not provide the needed accuracy, while passive optical (and laser) tracking systems can provide distance to the object and its angular position, but not a direct reading of velocity, the parameter of primary importance for space object tracking and characterization. Addressing this problem with active optical tracking techniques is challenging because of the great distances involved, the high velocity of the satellites, and the optical aberrations induced by the atmosphere. We have proposed a phase conjugation based laser tracking concept, and accomplished the first version of design and engineering of a prototype for an Active Laser Tracking System (ALTS). In its current state the ALTS is capable to demonstrate the very basics operational principles of the proposed active tracking technique. We then performed a number of experiments to prove operational capabilities of this prototype both at MetroLaser's lab environment and at Edwards AFB Test Range. In its current architecture the ALTS is comprised of two laser cavities, Master and Slave that are coupled through a Phase Conjugate Mirror (PCM) formed in a non-linear medium (NLM) set at Master laser cavity. By pumping NLM and forming PCM, Master laser establishes the cavities coupling mode and injects the photons in the slave cavity. It is essential that the specific features of the PCM not only serve to couple ALTS cavities, but also serves to compensate optical aberrations of the ALTS (gain media and optical elements of the laser resonator). Due to its ability to compensate optical aberrations, phase conjugate resonators are capable of sustaining oscillation with a remote target as an output coupler. The entire system comprises of several modules, including a laser, emitting/receiving telescope, gimbal-mirror module for laser beam steering and detectors, all set on a single platform. In the initial ALTS design, the laser module is conceptualized in coupled-cavitiesarchitecturewith a synchronously pumped gain media, a four-wave mixing PCM. The four-wave mixing arrangement uses optical phase conjugation to compensate for spatial inhomogeneities of the atmosphere. A significant innovation in the proposed approach is in its perspective capabilities to detect and measure the critical parameters in the returned signal that should allow to directly measure spatial/angular position and velocity of the target. This report will cover the system analysis, the ALTS design, test plan and exit criteria, functional and operational tests, and test results at Edwards AFB Range field.

Markov, V.; Khiznyak, A.; Woll, D.; Liu, S.

346

Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

1991-01-01

347

Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

Montgomery, Jim

2012-01-01

348

Immune function tests for hazard identification: a paradigm shift in drug development.  

PubMed

Routine immune function testing in preclinical drug development was established as a regulatory requirement in June of 2000 under the Committee of Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) Note for Guidance on Repeated Dose Toxicity (CPMP/SWP/1042/99). The purpose of the more stringent approach to immunotoxicology testing was to better identify unintended immunosuppression; however, the requirement was met with much discussion and debate. At the center of the discussion was an attempt to reconcile opposing regulatory directives from agencies outside of Europe that adhere to a more selective, weight-of-evidence approach to functional evaluations. Uncertainty over the predictive value of the recommended immune function tests relative to conventional toxicology parameters prompted an investigation by the International Committee on Harmonization (ICH). The results of a preliminary, industry-wide survey indicated that only a low percentage of pharmaceuticals adversely affect immune function without alterations to standard toxicology parameters. Expected ICH guidelines will ultimately determine to what extent and for what purpose immune function tests will be conducted. In the meantime, optimization of the recommended immune function tests is ongoing. The T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) by either conventional Sheep Red Blood Cell (SRBC) plaque assay or by the modified ELISA method using either SRBC or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as antigen is being extensively evaluated to determine best practices and procedures for preclinical immunotoxicity evaluations. This review addresses some aspects of the debate concerning the appropriateness of immune function tests for hazard identification, along with recommendations for optimizing TDAR methodology to ensure adequate sensitivity and predictability in risk assessments for immunotoxicity. PMID:16623854

Gore, Elizabeth R

2006-04-01

349

Field testing of physiological responses associated with Nordic Walking.  

PubMed

This study compared the physiological responses (oxygen consumption and energy expenditure) of Nordic Walking to regular walking under field-testing conditions. Eleven women (M age = 27.1 years, SD = 6.4) and 11 men (M age = 33.8 years, SD = 9.0) walked 1,600 m with and without walking poles on a level, 200-m track. For women, Nordic Walking resulted in increased oxygen consumption (M = 14.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), SD = 3.2 vs. M = 1 7.9 ml x kg(-1) min(-1), SD = 3.5; p < .001), caloric expenditure (M = 4.6 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.2 vs. M = 5.4 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.2; p < .001), and heart rate (M = 113.7 bpm, SD = 12.0 vs. M = 118.7 bpm, SD = 14.8; p < .05) compared to regular walking. For men, Nordic Walking resulted in increased oxygen consumption (M = 12.8 ml x kg(-1) min(-1), SD = 1.8 vs. M = 15.5, SD =3.4 ml x kg(-1) min(-1); p < .01), caloric expenditure (M = 5.7 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.3 vs. M = 6.9 kcal x min(-1), SD = 1.8; p < .001), and heart rate (M = 101.6 bpm, SD = 12.0 bpm vs. M = 109.8 bpm, SD = 14.7; p < .01) compared to regular walking. Nordic Walking, examined in the field, results in a significant increase in oxygen use and caloric expenditure compared to regular walking, without significantly increasing perceived exertion. PMID:12230336

Church, Timothy S; Earnest, Conrad P; Morss, Gina M

2002-09-01

350

Evaluation of a behavioral method for objective vision testing and identification of achromatopsia in dogs  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop a quantifiable behavioral test for identification of achromatopsic dogs based on visual performance. Animals 14 dogs. Procedures A 3.6-m-long obstacle-avoidance course with 6 obstacle panels was developed from a preliminary 2.4-m-long course. Achromatopsic and visually normal control dogs were run through the course at 4 ambient light intensities (from dim to bright: 0.2, 25, 65, and 646 lux). Completion of 4 runs ranging from dimmest to brightest light intensity constituted 1 complete trial. Each dog underwent 3 trials. Transit times were measured and compared between dog groups and between light intensities by use of a generalized linear model and ANOVA. Results At the 3 highest light intensities, the achromatopsic dogs needed significantly more time to pass through the obstacle course than the control animals. Compared with the mean transit time at the lowest light intensity, mean transit times were 2.6 times as long at 25 lux, 3.2 times as long at 65 lux, and 5.7 times as long at 646 lux. The achromatopsic dogs had signs of increasing difficulty navigating around the obstacle panels with increasing light intensities; this was not the situation for the control dogs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance A 3.6-m-long obstacle-avoidance course with 6 movable obstacle panels allowed identification of achromatopsic dogs at ambient light intensities ? 25 lux based on transit times. This test could be helpful in the evaluation of new cone photoreceptor–specific treatments.

Garcia, Monique M.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Cocores, Christina A.; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Komaromy, Andras M.

2010-01-01

351

Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

Hess, Ronald A.

1990-01-01

352

Cultivar Evaluation and Essential Test Locations Identification for Sugarcane Breeding in China  

PubMed Central

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China.

Luo, Jun; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai

2014-01-01

353

Cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in china.  

PubMed

The discrepancies across test sites and years, along with the interaction between cultivar and environment, make it difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the sugarcane cultivars. Using a genotype main effect plus genotype-environment interaction (GGE) Biplot software, the yield performance data of seven sugarcane cultivars in the 8th Chinese National Sugarcane Regional Tests were analyzed to identify cultivars recommended for commercial release. Fn38 produced a high and stable sugar yield. Gn02-70 had the lowest cane yield with high stability. Yz06-407 was a high cane yield cultivar with poor stability in sugar yield. Yz05-51 and Lc03-1137 had an unstable cane yield but relatively high sugar yield. Fn39 produced stable high sugar yield with low and unstable cane production. Significantly different sugar and cane yields were observed across seasons due to strong cultivar-environment interactions. Three areas, Guangxi Chongzuo, Guangxi Baise, and Guangxi Hechi, showed better representativeness of cane yield and sugar content than the other four areas. On the other hand, the areas Guangxi Chongzuo, Yunnan Lincang, and Yunnan Baoshan showed strong discrimination ability, while the areas Guangxi Hechi and Guangxi Liuzhou showed poor discrimination ability. This study provides a reference for cultivar evaluation and essential test locations identification for sugarcane breeding in China. PMID:24982939

Luo, Jun; Pan, Yong-Bao; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Hua; Yuan, Zhaonian; Deng, Zuhu; Chen, Rukai; Que, Youxiong

2014-01-01

354

Control and identification of strong field dissociative channels in CO_2^+ via molecular alignment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dissociative excitation of CO_2^+ was studied in the molecular frame as a function of probe laser intensity, ellipticity and polarization with respect to the molecular bond at laser wavelengths of 800 nm and 1350 nm. This allowed the identification of the main excitation pathway consisting of tunnel ionization from HOMO-2 followed by a parallel dipole transition from the second excited state B to the predissociating, third excited state C. Recollision excitation was shown to play a negligible role. Using laser induced impulsive alignment, the strong field induced coupling at 800 nm and 1350 nm of the ionic states B and C could thus be controlled by the laser polarization. This leads to a suppression of the fragmentation yield of up to 70% when the laser polarization was perpendicular to the molecular axis compared to parallel polarization. We have performed simulations of various ionization channels of CO2. Our simulations reflect the experimental findings and show that dissociation of CO_2^+ is induced by tunnelling from deeper molecular orbitals HOMO-1, HOMO-2, HOMO-3, followed by laser driven hole dynamics in the ion.

Oppermann, M.; Weber, S. J.; Morales, F.; Richter, M.; Patchkovskii, S.; Csehi, A.; Vibók, Á.; Ivanov, M.; Smirnova, O.; Marangos, J. P.

2014-06-01

355

Prediction system for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints.  

PubMed

A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as "unknown" by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

Zou, Wen; Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J

2012-05-01

356

Prediction System for Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes Based on Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprints  

PubMed Central

A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as “unknown” by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available.

Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B.; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J.

2012-01-01

357

Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

OConnell, Michael

2007-01-01

358

Comparison of Vitek identification and antifungal susceptibility testing methods to DNA sequencing and Sensititre YeastOne antifungal testing.  

PubMed

The colorimetric Vitek 2 YST card and the yeast susceptibility test (AST-YS01) were evaluated for their identification efficacy and their use in assessing the in vitro susceptibility of Candida spp. to fluconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin B. Ninety-one percent or 62 of 68 Candida isolates from blood specimens were correctly identified, as compared to determinations of the ITS2 fragment length. The overall essential agreements between Vitek 2 and the Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) colorimetric method were 78.4%, 84.6% and 90.8%, for fluconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. The overall categorical agreements between Vitek 2 and SYO for fluconazole and voriconazole were 76.9% and 96.9%, respectively. The poorest agreement between Vitek 2 and SYO was seen with C. glabrata (n = 27), particularly for fluconazole. The MIC values of 2 C. glabrata strains (3%) could not be determined with the Vitek 2 due to an insufficient growth in the control well. For other Candida species (n = 38) Vitek 2 and SYO showed acceptable agreements. PMID:20560861

Vijgen, Sara; Nys, Sita; Naesens, Reinout; Magerman, Koen; Boel, An; Cartuyvels, Reinoud

2011-01-01

359

Extension and field application of an integrated DNAPL source identification algorithm that utilizes stochastic modeling and a Kalman filter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThe design of an effective groundwater remediation system involves the determination of the source zone characteristics and subsequent source zone removal. The work presented in this paper focuses on the three-dimensional extension and field application of a previously described source zone identification and delineation algorithm. The three-dimensional search algorithm defines how to achieve an acceptable level of accuracy regarding the strength, geographic location and depth of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source while using the least possible number of water quality samples. Target locations and depths of potential sources are identified and given initial importance measures or weights using a technique that exploits expert knowledge. The weights reflect the expert's confidence that the particular source location is the correct one and they are updated as the investigation proceeds. The overall strategy uses stochastic groundwater flow and transport modeling assuming that hydraulic conductivity is known with uncertainty (Monte Carlo approach). Optimal water quality samples are selected according to the degree to which they contribute to the total concentration uncertainty reduction across all model layers and the proximity of the samples to the potential source locations. After a sample is taken, the contaminant concentration plume is updated using a Kalman filter. The set of optimal source strengths is determined using linear programming by minimizing the sum of the absolute differences between modeled and measured concentration values at sampling locations. The Monte Carlo generated suite of plumes emanating from each individual source is calculated and compared with the updated plume. The scores obtained from this comparison serve to update the weights initially assigned by the expert, and the above steps are repeated until the optimal source characteristics are determined. The algorithm's effectiveness is demonstrated by performing a 'blind test' at a field site in the Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in Alabama.

Dokou, Zoi; Pinder, George F.

2011-02-01

360

Field test results of a borehole directional radar  

SciTech Connect

The Borehole Directional Radar System is a high-power, high- resolution tool that is being developed to locate lithologic layers of fractures away from a wellbore. The prototype is a 50-kW peak- power pulsed directional radar system that determines fracture location by transmitting powerful radar pulses, 8 nanoseconds in length, in a known direction from a borehole. The frequency spectrum of the pulses ranges up to the VHF band, which is between 30 and 300 MHz. The transmitter and receiver rotate in place, permitting the tool to scan for fractures in all directions from the borehole. Because discontinuities in the rock interrupt and reflect radar signals, signals that return to the tool's receiving antenna indicate fractures. The distance of the fracture from the borehole is determined by the time delay of the return signal. The radio frequency signal is sampled and transmitted to the surface by wireline at audio frequencies, and then reconstructed at the surface using a personal computer. The key to the tool's potential is its ability to accurately measure distance and direction of a lithologic discontinuity underground. This paper presents field test results that show the capabilities of the tool for locating lithological discontinuities up to 10.5 m (34.5 ft) away from a wellbore. Unique features of the system are discussed. Potential applications of the system are described, such as locating gas and oil reservoirs below a salt dome and possibly detecting a blow-out well with or without casing. 10 refs., 8 figs.

Chang, Hsi-Tien (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-01-01

361

Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.  

PubMed

Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions. PMID:24364681

Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

2014-06-01

362

Field tests of the stem-induced explosive fracturing technique  

SciTech Connect

The explosive stem-induced fracturing technique has been field tested in over 20 producing oil wells in western Pennsylvania. The technique basically involves the placement of a primary explosive charge in an expendable rathole below the pay zone(s) to be fractured and of a solid gravel near the top of the pay zone to cause local fracturing through the dynamic reflection of the explosive gases. In the best cases, production increases realized with the technique are comparable to those obtained with conventional hydraulic fracturing in the area. A 35-mm downhole camera was developed and used to obtain photographs that show the absence of any vertical fracturing before the explosive treatments and well-developed vertical fractures in all zones designed to be fractured. This vertical fracturing is developed despite the fact that the in-situ stresses favor horizontal fracturing. The photographs also show that multiple radial fracturing, which might be expected with the high rates of the explosive loading, does not usually occur and that wellbore damage is less than predicted.

Young, C.; Barker, D.B.; Clark, H.C. Jr.

1986-07-01

363

Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter  

SciTech Connect

A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

1999-07-01

364

Testing a Poisson counter model for visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks.  

PubMed

The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is continued until the stimulus disappears, and the overt response is based on the categorization made the greatest number of times. The model was evaluated by Monte Carlo tests of goodness of fit against observed probability distributions of responses in two extensive experiments and also by quantifications of the information loss of the model compared with the observed data by use of information theoretic measures. The model provided a close fit to individual data on identification of digits and an apparently perfect fit to data on identification of Landolt rings. PMID:21928927

Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

2012-06-01

365

Organizational Identification and Social Motivation: A Field Descriptive Study in Two Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the relationships between leadership conversation and its impact upon organizational members' levels of organizational identification and behavior. It was hypothesized (1) that effective leader conversation would be associated with higher levels of role, means, goal and overall organizational identification, and (2) that…

Barge, J. Kevin

366

Fast and Confident: Postdicting Eyewitness Identification Accuracy in a Field Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The combined postdictive value of postdecision confidence, decision time, and Remember-Know-Familiar (RKF) judgments as markers of identification accuracy was evaluated with 10 targets and 720 participants. In a pedestrian area, passers-by were asked for directions. Identifications were made from target-absent or target-present lineups. Fast…

Sauerland, Melanie; Sporer, Siegfried L.

2009-01-01

367

X-ray identifications of FIRST radio sources in the XBoötes field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the goal of investigating the nature and the environment of the faint radio sources (at mJy level), here are presented results of X-ray identifications of Faint Imaging Radio Survey at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) in the 9 deg2 Boötes field of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS), using data from the Chandra XBoötes survey. A total of 92 (10 per cent) FIRST radio sources are identified above the X-ray flux limit fX(0.5-7)keV = 8 × 10-15ergs-1cm-2, and 79 optical counterparts are common to both the radio and X-ray sources. Spectroscopic identifications [obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) survey] were available for 22 sources (27 per cent). The majority of these sources (59 per cent) are classified as broad line active galactic nuclei (BLAGNs), and 18 per cent as low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), 14 per cent as star-forming galaxies and one source classified as BL Lac object. Multiwavelength optical/infrared photometric data (Bw ~ 25.5 mag, R ~ 25.8 mag, I ~ 25.5 mag and K ~ 19.4 mag) were available for this field and were used to derive photometric redshift for the remaining 57 sources without spectroscopic information. Most of the radio-X-ray matches are optically extended objects in the R band with a red colour, their radio emission is associated with AGN activity hosted in massive early type host galaxies with a photometric redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.7. Based on the hardness ratio and X-ray luminosity, 37 sources (89 per cent) were classified as AGN-1, 19 as AGN-2, 12 as quasi-stellar object 1 (QSO-1), two as QSO-2 and nine sources as normal galaxies. While the majority of these sources have a hard X-ray luminosity LX(2-7) keV > 1042ergs-1, about one third of the sources have LX(2-7) keV > 1044ergs-1 and therefore classified as QSO-1, 92 per cent of these objects are spectroscopically identified as QSOs. I found good agreement between the X-ray classification scheme and the classical AGN classification based on optical spectroscopic diagnostics. The majority (68 per cent) of the radio-X-ray matched population are found to have logfX/fopt within 0.0 +/- 1 region indicative of AGNs (Stocke et al.), 23 per cent with high X-ray to optical flux ratio (logfX/fopt > 1), suggesting high redshift and/or dust obscured AGN, and 11 per cent of the radio-X-ray matches that are X-ray faint optically bright sources with logfX/fopt < -1, and most of these sources are optically extended. These objects are low z, normal galaxies or low-luminosity AGNs (LINERs). Five sources of the radio-X-ray matches are associated with the so called extremely red object (ERO) having a colour of R - K > 5. No clear correlation has been found between the R - K colour and the hardness ratio. The very hard radio-X-ray matches (ignoring QSOs) all have low R - K colour which could be a consequence of the correlation found between the hardness ratio and redshift, and the fact that low R - K galaxies are mostly at low redshift.

El Bouchefry, K.

2009-07-01

368

40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Remove the selected engines for testing in a laboratory. You may...equipment and sampling methods for testing engines in the field. Use...thermostat starts modulating coolant temperature. (iv) The...threshold. (2) Engine testing may occur under any...

2013-07-01

369

Predictors of eyewitness identification decisions from video lineups in England: a field study.  

PubMed

Eyewitness identification decisions from 1,039 real lineups in England were analysed. Identification procedures have undergone dramatic change in the United Kingdom over recent years. Video lineups are now standard procedure, in which each lineup member is seen sequentially. The whole lineup is seen twice before the witness can make a decision, and the witness can request additional viewings of the lineup. A key aim of this paper was to investigate the association between repeated viewing and eyewitness decisions. Repeated viewing was strongly associated with increased filler identification rates, suggesting that witnesses who requested additional viewings were more willing to guess. In addition, several other factors were associated with lineup outcomes, including the age difference between the suspect and the witness, the type of crime committed, and delay. Overall, the suspect identification rate was 39%, the filler identification rate was 26% and the lineup rejection rate was 35%. PMID:22849411

Horry, Ruth; Memon, Amina; Wright, Daniel B; Milne, Rebecca

2012-08-01

370

Experimental identification and study of hydraulic resonance test rig with Francis turbine operating at partial load  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resonance in hydraulic systems is characterized by pressure fluctuations of high amplitude which can lead to undesirable and dangerous effects, such as noise, vibration and structural failure. For a Francis turbine operating at partial load, the cavitating vortex rope developing at the outlet of the runner induces pressure fluctuations which can excite the hydraulic system resonance, leading to undesirable large torque and power fluctuations. At resonant operating points, the prediction of amplitude pressure fluctuations by hydro-acoustic models breaks down and gives unreliable results. A more detailed knowledge of the eigenmodes and a better understanding of phenomenon occurring at resonance could allow improving the hydro-acoustic models prediction.This paper presents an experimental identification of a resonance observed in a close-looped hydraulic system with a Francis turbine reduced scale model operating at partial load. The resonance is excited matching one of the test rig eigenfrequencies with the vortex rope precession frequency. At this point, the hydro-acoustic response of the test rig is studied more precisely and used finally to reproduce the shape of the excited eigenmode.

Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Müller, A.; Avellan, F.

2012-11-01

371

Identification and Modeling of Electrohydraulic Force Control of the Material Test System (MTS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the heavy-duty material test device, an electrohydraulic force servo system is usually utilized to load the tested samples. The signal from the pressure sensor is compared with the instruction and the difference between them is then fed to a digital servo valve to form a closed loop control to the target force. The performance of the electrohydraulic force servo system is not only closely related to how accurate to feed the flow rate to the hydraulic cylinder, but also the stiffness of the system which is dominated by the compressibility of oil. Thus the clarification of the characteristic parameters becomes the key of the solution to optimal force control. To identify the electrohydraulic force servo system various step signals are input to excite the dynamic response of the system. From the relationship between the step magnitude and the force response, the system model and the key control parameters are determined. The electrohydraulic force servo system is identified as a first order system with time constant varied with the pressure. Based on the identification of the system optimal control parameters are finally obtained and force rate error is reduced to 0.2% from original 3%.

Ruan, J.; Pei, X.; Zhu, F. M.

2006-10-01

372

Distribution and identification of proteolytic Bacillus spp. in paddy field soil under rice cultivation.  

PubMed

Proteolytic bacteria in paddy field soils under rice cultivation were characterized and enumerated using azocoll agar plates. Bacillus spp. were the proteolytic bacteria that were most frequently present, comprising 59% of the isolates. They were always the numerically dominant proteolytic bacteria isolated from three kinds of fertilizer treatments (yearly application of rice-straw compost and chemical fertilizer, yearly application of chemical fertilizer, and no fertilizer application) and at three different stages of rice development (vegetative growth stage, maximal tillering stage, and harvest stage). Of the 411 proteolytic bacteria isolated, 124 isolates had stronger proteolytic activity than others on the basis of gelatin liquefaction tests and most of them were Bacillus spp. (100% in 1989 and 92.4% in 1991). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus were the main bacteria of this group and Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus megaterium were also present. We conclude that these Bacillus spp. are the primary source of soil protease in these paddy fields. PMID:8364803

Watanabe, K; Hayano, K

1993-07-01

373

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01

374

Testing a Poisson Counter Model for Visual Identification of Briefly Presented, Mutually Confusable Single Stimuli in Pure Accuracy Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is…

Kyllingsbaek, Soren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

2012-01-01

375

Identification of oil film coefficients of large journal bearings on a full scale journal bearing test rig  

Microsoft Academic Search

An attempt of adding a facility of investigating dynamic characteristics of oil film to a large full scale journal bearing test rig which was designed with only the function of static measurement is implemented. The considerations of impulse excitation, vibration measurement, data log and process, and dynamic characteristics identification are presented. The measured results are compared with theoretical data and

G. D. Jiang; H. Hu; W. Xu; Z. W. Jin; Y. B. Xie

1997-01-01

376

The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

1998-01-01

377

Adhoc electromagnetic compatibility testing of non-implantable medical devices and radio frequency identification  

PubMed Central

Background The use of radiofrequency identification (RFID) in healthcare is increasing and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have documented that RFID can interfere with medical devices. The majority of past studies have concentrated on implantable medical devices such as implantable pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). This study examined EMC between RFID systems and non-implantable medical devices. Methods Medical devices were exposed to 19 different RFID readers and one RFID active tag. The RFID systems used covered 5 different frequency bands: 125–134 kHz (low frequency (LF)); 13.56 MHz (high frequency (HF)); 433 MHz; 915 MHz (ultra high frequency (UHF])) and 2.4 GHz. We tested three syringe pumps, three infusion pumps, four automatic external defibrillators (AEDs), and one ventilator. The testing procedure is modified from American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C63.18, Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio-Frequency Transmitters. Results For syringe pumps, we observed electromagnetic interference (EMI) during 13 of 60 experiments (22%) at a maximum distance of 59 cm. For infusion pumps, we observed EMI during 10 of 60 experiments (17%) at a maximum distance of 136 cm. For AEDs, we observed EMI during 18 of 75 experiments (24%) at a maximum distance of 51 cm. The majority of the EMI observed was classified as probably clinically significant or left the device inoperable. No EMI was observed for all medical devices tested during exposure to 433 MHz (two readers, one active tag) or 2.4 GHz RFID (two readers). Conclusion Testing confirms that RFID has the ability to interfere with critical medical equipment. Hospital staff should be aware of the potential for medical device EMI caused by RFID systems and should be encouraged to perform on-site RF immunity tests prior to RFID system deployment or prior to placing new medical devices in an RFID environment. The methods presented in this paper are time-consuming and burdensome and suggest the need for standard test methods for assessing the immunity of medical devices to RFID systems.

2013-01-01

378

Magnetic Material Identification in Geometries With Non-Uniform Electromagnetic Fields Using Global and Local Magnetic Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the magnetic material characteristics are reconstructed for magnetic circuits with non-uniform electromagnetic field patterns, including excitation winding and\\/or air gaps, as in the case of rotating electrical machines. The identification process is done using a set of well chosen global and\\/or local magnetic measurements. Moreover, numerical inverse techniques are implemented in order to reconstruct the material characteristics

A. Abou-Elyazied Abdallh; P. Sergeant; G. Crevecoeur; L. Vandenbossche; L. Dupre; M. Sablik

2009-01-01

379

Retrospective evaluation of the impact of functional immunotoxicity testing on pesticide hazard identification and risk assessment.  

PubMed

Conduct of a T-cell-dependent antibody response (TDAR) assay in rodents according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Test Guideline OPPTS 870.7800 is now required for chemical pesticide active ingredients registered in the United States. To assess potential regulatory impact, a retrospective analysis was developed using TDAR tests conducted on 78 pesticide chemicals from 46 separate chemical classes. The objective of the retrospective analysis was to examine the frequency of positive responses and determine the potential for the TDAR to yield lower endpoints than those utilized to calculate reference doses (RfDs). A reduction in the TDAR response was observed at only the high-dose level in five studies, while it was unaltered in the remaining studies. Importantly, for all 78 pesticide chemicals, the TDAR no-observed-adverse-effect levels (TDAR NOAELs) were greater than the NOAELS currently in use as risk assessment endpoints. The TDAR NOAELs were higher than the current EPA-selected endpoints for the chronic RfD, short-term, intermediate and long-term exposure scenarios by 3-27,000, 3-1,688, 3-1,688 and 4.9-1,688 times, respectively. Based on this analysis, conduct of the TDAR assay had minimal impact on hazard identification and did not impact human health risk assessments for the pesticides included in this evaluation. These data strongly support employment of alternative approaches including initial weight-of-evidence analysis for immunotoxic potential prior to conducting functional immunotoxicity testing for pesticide active ingredients. PMID:24601769

Gehen, Sean C; Blacker, Ann M; Boverhof, Darrell R; Hanley, Thomas R; Hastings, Charles E; Ladics, Gregory S; Lu, Haitian; O'Neal, Fredrick O

2014-05-01

380

Underground Test Sensor Development. Volume 2. Electric Field Sensor Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A concept for the nonperturbative measurement of electric fields in a plasma is described. The concept is based on laser-induced fluorescence from Stark-mixed states. This work reviews the electric field measurement concept, the choices of an active mediu...

J. Bahns

1990-01-01

381

Tests on Mutagenic Effects of Strong Magnetic Fields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies on effects of magnetic fields on Tradescantia included pink stamen hair mutations, pollen abortion, and micronuclei formation in the tetrad stages of pollen production. Exposures were made using permanent magnets for fields up to 0.7 tesla, an ele...

J. W. Baum L. A. Schairer K. L. Lindahl

1978-01-01

382

Testing rates of planktonic versus benthic predation in the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predation is a major source of mortality for the eggs, embryos, and larvae of marine invertebrates. Many studies have measured rates of predation on the developmental stages of marine invertebrates in the lab, but few studies have estimated predation rates in the field. Field studies of predation on developmental stages have generally been limited to organisms in a single environment,

Jonathan D. Allen; Justin S. McAlister

2007-01-01

383

Testing Wetland Delineation Indicators in New England Boulder Fields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We evaluated the potential for regulating wet boulder fields as wetlands or other Waters of the US under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. We monitored hydrology in two boulder fields in Maine during the 2011 growing season and documented the presence/a...

J. J. Gillrich K. E. Curtis L. E. Dixon R. W. Lichvar

2012-01-01

384

Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: Evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).  

PubMed

In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (? ? or ? ?) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

2014-07-01

385

Quality analysis\\/quality control tests for field stabilization\\/solidification — 1. Dry cementing additives  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a field validation study of their proposed protocol for solidified waste evaluation, which will correlate laboratory test results with field behaviour, the Wastewater Technology Centre investigated the applicability of several rapid tests for quality analysis and control of the field solidified waste. A pilot-scale landfill was constructed and 63 m3 solidified arc furnace dust placed in it

C. Shi; J. A. Stegemann; R. J. Caldwell

1995-01-01

386

Field evaluation of deformation characteristics of a lacustrine clay deposit using seismic piezocone tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of the seismic piezocone test (SCPTU) in geotechnical site investigation offers direct field measurement on stratigraphy and soil behaviour. Compared with some traditional investigation methods such as drilling, sampling and field inspecting method or laboratory test procedures, SCPTU can greatly accelerate the field work and hereby reduce corresponding operation cost. This paper presents the methods review to predict

Guojun Cai; Songyu Liu; Liyuan Tong

2010-01-01

387

A semi-field approach to testing effects of fresh pesticide residues on bees in multiple-rate test  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a semi-field cage test specifically designed to test effects of delayed exposure to plant protection products. The trial involved the use of standardised mini-beehives. The principle of the trial was to prepare two groups of potted test plants per treatment. The first group of plants remained untreated, while the second group was treated at the desired rate and

F. Bakker; J. N. M. Calis

2003-01-01

388

BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris Hodge

2008-03-01

389

Do Toxicity Identification and Evaluation Laboratory-Based Methods Reflect Causes of Field Impairment?  

EPA Science Inventory

Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

390

A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work illustrates the efficiency of field spectroscopy for rapid identification of minerals in ore body, alteration zone and host rocks. The adopted procedure involves collection of field spectra, their processing for noise, spectral matching and spectral un-mixing with selected library end-members. Average weighted spectral similarity and effective peak matching techniques were used to draw end-members from library. Constrained linear mixture modelling technique was used to convolve end-member spectra. Linear mixture model was optimized based on root mean square error between field- and modelled-spectra. Estimated minerals and their abundances were subsequently compared with conventional procedures such as petrography, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence for accuracy assessment. The mineralized zone is found to contain azurite, galena, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, marcacite, gahnite, hematite, goethite, anglesite and malachite. The alteration zone contains chlorite, kaolinite, actinolite and mica. These mineral assemblages correlate well with the petrographic measurements ( R 2 = 0.89). Subsequently, the bulk chemistry of field samples was compared with spectroscopically derived cumulative weighted mineral chemistry and found to correlate well ( R 2 = 0.91-0.98) at excellent statistical significance levels (90-99%). From this study, it is evident that field spectroscopy can be effectively used for rapid mineral identification and abundance estimation.

Ramakrishnan, D.; Nithya, M.; Singh, K. D.; Bharti, Rishikesh

2013-02-01

391

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01

392

An Explication and Test of Communication Network Content and Multiplexity as Predictors of Organizational Identification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between identification and communication using organizational identification (OI) as a theoretical framework for studying communication networks among incoming graduate students in three university departments of communication. Concludes that, irrespective of initial OI, stronger initial multiplexity predicts the growth…

Bullis, Connie; Bach, Betsy Wackernagel

1991-01-01

393

Testing Delays Resulting in Increased Identification Accuracy in Line-Ups and Show-Ups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated time delays (immediate, two-three days, one week) between viewing a staged theft and attempting an eyewitness identification. Compared lineups to one-person showups in a laboratory analogue involving 412 subjects. Results show that across all time delays, participants maintained a higher identification accuracy with the showup…

Dekle, Dawn J.

1997-01-01

394

The Perceived Validity of Eyewitness Identification Testimony: A Test of the Five Biggers Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Supreme Court has outlined five criteria on which evaluations of eyewitness identifications should be based (certainty, view, attention, description, and time; Neil v. Biggers 1972). We postulated that certainty plays a qualitatively different role from the four other Biggers criteria in evaluations of eyewitness identification testimony. Specifically, we hypothesized that participants would ignore reports on other criteria when

Amy L. Bradfield; Gary L. Wells

2000-01-01

395

Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

1983-01-01

396

Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

2002-03-01

397

GUIDELINES FOR FIELD TESTING AQUATIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

This guidance has been developed for those attempting to field validate aquatic fate and transport models. Included are discussions of the major steps in validating models and sections on the individual fate and transport processes: biodegradation, oxidation, hydrolysis, photolys...

398

High performances simulation of ultrasonic fields for Non Destructive Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasonic imaging is a commonly used method to detect and identify defects in a mechanical part in nuclear applications. Nowadays massively parallel architectures enable the simulation of ultrasonic field emitted by a phased array transducer inspecting a part across a coupling medium. In this paper, regular field computation model will be discussed along its implementations on General Purpose Processors (GPP) and Graphic Processing Units (GPU).

Lambert, Jason; Lacassagne, Lionel; Rougeron, Gilles; Le Berre, Stéphane; Chatillon, Sylvain

2014-06-01

399

Testing potatoes for field resistance to late blight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Selection of potato clones for field resistance to late blight was made satisfactoly in the field by inoculating 3-hill units\\u000a with zoospores ofPhytophthora infestans. More precise comparisons were made in replicated 15-hill plots by measuring the spread of the disease from a single inoculated\\u000a plant in the center of each plot. Certain selections made in the 3-hill plots proved to

Carl J. Eide; Florian I. Lauer

1967-01-01

400

System identification using identification patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, system identification techniques using identification patterns are developed for use in on-line, in-situ monitoring of sensors and systems. The dynamic properties of sensors play an essential role in the performance of measurement and control systems. Both the single-frequency identification pattern (SIP) of the squarewave and the compact multifrequency identification pattern (MIP) for other test signals are examined

Ian A. Henderson; Lidia Jackowska-Strummillo; Joseph McGhee; Phillip McGlone; Dominik Sankowski

1999-01-01

401

Test Report for Photonic Sensors Used in Electric Field Measurement of Simulated Electromagnetic Pulses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the results of tests to record and analyze the characteristic response of three photonic Electric field (E-field sensors to simulated Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), compared to that of a reference metallic sensor. Work was performed un...

R. Blocksom R. Bucholz

1991-01-01

402

Putting Scholastic Aptitude Test Results on an Even Playing Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is very important, when considering how students from one area compare with those from another, to use similar student performance data. This is particularly evident when comparing the performance of students taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) from an area where many students take the test to the performance of students from an area from…

Costello, Ronald W.; Cox, Marge

403

Identification of structural surfaces' positions on an F\\/A-18 using the subspace identification method from flight flutter tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current paper, a linear state-space mathematical model, identified from flight flutter tests is presented, to simulate the aeroelastic deflections of specific structural parts of the NASA F\\/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing research aircraft. The flight flutter tests were performed in steady-level flight with Schroeder frequency excitation induced on the aircraft ailerons by an on-board excitation system activated by the

M N Beaulieu; S De Jesus Mota; R M Botez

2007-01-01

404

ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

Chris A. Hodge

2007-07-12

405

Comprehensive evaluation of a field test kit for lead  

SciTech Connect

The Hach Lead-Trak test kit for lead in water was tested in a laboratory evaluation. Considered were: operator bias, precision, accuracy, linear calibration range, and potential drinking water interferences. Interferences tested were realistic levels of: Ca, Mg, Ni, Sb, Mn, Cd, Cu, Zn, Fe(II), Fe(III), Al, NO3(-), Cl(-), F(-), PO4(3-), P2O7(4-), P6O18(-6), and P3O10(5-). Interferences were tested individually in deionized water, using a linear regression slope technique to detect bias. Results of analyses of split spiked samples and actual drinking water samples were compared to GFAAS values. Agreement with GFAAS was generally good from 0 to 50 micrograms Pb/L, but the kit suffered from significant negative interferences from Fe(II), Zn(II), and all polyphosphates. Recoveries of Pb from 6 different tap waters ranged from 81 to 109%. No operator bias was found.

George, G.K.; Schock, M.R.; Kelty, K.C.

1991-01-01

406

Three field tests of a gas filter correlation radiometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test flights to remotely measure nonurban carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations by gas filter correlation radiometry are discussed. The inferred CO concentrations obtained through use of the Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR) agreed with independent measurements obtained by gas chromatography air sample bottle analysis to within 20 percent. The equipment flown on board the aircraft, the flight test procedure, the gas chromatograph direct air sampling procedure, and the GFCR data analysis procedure are reported.

Campbell, S. A.; Casas, J. C.; Condon, E. P.

1977-01-01

407

Southwest Electronic One-Stop Shopping (EOSS): Field Operational Test. Final Evaluation Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Southwest Electronic One-Stop Shopping System (EOSS) Operational Test was selected for funding by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in 1994. Though it was selected as one of the field operational tests (FOTs) directed by the Intermodal Surface...

1999-01-01

408

Comparison and Evaluation of Field and Laboratory Toxicity Tests with Fenvalerate on an Estuarine Crustacean.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field and laboratory toxicity tests were conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural runoff. The study examined an integ...

D. S. Baughman D. W. Moore G. I. Scott

1989-01-01

409

Characterization of COROT Target Fields with BEST: Identification of Periodic Variable Stars in the IR01 Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on observations of the COROT IR01 field with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST). BEST is a small-aperture telescope with a wide field of view (FOV). It is dedicated to searching for variable stars within the target fields of the COROT space mission to aid in minimizing false-alarm rates, and identifying potential targets for additional science. COROT's observational program started in 2007 February, with the "initial run" field (IR01) observed for about 2 months. BEST observed this field for 12 nights spread over 3 months in winter 2006. From the total of 30,426 stars observed in the IR01 field, 3769 were marked as suspected variable stars, and 54 of these showed clear periodicity. From these, 19 periodic stars are within the part of the COROT FOV covered in our data set.

Kabath, P.; Eigmüller, P.; Erikson, A.; Hedelt, P.; Rauer, H.; Titz, R.; Wiese, T.; Karoff, C.

2007-10-01

410

Organic Field Effect Transistors for Neural Stimulation - In Vitro Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pentacene is an organic semiconductor that has the potential to be used as a switching element in active electrode matrices for neural stimulation. In this paper, we demonstrated that Pentacene-based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) can be used to drive stimulation currents of sufficient amplitude through neural electrodes in physiological-like environment. Furthermore, Pentacene was verified in respect to potential affects

Feili D; Schuettler M; Koch KP; Stieglitz T; Hoffmann KP

411

FIELD VALIDATION OF LABORATORY-DERIVED MULTISPECIES AQUATIC TEST SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

A three-year study was carried out to determine the feasibility of using multispecies microcosms of benthic microorganisms and infaunal macroinvertebrates to predict the responses of estuarine systems to toxic substances. Criteria were developed to evaluate the field validation o...

412

CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

413

FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER  

EPA Science Inventory

This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

414

Evaluation of latex agglutination tests for fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products in the forensic identification of menstrual blood.  

PubMed

The identification of menstrual blood is important when discriminating menstruation from vaginal trauma in sexual assault cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate two fibrin-fibrinogen degradation product (FDP)-latex agglutination test kits, FDPL® Test (FDP-L) and FDP Plasma "RD" (FDP-P), for their ability to forensically identify menstrual blood. Sensitivity and specificity of the two kits were compared for menstrual blood and various body fluids, and the sensitivity of the FDP-latex agglutination test kit was also compared with that of an immunochromatographic test for human hemoglobin. The robustness of the FDP-latex agglutination test was compared with that of gene expression analysis of menstrual blood specific markers. The FDP-L kit was more sensitive than the FDP-P kit, but it cross-reacted with peripheral bloodstains from healthy volunteers. The FDP-P kit was specific for menstrual blood, with the exception of postmortem blood samples, and was not affected by other body fluids. In an FDP-negative menstrual blood sample, the sensitivity of human hemoglobin detection was lower than for FDP-positive samples and peripheral blood stains, suggesting that determination of human hemoglobin could be useful in interpreting negative results in the FDP-latex agglutination test. In menstrual blood samples incubated in wet conditions, FDP was found to be a robust marker in the identification of menstrual blood compared with mRNA markers. FDP-P testing was shown to be a suitable and highly efficient rapid screening test for the laboratory identification of menstrual blood. PMID:22189168

Akutsu, Tomoko; Watanabe, Ken; Motani, Hisako; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

2012-01-01

415

Characterization of CoRoT target fields with BEST: Identification of periodic variable stars in the LRa1 field  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on observations of the CoRoT LRa1 field with the\\u000aBerlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST). The current paper is part of the\\u000aseries of papers describing the results of our stellar variability survey. BEST\\u000ais a small aperture telescope with a wide field-of-view (FOV). It is dedicated\\u000ato search for stellar variability within the target fields

P. Kabath; P. Eigmueller; A. Erikson; P. Hedelt; P. von Paris; H. Rauer; S. Renner; R. Titz; T. Wiese

2009-01-01

416

Radiation detection field test at the Federal Express (FedEx) air cargo facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility; quantify and identify "nuisance" alarms; evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment. LLNL emplaced a primary screening detector that provided the initial detection of radiation anomalies in near real-time. Once detected, a secondary test location provided capability to perform higher-resolution analysis of the parcels or containers that triggered the primary detector. Two triggered radiation events were observed during the course of this project. Both of the radiation events were determined to be legitimate shipments of radioactive material. The overall effect of this project on FedEx operations and personnel was deemed to be minimal.

Waters, Amy; Weirup, Dave; Hall, Howard; Dougan, Arden; Trombino, Dave; Mattesich, Gary; Hull, Ethan L.; Bahowick, Sally; Loshak, Alex; Gruidl, Jeremiah

2004-07-01

417

Half of the European fruit fly species barcoded (Diptera, Tephritidae); a feasibility test for molecular identification.  

PubMed

A FEASIBILITY TEST OF MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF EUROPEAN FRUIT FLIES (DIPTERA: Tephritidae) based on COI barcode sequences has been executed. A dataset containing 555 sequences of 135 ingroup species from three subfamilies and 42 genera and one single outgroup species has been analysed. 73.3% of all included species could be identified based on their COI barcode gene, based on similarity and distances. The low success rate is caused by singletons as well as some problematic groups: several species groups within the genus Terellia and especially the genus Urophora. With slightly more than 100 sequences - almost 20% of the total - this genus alone constitutes the larger part of the failure for molecular identification for this dataset. Deleting the singletons and Urophora results in a success-rate of 87.1% of all queries and 93.23% of the not discarded queries as correctly identified. Urophora is of special interest due to its economic importance as beneficial species for weed control, therefore it is desirable to have alternative markers for molecular identification. We demonstrate that the success of DNA barcoding for identification purposes strongly depends on the contents of the database used to BLAST against. Especially the necessity of including multiple specimens per species of geographically distinct populations and different ecologies for the understanding of the intra- versus interspecific variation is demonstrated. Furthermore thresholds and the distinction between true and false positives and negatives should not only be used to increase the reliability of the success of molecular identification but also to point out problematic groups, which should then be flagged in the reference database suggesting alternative methods for identification. PMID:24453563

Smit, John; Reijnen, Bastian; Stokvis, Frank

2013-12-30

418

Hazard identification: efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens and putative nongenotoxic carcinogens.  

PubMed Central

For more than a decade, mutagenicity tests have had a clearly defined role in the identification of potential human mutagens and an ancillary role in the identification of potential human carcinogens. The efficiency of short-term tests in identifying germ cell mutagens has been examined using a combined data set derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/International Agency for Research on Cancer Genetic Activity Profile (EPA/IARC GAP) and EPA Gene-Tox databases. Our review of these data indicates adequate sensitivity of batteries of in vitro short-term mutagenicity tests in identifying germ cell mutagens. The analysis also supports the inclusion of an in vivo assay as suggested in proposed regulatory testing guidelines. In the context of carcinogenicity testing, the ability of short-term bioassays to detect genotoxic or mutagenic carcinogens is well established. Such tests are not considered to be as sensitive to nongenotoxic or nonmutagenic carcinogens. However, analyses presented in this report using the EPA/IARC GAP database demonstrate that many putative nongenotoxic carcinogens that have been adequately tested in short-term genetic bioassays induce gene or chromosomal mutation or aneuploidy. Further investigation should reveal whether the mutagenicity of these agents plays an important mechanistic role in their carcinogenicity.

Waters, M D; Stack, H F; Jackson, M A; Bridges, B A

1993-01-01

419

Application of the nuclide identification system SHAMAN in monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty  

Microsoft Academic Search

SHAMAN is an expert system for qualitative and quantitative radionuclide identification in gamma spectrometry. SHAMAN requires\\u000a as input the calibrations, peak search, and fitting results from reliable spectral analysis software, such as SAMPO. SHAMAN\\u000a uses a comprehensive reference library with 2600 radionuclides and 80 000 gamma-lines, as well as a rule base consisting of\\u000a sixty inference rules. Identification results are

P. A. Aarnio; J. J. Ala-Heikkilä; T. T. Hakulinen; M. T. Nikkinen

1998-01-01

420

The Nuclide Identification System SHAMAN in the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

Microsoft Academic Search

SHAMAN is an expert system for radionuclide identification and spectrum peak interpretation in gamma-ray spectrometry. SHAMAN utilizes a comprehensive reference library with 2616 radionuclides and 81,642 gamma-ray lines, as well as a rule base consisting of sixty inference rules. Identification results are presented both via a graphical user interface and as configurable text reports. SHAMAN has been installed as an

P. A. Aarnio; J. J. Ala-Heikkilä; T. T. Hakulinen; M. T. Nikkinen

2001-01-01

421

Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) field test installations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MIMS program is funded by the Department of Energy under the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The program objective is to develop cost effective, modular, multi-sensor monitoring systems. Both in-plant and ground based sensors are envisioned. It is also desirable to develop sensors\\/systems that can be fielded\\/deployed in a rapid fashion. A MIMS architecture was selected to allow

R. L. Martinez; D. R. Waymire; D. A. Fuess

1995-01-01

422

Field testing of power utility condenser tube alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performances of various copper alloys after 4 years exposure in condenser steam-side and cooling water environments of\\u000a three operating power utility plants are described. In the steam-side environment, the copper alloys exhibited low corrosion\\u000a rates, and there was little variation in corrosion resistance as a function of major alloying elements. A comparison of the\\u000a field data and data from

G. P. Sheldon; N. W. Polan

1985-01-01

423

Wide-field-of-view imaging spectrometer (WFIS) engineering model laboratory tests and field demonstrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide Field-of View Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS) is a patented optical design allowing horizon to horizon imaging of the earth and earth"s atmosphere in the pushbroom-imaging mode from an aircraft or space platform. The design couples a fast, F/2.8, unobstructed all reflective telescope to an all-reflective three element imaging spectrometer using a unique field coupling mirror arrangement. Early laboratory demonstrations of the technology covered fields of view exceeding 70 degrees. The latest instrument, the incubator WFIS, demonstrate the field of view can be extended to 120 degrees. This paper summarizes the current ongoing work with the engineering model WFIS covering this field of view and a spectral range from 360 nm to 1000 nm. Also presented are the results of the latest laboratory and field demonstrations. The paper also identifies specific applications the technology is now addressing.

Haring, Robert E.; Pollock, Randy; Cross, Richard M.

2003-12-01

424

Preliminary results from pressure tank test and field acceleration test of New-Profiling float of Japan (NINJA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As one of contributions of Japan to the international Argo community, one of Japanese ocean instrument manufacturers, Tsurumi Seiki Co. (TSK), has started the development of original profiling float in 2000. We purchased the four TSK floats in 2001, and performed the pressure tank test and the acceleration field test in the north Pacific. Among four floats, two are carrying

K. Izawa; K. Ando; K. Mizuno; A. Inoue; N. Shikama; K. Takeuchi; M. Sekimoto

2002-01-01

425

CX100 And TX100 Blade Field Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. ...

J. R. Zayas P. L. Jones

2005-01-01

426

EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application  

EPA Science Inventory

Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station?s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology?s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

427

Field Test of Standard Bomb Damage Repair Techniques for Pavements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The repair of bomb damage runways (BDR) is a paramount problem in the event of sudden warfare. Air Force Regulation 93-2 specified a repair procedure designed to repair 3 750 pound bomb craters in 4 hours. This repair procedure was tested to determine its...

L. D. Hokanson R. S. Rollings

1975-01-01

428

Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

2007-01-01

429

Color Test Reagents/Kits for Preliminary Identification of Drugs of Abuse. NIJ Standard-0604.01. Law Enforcement and Corrections Standards and Testing Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this standard is to establish minimum requirements for color test reagent/kits to detect drugs of abuse and methods of testing the reagents to determine compliance with those requirements. This standard applies to field-testing kits that co...

2000-01-01

430

Rapid Immunochromatographic Test for the Identification and Discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates from Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria.  

PubMed

Background: A new rapid Immunochromatographic test (ICT) kit (SDBioline TB Ag MPT64RAPID(®)) developed by Standard Diagnostics, South Korea was evaluated for rapid differentiation of M. tuberculosis from non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It detects MPT 64 antigen in M. tuberculosis isolates using mouse monoclonal MPT 64 antibody. The kit was assessed for routine identification of the Acid Fast Bacilli(AFB) isolated in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: Two hundred eight culture isolates of Mycobacteria were tested using ICT test kit for detection of MPT 64 antigen from liquid and solid culture. H37Rv strain was employed as the positive reference control. Any negative result was referred for confirmation by Gen Probe Accu Probe assay for MTB Complex (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.). Speciation of NTM was performed using genotypic Mycobacterium CM assay (Hain's life sciences, Germany). Results: Of the 208 culture positive isolates tested, 182 (87.5%) were found positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and remaining 26 (12.5%) were considered as NTM. These results were further confirmed by Gen Probe Accu probe assay that served as the reference method for detection of MTBC. H37Rv reference strain was taken as a control for ICT test and molecular tests. The reference strain showed the presence of MPT64 antigen band in the ICT test. Similar bands were formed in all MTBC (182) isolates tested, proving 100 per cent sensitivity and no bands were detected in 48 (100%) NTM isolates tested, proving 100 per cent specificity of the ICT kit. Conclusion: Tuberculosis is a global pandemic. Rapid identification of Mycobacteria as MTB complex or non-tuberculous Mycobacteria from culture is important for treatment of infected cases and drug susceptibility testing of the culture isolate. MPT 64 TB antgen detection using SD Bioline Immunochromatographic test is a simple and cost effective method for differentiation of Mycobacterial cultures as MTB complex from non- tuberculous Mycobacteria. PMID:24959442

Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

2014-04-01

431

Rapid Immunochromatographic Test for the Identification and Discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates from Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria  

PubMed Central

Background: A new rapid Immunochromatographic test (ICT) kit (SDBioline TB Ag MPT64RAPID®) developed by Standard Diagnostics, South Korea was evaluated for rapid differentiation of M. tuberculosis from non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It detects MPT 64 antigen in M. tuberculosis isolates using mouse monoclonal MPT 64 antibody. The kit was assessed for routine identification of the Acid Fast Bacilli(AFB) isolated in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: Two hundred eight culture isolates of Mycobacteria were tested using ICT test kit for detection of MPT 64 antigen from liquid and solid culture. H37Rv strain was employed as the positive reference control. Any negative result was referred for confirmation by Gen Probe Accu Probe assay for MTB Complex (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.). Speciation of NTM was performed using genotypic Mycobacterium CM assay (Hain’s life sciences, Germany). Results: Of the 208 culture positive isolates tested, 182 (87.5%) were found positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and remaining 26 (12.5%) were considered as NTM. These results were further confirmed by Gen Probe Accu probe assay that served as the reference method for detection of MTBC. H37Rv reference strain was taken as a control for ICT test and molecular tests. The reference strain showed the presence of MPT64 antigen band in the ICT test. Similar bands were formed in all MTBC (182) isolates tested, proving 100 per cent sensitivity and no bands were detected in 48 (100%) NTM isolates tested, proving 100 per cent specificity of the ICT kit. Conclusion: Tuberculosis is a global pandemic. Rapid identification of Mycobacteria as MTB complex or non-tuberculous Mycobacteria from culture is important for treatment of infected cases and drug susceptibility testing of the culture isolate. MPT 64 TB antgen detection using SD Bioline Immunochromatographic test is a simple and cost effective method for differentiation of Mycobacterial cultures as MTB complex from non- tuberculous Mycobacteria.

Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

2014-01-01

432

Developing Mathematical Processes: 1972-73 Field Test Report. Technical Report No. 324.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A continuation of the field test of Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) was conducted in eight schools. Four were multiunit schools located in settings ranging from small town to large city; the remaining schools were conventionally organized and located in large urban areas. The purpose of the field test was (1) to determine the effectiveness…

Hubbard, W. Donald; Buchanan, Anne E.

433

Developing Mathematical Processes: A Report of the 1971-72 Field Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on a field test of Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP), a research based instructional program for elementary school children developed from psychological principles. The field test was conducted in eight schools; four were multiunit schools in small towns and large cities; four were conventionally organized and located…

Hubbard, W. Donald

434

76 FR 12932 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Fowl Laryngotracheitis-Marek's...Disease Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-03-09

435

76 FR 66032 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's...Disease Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-10-25

436

76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine...Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2011-01-19

437

77 FR 22283 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Interleukin-2...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Assessment for Field Testing Feline Interleukin-2...Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...obtain approval from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection...the product for field testing. To determine...

2012-04-13

438

Evaluation of the Field Test of Project Information Packages: Volume III--Resource Cost Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third of three volumes evaluating the first year field test of the Project Information Packages (PIPs) provides a cost analysis study as a key element in the total evaluation. The resource approach to cost analysis is explained and the specific resource methodology used in the main cost analysis of the 19 PIP field-test projects detailed. The…

Al-Salam, Nabeel; And Others