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  1. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    James, Sally; Fox, James; Afsari, Farinaz; Lee, Jennifer; Clough, Sally; Knight, Charlotte; Ashmore, James; Ashton, Peter; Preham, Olivier; Hoogduijn, Martin; Ponzoni, Raquel De Almeida Rocha; Hancock, Y.; Coles, Mark; Genever, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis of functional markers for BMSC subsets. All clones expressed typical BMSC cell-surface antigens; however, clones with trilineage differentiation capacity exhibited enhanced vascular interaction gene sets, whereas non-differentiating clones were uniquely CD317 positive with significantly enriched immunomodulatory transcriptional networks and high IL-7 production. IL-7 lineage tracing and CD317 immunolocalization confirmed the existence of a rare non-differentiating BMSC subtype, distinct from Cxcl12-DsRed+ perivascular stromal cells in vivo. Colony-forming CD317+ IL-7hi cells, identified at ∼1%–3% frequency in heterogeneous human BMSC fractions, were found to have the same biomolecular profile as non-differentiating BMSC clones using Raman spectroscopy. Distinct functional identities can be assigned to BMSC subpopulations, which are likely to have specific roles in immune control, lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis. PMID:26070611

  2. Genomic subtypes of breast cancer identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization display distinct molecular and clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a profoundly heterogeneous disease with respect to biologic and clinical behavior. Gene-expression profiling has been used to dissect this complexity and to stratify tumors into intrinsic gene-expression subtypes, associated with distinct biology, patient outcome, and genomic alterations. Additionally, breast tumors occurring in individuals with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations typically fall into distinct subtypes. Methods We applied global DNA copy number and gene-expression profiling in 359 breast tumors. All tumors were classified according to intrinsic gene-expression subtypes and included cases from genetically predisposed women. The Genomic Identification of Significant Targets in Cancer (GISTIC) algorithm was used to identify significant DNA copy-number aberrations and genomic subgroups of breast cancer. Results We identified 31 genomic regions that were highly amplified in > 1% of the 359 breast tumors. Several amplicons were found to co-occur, the 8p12 and 11q13.3 regions being the most frequent combination besides amplicons on the same chromosomal arm. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering with 133 significant GISTIC regions revealed six genomic subtypes, termed 17q12, basal-complex, luminal-simple, luminal-complex, amplifier, and mixed subtypes. Four of them had striking similarity to intrinsic gene-expression subtypes and showed associations to conventional tumor biomarkers and clinical outcome. However, luminal A-classified tumors were distributed in two main genomic subtypes, luminal-simple and luminal-complex, the former group having a better prognosis, whereas the latter group included also luminal B and the majority of BRCA2-mutated tumors. The basal-complex subtype displayed extensive genomic homogeneity and harbored the majority of BRCA1-mutated tumors. The 17q12 subtype comprised mostly HER2-amplified and HER2-enriched subtype tumors and had the worst prognosis. The amplifier and mixed subtypes contained tumors

  3. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L.; Volmar, Keith E.; Loeza, S. Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Rashid, Naim U.; Williams, Lindsay A.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Chung, Alexander H.; Smyla, Jadwiga K.; Anderson, Judy M.; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here, we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, which includes primary, metastatic, and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stroma, and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor-specific subtypes including a “basal-like” subtype which has worse outcome, and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancer. Furthermore, we define “normal” and “activated” stromal subtypes which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insight into the molecular composition of PDAC which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies is critical. PMID:26343385

  4. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  5. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  6. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K; Schouten, Philip C; Rueda, Oscar M; Bosma, Astrid J; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J C; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O'Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J F; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A; Barbet, Aurélie S; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O'Connor, Darran P; Vis, Daniël J; Benes, Cyril H; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J; Simon, Iris M; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C; Gallagher, William M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  7. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M.; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K.; Schouten, Philip C.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Bosma, Astrid J.; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J.C.; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O’Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J.F.; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A.; Barbet, Aurélie S.; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O’Connor, Darran P.; Vis, Daniël J.; Benes, Cyril H.; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J.; Simon, Iris M.; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C.; Gallagher, William M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  8. Promoter Hypermethylation Profiling Identifies Subtypes of Head and Neck Cancer with Distinct Viral, Environmental, Genetic and Survival Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Javed Hussain; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic and genetic alteration plays a major role to the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Consumption of tobacco (smoking/chewing) and human papilloma virus (HPV) are also associated with an increase the risk of HNSCC. Promoter hypermethylation of the tumor suppression genes is related with transcriptional inactivation and loss of gene expression. We investigated epigenetic alteration (promoter methylation of tumor-related genes/loci) in tumor tissues in the context of genetic alteration, viral infection, and tobacco exposure and survival status. Methodology The study included 116 tissue samples (71 tumor and 45 normal tissues) from the Northeast Indian population. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to determine the methylation status of 10 tumor-related genes/loci (p16, DAPK, RASSF1, BRAC1, GSTP1, ECAD, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2 and MINT31). Polymorphisms of CYP1A1, GST (M1 & T1), XRCC1and XRCC2 genes were studied by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex-PCR respectively. Principal Findings Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis based on methylation pattern had identified two tumor clusters, which significantly differ by CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), tobacco, GSTM1, CYP1A1, HPV and survival status. Analyzing methylation of genes/loci individually, we have found significant higher methylation of DAPK, RASSF1, p16 and MINT31genes (P = 0.031, 0.013, 0.031 and 0.015 respectively) in HPV (+) cases compared to HPV (-). Furthermore, a CIMP-high and Cluster-1 characteristic was also associated with poor survival. Conclusions Promoter methylation profiles reflecting a correlation with tobacco, HPV, survival status and genetic alteration and may act as a marker to determine subtypes and patient outcome in HNSCC. PMID:26098903

  9. Subtypes of medulloblastoma have distinct developmental origins

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Paul; Tong, Yiai; Robinson, Giles; Thompson, Margaret C.; Currle, D. Spencer; Eden, Christopher; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Hogg, Twala; Poppleton, Helen; Martin, Julie; Finkelstein, David; Pounds, Stanley; Weiss, Aaron; Patay, Zoltan; Scoggins, Matthew; Ogg, Robert; Pei, Yanxin; Yang, Zeng-Jie; Brun, Sonja; Lee, Youngsoo; Zindy, Frederique; Lindsey, Janet C.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Boop, Frederick A.; Sanford, Robert A.; Gajjar, Amar; Clifford, Steven C.; Roussel, Martine F.; McKinnon, Peter J.; Gutmann, David H.; Ellison, David W.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastoma encompasses a collection of clinically and molecularly diverse tumor subtypes that together comprise the most common malignant childhood brain tumor1–4. These tumors are thought to arise within the cerebellum, with approximately 25% originating from granule neuron precursor cells (GNPCs) following aberrant activation of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway (hereafter, SHH-subtype)3–8. The pathological processes that drive heterogeneity among the other medulloblastoma subtypes are not known, hindering the development of much needed new therapies. Here, we provide evidence that a discrete subtype of medulloblastoma that contains activating mutations in the WNT pathway effector CTNNB1 (hereafter, WNT-subtype)1,3,4, arises outside the cerebellum from cells of the dorsal brainstem. We found that genes marking human WNT-subtype medulloblastomas are more frequently expressed in the lower rhombic lip (LRL) and embryonic dorsal brainstem than in the upper rhombic lip (URL) and developing cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intra-operative reports showed that human WNT-subtype tumors infiltrate the dorsal brainstem, while SHH-subtype tumors are located within the cerebellar hemispheres. Activating mutations in Ctnnb1 had little impact on progenitor cell populations in the cerebellum, but caused the abnormal accumulation of cells on the embryonic dorsal brainstem that included aberrantly proliferating Zic1+ precursor cells. These lesions persisted in all mutant adult mice and in 15% of cases in which Tp53 was concurrently deleted, progressed to form medulloblastomas that recapitulated the anatomy and gene expression profiles of human WNT-subtype medulloblastoma. We provide the first evidence that subtypes of medulloblastoma have distinct cellular origins. Our data provide an explanation for the marked molecular and clinical differences between SHH and WNT-subtype medulloblastomas and have profound implications for future research and treatment of this

  10. Cluster Analysis in the COPDGene Study Identifies Subtypes of Smokers with Distinct Patterns of Airway Disease and Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J; Dy, Jennifer; Ross, James; Chang, Yale; Washko, George R; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Williams, Andre; Lynch, David A; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Bowler, Russ P; Regan, Elizabeth A; Hokanson, John E; Kinney, Greg L; Han, Meilan K; Soler, Xavier; Ramsdell, Joseph W; Barr, R Graham; Foreman, Marilyn; van Beek, Edwin; Casaburi, Richard; Criner, Gerald J; Lutz, Sharon M; Rennard, Steven I; Santorico, Stephanie; Sciurba, Frank C; DeMeo, Dawn L; Hersh, Craig P; Silverman, Edwin K; Cho, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Background There is notable heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of patients with COPD. To characterize this heterogeneity, we sought to identify subgroups of smokers by applying cluster analysis to data from the COPDGene Study. Methods We applied a clustering method, k-means, to data from 10,192 smokers in the COPDGene Study. After splitting the sample into a training and validation set, we evaluated three sets of input features across a range of k (user-specified number of clusters). Stable solutions were tested for association with four COPD-related measures and five genetic variants previously associated with COPD at genome-wide significance. The results were confirmed in the validation set. Findings We identified four clusters that can be characterized as 1) relatively resistant smokers (i.e. no/mild obstruction and minimal emphysema despite heavy smoking), 2) mild upper zone emphysema predominant, 3) airway disease predominant, and 4) severe emphysema. All clusters are strongly associated with COPD-related clinical characteristics, including exacerbations and dyspnea (p<0.001). We found strong genetic associations between the mild upper zone emphysema group and rs1980057 near HHIP, and between the severe emphysema group and rs8034191 in the chromosome 15q region (p<0.001). All significant associations were replicated at p<0.05 in the validation sample (12/12 associations with clinical measures and 2/2 genetic associations). Interpretation Cluster analysis identifies four subgroups of smokers that show robust associations with clinical characteristics of COPD and known COPD-associated genetic variants. PMID:24563194

  11. Triple positive breast cancer: a distinct subtype?

    PubMed

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Natoli, Clara; Gamucci, Teresa; Di Lauro, Luigi; Barba, Maddalena; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Michelotti, Andrea; Moscetti, Luca; Mariani, Luciano; Izzo, Fiorentino; D'Onofrio, Loretta; Sperduti, Isabella; Conti, Francesca; Rossi, Valentina; Cassano, Alessandra; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Mottolese, Marcella; Marchetti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and within the HER-2 positive subtype this is highly exemplified by the presence of substantial phenotypical and clinical heterogeneity, mostly related to hormonal receptor (HR) expression. It is well known how HER-2 positivity is commonly associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and decreased overall survival and, moreover, with a reduced benefit from endocrine treatment. Preclinical studies corroborate the role played by functional crosstalks between HER-2 and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling in endocrine resistance and, more recently, the activation of ER signaling is emerging as a possible mechanism of resistance to HER-2 blocking agents. Indeed, HER-2 positive breast cancer heterogeneity has been suggested to underlie the variability of response not only to endocrine treatments, but also to HER-2 blocking agents. Among HER-2 positive tumors, HR status probably defines two distinct subtypes, with dissimilar clinical behavior and different sensitivity to anticancer agents. The triple positive subtype, namely, ER/PgR/Her-2 positive tumors, could be considered the subset which most closely resembles the HER-2 negative/HR positive tumors, with substantial differences in biology and clinical outcome. We argue on whether in this subgroup the "standard" treatment may be considered, in selected cases, i.e., small tumors, low tumor burden, high expression of both hormonal receptors, an overtreatment. This article review the existing literature on biologic and clinical data concerning the HER-2/ER/PgR positive tumors, in an attempt to better define the HER-2 subtypes and to optimize the use of HER-2 targeted agents, chemotherapy and endocrine treatments in the various subsets. PMID:25554445

  12. Human islets contain four distinct subtypes of β cells.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Craig; Schug, Jonathan; Canaday, Pamela S; Russ, Holger A; Tarlow, Branden D; Grompe, Maria T; Horton, Tamara; Hebrok, Matthias; Streeter, Philip R; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Human pancreatic islets of Langerhans contain five distinct endocrine cell types, each producing a characteristic hormone. The dysfunction or loss of the insulin-producing β cells causes diabetes mellitus, a disease that harms millions. Until now, β cells were generally regarded as a single, homogenous cell population. Here we identify four antigenically distinct subtypes of human β cells, which we refer to as β1-4, and which are distinguished by differential expression of ST8SIA1 and CD9. These subpopulations are always present in normal adult islets and have diverse gene expression profiles and distinct basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the β cell subtype distribution is profoundly altered in type 2 diabetes. These data suggest that this antigenically defined β cell heterogeneity is functionally and likely medically relevant. PMID:27399229

  13. From pluripotency to distinct cardiomyocyte subtypes.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2012-06-01

    Differentiated adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) lack significant regenerative potential, which is one reason why degenerative heart diseases are the leading cause of death in the western world. For future cardiac repair, stem cell-based therapeutic strategies may become alternatives to donor heart transplantation. The principle of reprogramming adult terminally differentiated cells (iPSC) had a major impact on stem cell biology. One can now generate autologous pluripotent cells that highly resemble embryonic stem cells (ESC) and that are ethically inoffensive as opposed to human ESC. Yet, due to genetic and epigenetic aberrations arising during the full reprogramming process, it is questionable whether iPSC will enter the clinic in the near future. Therefore, the recent achievement of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes via a milder approach, thereby avoiding an initial pluripotent state, may become of great importance. In addition, various clinical scenarios will depend on the availability of specific cardiac cellular subtypes, for which a first step was achieved via our own programming approach to achieve cardiovascular cell subtypes. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the cardiovascular stem cell field addressing the above mentioned aspects. PMID:22689787

  14. Metabolite profiling stratifies pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas into subtypes with distinct sensitivities to metabolic inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Daemen, Anneleen; Peterson, David; Sahu, Nisebita; McCord, Ron; Du, Xiangnan; Liu, Bonnie; Kowanetz, Katarzyna; Hong, Rebecca; Moffat, John; Gao, Min; Boudreau, Aaron; Mroue, Rana; Corson, Laura; O’Brien, Thomas; Qing, Jing; Sampath, Deepak; Merchant, Mark; Yauch, Robert; Manning, Gerard; Settleman, Jeffrey; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although targeting cancer metabolism is a promising therapeutic strategy, clinical success will depend on an accurate diagnostic identification of tumor subtypes with specific metabolic requirements. Through broad metabolite profiling, we successfully identified three highly distinct metabolic subtypes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). One subtype was defined by reduced proliferative capacity, whereas the other two subtypes (glycolytic and lipogenic) showed distinct metabolite levels associated with glycolysis, lipogenesis, and redox pathways, confirmed at the transcriptional level. The glycolytic and lipogenic subtypes showed striking differences in glucose and glutamine utilization, as well as mitochondrial function, and corresponded to differences in cell sensitivity to inhibitors of glycolysis, glutamine metabolism, lipid synthesis, and redox balance. In PDAC clinical samples, the lipogenic subtype associated with the epithelial (classical) subtype, whereas the glycolytic subtype strongly associated with the mesenchymal (QM-PDA) subtype, suggesting functional relevance in disease progression. Pharmacogenomic screening of an additional ∼200 non-PDAC cell lines validated the association between mesenchymal status and metabolic drug response in other tumor indications. Our findings highlight the utility of broad metabolite profiling to predict sensitivity of tumors to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. PMID:26216984

  15. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  16. Identifying molecular subtypes in human colon cancer using gene expression and DNA methylation microarray data

    PubMed Central

    REN, ZHONGLU; WANG, WENHUI; LI, JINMING

    2016-01-01

    Identifying colon cancer subtypes based on molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications using gene expression data have been attempted before with little concordance between the different studies carried out. In this study we aimed to uncover subtypes of colon cancer that have distinct biological characteristics and identify a set of novel biomarkers which could best reflect the clinical and/or biological characteristics of each subtype. Clustering analysis and discriminant analysis were utilized to discover the subtypes in two different molecular levels on 153 colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal. At gene expression level, we identified two major subtypes, ECL1 (expression cluster 1) and ECL2 (expression cluster 2) and a list of signature genes. Due to the heterogeneity of colon cancer, the subtype ECL1 can be further subdivided into three nested subclasses, and HOTAIR were found upregulated in subclass 2. At DNA methylation level, we uncovered three major subtypes, MCL1 (methylation cluster 1), MCL2 (methylation cluster 2) and MCL3 (methylation cluster 3). We found only three subtypes of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer instead of the four subtypes in the previous reports, and we found no sufficient evidence to subdivide MCL3 into two distinct subgroups. PMID:26647925

  17. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  18. Identifying subtypes of spousal assaulters Using the B-SAFER.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Jill; de Ruiter, Corine

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a structured risk assessment instrument for intimate partner violence, the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER), was coded for 146 files of spousal assault cases from the Dutch probation service, dating from 2004 and 2005. The aim of the study was twofold: (a) to validate Holtzworth-Munroe and Stuart's typology using the risk factors of the B-SAFER and (b) to examine the relationship between the subtypes found and recidivism rates. Four subtypes of assaulters were identified: family only, generally violent/antisocial, low-level antisocial, and psychopathology. These subtypes were comparable to the subtypes found in previous studies. The generally violent/antisocial subtype had the highest recidivism rate, although not significantly different from the other three subtypes. PMID:20522890

  19. Distinct sequence elements control the specificity of G protein activation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Lechleiter, J; Hellmiss, R; Duerson, K; Ennulat, D; David, N; Clapham, D; Peralta, E

    1990-01-01

    Relatively little is understood concerning the mechanisms by which subtypes of receptors, G proteins and effector enzymes interact to transduce specific signals. Through expression of normal, hybrid and deletion mutant receptors in Xenopus oocytes, we determined the G protein coupling characteristics of the functionally distinct m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes and identified the critical receptor sequences responsible for G protein specificity. Activation of a pertussis toxin insensitive G protein pathway, leading to a rapid and transient release of intracellular Ca2+ characteristic of the m3 receptor, could be specified by the transfer of as few as nine amino acids from the m3 to the m2 receptor. In a reciprocal manner, transfer of no more than 21 residues from the m2 to the m3 receptor was sufficient to specify activation of a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein coupled to a slow and oscillatory Ca2+ release pathway typical of the m2 subtype. Notably, these critical residues occur within the same region of the third cytoplasmic domain of functionally distinct mAChR subtypes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2124972

  20. Transcriptome correlation analysis identifies two unique craniosynostosis subtypes associated with IRS1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Mecham, B.; Park, S. S.; Wilkerson, H.; Farin, F. M.; Beyer, R. P.; Bammler, T. K.; Mangravite, L. M.; Cunningham, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of causal mechanisms associated with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis has proven to be a difficult task due to the complex nature of the disease. In this study, differential transcriptome correlation analysis was used to identify two molecularly distinct subtypes of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, termed subtype A and subtype B. In addition to unique correlation structure, subtype A was also associated with high IGF pathway expression, whereas subtype B was associated with high integrin expression. To identify a pathologic link between altered gene correlation/expression and the disease state, phosphorylation assays were performed on primary osteoblast cell lines derived from cases within subtype A or subtype B, as well as on primary osteoblast cell lines with novel IGF1R variants previously reported by our lab (Cunningham ML, Horst JA, Rieder MJ, Hing AV, Stanaway IB, Park SS, Samudrala R, Speltz ML. Am J Med Genet A 155A: 91–97, 2011). Elevated IRS1 (pan-tyr) and GSK3β (ser-9) phosphorylation were observed in two novel IGF1R variants with receptor L domain mutations. In subtype A, a hypomineralization phenotype coupled with decreased phosphorylation of IRS1 (ser-312), p38 (thr-180/tyr-182), and p70S6K (thr-412) was observed. In subtype B, decreased phosphorylation of IRS1 (ser-312) as well as increased phosphorylation of Akt (ser-473), GSK3β (ser-9), IGF1R (tyr-1135/tyr-1136), JNK (thr-183/tyr-187), p70S6K (thr-412), and pRPS6 (ser-235/ser-236) was observed, thus implicating the activation of IRS1-mediated Akt signaling in potentiating craniosynostosis in this subtype. Taken together, these results suggest that despite the stimulation of different pathways, activating phosphorylation patterns for IRS1 were consistent in cell lines from both subtypes and the IGF1R variants, thus implicating a key role for IRS1 in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:23073384

  1. Odorants of different chemical classes interact with distinct odorant binding protein subtypes.

    PubMed

    Löbel, Dietrich; Jacob, Marion; Völkner, Meike; Breer, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    The ligand profile for three odorant binding proteins (OBPs) of the rat have been determined using a large number of odorous compounds from different chemical classes. To evaluate the binding spectra of distinct subtypes, all OBPs were produces in Escherichia coli as recombinant His-tagged fusion proteins. The individual binding properties of each OBP subtype were analysed using a large array of organic compounds, representing derivatives of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, as well as terpenes, pyrazines and thiazoles, in a competitive spectroscopic binding assay with various fluorescence chromophores as the specific interacting partner for the OBPs. Most of the compounds were identified to interact only with one OBP subtype. But interestingly, a small change, for example in the 2-methyl or 2-ethoxy side chain in the pyrazine and thiazole derivatives to a 2-isobutyl group, caused overlapping binding affinities to rat-OBP1 and rat-OBP3. However, the data strongly support the notion that each OBP subtype displays a characteristic ligand binding profile and interacts with a different subset of exogenous organic compounds in a micromolar range. PMID:11751466

  2. Identifying Psychopathy Subtypes on the Basis of Personality Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Brian M.; Markon, Kristian E.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Krueger, Robert F.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    The authors used model-based cluster analysis to identify subtypes of criminal psychopaths on the basis of differences in personality structure. Participants included 96 male prisoners diagnosed as psychopathic, using the Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991). Personality was assessed using the brief form of the Multidimensional…

  3. THE DISTINCT TEMPORAL ORIGINS OF OLFACTORY BULB INTERNEURON SUBTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Batista-Brito, Renata; Close, Jennie; Machold, Robert; Ekker, Mark; Fishell, Gord

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons are a heterogeneous population produced beginning in embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. Understanding how this diversity arises will provide insight into how olfactory bulb microcircuitry is established as well as adult neurogenesis. Specific spatial domains have been shown to contribute specific interneuron subtypes. However, the temporal profile by which OB interneuron subtypes are produced is unknown. Using inducible genetic fate mapping of Dlx1/2 precursors, we analyzed the production of seven OB interneuron subtypes and find that the generation of each subpopulation has a unique temporal signature. Within the glomerular layer, while the production of TH-positive interneurons is maximal during early embryogenesis, it decreases thereafter. By contrast, the generation of CB interneurons is maximal during late embryogenesis and declines postnatally, while CR cell production is low during embryogenesis and increases postnatally. PV interneurons within the external plexiform layer are produced only perinatally, while the generation of 5T4-positive granule cells in the mitral cell layer does not change significantly over time. CR-positive granule cells are not produced at early embryonic timepoints, but constitute a large percentage of the granule cells born after birth. Blanes cells by contrast are produced in greatest number during embryogenesis. Taken together we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the temporal generation of olfactory bulb interneuron subtypes and demonstrate that the timing by which these populations are produced is tightly orchestrated. PMID:18400896

  4. Distinct Response Time Distributions in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Querne, Laurent; Berquin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the issue of response time (RT) profiles in hyperactive-impulsive (ADHD-HI), inattentive (ADHD-IA), and combined (ADHD-C) subtypes of ADHD. We hypothesized that children with ADHD-HI should respond more rapidly than children without ADHD and children with ADHD-IA and ADHD-C should respond more slowly than children without…

  5. Centrilobular zonal necrosis as a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Sugita, Tomonori; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Chuganji, Yoshimichi; Furumoto, Youhei; Sakata, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Centrilobular zonal necrosis (CZN) is a known histological variant of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). However, the significance of CZN is yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to determine whether CZN is a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of AIH. Methods Histological changes in the centrilobular zones of liver biopsies from 113 AIH patients were assessed by a single pathologist and classified into three categories: typical zonal necrosis defined as CZN (15 patients); other necroinflammatory change (NIC; 24 patients); and absence of necrosis (non-NIC; 74 patients). The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of CZN patients were then assessed. Results The clinicopathological features of AIH with CZN were distinct from other types of AIH, including a higher frequency of acute onset, lower frequency of antinuclear antibodies, lower antinuclear antibody titers, lower serum immunoglobulin G levels, lower grade interface hepatitis, less prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and lower AIH score. Increased and decreased frequencies of HLA-DR9 and HLA-DR4, respectively, were identified as immunogenetic features of AIH with CZN. Conversely, the clinicopathological characteristics of AIH with NIC were similar to those of non-NIC AIH, including the majority of the AIH patients. The therapeutic outcomes of AIH with CZN were excellent when precise diagnoses were made without delay. Conclusion The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of AIH with CZN differed from AIH without CZN. CZN may be a hallmark of a distinct subtype of AIH. PMID:26657454

  6. Distinct patterns of peritumoral histological findings in subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Michihiro; Imada, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Maetani, Iruru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2015-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are primary pancreatic neoplasms that can act as precursors to invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized to play an important role in many types of tumors. Therefore, to investigate the clinicopathological significance of the peritumoral stroma in IPMNs, we examined the histological features of the peritumoral stroma in each subtype and histological grade of IPMNs. Eighty-two patients with IPMN, who underwent surgical resection, were reviewed clinicopathologically. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (86 lesions in total) were histologically subclassified into gastric (n = 51), intestinal (n = 22), pancreatobiliary (n = 11), and oncocytic (n = 2) subtypes. Peritumoral histological features between the gastric and intestinal subtypes were evaluated by each histological grade. The results showed that subepithelial edema and inflammatory cell infiltration were more commonly observed in the gastric subtype (74% and 79%, respectively) than in the intestinal subtype (12% and 25%, respectively) of low-grade IPMNs. On the other hand, mucus lakes were more commonly observed in the intestinal subtype (100%) than in the gastric subtype (0%) of high-grade IPMNs. In addition, pancreatobiliary subtype IPMNs tended to exhibit acute inflammation such as neutrophil predominance. This study showed that peritumoral histological features differed among subtypes of IPMNs from low-grade tumors. These differences suggest the possibility that each subtype of IPMNs has a distinct mechanism from an early stage of tumor progression, which is reflected in the properties of the peritumoral stroma. PMID:26265194

  7. Lactotransferrin-Cre reporter mice trace neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Boris; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea; Fischhuber, Katrin M; Leitner, Nicole R; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Casanova, Emilio; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to identify genes that account for myeloid lineage commitment and development. However, currently available non-invasive mouse models utilize myeloid-specific reporters that are significantly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as lymphoid compartments. Here, we describe a myeloid-specific marker that is not shared by any other lineage. We show that lactotransferrin mRNA is expressed by Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells in the bone marrow, as opposed to hematopoietic stem cells or any peripheral cell population. To follow the progeny of lactotransferrin-expressing bone marrow cells, we generated a mouse model in which a reporter gene is irreversibly activated from the lactotransferrin-promoter. We found that lactotransferrin-reporter labels a majority of neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells, while excluding T, B, natural killer cells, interferon-producing killer dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, erythrocytes and eosinophils. Lactotransferrin-reporter(-) bone marrow cells retain lymphoid, erythroid and long-term repopulating potential, while lactotransferrin-reporter(+) bone marrow cells confer only myeloid, but not lymphoid potential. We conclude that lactotransferrin represents a late stage differentiation marker of neutrophils, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells. PMID:24561791

  8. Lactotransferrin-Cre reporter mice trace neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Boris; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea; Fischhuber, Katrin M.; Leitner, Nicole R.; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Casanova, Emilio; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to identify genes that account for myeloid lineage commitment and development. However, currently available non-invasive mouse models utilize myeloid-specific reporters that are significantly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as lymphoid compartments. Here, we describe a myeloid-specific marker that is not shared by any other lineage. We show that lactotransferrin mRNA is expressed by Gr-1+/CD11b+ cells in the bone marrow, as opposed to hematopoietic stem cells or any peripheral cell population. To follow the progeny of lactotransferrin-expressing bone marrow cells, we generated a mouse model in which a reporter gene is irreversibly activated from the lactotransferrin-promoter. We found that lactotransferrin-reporter labels a majority of neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells, while excluding T, B, natural killer cells, interferon-producing killer dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, erythrocytes and eosinophils. Lactotransferrin-reporter− bone marrow cells retain lymphoid, erythroid and long-term repopulating potential, while lactotransferrin-reporter+ bone marrow cells confer only myeloid, but not lymphoid potential. We conclude that lactotransferrin represents a late stage differentiation marker of neutrophils, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells. PMID:24561791

  9. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development. PMID:26909576

  10. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity. PMID:26987019

  11. Examining the latent structure of negative symptoms: is there a distinct subtype of negative symptom schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Jack J; Horan, William P; Collins, Lindsay M

    2005-09-15

    Negative symptoms have emerged as a replicable factor of symptomatology within schizophrenia. Although rating scales provide assessments along dimensions of severity, categorization into a negative symptom subtype is typically conducted. A categorical view of negative symptoms is best reflected in the proposal that enduring, primary negative symptoms, or deficit symptoms, reflect a distinct subtype of schizophrenia . Despite an accumulation of findings that support a categorical conceptualization, the data are also consistent with a dimensional-only model where negative symptom subtypologies simply reflect an extreme on a continuum of severity. Using taxometric statistical methods , the present study examined whether a taxonic, or latent class, model best describes negative symptoms in a sample of 238 schizophrenia patients. In order to obtain more stable estimates of symptoms, ratings on the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms [Andreasen, N.C., 1982. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: Definition and reliability. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 39, 784-788.] were averaged across two assessments over a 6-month period. Two taxometric methods, maximum covariance analysis (MAXCOV) and mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC) identified a latent class or taxon with a base rate of approximately 28-36%. Members of the negative symptom taxon differed from the nontaxon class in that taxon members were more likely to be male and demonstrated poorer social functioning. Taxon and nontaxon schizophrenia patients did not differ in psychotic or affective symptoms. The findings converge to provide support for a categorical view of negative symptoms. Further research is required to replicate the present taxonic findings and to examine characteristics (including possible etiological factors) associated with this negative symptom taxon. PMID:15916881

  12. Distinct subtypes of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia based on patterns of network degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Kamalini G; Rankin, Katherine P; Pressman, Peter S; Perry, David C; Lobach, Iryna V; Seeley, William W; Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna M; Grinberg, Lea T; Shany-Ur, Tal; Lee, Suzee E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Boxer, Adam L; Miller, Zachary A; Chiong, Winston; DeMay, Mary; Kramer, Joel H; Possin, Katherine L; Sturm, Virginia E; Bettcher, Brianne M; Neylan, Michael; Zackey, Diana D; Nguyen, Lauren A; Ketelle, Robin; Block, Nikolas; Wu, Teresa Q; Dallich, Alison; Russek, Natanya; Caplan, Alyssa; Geschwind, Daniel H; Vossel, Keith A; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    Importance Clearer delineation of the phenotypic heterogeneity within behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) will help uncover underlying biological mechanisms, and will improve clinicians’ ability to predict disease course and design targeted management strategies. Objective To identify subtypes of bvFTD syndrome based on distinctive patterns of atrophy defined by selective vulnerability of specific functional networks targeted in bvFTD, using statistical classification approaches. Design, Setting and Participants In this retrospective observational study, 104 patients meeting the Frontotemporal Dementia Consortium consensus criteria for bvFTD were evaluated at the Memory and Aging Center of Department of Neurology at University of California, San Francisco. Patients underwent a multidisciplinary clinical evaluation, including clinical demographics, genetic testing, symptom evaluation, neurological exam, neuropsychological bedside testing, and socioemotional assessments. Ninety patients underwent structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging at their earliest evaluation at the memory clinic. From each patients’ structural imaging, the mean volumes of 18 regions of interest (ROI) comprising the functional networks specifically vulnerable in bvFTD, including the ‘salience network’ (SN), with key nodes in the frontoinsula and pregenual anterior cingulate, and the ‘semantic appraisal network’ (SAN) anchored in the anterior temporal lobe and subgenual cingulate, were estimated. Principal component and cluster analyses of ROI volumes were used to identify patient clusters with anatomically distinct atrophy patterns. Main Outcome Measures We evaluated brain morphology and other clinical features including presenting symptoms, neurologic exam signs, neuropsychological performance, rate of dementia progression, and socioemotional function in each patient cluster. Results We identified four subgroups of bvFTD patients with distinct anatomic patterns of

  13. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P; Boucher, Kenneth M; Burt, Randall W; Neklason, Deborah W; Hagedorn, Curt H; Delker, Don A

    2016-06-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20% to 30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon, and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross-validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1,422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n = 12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n = 9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability. A smaller 7-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF-mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high, and MLH1-silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 456-65. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27026680

  14. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  15. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG.

    PubMed

    Heipertz, Richard A; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; OʼSullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-08-01

    While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development.The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants.The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73-100% and 90-100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants.CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  16. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG

    PubMed Central

    Heipertz, Richard A.; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; O'Sullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development. The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants. The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73–100% and 90–100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants. CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  17. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  18. Cognitive subtypes of dyslexia are characterized by distinct patterns of grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Gawron, Natalia; Marchewka, Artur; Heim, Stefan; Grabowska, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The variety of different causal theories together with inconsistencies about the anatomical brain markers emphasize the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. Attempts were made to test on a behavioral level the existence of subtypes of dyslexia showing distinguishable cognitive deficits. Importantly, no research was directly devoted to the investigation of structural brain correlates of these subtypes. Here, for the first time, we applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to study grey matter volume (GMV) differences in a relatively large sample (n = 46) of dyslexic children split into three subtypes based on the cognitive deficits: phonological, rapid naming, magnocellular/dorsal, and auditory attention shifting. VBM revealed GMV clusters specific for each studied group including areas of left inferior frontal gyrus, cerebellum, right putamen, and bilateral parietal cortex. In addition, using discriminant analysis on these clusters 79% of cross-validated cases were correctly re-classified into four groups (controls vs. three subtypes). Current results indicate that dyslexia may result from distinct cognitive impairments characterized by distinguishable anatomical markers. PMID:23775490

  19. Three distinct biochemical subtypes of C4 photosynthesis? A modelling analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis has higher light-use, nitrogen-use, and water-use efficiencies than C3 photosynthesis. Historically, most of C4 plants were classified into three subtypes (NADP-malic enzyme (ME), NAD-ME, or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) subtypes) according to their major decarboxylation enzyme. However, a wealth of historic and recent data indicates that flexibility exists between different decarboxylation pathways in many C4 species, and this flexibility might be controlled by developmental and environmental cues. This work used systems modelling to theoretically explore the significance of flexibility in decarboxylation mechanisms and transfer acids utilization. The results indicate that employing mixed C4 pathways, either the NADP-ME type with the PEPCK type or the NAD-ME type with the PEPCK type, effectively decreases the need to maintain high concentrations and concentration gradients of transport metabolites. Further, maintaining a mixture of C4 pathways robustly affords high photosynthetic efficiency under a broad range of light regimes. A pure PEPCK-type C4 photosynthesis is not beneficial because the energy requirements in bundle sheath cells cannot be fulfilled due to them being shaded by mesophyll cells. Therefore, only two C4 subtypes should be considered as distinct subtypes, the NADP-ME type and NAD-ME types, which both inherently involve a supplementary PEPCK cycle. PMID:24609651

  20. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12116.001 PMID:26987019

  1. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  2. Distinct Roles of Central and Peripheral Prostaglandin E2 and EP Subtypes in Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianxin; Du, Yaomin

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a major prostanoid with a wide variety of biological activities. PGE2 can influence blood pressure (BP) both positively and negatively. In particular, centrally administered PGE2 induces hypertension whereas systemic administration of PGE2 produces a hypotensive effect. These physiologically opposing effects are generated by the existence of multiple EP receptors, namely EP1–4, which are G protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling properties. This review highlights the distinct roles of PGE2 in BP regulation and the involvement of specific EP receptor subtypes. American Journal of Hypertension, advance online publication 14 June 2012; doi:10.1038/ajh.2012.67 PMID:22695507

  3. Response to clozapine in a clinically identifiable subtype of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Fitzpatrick, Laura; Guna, Alina; Andrade, Danielle M.; Lang, Anthony E.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing in psychiatry promises to improve patient care through advances in personalised medicine. However, there are few clinically relevant examples. Aims To determine whether patients with a well-established genetic subtype of schizophrenia show a different response profile to the antipsychotic clozapine than those with idiopathic schizophrenia. Method We retrospectively studied the long-term safety and efficacy of clozapine in 40 adults with schizophrenia, half with a 22q11.2 deletion (22q11.2DS group) and half matched for age and clinical severity but molecularly confirmed to have no pathogenic copy number variant (idiopathic group). Results Both groups showed similar clinical improvement and significant reductions in hospitalisations, achieved at a lower median dose for those in the 22q11.2DS group. Most common side-effects were similarly prevalent between the two groups, however, half of the 22q11.2DS group experienced at least one rare serious adverse event compared with none of the idiopathic group. Many were successfully retried on clozapine. Conclusions Individuals with 22q11.2DS-schizophrenia respond as well to clozapine treatment as those with other forms of schizophrenia, but may represent a disproportionate number of those with serious adverse events, primarily seizures. Lower doses and prophylactic (for example anticonvulsant) management strategies can help ameliorate side-effect risks. This first systematic evaluation of antipsychotic response in a genetic subtype of schizophrenia provides a proof-of-principle for personalised medicine and supports the utility of clinical genetic testing in schizophrenia. PMID:25745132

  4. Distinct Clinicopathologic and Genetic Features of 2 Histologic Subtypes of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akimasa; Misumi, Kento; Shibahara, Junji; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified 2 clinically significant morphologic subtypes of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) on the basis of anatomic location and/or histologic appearances. Recognizing that these classification schemes are not always applicable practically, this study aimed to establish a novel classification system based on mucin productivity and immunophenotype and to determine the rationale of this classification by examining the clinicopathologic and genetic characteristics of the 2 subtypes defined by this method. We retrospectively investigated 102 consecutive ICC cases and classified them on the basis of mucin productivity and immunophenotype (S100P, N-cadherin, and NCAM). We found that 42 and 56 cases were classified as type 1 and type 2 ICCs, respectively, and only 4 cases were of indeterminate type. Type 1 ICC, generally characterized by mucin production and diffuse immunoreactivity to S100P, arose less frequently in chronic liver diseases and showed higher levels of serum CEA and CA 19-9 than did type 2 ICC, which generally showed little mucin production and exhibited immunoreactivity to N-cadherin and/or NCAM. Type 1 ICC was characterized by several pathologic features, including higher frequencies of perineural invasion and lymph node metastasis. Although the log-rank test demonstrated that type 1 ICC had significantly worse survival, the multivariate Cox regression analysis showed no prognostic significance of this histologic subtype. Genetic analyses revealed that KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in type 1 ICC, whereas IDH mutation and FGFR2 translocation were restricted to type 2 ICC. In conclusion, the present classification of ICC based on mucin productivity and immunophenotype identified 2 subtypes with clinicopathologic significance. PMID:27259014

  5. Identifying Cancer Subtypes from miRNA-TF-mRNA Regulatory Networks and Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Rujing; Sun, Bingyu; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying cancer subtypes is an important component of the personalised medicine framework. An increasing number of computational methods have been developed to identify cancer subtypes. However, existing methods rarely use information from gene regulatory networks to facilitate the subtype identification. It is widely accepted that gene regulatory networks play crucial roles in understanding the mechanisms of diseases. Different cancer subtypes are likely caused by different regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, there are great opportunities for developing methods that can utilise network information in identifying cancer subtypes. Results In this paper, we propose a method, weighted similarity network fusion (WSNF), to utilise the information in the complex miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network in identifying cancer subtypes. We firstly build the regulatory network where the nodes represent the features, i.e. the microRNAs (miRNAs), transcription factors (TFs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and the edges indicate the interactions between the features. The interactions are retrieved from various interatomic databases. We then use the network information and the expression data of the miRNAs, TFs and mRNAs to calculate the weight of the features, representing the level of importance of the features. The feature weight is then integrated into a network fusion approach to cluster the samples (patients) and thus to identify cancer subtypes. We applied our method to the TCGA breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The experimental results show that WSNF performs better than the other commonly used computational methods, and the information from miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network contributes to the performance improvement. The WSNF method successfully identified five breast cancer subtypes and three GBM subtypes which show significantly different survival patterns. We observed that the expression patterns of the features in some mi

  6. Childhood maltreatment and psychopathology: A case for ecophenotypic variants as clinically and neurobiologically distinct subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Teicher, Martin H.; Samson, Jacqueline A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Childhood maltreatment increases risk for psychopathology. For some highly prevalent disorders (i.e., major depression, substance abuse, anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder) there is a substantial subset of individuals with maltreatment histories and a substantial subset without. Do those with maltreatment histories represent a clinically and biologically distinct subtype? Method The authors review literature on maltreatment as a risk factor for these disorders and on the clinical differences between individuals with and without maltreatment who share the same diagnoses. Neurobiological findings in maltreated individuals are reviewed and compared to findings reported for these disorders. Results Maltreated individuals with depressive, anxiety and substance use disorders show an earlier age of onset, greater symptom severity, more comorbidity, increased risk for suicide and poorer treatment response than non-maltreated individuals with the same diagnoses. Imaging findings associated with these disorders, such as reduced hippocampal volume and amygdala hyperreactivity are more consistently observed in maltreated individuals and may represent a maltreatment-related risk factor. Maltreated individuals also differ from others due to epigenetic modifications and genetic polymorphisms that interact with experience to increase risk for psychopathology. Conclusions Phenotypic expression of psychopathology may be strongly influenced by exposure to maltreatment leading to a constellation of ecophenotypes. While these ecophenotypes fit within conventional diagnostic boundaries, they likely represent distinct subtypes. Recognition of this distinction may be essential in determining the biological bases of these disorders. Further, treatment guidelines and algorithms may be enhanced if maltreated and non-maltreated individuals with the same diagnostic labels are differentiated. PMID:23982148

  7. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:23948749

  8. Integrated data analysis reveals uterine leiomyoma subtypes with distinct driver pathways and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Mehine, Miika; Kaasinen, Eevi; Heinonen, Hanna-Riikka; Mäkinen, Netta; Kämpjärvi, Kati; Sarvilinna, Nanna; Aavikko, Mervi; Vähärautio, Anna; Pasanen, Annukka; Bützow, Ralf; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Sjöberg, Jari; Pitkänen, Esa; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are common benign smooth muscle tumors that impose a major burden on women’s health. Recent sequencing studies have revealed recurrent and mutually exclusive mutations in leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of molecularly distinct pathways. In this study, we explored transcriptional differences among leiomyomas harboring different genetic drivers, including high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) rearrangements, mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) mutations, biallelic inactivation of fumarate hydratase (FH), and collagen, type IV, alpha 5 and collagen, type IV, alpha 6 (COL4A5-COL4A6) deletions. We also explored the transcriptional consequences of 7q22, 22q, and 1p deletions, aiming to identify possible target genes. We investigated 94 leiomyomas and 60 corresponding myometrial tissues using exon arrays, whole genome sequencing, and SNP arrays. This integrative approach revealed subtype-specific expression changes in key driver pathways, including Wnt/β-catenin, Prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1 signaling. Leiomyomas with HMGA2 aberrations displayed highly significant up-regulation of the proto-oncogene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1), suggesting that HMGA2 promotes tumorigenesis through PLAG1 activation. This was supported by the identification of genetic PLAG1 alterations resulting in expression signatures as seen in leiomyomas with HMGA2 aberrations. RAD51 paralog B (RAD51B), the preferential translocation partner of HMGA2, was up-regulated in MED12 mutant lesions, suggesting a role for this gene in the genesis of leiomyomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas were uniquely characterized by activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) target genes, supporting the hypothesis that accumulation of fumarate leads to activation of the oncogenic transcription factor NRF2. This study emphasizes the need for molecular stratification in leiomyoma research and possibly in clinical practice as well. Further research is

  9. Establishment of a Novel Histopathological Classification of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Correlated with Prognostically Distinct Gene Expression Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Yamanoi, Koji; Abiko, Kaoru; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Hamanishi, Junzo; Yamaguchi, Ken; Baba, Tsukasa; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Enomoto, Takayuki; Okamoto, Aikou; Murphy, Susan K; Mori, Seiichi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-05-01

    Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed four molecular subtypes of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) exhibiting distinct prognoses. We developed four novel HGSOC histopathological subtypes by focusing on tumor microenvironment: mesenchymal transition, defined by a remarkable desmoplastic reaction; immune reactive by lymphocytes infiltrating the tumor; solid and proliferative by a solid growth pattern; and papilloglandular by a papillary architecture. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed four clusters correlated with histopathological subtypes in both Kyoto and Niigata HGSOC transcriptome data sets (P < 0.001). Gene set enrichment analysis revealed pathways enriched in our histopathological classification significantly overlapped with the four molecular subtypes: mesenchymal, immunoreactive, proliferative, and differentiated (P < 0.0001, respectively). In 132 HGSOC cases, progression-free survival and overall survival were best in the immune reactive, whereas overall survival was worst in the mesenchymal transition (P < 0.001, respectively), findings reproduced in 89 validation cases (P < 0.05, respectively). The CLOVAR_MES_UP single-sample gene set enrichment analysis scores representing the mesenchymal molecular subtype were higher in paclitaxel responders than nonresponders (P = 0.002) in the GSE15622 data set. Taxane-containing regimens improved survival of cases with high MES_UP scores compared with nontaxane regimens (P < 0.001) in the GSE9891 data set. Our novel histopathological classification of HGSOC correlates with distinct prognostic transcriptome subtypes. The mesenchymal transition subtype might be particularly sensitive to taxane. PMID:26993207

  10. Identifying ultrasound and clinical features of breast cancer molecular subtypes by ensemble decision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun; Cui, Hao; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Ziyao; Wu, Tong; Li, Xia; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is molecularly heterogeneous and categorized into four molecular subtypes: Luminal-A, Luminal-B, HER2-amplified and Triple-negative. In this study, we aimed to apply an ensemble decision approach to identify the ultrasound and clinical features related to the molecular subtypes. We collected ultrasound and clinical features from 1,000 breast cancer patients and performed immunohistochemistry on these samples. We used the ensemble decision approach to select unique features and to construct decision models. The decision model for Luminal-A subtype was constructed based on the presence of an echogenic halo and post-acoustic shadowing or indifference. The decision model for Luminal-B subtype was constructed based on the absence of an echogenic halo and vascularity. The decision model for HER2-amplified subtype was constructed based on the presence of post-acoustic enhancement, calcification, vascularity and advanced age. The model for Triple-negative subtype followed two rules. One was based on irregular shape, lobulate margin contour, the absence of calcification and hypovascularity, whereas the other was based on oval shape, hypovascularity and micro-lobulate margin contour. The accuracies of the models were 83.8%, 77.4%, 87.9% and 92.7%, respectively. We identified specific features of each molecular subtype and expanded the scope of ultrasound for making diagnoses using these decision models. PMID:26046791

  11. Dkk4 and Eda regulate distinctive developmental mechanisms for subtypes of mouse hair.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Kunisada, Makoto; Piao, Yulan; Childress, Victoria; Ko, Minoru S H; Schlessinger, David

    2010-01-01

    The mouse hair coat comprises protective "primary" and thermo-regulatory "secondary" hairs. Primary hair formation is ectodysplasin (Eda) dependent, but it has been puzzling that Tabby (Eda(-/y)) mice still make secondary hair. We report that Dickkopf 4 (Dkk4), a Wnt antagonist, affects an auxiliary pathway for Eda-independent development of secondary hair. A Dkk4 transgene in wild-type mice had no effect on primary hair, but secondary hairs were severely malformed. Dkk4 action on secondary hair was further demonstrated when the transgene was introduced into Tabby mice: the usual secondary follicle induction was completely blocked. The Dkk4-regulated secondary hair pathway, like the Eda-dependent primary hair pathway, is further mediated by selective activation of Shh. The results thus reveal two complex molecular pathways that distinctly regulate subtype-based morphogenesis of hair follicles, and provide a resolution for the longstanding puzzle of hair formation in Tabby mice lacking Eda. PMID:20386733

  12. Distinct neural signatures detected for ADHD subtypes after controlling for micro-movements in resting state functional connectivity MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Damien A.; Nigg, Joel T.; Iyer, Swathi; Bathula, Deepti; Mills, Kathryn L.; Dosenbach, Nico U. F.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Mennes, Maarten; Gutman, David; Bangaru, Saroja; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Di Martino, Adriana; Kennedy, David N.; Kelly, Clare; Luna, Beatriz; Schweitzer, Julie B.; Velanova, Katerina; Wang, Yu-Feng; Mostofsky, Stewart; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    be used to characterize individual patients with ADHD and to identify neural distinctions underlying the clinical heterogeneity of ADHD. PMID:23382713

  13. Distinct neural signatures detected for ADHD subtypes after controlling for micro-movements in resting state functional connectivity MRI data.

    PubMed

    Fair, Damien A; Nigg, Joel T; Iyer, Swathi; Bathula, Deepti; Mills, Kathryn L; Dosenbach, Nico U F; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Mennes, Maarten; Gutman, David; Bangaru, Saroja; Buitelaar, Jan K; Dickstein, Daniel P; Di Martino, Adriana; Kennedy, David N; Kelly, Clare; Luna, Beatriz; Schweitzer, Julie B; Velanova, Katerina; Wang, Yu-Feng; Mostofsky, Stewart; Castellanos, F Xavier; Milham, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    used to characterize individual patients with ADHD and to identify neural distinctions underlying the clinical heterogeneity of ADHD. PMID:23382713

  14. Latent class analysis identifies three subtypes of aggressive end-of-life care: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Chen, Yun-Yi; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2013-10-01

    The aggressiveness of end-of-life (EOL) cancer care has often been analysed by the occurrence of several indicators, separately or aggregately. Whether aggressive EOL cancer care has different subtypes is unknown. This study sought to identify distinct subtypes of aggressive EOL care based on usage patterns of aggressive EOL-care indicators and to explore demographic, disease and treatment factors associated with the identified subtypes. This retrospective study linked data from 2001 to 2006 from three Taiwanese databases: National Registration of Death Database, Cancer Registration System and National Health Insurance claims database. Adult cancer patients (N=203,642) who died in 2001-2006 were selected. For these cancer patients' last month of life, we analysed eight indicators of aggressive EOL care: receiving chemotherapy, >1 emergency room visit, >1 hospitalisation, hospitalisation for >14 days, intensive care unit admission, received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, received intubation and received mechanical ventilation. Subtypes of aggressive EOL care were identified by latent class analysis. Among the study population, only 22.3% were treated by medical oncologists. Based on their profiles of EOL care, deceased cancer patients were classified into three subgroups: 'not aggressive' (45%), 'intent to sustain life' (33%) and 'symptom crisis' group (22%). Patients assigned to the 'intent to sustain life' group were less likely to have metastatic disease and to receive hospice care in the last year of life, but more likely to be cared for by non-medical oncologists, to die within 2 months after diagnosis and to die in hospital. EOL cancer care may be improved by understanding factors related to different subtypes of aggressive EOL care. PMID:23756054

  15. Clueless or Powerful? Identifying Subtypes of Bullies in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Margot; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the heterogeneity of bullying among adolescents. It was hypothesized that bullying behavior serves different social functions and, depending on these functions, bullies will differ in their skills, status and social behavior. In a total sample of 806 8th graders, 120 adolescents (52 boys, 68 girls) were identified as bullies…

  16. IFN-α subtypes: distinct biological activities in anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbert, K; Schlaak, JF; Yang, D; Dittmer, U

    2013-01-01

    During most viral infections, the immediate host response is characterized by an induction of type I IFN. These cytokines have various biological activities, including anti-viral, anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects. After induction, they bind to their IFN-α/β receptor, which leads to downstream signalling resulting in the expression of numerous different IFN-stimulated genes. These genes encode anti-viral proteins that directly inhibit viral replication as well as modulate immune function. Thus, the induction of type I IFN is a very powerful tool for the host to fight virus infections. Many viruses evade this response by various strategies like the direct suppression of IFN induction or inhibition of the IFN signalling pathway. Therefore, the therapeutic application of exogenous type I IFN or molecules that induce strong IFN responses should be of great potential for future immunotherapies against viral infections. Type I IFN is currently used as a treatment in chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, but as yet is not widely utilized for other viral infections. One reason for this restricted clinical use is that type I IFN belongs to a multigene family that includes 13 different IFN-α subtypes and IFN-β, whose individual anti-viral and immunomodulatory properties have so far not been investigated in detail to improve IFN therapy against viral infections in humans. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in defining the distinct biological functions of type I IFN subtypes in cell culture and in animal models of viral infection as well as their clinical usage in chronic hepatitis virus infections. PMID:23072338

  17. A melanoma subtype with intrinsic resistance to BRAF inhibition identified by receptor tyrosine kinases gene-driven classification

    PubMed Central

    Dugo, Matteo; Nicolini, Gabriella; Tragni, Gabrina; Bersani, Ilaria; Tomassetti, Antonella; Colonna, Valentina; Del Vecchio, Michele; De Braud, Filippo; Canevari, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) contributes to several aspects of oncogenesis including drug resistance. In melanoma, distinct RTKs have been involved in BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) resistance, yet the utility of RTKs expression pattern to identify intrinsically resistant tumors has not been assessed. Transcriptional profiling of RTKs and integration with a previous classification, reveals three robust subtypes in two independent datasets of melanoma cell lines and one cohort of melanoma samples. This classification was validated by Western blot in a panel of patient-derived melanoma cell lines. One of the subtypes identified here for the first time displayed the highest and lowest expression of EGFR and ERBB3, respectively, and included BRAF-mutant tumors all intrinsically resistant to BRAFi PLX4720, as assessed by analysis of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia pharmacogenomic study and by in vitro growth inhibition assays. High levels of EGFR were detected, even before therapy, in tumor cells of one of three melanoma patients unresponsive to BRAFi. Use of different pharmacological inhibitors highlighted the relevance of PI3K/mTOR signaling for growth of this PLX4720-resistant subtype. Our results identify a specific molecular profile of melanomas intrinsically resistant to BRAFi and suggest the PI3K/mTOR pathway as a potential therapeutic target for these tumors. PMID:25742786

  18. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947-1961], 43 from France [1986-2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2') A5(B3'), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  19. Diversity of Group I and II Clostridium botulinum Strains from France Including Recently Identified Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Philippe; Popoff, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    In France, human botulism is mainly food-borne intoxication, whereas infant botulism is rare. A total of 99 group I and II Clostridium botulinum strains including 59 type A (12 historical isolates [1947–1961], 43 from France [1986–2013], 3 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), 31 type B (3 historical, 23 recent isolates, 4 from other countries, and 1 collection strain), and 9 type E (5 historical, 3 isolates, and 1 collection strain) were investigated by botulinum locus gene sequencing and multilocus sequence typing analysis. Historical C. botulinum A strains mainly belonged to subtype A1 and sequence type (ST) 1, whereas recent strains exhibited a wide genetic diversity: subtype A1 in orfX or ha locus, A1(B), A1(F), A2, A2b2, A5(B2′) A5(B3′), as well as the recently identified A7 and A8 subtypes, and were distributed into 25 STs. Clostridium botulinum A1(B) was the most frequent subtype from food-borne botulism and food. Group I C. botulinum type B in France were mainly subtype B2 (14 out of 20 historical and recent strains) and were divided into 19 STs. Food-borne botulism resulting from ham consumption during the recent period was due to group II C. botulinum B4. Type E botulism is rare in France, 5 historical and 1 recent strains were subtype E3. A subtype E12 was recently identified from an unusual ham contamination. Clostridium botulinum strains from human botulism in France showed a wide genetic diversity and seems to result not from a single evolutionary lineage but from multiple and independent genetic rearrangements. PMID:27189984

  20. Dkk4 and Eda Regulate Distinctive Developmental Mechanisms for Subtypes of Mouse Hair

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Kunisada, Makoto; Piao, Yulan; Childress, Victoria; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Schlessinger, David

    2010-01-01

    The mouse hair coat comprises protective “primary” and thermo-regulatory “secondary” hairs. Primary hair formation is ectodysplasin (Eda) dependent, but it has been puzzling that Tabby (Eda-/y) mice still make secondary hair. We report that Dickkopf 4 (Dkk4), a Wnt antagonist, affects an auxiliary pathway for Eda-independent development of secondary hair. A Dkk4 transgene in wild-type mice had no effect on primary hair, but secondary hairs were severely malformed. Dkk4 action on secondary hair was further demonstrated when the transgene was introduced into Tabby mice: the usual secondary follicle induction was completely blocked. The Dkk4-regulated secondary hair pathway, like the Eda-dependent primary hair pathway, is further mediated by selective activation of Shh. The results thus reveal two complex molecular pathways that distinctly regulate subtype-based morphogenesis of hair follicles, and provide a resolution for the longstanding puzzle of hair formation in Tabby mice lacking Eda. PMID:20386733

  1. Cognitive and familial risk evidence converged: A data-driven identification of distinct and homogeneous subtypes within the heterogeneous sample of reading disabled children.

    PubMed

    Willems, Gonny; Jansma, Bernadette; Blomert, Leo; Vaessen, Anniek

    2016-01-01

    The evident degree of heterogeneity observed in reading disabled children has puzzled reading researchers for decades. Recent advances in the genetic underpinnings of reading disability have indicated that the heritable, familial risk for dyslexia is a major risk factor. The present data-driven, classification attempt aims to revisit the possibility of identifying distinct cognitive deficit profiles in a large sample of second to fourth grade reading disabled children. In this sample, we investigated whether genetic and environmental risk factors are able to distinguish between poor reader subtypes. In this profile, we included reading-related measures of phonemic awareness, letter-speech sound processing and rapid naming, known as candidate vulnerability markers associated with dyslexia and familial risk for dyslexia, as well as general cognitive abilities (non-verbal IQ and vocabulary). Clustering was based on a 200 multi-start K-means approach. Results revealed four emerging subtypes of which the first subtype showed no cognitive deficits underlying their poor reading skills (Reading-only impaired poor readers). The other three subtypes shared a core phonological deficit (PA) with a variable and discriminative expression across the other underlying vulnerability markers. More specific, type 2 showed low to poor performance across all reading-related and general cognitive abilities (general poor readers), type 3 showed a specific letter-speech sound mapping deficit next to a PA deficit (PA-LS specific poor readers) and type 4 showed a specific rapid naming deficit complementing their phonological weakness (PA-RAN specific poor readers). The first three poor reader profiles were more characterized by variable environmental risk factor, while the fourth, PA-RAN poor reader subtype showed a significantly strong familial risk for dyslexia. Overall, when we zoom in on the heterogeneous phenomenon of reading disability, unique and distinct cognitive subtypes can be

  2. DNA Methylome of Familial Breast Cancer Identifies Distinct Profiles Defined by Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, James M.; Cocciardi, Sibylle; Waddell, Nic; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Marsh, Anna; Henderson, Stephen; Simpson, Peter; da Silva, Leonard; Khanna, Kumkum; Lakhani, Sunil; Boshoff, Chris; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that epigenetic alterations occur frequently in sporadic breast carcinogenesis, but little is known about the epigenetic alterations associated with familial breast tumors. We performed genome-wide DNA-methylation profiling on familial breast cancers (n = 33) to identify patterns of methylation specific to the different mutation groups (BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAx) or intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer (basal, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-amplified, and normal-like). We used methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix promoter chips to interrogate methylation profiles across 25,500 distinct transcripts. Using a support vector machine classification algorithm, we demonstrated that genome-wide methylation profiles predicted tumor mutation status with estimated error rates of 19% (BRCA1), 31% (BRCA2), and 36% (BRCAx) but did not accurately predict the intrinsic subtypes defined by gene expression. Furthermore, using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified a distinct subgroup of BRCAx tumors defined by methylation profiles. We validated these findings in the 33 tumors in the test set, as well as in an independent validation set of 47 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded familial breast tumors, by pyrosequencing and Epityper. Finally, gene-expression profiling and SNP CGH array previously performed on the same samples allowed full integration of methylation, gene-expression, and copy-number data sets, revealing frequent hypermethylation of genes that also displayed loss of heterozygosity, as well as of genes that show copy-number gains, providing a potential mechanism for expression dosage compensation. Together, these data show that methylation profiles for familial breast cancers are defined by the mutation status and are distinct from the intrinsic subtypes. PMID:20206335

  3. Identifying Subtypes of Peer Status by Combining Popularity and Preference: A Cohort-Sequential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Yvonne H. M.; Burk, William J.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and validate subtypes of peer status by integrating preference and popularity into a single framework. Person-oriented analyses were performed among 3,630 children and adolescents of different cohorts in primary and secondary education. In the young age groups (Grade 3/4 to Grade 7), three clusters were…

  4. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  5. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  6. Characterization of the two distinct subtypes of metabotropic glutamate receptors from honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Funada, Masahiro; Yasuo, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Takashi; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Sasagawa, Hiromi; Kitagawa, Yasuo; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2004-04-15

    L-Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter at the excitatory synapses in the vertebrate brain. It is also the excitatory neurotransmitter at neuromuscular junctions in insects, however its functions in their brains remain to be established. We identified and characterized two different subtypes (AmGluRA and AmGluRB) of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) from an eusocial insect, honeybee. Both AmGluRA and AmGluRB form homodimers independently on disulfide bonds, and bind [3H]glutamate with K(D) values of 156.7 and 80.7 nM, respectively. AmGluRB is specifically expressed in the brain, while AmGluRA is expressed in the brain and other body parts, suggesting that AmGluRA is also present at the neuromuscular junctions. Both mGluRs are expressed in the mushroom bodies and the brain regions of honeybees, where motor neurons are clustered. Their expression in the brain apparently overlaps, suggesting that they may interact with each other to modulate the glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:15050695

  7. Identifying subtypes of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration by genotypic and cardiovascular risk characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the challenges in the interpretation of studies showing associations between environmental and genotypic data with disease outcomes such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is understanding the phenotypic heterogeneity within a patient population with regard to any risk factor associated with the condition. This is critical when considering the potential therapeutic response of patients to any drug developed to treat the condition. In the present study, we identify patient subtypes or clusters which could represent several different targets for treatment development, based on genetic pathways in AMD and cardiovascular pathology. Methods We identified a sample of patients with neovascular AMD, that in previous studies had been shown to be at elevated risk for the disease through environmental factors such as cigarette smoking and genetic variants including the complement factor H gene (CFH) on chromosome 1q25 and variants in the ARMS2/HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) gene(s) on chromosome 10q26. We conducted a multivariate segmentation analysis of 253 of these patients utilizing available epidemiologic and genetic data. Results In a multivariate model, cigarette smoking failed to differentiate subtypes of patients. However, four meaningfully distinct clusters of patients were identified that were most strongly differentiated by their cardiovascular health status (histories of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension), and the alleles of ARMS2/HTRA1 rs1049331. Conclusions These results have significant personalized medicine implications for drug developers attempting to determine the effective size of the treatable neovascular AMD population. Patient subtypes or clusters may represent different targets for therapeutic development based on genetic pathways in AMD and cardiovascular pathology, and treatments developed that may elevate CV risk, may be ill advised for certain of the clusters identified. PMID:21682878

  8. Genome-Wide Methylation Patterns in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Are Distinct Based on Histological Subtype and Tumor Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ryan J.; Wang, Yonghong; Stevenson, Holly S.; Boufraqech, Myriem; Patel, Dhaval; Nilubol, Naris; Davis, Sean; Edelman, Daniel C.; Merino, Maria J.; He, Mei; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Aberrant DNA methylation is known to be a major factor in oncogenesis and cancer progression, but effects of methylation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) are not well defined. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify altered methylation patterns, which may be associated with PTC disease behavior. Design: This study was a genome-wide methylation analysis of PTC. Setting: The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Patients: PTC tissue from 51 patients were analyzed and compared with normal thyroid tissue from seven patients. Interventions: CpG methylation status was assessed using advanced genome-wide methylation bead chips. Outcome Measures: Altered methylation patterns in PTC were analyzed by stage, recurrence, histological subtype of tumor, and tumor genotype. Results: PTC is globally hypomethylated compared with normal thyroid with 2837 differentially methylated CpG sites. The follicular variant of PTC demonstrated less differential methylation with only 569 differentially methylated CpG sites. Tumors with mutations in BRAF, RET/PTC, and RAS demonstrated a 3.6-fold increase in the number of differentially methylated sites compared with wild-type tumors. The differentially methylated genes were associated with oncological pathways including cellular movement, growth, and proliferation. Conclusion: PTC is epigenetically distinct from the follicular variant of PTC and by gene mutation status (BRAF, RET/PTC, and RAS). PMID:24423287

  9. Molecular analysis of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) subtypes reveals two distinct cell populations with different identities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The term endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is currently used to refer to cell populations which are quite dissimilar in terms of biological properties. This study provides a detailed molecular fingerprint for two EPC subtypes: early EPCs (eEPCs) and outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs). Methods Human blood-derived eEPCs and OECs were characterised by using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, 2D protein electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. Comparative analysis at the transcript and protein level included monocytes and mature endothelial cells as reference cell types. Results Our data show that eEPCs and OECs have strikingly different gene expression signatures. Many highly expressed transcripts in eEPCs are haematopoietic specific (RUNX1, WAS, LYN) with links to immunity and inflammation (TLRs, CD14, HLAs), whereas many transcripts involved in vascular development and angiogenesis-related signalling pathways (Tie2, eNOS, Ephrins) are highly expressed in OECs. Comparative analysis with monocytes and mature endothelial cells clusters eEPCs with monocytes, while OECs segment with endothelial cells. Similarly, proteomic analysis revealed that 90% of spots identified by 2-D gel analysis are common between OECs and endothelial cells while eEPCs share 77% with monocytes. In line with the expression pattern of caveolins and cadherins identified by microarray analysis, ultrastructural evaluation highlighted the presence of caveolae and adherens junctions only in OECs. Conclusions This study provides evidence that eEPCs are haematopoietic cells with a molecular phenotype linked to monocytes; whereas OECs exhibit commitment to the endothelial lineage. These findings indicate that OECs might be an attractive cell candidate for inducing therapeutic angiogenesis, while eEPC should be used with caution because of their monocytic nature. PMID:20465783

  10. Human plasma metabolomics for identifying differential metabolites and predicting molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Jin; Liu, Qun; Alolga, Raphael N; Chen, Yan; Lai, Mao-De; Li, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This work aims to identify differential metabolites and predicting molecular subtypes of breast cancer (BC). Methods Plasma samples were collected from 96 BC patients and 79 normal participants. Metabolic profiles were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based on multivariate statistical data analysis. Results We observed 64 differential metabolites between BC and normal group. Compared to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative patients, HER2-positive group showed elevated aerobic glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and increased fatty acid biosynthesis with reduced Krebs cycle. Compared with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative group, ER-positive patients showed elevated alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, decreased glycerolipid catabolism, and enhanced purine metabolism. A panel of 8 differential metabolites, including carnitine, lysophosphatidylcholine (20:4), proline, alanine, lysophosphatidylcholine (16:1), glycochenodeoxycholic acid, valine, and 2-octenedioic acid, was identified for the classification of BC subtypes. These markers showed potential diagnostic value with average area under the curve at 0.925 (95% CI 0.867-0.983) for the training set (n=51) and 0.893 (95% CI 0.847-0.939) for the test set (n=45). Conclusion Human plasma metabolomics is useful in identifying differential metabolites and predicting breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26848530

  11. Distinct Splice Variants and Pathway Enrichment in the Cell Line Models of Aggressive Human Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Im, Hogune; Zhang, Emma (Yue); Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael; Hancock, William S.; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) of the Human Proteome Organization. The United States team of C-HPP is focused on characterizing the protein-coding genes in chromosome 17. Despite its small size, chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, it contains many cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, ERBB2 (Her2/neu), and TP53. The goal of this study was to examine the splice variants expressed in three ERBB2 expressed breast cancer cell line models of hormone receptor negative breast cancers by integrating RNA-Seq and proteomic mass spectrometry data. The cell-lines represent distinct phenotypic variations subtype: SKBR3 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ ER−/PR−; adenocarcinoma), SUM190 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ER−/PR−; inflammatory breast cancer) and SUM149 (ERBB2 (low expression) ER−/PR −; inflammatory breast cancer). We identified more than one splice variant for 1167 genes expressed in at least one of the three cancer cell lines. We found multiple variants of genes that are in the signaling pathways downstream of ERBB2 along with variants specific to one cancer cell line compared to the other two cancer cell lines and to normal mammary cells. The overall transcript profiles based on read counts indicated more similarities between SKBR3 and SUM190. The top-ranking Gene Ontology and BioCarta pathways for the cell-line specific variants pointed to distinct key mechanisms including: amino sugar metabolism, caspase activity, and endocytosis in SKBR3; different aspects of metabolism, especially of lipids in SUM190; cell- to-cell adhesion, integrin and ERK1/ERK2 signaling, and translational control in SUM149. The analyses indicated an enrichment in the electron transport chain processes in the ERBB2 over-expressed cell line models; and an association of nucleotide binding, RNA splicing and translation processes with the IBC models, SUM190 and SUM149. Detailed experimental studies on the distinct

  12. Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 2: evidence for distinct sequence subtypes with differences in virus biology.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, F; Yue, L; Robertson, D L; Hill, S C; Hui, H; Biggar, R J; Neequaye, A E; Whelan, T M; Ho, D D; Shaw, G M

    1994-01-01

    The virulence properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are known to vary significantly and to range from relative attenuation in certain individuals to high-level pathogenicity in others. These differences in clinical manifestations may, at least in part, be determined by genetic differences among infecting virus strains. Evaluation of the full spectrum of HIV-2 genetic diversity is thus a necessary first step towards understanding its molecular epidemiology, natural history of infection, and biological diversity. In this study, we have used nested PCR techniques to amplify viral sequences from the DNA of uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 12 patients with HIV-2 seroreactivity. Sequence analysis of four nonoverlapping genomic regions allowed a comprehensive analysis of HIV-2 phylogeny. The results revealed (i) the existence of five distinct and roughly equidistant evolutionary lineages of HIV-2 which, by analogy with HIV-1, have been termed sequence subtypes A to E; (ii) evidence for a mosaic HIV-2 genome, indicating that coinfection with genetically divergent strains and recombination can occur in HIV-2-infected individuals; and (iii) evidence supporting the conclusion that some of the HIV-2 subtypes may have arisen from independent introductions of genetically diverse sooty mangabey viruses into the human population. Importantly, only a subset of HIV-2 strains replicated in culture: all subtype A viruses grew to high titers, but attempts to isolate representatives of subtypes C, D, and E, as well as the majority of subtype B viruses, remained unsuccessful. Infection with all five viral subtypes was detectable by commercially available serological (Western immunoblot) assays, despite intersubtype sequence differences of up to 25% in the gag, pol, and env regions. These results indicate that the genetic and biological diversity of HIV-2 is far greater than previously appreciated and suggest that there may be subtype

  13. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  14. COPD subtypes identified by network-based clustering of blood gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yale; Glass, Kimberly; Liu, Yang-Yu; Silverman, Edwin K; Crapo, James D; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Bowler, Russ; Dy, Jennifer; Cho, Michael; Castaldi, Peter

    2016-03-01

    One of the most common smoking-related diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), results from a dysregulated, multi-tissue inflammatory response to cigarette smoke. We hypothesized that systemic inflammatory signals in genome-wide blood gene expression can identify clinically important COPD-related disease subtypes, and we leveraged pre-existing gene interaction networks to guide unsupervised clustering of blood microarray expression data. Using network-informed non-negative matrix factorization, we analyzed genome-wide blood gene expression from 229 former smokers in the ECLIPSE Study, and we identified novel, clinically relevant molecular subtypes of COPD. These network-informed clusters were more stable and more strongly associated with measures of lung structure and function than clusters derived from a network-naïve approach, and they were associated with subtype-specific enrichment for inflammatory and protein catabolic pathways. These clusters were successfully reproduced in an independent sample of 135 smokers from the COPDGene Study. PMID:26773458

  15. New Stx2e monoclonal antibodies for immunological detection and distinction of Stx2 subtypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Stx2e is a primary virulence factor in STEC strains that cause edema disease in neonatal piglets. Though Stx2a and Stx2e are similar, most antibody-based Stx detection kits are designed to detect Stx2a and do not recognize the Stx2e subtype. Methods and Findings Four monoclonal antibodie...

  16. Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Distinct or Related Disorders across Measurement Levels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeyens, Dieter; Roeyers, Herbert; Walle, Johan Vande

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this literature review is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding differences and similarities between the inattentive (IA) and combined (C) subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in order to detail challenges concerning further conceptualization, diagnostics, and treatment. The literature on ADHD-IA and…

  17. Ctip1 regulates the balance between specification of distinct projection neuron subtypes in deep cortical layers

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Mollie B.; Greig, Luciano C.; Liu, Kevin X.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Tucker, Haley O.; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular linkage between neocortical projection neuron subtype and area development, which enables the establishment of functional areas by projection neuron populations appropriate for specific sensory and motor functions, is poorly understood. Here, we report that Ctip1 controls precision of neocortical development by regulating subtype identity in deep-layer projection neurons. Ctip1 is expressed by postmitotic callosal and corticothalamic projection neurons, but is excluded over embryonic development from corticospinal motor neurons, which instead express its close relative, Ctip2. Loss of Ctip1 function results in a striking bias in favor of subcerebral projection neuron development in sensory cortex at the expense of corticothalamic and deep-layer callosal development, while misexpression of Ctip1 in vivo represses subcerebral gene expression and projections. As we report in a paired paper, Ctip1 also controls acquisition of sensory area identity. Therefore, Ctip1 couples subtype and area specification, enabling specific functional areas to organize precise ratios of appropriate output projections. PMID:27117402

  18. Genome Sequence of a Complex HIV-1 Unique Recombinant Form Involving CRF01_AE, Subtype B, and Subtype B' Identified in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Nizam, Sarimie; Ong, Lai Yee; Ng, Kim Tien; Chan, Kok Gan; Takebe, Yutaka; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2014-01-01

    A complex HIV-1 unique recombinant form involving subtypes CRF01_AE, B, and B' was recently identified from an injecting drug user in Malaysia. A total of 13 recombination breakpoints were mapped across the near-full-length genome of isolate 10MYPR226, indicating the increasingly diverse molecular epidemiology and frequent linkage among various high-risk groups. PMID:24675847

  19. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat; Mancino, Mario; Gascón, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  20. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  1. Biphasic Squamoid Alveolar Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Distinctive Subtype of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Hes, Ondrej; Condom Mundo, Enric; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Lopez, Jose I; Martinek, Petr; Vanecek, Tomas; Falconieri, Giovanni; Agaimy, Abbas; Davidson, Whitney; Petersson, Fredrik; Bulimbasic, Stela; Damjanov, Ivan; Jimeno, Mireya; Ulamec, Monika; Podhola, Miroslav; Sperga, Maris; Pane Foix, Maria; Shelekhova, Ksenya; Kalusova, Kristyna; Hora, Milan; Rotterova, Pavla; Daum, Ondrej; Pivovarcikova, Kristyna; Michal, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma (BSARCC) has been recently described as a distinct neoplasm. Twenty-one cases from 12 institutions were analyzed using routine histology, immunohistochemistry, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Tumors were removed from 11 male and 10 female patients, whose age ranged from 53 to 79 years. The size of tumors ranged from 1.5 to 16 cm. Follow-up information was available for 14 patients (range, 1 to 96 mo), and metastatic spread was found in 5 cases. All tumors comprised 2 cell populations arranged in organoid structures: small, low-grade neoplastic cells with scant cytoplasm usually lining the inside of alveolar structures, and larger squamoid cells with more prominent cytoplasm and larger vesicular nuclei arranged in compact nests. In 9/21 tumors there was a visible transition from such solid and alveolar areas into papillary components. Areas composed of large squamoid cells comprised 10% to 80% of total tumor volume. Emperipolesis was present in all (21/21) tumors. Immunohistochemically, all cases were positive for cytokeratin 7, EMA, vimentin, and cyclin D1. aCGH (confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization) in 5 analyzable cases revealed multiple numerical chromosomal changes including gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 in all cases. These changes were further disclosed in 6 additional cases, which were unsuitable for aCGH. We conclude that tumors show a morphologic spectrum ranging from RCC with papillary architecture and large squamoid cells to fully developed BSARCC. Emperipolesis in squamoid cells was a constant finding. All BSARCCs expressed CK7, EMA, vimentin, and cyclin D1. Antibody to cyclin D1 showed a unique and previously not recognized pattern of immunohistochemical staining. Multiple chromosomal aberrations were identified in all analyzable cases including gains of chromosomes 7 and 17, indicating that they are akin to papillary RCC. Some BSARCCs were

  2. The oxytocin/vasopressin receptor family has at least five members in the gnathostome lineage, inclucing two distinct V2 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Lewicka, Michalina; Larhammar, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate oxytocin and vasopressin receptors form a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate a large variety of functions, including social behavior and the regulation of blood pressure, water balance and reproduction. In mammals four family members have been identified, three of which respond to vasopressin (VP) named V1A, V1B and V2, and one of which is activated by oxytocin (OT), called the OT receptor. Four receptors have been identified in chicken as well, but these have received different names. Until recently only V1-type receptors have been described in several species of teleost fishes. We have identified family members in several gnathostome genomes and performed phylogenetic analyses to classify OT/VP-receptors across species and determine orthology relationships. Our phylogenetic tree identifies five distinct ancestral gnathostome receptor subtypes in the OT/VP receptor family: V1A, V1B, V2A, V2B and OT receptors. The existence of distinct V2A and V2B receptors has not been previously recognized. We have found these two subtypes in all examined teleost genomes as well as in available frog and lizard genomes and conclude that the V2A-type is orthologous to mammalian V2 receptors whereas the V2B-type is orthologous to avian V2 receptors. Some teleost fishes have acquired additional and more recent gene duplicates with up to eight receptor family members. Thus, this analysis reveals an unprecedented complexity in the gnathostome repertoire of OT/VP receptors, opening interesting research avenues regarding functions such as regulation of water balance, reproduction and behavior, particularly in reptiles, amphibians, teleost fishes and cartilaginous fishes. PMID:22057000

  3. Integration of electrophysiological recordings with single-cell RNA-seq data identifies neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fuzik, János; Zeisel, Amit; Máté, Zoltán; Calvigioni, Daniela; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Szabó, Gábor; Linnarsson, Sten; Harkany, Tibor

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, neuroscientists have defined the identity of neurons by the cells' location, morphology, connectivity and excitability. However, the direct relationship between these parameters and the molecular phenotypes has remained largely unexplored. Here, we present a method for obtaining full transcriptome data from single neocortical pyramidal cells and interneurons after whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. In our approach, termed Patch-seq, a patch-clamp stimulus protocol is followed by the aspiration of the entire somatic compartment into the recording pipette, reverse transcription of RNA including addition of unique molecular identifiers, cDNA amplification, Illumina library preparation and sequencing. We show that Patch-seq reveals a close link between electrophysiological characteristics, responses to acute chemical challenges and RNA expression of neurotransmitter receptors and channels. Moreover, it distinguishes neuronal subpopulations that correspond to both well-established and, to our knowledge, hitherto undescribed neuronal subtypes. Our findings demonstrate the ability of Patch-seq to precisely map neuronal subtypes and predict their network contributions in the brain. PMID:26689544

  4. SF3B1 mutation identifies a distinct subset of myelodysplastic syndrome with ring sideroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohsen; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Jädersten, Martin; Jansson, Monika; Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Walldin, Gunilla; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas; Travaglino, Erica; Kallenbach, Klaus; Pietra, Daniela; Ljungström, Viktor; Conte, Simona; Boveri, Emanuela; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Rosenquist, Richard; Campbell, Peter J.; Cazzola, Mario; Hellström Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) characterized by isolated erythroid dysplasia and 15% or more bone marrow ring sideroblasts. Ring sideroblasts are found also in other MDS subtypes, such as refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts (RCMD-RS). A high prevalence of somatic mutations of SF3B1 was reported in these conditions. To identify mutation patterns that affect disease phenotype and clinical outcome, we performed a comprehensive mutation analysis in 293 patients with myeloid neoplasm and 1% or more ring sideroblasts. SF3B1 mutations were detected in 129 of 159 cases (81%) of RARS or RCMD-RS. Among other patients with ring sideroblasts, lower prevalence of SF3B1 mutations and higher prevalence of mutations in other splicing factor genes were observed (P < .001). In multivariable analyses, patients with SF3B1 mutations showed significantly better overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], .37; P = .003) and lower cumulative incidence of disease progression (HR = 0.31; P = .018) compared with SF3B1-unmutated cases. The independent prognostic value of SF3B1 mutation was retained in MDS without excess blasts, as well as in sideroblastic categories (RARS and RCMD-RS). Among SF3B1-mutated patients, coexisting mutations in DNA methylation genes were associated with multilineage dysplasia (P = .015) but had no effect on clinical outcome. TP53 mutations were frequently detected in patients without SF3B1 mutation, and were associated with poor outcome. Thus, SF3B1 mutation identifies a distinct MDS subtype that is unlikely to develop detrimental subclonal mutations and is characterized by indolent clinical course and favorable outcome. PMID:25957392

  5. Neurofibromin protein loss in desmoplastic melanoma subtypes: implicating NF1 allelic loss as a distinct genetic driver?

    PubMed

    Kadokura, Alexander; Frydenlund, Noah; Leone, Dominick A; Yang, Shi; Hoang, Mai P; Deng, April; Hernandez-Perez, Marier; Biswas, Asok; Singh, Rajendra; Yaar, Ron; Mahalingam, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Loss of the NF1 allele, coding for the protein neurofibromin, and polymorphism in the proto-oncogene RET (RETp) are purportedly common in desmoplastic melanoma (DM). DM is categorized into pure (PDM) and mixed (MDM) subtypes, which differ in prognosis. Most NF1 mutations result in a truncated/absent protein, making immunohistochemical screening for neurofibromin an ideal surrogate for NF1 allelic loss. Using antineurofibromin, our aims were to ascertain the incidence of neurofibromin loss in DM subtypes and to evaluate the relationship with RET, perineural invasion (PNI) and established histopathologic prognosticators. A total of 78 archival samples of DM met criteria for inclusion (54 cases of non-DM serving as controls). Immunohistochemistry was performed for neurofibromin, whereas direct DNA sequencing was used for RETp and BRAF mutation status. Statistical analyses included χ(2) test as well as Fisher exact test. Neurofibromin loss was more common in DM than non-DM (69% versus 54%; P=.02). In DM, significant differences in neurofibromin loss were noted in the following: non-head and neck versus head and neck biopsy site (88% versus 55%) and PDM versus MDM variants (80% versus 56%). No significant associations were noted with sex, presence of a junctional component, Breslow depth, ulceration, mitoses, host response, RETp, BRAF status, or PNI. RETp was marginally associated with PNI-positive DM versus PNI-negative DM (36 versus 18%; P=.08). Our findings, the largest to date investigating neurofibromin in DM, validate the incidence of NF1 mutations/allelic loss in DM and suggest that the DM subtypes have distinct genetic drivers. PMID:26980030

  6. Stability of arithmetic disability subtypes.

    PubMed

    Silver, C H; Pennett, H D; Black, J L; Fair, G W; Balise, R R

    1999-01-01

    Cross-sectional research has identified subtypes of children with learning disabilities who may have distinctive cognitive ability patterns. This study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classifications for 80 children ages 9 to 13 representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD), using three criteria for learning disability identification. Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with pervasive deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling displayed the greatest subtype stability. Only one third of the children with the other subtypes, including those with isolated arithmetic deficits, retained their original subtypes. Thus, drawing conclusions and making recommendations based on academic subtyping at a single point in time may be unwise. PMID:15499712

  7. Subtypes of Cocaine Abusers: Support for a Type A-Type B Distinction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Samuel A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Systematically assessed replicability and generalizability of a multidimensional alcoholism typological system in 399 inpatient, outpatient, and non-treatment-seeking cocaine abusers. Two different procedures supported the construct, concurrent, and predictive validity of the Type A-Type B distinction in cocaine abusers. Multidimensional…

  8. A diVIsive Shuffling Approach (VIStA) for gene expression analysis to identify subtypes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An important step toward understanding the biological mechanisms underlying a complex disease is a refined understanding of its clinical heterogeneity. Relating clinical and molecular differences may allow us to define more specific subtypes of patients that respond differently to therapeutic interventions. Results We developed a novel unbiased method called diVIsive Shuffling Approach (VIStA) that identifies subgroups of patients by maximizing the difference in their gene expression patterns. We tested our algorithm on 140 subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and found four distinct, biologically and clinically meaningful combinations of clinical characteristics that are associated with large gene expression differences. The dominant characteristic in these combinations was the severity of airflow limitation. Other frequently identified measures included emphysema, fibrinogen levels, phlegm, BMI and age. A pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes in the identified subtypes suggests that VIStA is capable of capturing specific molecular signatures within in each group. Conclusions The introduced methodology allowed us to identify combinations of clinical characteristics that correspond to clear gene expression differences. The resulting subtypes for COPD contribute to a better understanding of its heterogeneity. PMID:25032995

  9. Clinicopathologic analysis of TAFRO syndrome demonstrates a distinct subtype of HHV-8-negative multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Noriko; Fajgenbaum, David C; Nabel, Christopher S; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Yoshida, Isao; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Matsue, Kosei; Kurosawa, Mitsutoshi; Hagihara, Masao; Saito, Akio; Okamoto, Masataka; Yokota, Kenji; Hiraiwa, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Naoya; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2016-02-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) describes a heterogeneous group of disorders involving systemic inflammation, characteristic lymph node histopathology, and multi-organ dysfunction because of pathologic hypercytokinemia. Whereas Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8) drives the hypercytokinemia in a cohort of immunocompromised patients, the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). Recently, a limited series of iMCD cases in Japan sharing a constellation of clinical features, including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been described as TAFRO syndrome. Herein, we report clinicopathological findings on 25 patients (14 males and 11 females; 23 Japanese-born and two US-born), the largest TAFRO syndrome case series, including the first report of cases from the USA. The median age of onset was 50 years old (range: 23-72). The frequency of each feature was as follows: thrombocytopenia (21/25), anasarca (24/25), fever (21/25), organomegaly (25/25), and reticulin fibrosis (13/16). These patients frequently demonstrated abdominal pain, elevated serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and acute kidney failure. Surprisingly, none of the cases demonstrated marked hypergammoglobulinemia, which is frequently reported in iMCD. Lymph node biopsies revealed atrophic germinal centers with enlarged nuclei of endothelial cells and proliferation of endothelial venules in interfollicular zone. 23 of 25 cases were treated initially with corticosteroids; 12 patients responded poorly and required further therapy. Three patients died during the observation period (median: 9 months) because of disease progression or infections. TAFRO syndrome is a unique subtype of iMCD that demonstrates characteristic clinicopathological findings. Further study to clarify prognosis, pathophysiology, and appropriate treatment is needed. PMID:26805758

  10. Phenotypically distinct subtypes of psychosis accompany novel or rare variants in four different signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Thorsten M.; Berns, Adam; Shields, Jerry; Rothman, Karen; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Goetz, Raymond R.; Chao, Moses V.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    alter the function of specific genes or their signaling partners may contribute to particular subtypes of psychosis. This approach may be applicable to other complex disorders. PMID:27211562

  11. Identifying significant microRNA-mRNA pairs associated with breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Malay; Nath, Joyshree; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that help in post-transcriptional gene silencing. These endogenous RNAs develop a post-transcriptional gene-regulatory network by binding to complementary sequences of target mRNAs and essentially degrade them. Cancer is a class of diseases that is caused by the uncontrolled cell growth, thereby resulting into a gradual degradation of cell structure. Earlier researches have shown that miRNAs have significant biological involvement in cancer. Prolonged research in this genre has led to the identification of the functions of numerous miRNAs in cancer development. Studying the differential expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs together could help us in recognizing the significant miRNA-mRNA pairs from cancer samples. In this paper, we have analyzed the simultaneous over-expression of miRNAs and under-expression of mRNAs and vice versa to establish their association with cancer. This study focuses on breast tumor samples and the miRNA-mRNA target pairs that have a visible signature in such breast tumor samples. We have been able to identify the differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs, and further established relations between them to extract the miRNA-mRNA pairs that might be significant in the breast cancer types. This gives us the clue about the potential biomarkers for the breast cancer subtypes that can further help in understanding the progression of each of the subtypes separately. This might be helpful for the joint miRNA-mRNA biomarker identification. PMID:27245063

  12. Natural cytotoxicity receptor splice variants orchestrate the distinct functions of human natural killer cell subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Siewiera, Johan; Gouilly, Jordi; Hocine, Hocine-Rachid; Cartron, Géraldine; Levy, Claude; Al-Daccak, Reem; Jabrane-Ferrat, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    The natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46/NCR1, NKp44/NCR2 and NKp30/NCR3 are critical for natural killer (NK) cell functions. Their genes are transcribed into several splice variants whose physiological relevance is not yet fully understood. Here we report that decidua basalis NK (dNK) cells of the pregnant uterine mucosa and peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells, two functionally distinct subsets of the physiological NK cell pool, display differential expression of NKp30/NCR3 and NKp44/NCR2 splice variants. The presence of cytokines that are enriched within the decidual microenvironment is sufficient to convert the splice variant profile of pNK cells into one similar to that of dNK cells. This switch is associated with decreased cytotoxic function and major adaptations to the secretome, hallmarks of the decidual phenotype. Thus, NKp30/NCR3 and NKp44/NCR2 splice variants delineate functionally distinct NK cell subsets. To our knowledge, this is the first conclusive evidence underlining the physiological importance of NCR splice variants. PMID:26666685

  13. Distinct electrophysiological properties in subtypes of nonspiking olfactory local interneurons correlate with their cell type-specific Ca2+ current profiles.

    PubMed

    Husch, Andreas; Paehler, Moritz; Fusca, Debora; Paeger, Lars; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2009-11-01

    A diverse population of local interneurons (LNs) helps to process, structure, and spatially represent olfactory information in the insect antennal lobe. In Periplaneta americana, we identified two subtypes of nonspiking local interneurons (type II LNs) by their distinct morphological and intrinsic electrophysiological properties. As an important step toward a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that mediate odor information processing, we present a detailed analysis of their distinct voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents, which clearly correlated with their distinct intrinsic electrophysiological properties. Both type II LNs did not posses voltage-activated Na(+) currents and apparently innervated all glomeruli including the macroglomerulus. Type IIa LNs had significant longer and thicker low-order neurites and innervated each glomerulus entirely and homogeneously, whereas type IIb LNs innervated only parts of each glomerulus. All type II LNs were broadly tuned and responded to odorants of many chemical classes with graded changes in the membrane potential. Type IIa LNs responded with odor-specific elaborate patterns of excitation that could also include "spikelets" riding on the depolarizations and periods of inhibition. In contrast, type IIb LNs responded mostly with sustained, relatively smooth depolarizations. Consistent with the strong active membrane properties of type IIa LNs versus type IIb LNs, the voltage-activated Ca(2+) current of type IIa LNs activated at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials and had a larger transient component. PMID:19759323

  14. Genome-wide association study of clinically defined gout identifies multiple risk loci and its association with clinical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Chiba, Toshinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Danjoh, Inaho; Shimizu, Seiko; Abe, Junko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Terashige, Sho; Ogata, Hiraku; Tatsukawa, Seishiro; Yin, Guang; Okada, Rieko; Morita, Emi; Naito, Mariko; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Iwaya, Keiichi; Ito, Toshimitsu; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Kato, Yukio; Nakamura, Yukio; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Ituro; Kubo, Michiaki; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gout, caused by hyperuricaemia, is a multifactorial disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of gout have been reported, they included self-reported gout cases in which clinical information was insufficient. Therefore, the relationship between genetic variation and clinical subtypes of gout remains unclear. Here, we first performed a GWAS of clinically defined gout cases only. Methods A GWAS was conducted with 945 patients with clinically defined gout and 1213 controls in a Japanese male population, followed by replication study of 1048 clinically defined cases and 1334 controls. Results Five gout susceptibility loci were identified at the genome-wide significance level (p<5.0×10−8), which contained well-known urate transporter genes (ABCG2 and SLC2A9) and additional genes: rs1260326 (p=1.9×10−12; OR=1.36) of GCKR (a gene for glucose and lipid metabolism), rs2188380 (p=1.6×10−23; OR=1.75) of MYL2-CUX2 (genes associated with cholesterol and diabetes mellitus) and rs4073582 (p=6.4×10−9; OR=1.66) of CNIH-2 (a gene for regulation of glutamate signalling). The latter two are identified as novel gout loci. Furthermore, among the identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrated that the SNPs of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were differentially associated with types of gout and clinical parameters underlying specific subtypes (renal underexcretion type and renal overload type). The effect of the risk allele of each SNP on clinical parameters showed significant linear relationships with the ratio of the case–control ORs for two distinct types of gout (r=0.96 [p=4.8×10−4] for urate clearance and r=0.96 [p=5.0×10−4] for urinary urate excretion). Conclusions Our findings provide clues to better understand the pathogenesis of gout and will be useful for development of companion diagnostics. PMID:25646370

  15. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  16. Distinct subtypes of zona pellucida morphology reflect canine oocyte viability and cumulus-oocyte complex quality.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Matthew O; Wright, Shirley J

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze surface morphology of the zona pellucida (ZP) and assess its relationship with oocyte viability, cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) quality, and oocyte donor age in dogs. Canine ovaries were sliced to release COCs for use in three experiments. In Experiment 1, oocytes from high-quality (grade I) COCs were viewed with scanning electron microscopy to visualize the zona surface. Four zonae, classified as types I, II, III, and IV, were detectable on high-quality oocytes. Most (95.5%) dog donors had oocytes with two or three ZP types. The ZP type I had a smooth compact surface with few pores. The ZP type II was less compact with many distinct circular or elliptical pores. The ZP type III had a rough surface with folds and many irregular shaped pores and hollows. The ZP type IV also had a rough surface with folds, but in addition, stringy filaments obscured the pores and hollows. The frequency of ZP type I in the oocyte population was low (2.7%), whereas ZP types II, III, and IV each occurred in approximately one-third of the oocyte population. In Experiment 2, oocytes from high-quality COCs were stained with propidium iodide (PI) before scanning electron microscopy to investigate the relationship of oocyte viability with ZP morphology. In Experiment 3, oocytes were collected from low-quality (grade 2) and high-quality (grade 1) COCs to investigate the role of COC quality on zona structure. Zonae types I and II were characteristic of PI-positive (dead) oocytes and oocytes from low-quality COCs, whereas ZP types III and IV were prevalent on PI-negative (living) oocytes and oocytes from high-quality COCs. We concluded that the heterogeneous ZP surface underwent structural rearrangements related to oocyte viability and COC quality. This warrants further investigation into ZP structure and may be useful for canine-assisted reproduction. PMID:23790239

  17. Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and hoarding symptoms: a distinctive clinical subtype?

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Soares, Isabela D; Versiani, Márcio

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and hoarding symptoms can be differentiated from their counterparts with other types of obsessions and compulsions in terms of sociodemographic and clinical features. Ninety-seven patients with OCD were assessed with a sociodemographic and clinical questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I), the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Fifteen patients who reported hoarding symptoms in the Y-BOCS checklist (15.6% of the total sample) were compared and contrasted with 82 patients without those symptoms using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and the Pearson's goodness-of-fit chi-square test for categorical ones; Fisher's exact test was employed when indicated. Hoarders were characterized by (1) higher educational levels (chi(2) = 7.49; df = 2; P =.02); (2) earlier age at onset (Z = -2.99; P =.003); (3) higher rates of symmetry obsessions (chi(2) = 7.03; df = 1; P =.01); (4) greater frequency of ordering (chi(2) = 10.08; df = 1; P =.004); (5) rituals repetition (chi(2) = 4.42; df = 1; P =.03); (6) counting compulsions (chi(2) = 5.92; df = 1; P =.02); and (7) significantly higher rates of comorbidity with bipolar II disorder (chi(2) = 10.62; df = 1; P =.02) and (8) with eating disorders (chi(2) = 7.42; df = 1; P =.02). In conclusion, patients with OCD exhibiting hoarding feature a distinctive sociodemographic and clinical profile. It remains to be investigated whether these phenotypical characteristics are underlined by specific neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:15332201

  18. Identifying risk factors of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 subtype) in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Loth; Marius, Gilbert; Jianmei, Wu; Christina, Czarnecki; Muhammad, Hidayat; Xiangming, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), subtype H5N1, was first officially reported in Indonesia in 2004. Since then the disease has spread and is now endemic in large parts of the country. This study investigated the statistical relationship between a set of risk factors and the presence or absence of HPAI in Indonesia during 2006 and 2007. HPAI was evaluated through participatory disease surveillance (PDS) in backyard village chickens (the study population), and risk factors included descriptors of people and poultry distribution (separating chickens, ducks and production sectors), poultry movement patterns and agro-ecological conditions. The study showed that the risk factors “elevation”, “human population density” and “rice cropping” were significant in accounting for the spatial variation of the PDS-defined HPAI cases. These findings were consistent with earlier studies in Thailand and Vietnam. In addition “commercial poultry population”, and two indicators of market locations and transport; “human settlements” and “road length”, were identified as significant risk factors in the models. In contrast to several previous studies carried out in Southeast Asia, domestic backyard ducks were not found to be a significant risk factor in Indonesia. The study used surrogate estimates of market locations and marketing chains and further work should focus on the actual location of the live bird markets, and on the flow of live poultry and poultry products between them, so that patterns of possible transmission, and regions of particular risk could be better inferred. PMID:21813198

  19. Identifying risk factors of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 subtype) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Loth, Leo; Gilbert, Marius; Wu, Jianmei; Czarnecki, Christina; Hidayat, Muhammad; Xiao, Xiangming

    2011-10-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), subtype H5N1, was first officially reported in Indonesia in 2004. Since then the disease has spread and is now endemic in large parts of the country. This study investigated the statistical relationship between a set of risk factors and the presence or absence of HPAI in Indonesia during 2006 and 2007. HPAI was evaluated through participatory disease surveillance (PDS) in backyard village chickens (the study population), and risk factors included descriptors of people and poultry distribution (separating chickens, ducks and production sectors), poultry movement patterns and agro-ecological conditions. The study showed that the risk factors "elevation", "human population density" and "rice cropping" were significant in accounting for the spatial variation of the PDS-defined HPAI cases. These findings were consistent with earlier studies in Thailand and Vietnam. In addition "commercial poultry population", and two indicators of market locations and transport; "human settlements" and "road length", were identified as significant risk factors in the models. In contrast to several previous studies carried out in Southeast Asia, domestic backyard ducks were not found to be a significant risk factor in Indonesia. The study used surrogate estimates of market locations and marketing chains and further work should focus on the actual location of the live bird markets, and on the flow of live poultry and poultry products between them, so that patterns of possible transmission, and regions of particular risk could be better inferred. PMID:21813198

  20. Identifying subtypes among offenders with antisocial personality disorder: a cluster-analytic study.

    PubMed

    Poythress, Norman G; Edens, John F; Skeem, Jennifer L; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Douglas, Kevin S; Frick, Paul J; Patrick, Christopher J; Epstein, Monica; Wang, Tao

    2010-05-01

    The question of whether antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and psychopathy are largely similar or fundamentally different constructs remains unresolved. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), many of the personality features of psychopathy are cast as associated features of ASPD, although the DSM-IV offers no guidance as to how, or the extent to which, these features relate to ASPD. In a sample of 691 offenders who met DSM-IV criteria for ASPD, we used model-based clustering to identify subgroups of individuals with relatively homogeneous profiles on measures of associated features (psychopathic personality traits) and other constructs with potential etiological significance for subtypes of ASPD. Two emergent groups displayed profiles that conformed broadly to theoretical descriptions of primary psychopathy and Karpman's (1941) variant of secondary psychopathy. As expected, a third group (nonpsychopathic ASPD) lacked substantial associated features. A fourth group exhibited elevated psychopathic features as well as a highly fearful temperament, a profile not clearly predicted by extant models. Planned comparisons revealed theoretically informative differences between primary and secondary groups in multiple domains, including self-report measures, passive avoidance learning, clinical ratings, and official records. Our results inform ongoing debates about the overlap between psychopathy and ASPD and raise questions about the wisdom of placing most individuals who habitually violate social norms and laws into a single diagnostic category. PMID:20455611

  1. Systematic Discovery of Molecular Probes Targeting Multiple Non-orthosteric and Spatially Distinct Sites in the Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype A (BoNT/A)

    PubMed Central

    Dadgar, Saedeh; Floriano, Wely B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of molecular probes targeting proteins has traditionally relied on labeling compounds already known to bind to the protein of interest. These known ligands bind to orthosteric or allosteric sites in their target protein as a way to control their activity. Binding pockets other than known orthosteric or allosteric sites may exist that are large enough to accommodate a ligand without significantly disrupting protein activity. Such sites may provide opportunities to discriminate between subtypes or other closely related proteins, since they are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. The Protein Scanning with Virtual Ligand Screening (PSVLS) approach was previously used to identify a novel inhibitor and a fluorescent probe against the catalytic site of the botulinum neurotoxin subtype A (BoNT/A). PSVLS screens compound databases against multiple sites within a target protein, and the results for all the sites probed against BoNT/A, not only the catalytic site, are available online. Here, we analyze the PSVLS data for multiple sites in order to identify molecular probes with affinity for binding pockets other than the catalytic site of BoNT/A. BoNT/A is a large protein with a light (LC) and a heavy (HC) chain that can be assayed separately. We used scintillation proximity assay (SPA) to test experimentally 5 probe candidates predicted computationally to have affinity for different non-orthosteric binding regions within the HC and LC, and one compound predicted not to have affinity for either domain. The binding profiles obtained experimentally confirmed the targeting of multiple and spatially distinct pockets within BoNT/A. Moreover, inhibition assay results indicate that some of these probes do not significantly interfere with the catalytic activity of BoNT/A. PMID:25745992

  2. Gene expression profiling reveals molecularly and clinically distinct subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Diehn, Maximilian; Watson, Nathan; Bollen, Andrew W.; Aldape, Ken D.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Israel, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by genetic instability, intratumoral histopathological variability, and unpredictable clinical behavior. We investigated global gene expression in surgical samples of brain tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed large differences between normal brain samples and tumor tissues and between GBMs and lower-grade oligodendroglial tumors. Extensive differences in gene expression were found among GBMs, particularly in genes involved in angiogenesis, immune cell infiltration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. We found that the gene expression patterns in paired specimens from the same GBM invariably were more closely related to each other than to any other tumor, even when the paired specimens had strikingly divergent histologies. Survival analyses revealed a set of ≈70 genes more highly expressed in rapidly progressing tumors that stratified GBMs into two groups that differed by >4-fold in median duration of survival. We further investigated one gene from the group, FABP7, and confirmed its association with survival in two unrelated cohorts totaling 105 patients. Expression of FABP7 enhanced the motility of glioma-derived cells in vitro. Our analyses thus identify and validate a prognostic marker of both biologic and clinical significance and provide a series of putative markers for additional evaluation. PMID:15827123

  3. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses. PMID:23123385

  4. Comorbid problems in ADHD: degree of association, shared endophenotypes, and formation of distinct subtypes. Implications for a future DSM.

    PubMed

    Rommelse, Nanda N J; Altink, Marieke E; Fliers, Ellen A; Martin, Neilson C; Buschgens, Cathelijne J M; Hartman, Catharina A; Buitelaar, Jan K; Faraone, Stephen V; Sergeant, Joseph A; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2009-08-01

    We aimed to assess which comorbid problems (oppositional defiant behaviors, anxiety, autistic traits, motor coordination problems, and reading problems) were most associated with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); to determine whether these comorbid problems shared executive and motor problems on an endophenotype level with ADHD; and to determine whether executive functioning (EF)-and motor-endophenotypes supported the hypothesis that ADHD with comorbid problems is a qualitatively different phenotype than ADHD without comorbid problems. An EF-and a motor-endophenotype were formed based on nine neuropsychological tasks administered to 816 children from ADHD-and control-families. Additional data on comorbid problems were gathered using questionnaires. Results indicated that oppositional defiant behaviors appeared the most important comorbid problems of ADHD, followed by autistic traits, and than followed by motor coordination problems, anxiety, and reading problems. Both the EF-and motor-endophenotype were correlated and cross-correlated in siblings to autistic traits, motor coordination problems and reading problems, suggesting ADHD and these comorbid problems may possibly share familial/genetic EF and motor deficits. No such results were found for oppositional defiant behaviors and anxiety. ADHD in co-occurrence with comorbid problems may not be best seen as a distinct subtype of ADHD, but further research is warranted. PMID:19308723

  5. Structural brain alterations associated with schizophrenia preceded by conduct disorder: a common and distinct subtype of schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Boris; Leygraf, Norbert; Müller, Bernhard W; Scherbaum, Norbert; Forsting, Michael; Wiltfang, Jens; Gizewski, Elke R; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2013-09-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) prior to age 15 is a precursor of schizophrenia in a minority of cases and is associated with violent behavior through adulthood, after taking account of substance misuse. The present study used structural magnetic imaging to examine gray matter (GM) volumes among 27 men with schizophrenia preceded by CD (SZ+CD), 23 men with schizophrenia but without CD (SZ-CD), 27 men with CD only (CD), and 25 healthy (H) men. The groups with schizophrenia were similar in terms of age of onset and duration of illness, levels of psychotic symptoms, and medication. The 2 groups with CD were similar as to number of CD symptoms, lifelong aggressive behavior, and number of criminal convictions. Men with SZ+CD, relative to those with SZ-CD, displayed (1) increased GM volumes in the hypothalamus, the left putamen, the right cuneus/precuneus, and the right inferior parietal cortex after controlling for age, alcohol, and drug misuse and (2) decreased GM volumes in the inferior frontal region. Men with SZ+CD (relative to the SZ-CD group) and CD (relative to the H group) displayed increased GM volumes of the hypothalamus and the inferior and superior parietal lobes, which were not associated with substance misuse. Aggressive behavior, both prior to age 15 and lifetime tendency, was positively correlated with the GM volume of the hypothalamus. Thus, among males, SZ+CD represents a distinct subtype of schizophrenia. Although differences in behavior emerge in childhood and remain stable through adulthood, further research is needed to determine whether the differences in GM volumes result from abnormal neural development distinct from that of other males developing schizophrenia. PMID:23015687

  6. Comparison of melanoblast expression patterns identifies distinct classes of genes

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Stacie K.; Baxter, Laura L.; Buac, Kristina; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A full understanding of transcriptional regulation requires integration of information obtained from multiple experimental datasets. These include datasets annotating gene expression within the context of an entire organism under normal and genetically perturbed conditions. Here we describe an expression dataset annotating pigment cell-expressed genes of the developing melanocyte and RPE lineages. Expression images are annotated and available at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/manuscripts/Loftus/March2009/. Data is also summarized in a standardized manner using a universal melanoblast scoring scale that accounts for the embryonic location of cells and regional cell density. This approach allowed us to classify 14 pigment genes into 4 groupings classified by cell lineage expression, temporal-spatial context, and differential alteration in response to altered MITF and SOX10 status. Significant differences in regional populations were also observed across inbred strain backgrounds highlighting the value of this approach to identify modifier allele influences on melanoblast number and distributions. This analysis revealed novel features of in vivo expression patterns that are not measurable by in vitro-based assays, providing data that in combination with genomic analyses will allow modeling of pigment cell gene expression in development and disease. PMID:19493314

  7. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV-1 Subtypes A, B, G and Unique Recombinant AC and AD Viral Strains Identified in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Holzmayer, Vera; Jacobs, Graeme B.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Brennan, Catherine A.; Hackett, John; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By the end of 2012, more than 6.1 million people were infected with HIV-1 in South Africa. Subtype C was responsible for the majority of these infections and more than 300 near full-length genomes (NFLGs) have been published. Currently very few non-subtype C isolates have been identified and characterized within the country, particularly full genome non-C isolates. Seven patients from the Tygerberg Virology (TV) cohort were previously identified as possible non-C subtypes and were selected for further analyses. RNA was isolated from five individuals (TV047, TV096, TV101, TV218, and TV546) and DNA from TV016 and TV1057. The NFLGs of these samples were amplified in overlapping fragments and sequenced. Online subtyping tools REGA version 3 and jpHMM were used to screen for subtypes and recombinants. Maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis (phyML) was used to infer subtypes and SimPlot was used to confirm possible intersubtype recombinants. We identified three subtype B (TV016, TV047, and TV1057) isolates, one subtype A1 (TV096), one subtype G (TV546), one unique AD (TV101), and one unique AC (TV218) recombinant form. This is the first NFLG of subtype G that has been described in South Africa. The subtype B sequences described also increased the NFLG subtype B sequences in Africa from three to six. There is a need for more NFLG sequences, as partial HIV-1 sequences may underrepresent viral recombinant forms. It is also necessary to continue monitoring the evolution and spread of HIV-1 in South Africa, because understanding viral diversity may play an important role in HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:25492033

  8. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Timucin; Durası, İlknur Melis; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Tütüncü, Melih; Demirci, Nuri Onat; Saip, Sabahattin; Sezerman, O. Uğur; Siva, Aksel; Tahir Turanlı, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179). Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5) which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5) system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10) pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5). An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications. PMID:25942430

  9. Gene Set−Based Integrative Analysis Revealing Two Distinct Functional Regulation Patterns in Four Common Subtypes of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jie; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell (CCC), endometrioid (EC), mucinous (MC) and high-grade serous carcinoma (SC) are the four most common subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). The widely accepted dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis divided EOCs into type I and II categories based on the molecular features. However, this hypothesis has not been experimentally demonstrated. We carried out a gene set-based analysis by integrating the microarray gene expression profiles downloaded from the publicly available databases. These quantified biological functions of EOCs were defined by 1454 Gene Ontology (GO) term and 674 Reactome pathway gene sets. The pathogenesis of the four EOC subtypes was investigated by hierarchical clustering and exploratory factor analysis. The patterns of functional regulation among the four subtypes containing 1316 cases could be accurately classified by machine learning. The results revealed that the ERBB and PI3K-related pathways played important roles in the carcinogenesis of CCC, EC and MC; while deregulation of cell cycle was more predominant in SC. The study revealed that two different functional regulation patterns exist among the four EOC subtypes, which were compatible with the type I and II classifications proposed by the dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:27527159

  10. Distinct Cell- and Layer-Specific Expression Patterns and Independent Regulation of Kv2 Channel Subtypes in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Hannah I.; Guan, Dongxu; Bocksteins, Elke; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Murray, Karl D.; Cobb, Melanie M.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Zito, Karen; Foehring, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    cortical layers express diverse populations of ion channels and possess distinct intrinsic membrane properties. Here, we show that the Kv2 family members Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 are expressed in distinct cortical layers and pyramidal cell types associated with specific corticostriatal pathways. We find that Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 exhibit distinct responses to acute phosphorylation-dependent regulation in brain neurons in situ and in heterologous cells in vitro. These results identify a molecular mechanism that contributes to heterogeneity in cortical neuron ion channel function and regulation. PMID:26538660

  11. The association between school exclusion, delinquency and subtypes of cyber- and F2F-victimizations: identifying and predicting risk profiles and subtypes using latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Gia Elise

    2015-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to identify risk profiles of youth who are victimized by on- and offline harassment and to explore the consequences of victimization on school outcomes. Latent class analysis is used to explore the overlap and co-occurrence of different clusters of victims and to examine the relationship between class membership and school exclusion and delinquency. Participants were a random sample of youth between the ages of 12 and 18 selected for inclusion to participate in the 2011 National Crime Victimization Survey: School Supplement. The latent class analysis resulted in four categories of victims: approximately 3.1% of students were highly victimized by both bullying and cyberbullying behaviors; 11.6% of youth were classified as being victims of relational bullying, verbal bullying and cyberbullying; a third class of students were victims of relational bullying, verbal bullying and physical bullying but were not cyberbullied (8%); the fourth and final class, characteristic of the majority of students (77.3%), was comprised of non-victims. The inclusion of covariates to the latent class model indicated that gender, grade and race were significant predictors of at least one of the four victim classes. School delinquency measures were included as distal outcomes to test for both overall and pairwise associations between classes. With one exception, the results were indicative of a significant relationship between school delinquency and the victim subtypes. Implications for these findings are discussed. PMID:25194718

  12. Distinct cis-Regulatory Elements from the Dlx1/Dlx2 Locus Mark Different Progenitor Cell Populations in the Ganglionic Eminences and Different Subtypes of Adult Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Noël; Yu, Man; Long, Jason; Hatch, Gary; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Ekker, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Distinct subtypes of cortical GABAergic interneurons provide inhibitory signals that are indispensable for neural network function. The Dlx homeobox genes have a central role in regulating their development and function. We have characterized the activity of three cis-regulatory sequences involved in forebrain expression of vertebrate Dlx genes: upstream regulatory element 2 (URE2), I12b, and I56i. The three regulatory elements display regional and temporal differences in their activities within the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) and label distinct populations of tangentially migrating neurons at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and E13.5. We provide evidence that the dorsomedial and ventral MGE are distinct sources of tangentially migrating neurons during midgestation. In the adult cortex, URE2 and I12b/I56i are differentially expressed in parvalbumin-, calretinin-, neuropeptide Y-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive interneurons; I12b and I56i were specifically active in somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and calbindin-positive interneurons. These data suggest that interneuron subtypes use distinct combinations of Dlx1/Dlx2 enhancers from the time they are specified through adulthood. PMID:17494687

  13. Characterization of KIR intermediate promoters reveals four promoter types associated with distinct expression patterns of KIR subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongchuan; Wright, Paul W.; McCullen, Matthew; Anderson, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The human KIR genes contain multiple promoters that control the process of gene activation and variegated expression of KIR on NK and T cells. Specific subfamilies of KIR genes have differences in the timing and tissue-specificity of expression: however, previous studies of the proximal KIR promoters have not shown significant differences in activity between differentially expressed KIR gene subsets. The recent identification of an intermediate KIR promoter (ProI) associated with KIR2DL1 expression suggested a central role for this element in KIR expression. The current study identifies ProI elements in all of the KIR genes, revealing four classes of ProI that correspond with four distinct expression phenotypes of KIR sub-groups: KIR2DL2/S2/L3 that are expressed early in reconstituting NK after transplant; KIR2DL4 that is expressed by CD56-bright NK in a non-variegated manner; KIR3DL3 that is not expressed by circulating NK cells; and the remaining KIR that are expressed by subsets of CD56-dim NK. The four classes of ProI are structurally diverse and display distinct functional properties. Altogether, these results indicate that KIR ProI elements contribute to the tissue/cell type specificity of KIR transcription, and cooperate with the probabilistic proximal promoter to control KIR expression. PMID:26656451

  14. An Old Story Retold: Loss of G1 Control Defines A Distinct Genomic Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiyan; Bai, Jian; Abliz, Amir; Liu, Ying; Gong, Kenan; Li, Jingjing; Shi, Wenjie; Pan, Yaqi; Liu, Fangfang; Lai, Shujuan; Yang, Haijun; Lu, Changdong; Zhang, Lixin; Chen, Wei; Xu, Ruiping; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang; Zeng, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a high mortality rate. To determine the molecular basis of ESCC development, this study sought to identify characteristic genome-wide alterations in ESCC, including exonic mutations and structural alterations. The clinical implications of these genetic alterations were also analyzed. Exome sequencing and verification were performed for nine pairs of ESCC and the matched blood samples, followed by validation with additional samples using Sanger sequencing. Whole-genome SNP arrays were employed to detect copy number alteration (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 55 cases, including the nine ESCC samples subjected to exome sequencing. A total of 108 non-synonymous somatic mutations (NSSMs) in 102 genes were verified in nine patients. The chromatin modification process was found to be enriched in our gene ontology (GO) analysis. Tumor genomes with TP53 mutations were significantly more unstable than those without TP53 mutations. In terms of the landscape of genomic alterations, deletion of 9p21.3 covering CDKN2A/2B (30.9%), amplification of 11q13.3 covering CCND1 (30.9%), and TP53 point mutation (50.9%) occurred in two-thirds of the cases. These results suggest that the deregulation of the G1 phase during the cell cycle is a key event in ESCC. Furthermore, six minimal common regions were found to be significantly altered in ESCC samples and three of them, 9p21.3, 7p11.2, and 3p12.1, were associated with lymph node metastasis. With the high correlation of TP53 mutation and genomic instability in ESCC, the amplification of CCND1, the deletion of CDKN2A/2B, and the somatic mutation of TP53 appear to play pivotal roles via G1 deregulation and therefore helps to classify this cancer into different genomic subtypes. These findings provide clinical significance that could be useful in future molecular diagnoses and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26386145

  15. Two cholecystokinin receptor subtypes are identified in goldfish, being the CCKAR involved in the regulation of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, A B; Valenciano, A I; Gómez-Boronat, M; Blanco, A M; Nisembaum, L G; De Pedro, N; Delgado, M J

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) plays a key role in the digestive physiology of vertebrates. However, very little is known about the role of CCK on intestinal functions in fish. The present study identifies two CCK receptor subtypes in a stomachless teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), and investigates by using an in vitro system their involvement mediating the effects of the sulfated octapeptide of CCK (CCK-8S) on the motility of isolated proximal intestine. Partial-length mRNAs encoding two CCK receptor isoforms (CCKAR and CCKBR.I) were sequenced and the structural analysis showed that both receptors belong to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. Both goldfish CCK receptor sequences were more closely related to zebrafish sequences, sharing the lowest similarities with cavefish and tilapia. The highest expression of goldfish CCKAR was observed along the whole intestine whereas the CCKBR gen was predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus, vagal lobe and posterior intestine. Application of CCK-8S to the organ bath evoked a concentration-dependent contractile response in intestine strips. The contractions were not blocked by either tetrodotoxin or atropine, suggesting that CCK-8S acts on the gut smooth muscle directly. Preincubations of intestine strips with devazepide and L365,260 (CCKAR and CCKBR receptor selective antagonists) showed that the CCK-8S-induced contraction could be partially mediated by the CCKAR receptor subtype, which is also the most abundant CCK receptor found in gastrointestinal tissues. In conclusion, two CCK receptors with a differential distribution pattern has been identified in goldfish, and the CCKAR subtype is mainly involved in the regulation of intestinal motility by the CCK-8S. PMID:26051613

  16. Chromatin accessibility maps of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identify subtype-specific epigenome signatures and transcription regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Rendeiro, André F; Schmidl, Christian; Strefford, Jonathan C; Walewska, Renata; Davis, Zadie; Farlik, Matthias; Oscier, David; Bock, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is characterized by substantial clinical heterogeneity, despite relatively few genetic alterations. To provide a basis for studying epigenome deregulation in CLL, here we present genome-wide chromatin accessibility maps for 88 CLL samples from 55 patients measured by the ATAC-seq assay. We also performed ChIPmentation and RNA-seq profiling for ten representative samples. Based on the resulting data set, we devised and applied a bioinformatic method that links chromatin profiles to clinical annotations. Our analysis identified sample-specific variation on top of a shared core of CLL regulatory regions. IGHV mutation status-which distinguishes the two major subtypes of CLL-was accurately predicted by the chromatin profiles and gene regulatory networks inferred for IGHV-mutated versus IGHV-unmutated samples identified characteristic differences between these two disease subtypes. In summary, we discovered widespread heterogeneity in the chromatin landscape of CLL, established a community resource for studying epigenome deregulation in leukaemia and demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale chromatin accessibility mapping in cancer cohorts and clinical research. PMID:27346425

  17. An effective tool for identifying HIV-1 subtypes B, C, CRF01_AE, their recombinant forms, and dual infections in Southeast Asia by the multi-region subtype specific PCR (MSSP) assay.

    PubMed

    Sakkhachornphop, Supachai; Kijak, Gustavo H; Beyrer, Chris; Razak, Myat Htoo; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Jittiwutikarn, Jaroon; Suriyanon, Vinai; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Celentano, David D; McCutchan, Francine E; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2015-06-01

    The RV144 Thai vaccine trial has been the only vaccine study to show efficacy in preventing HIV infection. Ongoing molecular surveillance of HIV-1 in Southeast Asia is vital for vaccine development and evaluation. In this study a novel tool, the multi-region subtype specific PCR (MSSP) assay, that was able to identify subtypes B, C, CRF01_AE for Thailand, other Southeast Asian countries, India and China is described. The MSSP assay is based on a nested PCR strategy and amplifies eight short regions distributed along the HIV-1 genome using subtype-specific primers. A panel of 41 clinical DNA samples obtained primarily from opiate users in northern Thailand was used to test the assay performance. The MSSP assay provided 73-100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the three subtypes in each genome region. The assay was then field-tested on 337 sera from HIV infected northern Thai drug users collected between 1999 and 2002. Subtype distribution was CRF01_AE 77.4% (n=261), subtype B 3.3% (n=11), CRF01_AE/B recombinant 12.2% (n=41), CRF01_AE/C recombinant 0.6% (n=2), and non-typeable 6.5% (n=22). The MSSP assay is a simple, cost-effective, and accurate genotyping tool for laboratory settings with limited resources and is sensitive enough to capture the recombinant genomes and dual infections. PMID:25725414

  18. Distinct microRNA expression signatures are associated with melanoma subtypes and are regulated by HIF1A

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hun-Way; Baxter, Laura L.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Cronin, Julia C.; Trivedi, Niraj S.; Borate, Bhavesh; Pavan, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The complex genetic changes underlying metastatic melanoma need to be deciphered to develop new and effective therapeutics. Previously, genome-wide microarray analyses of human melanoma identified two reciprocal gene expression programs, including transcripts regulated by either transforming growth factor, beta 1 (TGFβ1) pathways or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF)/SRY-box containing gene 10 (SOX10) pathways. We extended this knowledge by discovering that melanoma cell lines with these two expression programs exhibit distinctive microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns. We also demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) is increased in TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells and that HIF1A upregulates miR-210, miR-218, miR-224, and miR-452. Reduced expression of these four miRNAs in TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells arrests the cell cycle, while their overexpression in mouse melanoma cells increases the expression of the hypoxic response gene Bnip3. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF1A may regulate some of the gene expression and biological behavior of TGFβ1 pathway-expressing melanoma cells, in part via alterations in these four miRNAs. PMID:24767210

  19. Choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in a physiologically distinct subtype of olfactory nonspiking local interneurons in the cockroach (periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Fusca, Debora; Husch, Andreas; Baumann, Arnd; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Behavioral and physiological studies have shown that local interneurons are pivotal for processing odor information in the insect antennal lobe. They mediate inhibitory and excitatory interactions between the glomerular pathways and ultimately shape the tuning profile of projection neurons. To identify putative cholinergic local interneurons in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana, an antibody raised against the biosynthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was applied to individual morphologically and electrophysiologically characterized local interneurons. In nonspiking type IIa1 local interneurons, which were classified in this study, we found ChAT-like immunoreactivity suggesting that they are most likely excitatory. This is a well-defined population of neurons that generates Ca(2+) -driven spikelets upon depolarization and stimulation with odorants, but not Na(+) -driven action potentials, because they lack voltage-activated transient Na(+) currents. The nonspiking type IIa2 and type IIb local interneurons, in which Ca(2+) -driven spikelets were absent, had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. The GABA-like immunoreactive, spiking type I local interneurons had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. In addition, we showed that uniglomerular projection neurons with cell bodies located in the ventral portion of the ventrolateral somata group and projections along the inner antennocerebral tract exhibited ChAT-like immunoreactivity. Assigning potential transmitters and neuromodulators to distinct morphological and electrophysiological types of antennal lobe neurons is an important prerequisite for a detailed understanding of odor information processing in insects. PMID:23749599

  20. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  1. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  2. Functional genomics identifies neural stem cell sub-type expression profiles and genes regulating neuroblast homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Travis D.; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Bayraktar, Omer A.; Osterhout, Jessica A.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval central brain contains about 10,000 differentiated neurons and 200 scattered neural progenitors (neuroblasts), which can be further subdivided into ~95 type I neuroblasts and eight type II neuroblasts per brain lobe. Only type II neuroblasts generate self-renewing intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), and consequently each contributes more neurons to the brain, including much of the central complex. We characterized six different mutant genotypes that lead to expansion of neuroblast numbers; some preferentially expand type II or type I neuroblasts. Transcriptional profiling of larval brains from these mutant genotypes versus wild-type allowed us to identify small clusters of transcripts enriched in type II or type I neuroblasts, and we validated these clusters by gene expression analysis. Unexpectedly, only a few genes were found to be differentially expressed between type I/II neuroblasts, suggesting that these genes play a large role in establishing the different cell types. We also identified a large group of genes predicted to be expressed in all neuroblasts but not neurons. We performed a neuroblast-specific, RNAi-based functional screen and identified 84 genes that are required to maintain proper neuroblast numbers; all have conserved mammalian orthologs. These genes are excellent candidates for regulating neural progenitor self-renewal in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22061480

  3. Identifying Clinically Distinct Subgroups of Self-Injurers among Young Adults: A Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klonsky, E. David; Olino, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    High rates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; 14%-17%) in adolescents and young adults suggest that some self-injurers may exhibit more or different psychiatric problems than others. In the present study, the authors utilized a latent class analysis to identify clinically distinct subgroups of self-injurers. Participants were 205 young adults with…

  4. Identifying Male Sexual Offender Subtypes Using Cluster Analysis and the Static-2002R.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Liam; Buro, Karen; Jung, Sandy

    2016-08-01

    This study examines whether clinically meaningful subgroups could be identified within a large, undifferentiated group of convicted adult male sex offenders. Of eight cluster analyses, a reliable three-cluster solution emerged based on the subscores of the Static-2002R with 345 sex offenders. To establish the validity of the emergent clusters, the three groups of offenders were compared on four domains: criminal history, psychosexual development, sexual attitudes and interests, and recidivism. The findings revealed meaningful differences among the group, and the implications of subgroup membership is discussed in terms of risk, treatment, and supervision. PMID:24659274

  5. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    serve to better characterize agonist binding to CB2R and to identify specific properties of CB2R on living cells. PMID:27358483

  6. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  7. Breast cancer intrinsic subtype classification, clinical use and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu; Yang, Yankun; Liu, Xiuxia; Zhan, Jinling; Shi, Bozhi

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is composed of multiple subtypes with distinct morphologies and clinical implications. The advent of microarrays has led to a new paradigm in deciphering breast cancer heterogeneity, based on which the intrinsic subtyping system using prognostic multigene classifiers was developed. Subtypes identified using different gene panels, though overlap to a great extent, do not completely converge, and the avail of new information and perspectives has led to the emergence of novel subtypes, which complicate our understanding towards breast tumor heterogeneity. This review explores and summarizes the existing intrinsic subtypes, patient clinical features and management, commercial signature panels, as well as various information used for tumor classification. Two trends are pointed out in the end on breast cancer subtyping, i.e., either diverging to more refined groups or converging to the major subtypes. This review improves our understandings towards breast cancer intrinsic classification, current status on clinical application, and future trends. PMID:26693050

  8. DNA methylation patterns in luminal breast cancers differ from non-luminal subtypes and can identify relapse risk independent of other clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Varadan, Vinay; Giercksky Russnes, Hege E; Levy, Dan; Kendall, Jude; Janevski, Angel; Riggs, Michael; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Synnestvedt, Marit; Schlichting, Ellen; Kåresen, Rolf; Shama Prasada, K; Rotti, Harish; Rao, Ramachandra; Rao, Laxmi; Eric Tang, Man-Hung; Satyamoorthy, K; Lucito, Robert; Wigler, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Naume, Bjorn; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hicks, James B

    2011-02-01

    The diversity of breast cancers reflects variations in underlying biology and affects the clinical implications for patients. Gene expression studies have identified five major subtypes- Luminal A, Luminal B, basal-like, ErbB2+ and Normal-Like. We set out to determine the role of DNA methylation in subtypes by performing genome-wide scans of CpG methylation in breast cancer samples with known expression-based subtypes. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using a set of most varying loci clustered the tumors into a Luminal A majority (82%) cluster, Basal-like/ErbB2+ majority (86%) cluster and a non-specific cluster with samples that were also inconclusive in their expression-based subtype correlations. Contributing methylation loci were both gene associated loci (30%) and non-gene associated (70%), suggesting subtype dependant genome-wide alterations in the methylation landscape. The methylation patterns of significant differentially methylated genes in luminal A tumors are similar to those identified in CD24 + luminal epithelial cells and the patterns in basal-like tumors similar to CD44 + breast progenitor cells. CpG islands in the HOXA cluster and other homeobox (IRX2, DLX2, NKX2-2) genes were significantly more methylated in Luminal A tumors. A significant number of genes (2853, p < 0.05) exhibited expression-methylation correlation, implying possible functional effects of methylation on gene expression. Furthermore, analysis of these tumors by using follow-up survival data identified differential methylation of islands proximal to genes involved in Cell Cycle and Proliferation (Ki-67, UBE2C, KIF2C, HDAC4), angiogenesis (VEGF, BTG1, KLF5), cell fate commitment (SPRY1, OLIG2, LHX2 and LHX5) as having prognostic value independent of subtypes and other clinical factors. PMID:21169070

  9. Genetic Profiling by Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Array Analysis Defines Three Distinct Subtypes of Orbital Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mosier, Stacy; Safneck, Janice; Salomao, Diva R.; Miller, Neil R.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Batista, Denise A. S.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital meningiomas can be classified as primary optic nerve sheath (ON) meningiomas, primary intraorbital ectopic (Ob) meningiomas and spheno-orbital (Sph-Ob) meningiomas based on anatomic site. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based array analysis with the Illumina 300K platform was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 orbital meningiomas (5 ON, 4 Ob and 10 Sph-Ob meningiomas). Tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I except for two grade II meningiomas, and one was NF2-associated. We found genomic alterations in 68% (13 of 19) of orbital meningiomas. Sph-Ob tumors frequently exhibited monosomy 22/22q loss (70%; 7/10) and deletion of chromosome 1p, 6q and 19p (50% each; 5/10). Among genetic alterations, loss of chromosome 1p and 6q were more frequent in clinically progressive tumors. Chromosome 22q loss also was detected in the majority of Ob meningiomas (75%; 3/4) but was infrequent in ON meningiomas (20%; 1/5). In general, Ob tumors had fewer chromosome alterations than Sph-Ob and ON tumors. Unlike Sph-Ob meningiomas, most of the Ob and ON meningiomas did not progress even after incomplete excision, although follow-up was limited in some cases. Our study suggests that ON, Ob and Sph-Ob meningiomas are three molecularly distinct entities. Our results also suggest that molecular subclassification may have prognostic implications. PMID:24773246

  10. The expression pattern of small nucleolar and small Cajal body-specific RNAs characterizes distinct molecular subtypes of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, D; Todoerti, K; Tuana, G; Agnelli, L; Mosca, L; Lionetti, M; Fabris, S; Colapietro, P; Miozzo, M; Ferrarini, M; Tassone, P; Neri, A

    2012-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are non-coding RNAs involved in the maturation of other RNA molecules and generally located in the introns of host genes. It is now emerging that altered sno/scaRNAs expression may have a pathological role in cancer. This study elucidates the patterns of sno/scaRNAs expression in multiple myeloma (MM) by profiling purified malignant plasma cells from 55 MMs, 8 secondary plasma cell leukemias (sPCLs) and 4 normal controls. Overall, a global sno/scaRNAs downregulation was found in MMs and, even more, in sPCLs compared with normal plasma cells. Whereas SCARNA22 resulted the only sno/scaRNA characterizing the translocation/cyclin D4 (TC4) MM, TC2 group displayed a distinct sno/scaRNA signature overexpressing members of SNORD115 and SNORD116 families located in a region finely regulated by an imprinting center at 15q11, which, however, resulted overall hypomethylated in MMs independently of the SNORD115 and SNORD116 expression levels. Finally, integrative analyses with available gene expression and genome-wide data revealed the occurrence of significant sno/scaRNAs/host genes co-expression and the putative influence of allelic imbalances on specific snoRNAs expression. Our data extend the current view of sno/scaRNAs deregulation in cancer and add novel information to the bio-molecular complexity of plasma cell dyscrasias. PMID:23178508

  11. Deep sequencing of RNA from three different extracellular vesicle (EV) subtypes released from the human LIM1863 colon cancer cell line uncovers distinct miRNA-enrichment signatures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Greening, David W; He, Weifeng; Rai, Alin; Zhang, Wenwei; Simpson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Secreted microRNAs (miRNAs) enclosed within extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a pivotal role in intercellular communication by regulating recipient cell gene expression and affecting target cell function. Here, we report the isolation of three distinct EV subtypes from the human colon carcinoma cell line LIM1863--shed microvesicles (sMVs) and two exosome populations (immunoaffinity isolated A33-exosomes and EpCAM-exosomes). Deep sequencing of miRNA libraries prepared from parental LIM1863 cells/derived EV subtype RNA yielded 254 miRNA identifications, of which 63 are selectively enriched in the EVs--miR-19a/b-3p, miR-378a/c/d, and miR-577 and members of the let-7 and miR-8 families being the most prominent. Let-7a-3p*, let-7f-1-3p*, miR-451a, miR-574-5p*, miR-4454 and miR-7641 are common to all EV subtypes, and 6 miRNAs (miR-320a/b/c/d, miR-221-3p, and miR-200c-3p) discern LIM1863 exosomes from sMVs; miR-98-5p was selectively represented only in sMVs. Notably, A33-Exos contained the largest number (32) of exclusively-enriched miRNAs; 14 of these miRNAs have not been reported in the context of CRC tissue/biofluid analyses and warrant further examination as potential diagnostic markers of CRC. Surprisingly, miRNA passenger strands (star miRNAs) for miR-3613-3p*, -362-3p*, -625-3p*, -6842-3p* were the dominant strand in A33-Exos, the converse to that observed in parental cells. This finding suggests miRNA biogenesis may be interlinked with endosomal/exosomal processing. PMID:25330373

  12. Distinct Host Tropism Protein Signatures to Identify Possible Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Christine L. P.; Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses constantly pose a health threat to humans as novel strains occasionally emerge from the avian population to cause human infections. Many past epidemic as well as pandemic strains have originated from avian species. While most viruses are restricted to their primary hosts, zoonotic strains can sometimes arise from mutations or reassortment, leading them to acquire the capability to escape host species barrier and successfully infect a new host. Phylogenetic analyses and genetic markers are useful in tracing the origins of zoonotic infections, but there are still no effective means to identify high risk strains prior to an outbreak. Here we show that distinct host tropism protein signatures can be used to identify possible zoonotic strains in avian species which have the potential to cause human infections. We have discovered that influenza A viruses can now be classified into avian, human, or zoonotic strains based on their host tropism protein signatures. Analysis of all influenza A viruses with complete proteome using the host tropism prediction system, based on machine learning classifications of avian and human viral proteins has uncovered distinct signatures of zoonotic strains as mosaics of avian and human viral proteins. This is in contrast with typical avian or human strains where they show mostly avian or human viral proteins in their signatures respectively. Moreover, we have found that zoonotic strains from the same influenza outbreaks carry similar host tropism protein signatures characteristic of a common ancestry. Our results demonstrate that the distinct host tropism protein signature in zoonotic strains may prove useful in influenza surveillance to rapidly identify potential high risk strains circulating in avian species, which may grant us the foresight in anticipating an impending influenza outbreak. PMID:26915079

  13. Distinct Host Tropism Protein Signatures to Identify Possible Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Eng, Christine L P; Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses constantly pose a health threat to humans as novel strains occasionally emerge from the avian population to cause human infections. Many past epidemic as well as pandemic strains have originated from avian species. While most viruses are restricted to their primary hosts, zoonotic strains can sometimes arise from mutations or reassortment, leading them to acquire the capability to escape host species barrier and successfully infect a new host. Phylogenetic analyses and genetic markers are useful in tracing the origins of zoonotic infections, but there are still no effective means to identify high risk strains prior to an outbreak. Here we show that distinct host tropism protein signatures can be used to identify possible zoonotic strains in avian species which have the potential to cause human infections. We have discovered that influenza A viruses can now be classified into avian, human, or zoonotic strains based on their host tropism protein signatures. Analysis of all influenza A viruses with complete proteome using the host tropism prediction system, based on machine learning classifications of avian and human viral proteins has uncovered distinct signatures of zoonotic strains as mosaics of avian and human viral proteins. This is in contrast with typical avian or human strains where they show mostly avian or human viral proteins in their signatures respectively. Moreover, we have found that zoonotic strains from the same influenza outbreaks carry similar host tropism protein signatures characteristic of a common ancestry. Our results demonstrate that the distinct host tropism protein signature in zoonotic strains may prove useful in influenza surveillance to rapidly identify potential high risk strains circulating in avian species, which may grant us the foresight in anticipating an impending influenza outbreak. PMID:26915079

  14. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matt Q; McCumsey, Stephanie J; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S; Doe, Chris Q

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines-chosen for sparse neuronal expression-to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  15. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matt Q.; McCumsey, Stephanie J.; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  16. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Nakatani, Masashi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Asami; Yamada, Harumoto; Kasai, Takehiro; Masuda, Satoru; Narita, Asako; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases. PMID:27509136

  17. Cribriform adenocarcinoma of the lung: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis of 15 cases of a distinctive morphologic subtype of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Alexander C; Luevano, Arturo; de Araujo, Lisley C; Rao, Nagarjun; Le, Min; Suster, Saul

    2014-08-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked heterogeneity and may be composed of an admixture of histologic growth patterns, including acinar, papillary, solid, and lepidic (bronchioloalveolar). Tumors displaying a prominent or predominant cribriform architecture are rare and most often confused for metastases from other organs. We report the clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features in 15 primary lung adenocarcinomas with a predominant cribriform histology. All patients were adults between 30 and 80 years of age (median: 64), and all but one reported a history of heavy cigarette smoking. All cases showed a predominant (>70%) cribriform architecture that resembled a variety of tumors arising in other organs, including breast, prostate, ovary, pancreas, uterus, colon, and thyroid. Immunohistochemical stains showed a phenotype consistent with a primary lung tumor (ie, TTF1+/CK7+), with negative results for other markers. Molecular analysis in six cases showed that none harbored an EGFR-activating mutation. KRAS mutation was detected in one case, and an ALK1 and ROS1 gene rearrangement were each detected in an additional two cases. Cribriform adenocarcinomas of the lung represent a distinctive histologic subtype of lung cancer that may be morphologically difficult to differentiate from metastases with a predominant cribriform architecture. PMID:24390215

  18. Identifying Subtypes among Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder and Mathematical Learning Disabilities, Using Model-Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieters, Stefanie; Roeyers, Herbert; Rosseel, Yves; Van Waelvelde, Hilde; Desoete, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between motor and mathematical skills has been shown by previous research. However, the question of whether subtypes can be differentiated within developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and/or mathematical learning disability (MLD) remains unresolved. In a sample of children with and without DCD and/or MLD, a data-driven…

  19. Use of the MMPI-I in Identifying Personality Characteristics of Anorexia Nervosa, Restrictor Subtype: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regardie, Cynthia Ramos

    In recent decades, the incidence of eating disorders has sharply increased. This paper reviews literature published between 1969 through 1992 which addresses personality characteristics of individuals with anorexia nervosa, restrictor subtype, utilizing the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-I). The current literature and research…

  20. Distinctive Patterns of Initially Presenting Metastases and Clinical Outcomes According to the Histological Subtypes in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon S.; Kay, Chul S.; Kim, Sung H.; Yeo, Chang D.; Kim, Jin W.; Kim, Seung Joon; Kim, Young K.; Ko, Yoon H.; Kang, Jin H.; Lee, Kyo Y.

    2016-01-01

    /neck metastasis (P = 0.006), and treatment factors (P < 0.001) remained independent prognostic factors affecting overall survival. We observed distinctive patterns of primary metastases and clinical outcomes according to the histological subtypes in stage IV NSCLC. Future studies need to disclose the underlying mechanism of these unique metastatic features and tumor biologies. PMID:26871841

  1. A Case-Control Study to Identify Risk Factors Associated with Avian Influenza Subtype H9N2 on Commercial Poultry Farms in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Rashid, Hamad B.; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Sue; Bronsvoort, Barend MdeC.

    2015-01-01

    A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for avian influenza subtype H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in 16 districts of Punjab, and 1 administrative unit of Pakistan. One hundred and thirty-three laboratory confirmed positive case farms were matched on the date of sample submission with 133 negative control farms. The association between a series of farm-level characteristics and the presence or absence of H9N2 was assessed by univariable analysis. Characteristics associated with H9N2 risk that passed the initial screening were included in a multivariable conditional logistic regression model. Manual and automated approaches were used, which produced similar models. Key risk factors from all approaches included selling of eggs/birds directly to live bird retail stalls, being near case/infected farms, a previous history of infectious bursal disease (IBD) on the farm and having cover on the water storage tanks. The findings of current study are in line with results of many other studies conducted in various countries to identify similar risk factors for AI subtype H9N2 infection. Enhancing protective measures and controlling risks identified in this study could reduce spread of AI subtype H9N2 and other AI viruses between poultry farms in Pakistan. PMID:25774768

  2. A case-control study to identify risk factors associated with avian influenza subtype H9N2 on commercial poultry farms in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mamoona; Rashid, Hamad B; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Sue; Bronsvoort, Barend MdeC

    2015-01-01

    A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for avian influenza subtype H9N2 infection on commercial poultry farms in 16 districts of Punjab, and 1 administrative unit of Pakistan. One hundred and thirty-three laboratory confirmed positive case farms were matched on the date of sample submission with 133 negative control farms. The association between a series of farm-level characteristics and the presence or absence of H9N2 was assessed by univariable analysis. Characteristics associated with H9N2 risk that passed the initial screening were included in a multivariable conditional logistic regression model. Manual and automated approaches were used, which produced similar models. Key risk factors from all approaches included selling of eggs/birds directly to live bird retail stalls, being near case/infected farms, a previous history of infectious bursal disease (IBD) on the farm and having cover on the water storage tanks. The findings of current study are in line with results of many other studies conducted in various countries to identify similar risk factors for AI subtype H9N2 infection. Enhancing protective measures and controlling risks identified in this study could reduce spread of AI subtype H9N2 and other AI viruses between poultry farms in Pakistan. PMID:25774768

  3. Distinct myeloid progenitor-differentiation pathways identified through single-cell RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Drissen, Roy; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Woll, Petter; Thongjuea, Supat; Gambardella, Adriana; Giustacchini, Alice; Mancini, Elena; Zriwil, Alya; Lutteropp, Michael; Grover, Amit; Mead, Adam; Sitnicka, Ewa; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-06-01

    According to current models of hematopoiesis, lymphoid-primed multi-potent progenitors (LMPPs) (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)Flt3(hi)) and common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)CD41(hi)) establish an early branch point for separate lineage-commitment pathways from hematopoietic stem cells, with the notable exception that both pathways are proposed to generate all myeloid innate immune cell types through the same myeloid-restricted pre-granulocyte-macrophage progenitor (pre-GM) (Lin(-)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)CD41(-)FcγRII/III(-)CD150(-)CD105(-)). By single-cell transcriptome profiling of pre-GMs, we identified distinct myeloid differentiation pathways: a pathway expressing the gene encoding the transcription factor GATA-1 generated mast cells, eosinophils, megakaryocytes and erythroid cells, and a pathway lacking expression of that gene generated monocytes, neutrophils and lymphocytes. These results identify an early hematopoietic-lineage bifurcation that separates the myeloid lineages before their segregation from other hematopoietic-lineage potential. PMID:27043410

  4. Online Discourse on Fibromyalgia: Text-Mining to Identify Clinical Distinction and Patient Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungsik; Ryu, Young Uk

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using text-mining to identify clinical distinctions and patient concerns in online memoires posted by patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Material/Methods A total of 399 memoirs were collected from an FM group website. The unstructured data of memoirs associated with FM were collected through a crawling process and converted into structured data with a concordance, parts of speech tagging, and word frequency. We also conducted a lexical analysis and phrase pattern identification. After examining the data, a set of FM-related keywords were obtained and phrase net relationships were set through a web-based visualization tool. Results The clinical distinction of FM was verified. Pain is the biggest issue to the FM patients. The pains were affecting body parts including ‘muscles,’ ‘leg,’ ‘neck,’ ‘back,’ ‘joints,’ and ‘shoulders’ with accompanying symptoms such as ‘spasms,’ ‘stiffness,’ and ‘aching,’ and were described as ‘sever,’ ‘chronic,’ and ‘constant.’ This study also demonstrated that it was possible to understand the interests and concerns of FM patients through text-mining. FM patients wanted to escape from the pain and symptoms, so they were interested in medical treatment and help. Also, they seemed to have interest in their work and occupation, and hope to continue to live life through the relationships with the people around them. Conclusions This research shows the potential for extracting keywords to confirm the clinical distinction of a certain disease, and text-mining can help objectively understand the concerns of patients by generalizing their large number of subjective illness experiences. However, it is believed that there are limitations to the processes and methods for organizing and classifying large amounts of text, so these limits have to be considered when analyzing the results. The development of research methodology to overcome

  5. Affinity-Based Screening of Tetravalent Peptides Identifies Subtype-Selective Neutralizers of Shiga Toxin 2d, a Highly Virulent Subtype, by Targeting a Unique Amino Acid Involved in Its Receptor Recognition.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takaaki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Miho; Shimizu, Eiko; Zhang, Baihao; Funamoto, Satoru; Yamasaki, Shinji; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), a major virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), can be classified into two subgroups, Stx1 and Stx2, each consisting of various closely related subtypes. Stx2 subtypes Stx2a and Stx2d are highly virulent and linked with serious human disorders, such as acute encephalopathy and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Through affinity-based screening of a tetravalent peptide library, we previously developed peptide neutralizers of Stx2a in which the structure was optimized to bind to the B-subunit pentamer. In this study, we identified Stx2d-selective neutralizers by targeting Asn16 of the B subunit, an amino acid unique to Stx2d that plays an essential role in receptor binding. We synthesized a series of tetravalent peptides on a cellulose membrane in which the core structure was exactly the same as that of peptides in the tetravalent library. A total of nine candidate motifs were selected to synthesize tetravalent forms of the peptides by screening two series of the tetravalent peptides. Five of the tetravalent peptides effectively inhibited the cytotoxicity of Stx2a and Stx2d, and notably, two of the peptides selectively inhibited Stx2d. These two tetravalent peptides bound to the Stx2d B subunit with high affinity dependent on Asn16. The mechanism of binding to the Stx2d B subunit differed from that of binding to Stx2a in that the peptides covered a relatively wide region of the receptor-binding surface. Thus, this highly optimized screening technique enables the development of subtype-selective neutralizers, which may lead to more sophisticated treatments of infections by Stx-producing EHEC. PMID:27382021

  6. Identifying Distinct Healthcare Pathways During Episodes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kuwornu, John P.; Lix, Lisa M.; Quail, Jacqueline M.; Forget, Evelyn; Muthukumarana, Saman; Wang, Xiaoyun E.; Osman, Meric; Teare, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Healthcare pathways are important to measure because they are expected to affect outcomes. However, they are challenging to define because patients exhibit heterogeneity in their use of healthcare services. The objective of this study was to identify and describe healthcare pathways during episodes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Linked administrative databases from Saskatchewan, Canada were used to identify a cohort of newly diagnosed COPD patients and their episodes of healthcare use for disease exacerbations. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify the cohort into homogeneous pathways using indicators of respiratory-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, general and specialist physician visits, and outpatient prescription drug dispensations. Multinomial logistic regression models tested patients’ demographic and disease characteristics associated with pathway group membership. The most frequent healthcare contact sequences in each pathway were described. Tests of mean costs across groups were conducted using a model-based approach with χ2 statistics. LCA identified 3 distinct pathways for patients with hospital- (n = 963) and ED-initiated (n = 364) episodes. For the former, pathway group 1 members followed complex pathways in which multiple healthcare services were repeatedly used and incurred substantially higher costs than patients in the other pathway groups. For patients with an ED-initiated episode, pathway group 1 members also had higher costs than other groups. Pathway groups differed with respect to patient demographic and disease characteristics. A minority of patients were discharged from ED or hospital, but did not have any follow-up care during the remainder of their episode. Patients who followed complex pathways could benefit from case management interventions to streamline their journeys through the healthcare system. The minority of patients whose pathways were not

  7. MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: neuropathological, biochemical and transmission studies identify a distinctive prion strain.

    PubMed

    Moda, Fabio; Suardi, Silvia; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Indaco, Antonio; Limido, Lucia; Vimercati, Chiara; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Langeveld, Jan; Terruzzi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Antonio; Zerbi, Pietro; Fociani, Paolo; Bishop, Matthew T; Will, Robert G; Manson, Jean C; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    In Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD patients are characterized by cerebral deposition of type 1 PrP(Sc) and correspond to the classic clinical CJD phenotype. The rare 129MM CJD patients with type 2 PrP(Sc) are further subdivided in a cortical and a thalamic form also indicated as sporadic fatal insomnia. We observed two young patients with MM2-thalamic CJD. Main neuropathological features were diffuse, synaptic PrP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex and severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the thalamus and olivary nucleus. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 2A PrP(Sc) . Challenge of transgenic mice expressing 129MM human PrP showed that MM2-thalamic sporadic CJD (sCJD) was able to transmit the disease, at variance with MM2-cortical sCJD. The affected mice showed deposition of type 2A PrP(Sc) , a scenario that is unprecedented in this mouse line. These data indicate that MM2-thalamic sCJD is caused by a prion strain distinct from the other sCJD subtypes including the MM2-cortical form. PMID:22288561

  8. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD. PMID:27479907

  9. Joint-specific DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures in rheumatoid arthritis identify distinct pathogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Ai, Rizi; Hammaker, Deepa; Boyle, David L; Morgan, Rachel; Walsh, Alice M; Fan, Shicai; Firestein, Gary S; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stratifying patients on the basis of molecular signatures could facilitate development of therapeutics that target pathways specific to a particular disease or tissue location. Previous studies suggest that pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is similar in all affected joints. Here we show that distinct DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures not only discriminate RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from osteoarthritis FLS, but also distinguish RA FLS isolated from knees and hips. Using genome-wide methods, we show differences between RA knee and hip FLS in the methylation of genes encoding biological pathways, such as IL-6 signalling via JAK-STAT pathway. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes are identified between knee and hip FLS using RNA-sequencing. Double-evidenced genes that are both differentially methylated and expressed include multiple HOX genes. Joint-specific DNA signatures suggest that RA disease mechanisms might vary from joint to joint, thus potentially explaining some of the diversity of drug responses in RA patients. PMID:27282753

  10. Joint-specific DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures in rheumatoid arthritis identify distinct pathogenic processes

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Rizi; Hammaker, Deepa; Boyle, David L.; Morgan, Rachel; Walsh, Alice M.; Fan, Shicai; Firestein, Gary S.; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stratifying patients on the basis of molecular signatures could facilitate development of therapeutics that target pathways specific to a particular disease or tissue location. Previous studies suggest that pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is similar in all affected joints. Here we show that distinct DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures not only discriminate RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from osteoarthritis FLS, but also distinguish RA FLS isolated from knees and hips. Using genome-wide methods, we show differences between RA knee and hip FLS in the methylation of genes encoding biological pathways, such as IL-6 signalling via JAK-STAT pathway. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes are identified between knee and hip FLS using RNA-sequencing. Double-evidenced genes that are both differentially methylated and expressed include multiple HOX genes. Joint-specific DNA signatures suggest that RA disease mechanisms might vary from joint to joint, thus potentially explaining some of the diversity of drug responses in RA patients. PMID:27282753

  11. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, David W; Westover, M Brandon; McClain, Lauren M; Nagaraj, Sunil B; Bajwa, Ednan K; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J Perren; Purdon, Patrick L

    2015-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude "burst" periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude "suppression" periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient's underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  12. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, David W.; Westover, M. Brandon; McClain, Lauren M.; Nagaraj, Sunil B.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Quraishi, Sadeq A.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J. Perren; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude “burst” periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude “suppression” periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient’s underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  13. Molecular epidemiology of 58 new African human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) strains: identification of a new and distinct HTLV-1 molecular subtype in Central Africa and in Pygmies.

    PubMed Central

    Mahieux, R; Ibrahim, F; Mauclere, P; Herve, V; Michel, P; Tekaia, F; Chappey, C; Garin, B; Van Der Ryst, E; Guillemain, B; Ledru, E; Delaporte, E; de The, G; Gessain, A

    1997-01-01

    To gain new insights on the origin, evolution, and modes of dissemination of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), we performed a molecular analysis of 58 new African HTLV-1 strains (18 from West Africa, 36 from Central Africa, and 4 from South Africa) originating from 13 countries. Of particular interest were eight strains from Pygmies of remote areas of Cameroon and the Central African Republic (CAR), considered to be the oldest inhabitants of these regions. Eight long-term activated T-cell lines producing HTLV-1 gag and env antigens were established from peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1 seropositive individuals, including three from Pygmies. A fragment of the env gene encompassing most of the gp21 transmembrane region was sequenced for the 58 new strains, while the complete long terminal repeat (LTR) region was sequenced for 9 strains, including 4 from Pygmies. Comparative sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies performed on both the env and LTR regions by the neighbor-joining and DNA parsimony methods demonstrated that all 22 strains from West and South Africa belong to the widespread cosmopolitan subtype (also called HTLV-1 subtype A). Within or alongside the previously described Zairian cluster (HTLV-1 subtype B), we discovered a number of new HTLV-1 variants forming different subgroups corresponding mainly to the geographical origins of the infected persons, Cameroon, Gabon, and Zaire. Six of the eight Pygmy strains clustered together within this Central African subtype, suggesting a common origin. Furthermore, three new strains (two originating from Pygmies from Cameroon and the CAR, respectively, and one from a Gabonese individual) were particularly divergent and formed a distinct new phylogenetic cluster, characterized by specific mutations and occupying in most analyses a unique phylogenetic position between the large Central African genotype (HTLV-1 subtype B) and the Melanesian subtype (HTLV-1 subtype C). We have

  14. Absence of IDH mutation identifies a novel radiologic and molecular subtype of WHO grade II gliomas with dismal prognosis.

    PubMed

    Metellus, Philippe; Coulibaly, Bema; Colin, Carole; de Paula, Andre Maues; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Taieb, David; Barlier, Anne; Boisselier, Blandine; Mokhtari, Karima; Wang, Xiao Wei; Loundou, Anderson; Chapon, Frederique; Pineau, Sandrine; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) is still inconsistently explained by known molecular abnormalities in patients treated according to the present standards of care. IDH1 codon 132 and IDH2 codon 172 sequencing was performed in a series of 47 LGGs and correlated with clinical presentation, MR imaging characteristics, genomic profile and outcome. A total of 38 IDH1 mutations at codon 132 and 2 IDH2 mutations at codon 172 were found, including 35 R132H (87.5%), 2 R132C (5.0%), 1 R132S (2.5%) and 2 R172 M (5%). The IDH mutations were significantly associated with 1p19q deleted genotype (P = 0.031) and p53 expression (P = 0.014). The presence (vs. absence) of IDH mutations was associated with a better outcome (5-year survival rate, 93% vs. 51%, respectively, P = 0.000001). After adjustment for age, tumor location and size, radiologic infiltration pattern and extent of surgery, multivariate analysis confirmed that IDH mutations was an independent favorable prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 40.9; 95% CI, 2.89-578.49, P = 0.006). Furthermore, we showed that patients with IDH-nonmutated tumors were significantly older (P = 0.020) and that these tumors involved significantly more frequently the insula (P = 0.004), were larger in size (>6 cm, P = 0.047), displayed an infiltrative pattern on MRI (P = 0.007) and were all p53 negative with no 1p19q deletion (P < 10⁻⁶). The absence of IDH mutations in LGGs identifies a novel entity of LGGs with distinctive location, infiltrative behavior, specific molecular alterations, and dismal outcome. These findings could significantly modify the LGG classification and may represent a new tool to guide patient-tailored therapy. PMID:21080178

  15. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-07-24

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9-26 and 35-55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  16. Enchondromatosis: insights on the different subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pansuriya, Twinkal C; Kroon, Herman M; Bovée, Judith VMG

    2010-01-01

    Enchondromatosis is a rare, heterogeneous skeletal disorder in which patients have multiple enchondromas. Enchondromas are benign hyaline cartilage forming tumors in the medulla of metaphyseal bone. The disorder manifests itself early in childhood without any significant gender bias. Enchondromatosis encompasses several different subtypes of which Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are most common, while the other subtypes (metachondromatosis, genochondromatosis, spondyloenchondrodysplasia, dysspondyloenchondromatosis and cheirospondyloenchondromatosis) are extremely rare. Most subtypes are non-hereditary, while some are autosomal dominant or recessive. The gene(s) causing the different enchondromatosis syndromes are largely unknown. They should be distinguished and adequately diagnosed, not only to guide therapeutic decisions and genetic counseling, but also with respect to research into their etiology. For a longtime enchondromas have been considered a developmental disorder caused by the failure of normal endochondral bone formation. With the identification of genetic abnormalities in enchondromas however, they were being thought of as neoplasms. Active hedgehog signaling is reported to be important for enchondroma development and PTH1R mutations have been identified in ∼10% of Ollier patients. One can therefore speculate that the gene(s) causing the different enchondromatosis subtypes are involved in hedgehog/PTH1R growth plate signaling. Adequate distinction within future studies will shed light on whether these subtypes are different ends of a spectrum caused by a single gene, or that they represent truely different diseases. We therefore review the available clinical information for all enchondromatosis subtypes and discuss the little molecular data available hinting towards their cause. PMID:20661403

  17. Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration by Court-Ordered Men: Distinctions among Subtypes of Physical Violence, Sexual Violence, Psychological Abuse, and Stalking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jeffrey E.; Walters, Mikel L.; Basile, Kathleen C.

    2012-01-01

    This study continues previous work documenting the structure of violence perpetrated by males against their female intimate partners. It assesses the construct validity of a measurement model depicting associations among eight subtypes of perpetration: moderate physical violence, severe physical violence, forced or coerced sexual violence, sexual…

  18. Subtyping adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eunice Y; Le Grange, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Cluster analyses of eating disorder patients have yielded a "dietary-depressive" subtype, typified by greater negative affect, and a "dietary" subtype, typified by dietary restraint. This study aimed to replicate these findings in an adolescent sample with bulimia nervosa (BN) from a randomized controlled trial and to examine the validity and reliability of this methodology. In the sample of BN adolescents (N=80), cluster analysis revealed a "dietary-depressive" subtype (37.5%) and a "dietary" subtype (62.5%) using the Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Eating Disorder Examination Restraint subscale. The "dietary-depressive" subtype compared to the "dietary" subtype was significantly more likely to: (1) report co-occurring disorders, (2) greater eating and weight concerns, and (3) less vomiting abstinence at post-treatment (all p's<.05). The cluster analysis based on "dietary" and "dietary-depressive" subtypes appeared to have concurrent validity, yielding more distinct groups than subtyping by vomiting frequency. In order to assess the reliability of the subtyping scheme, a larger sample of adolescents with mixed eating and weight disorders in an outpatient eating disorder clinic (N=149) was subtyped, yielding similar subtypes. These results support the validity and reliability of the subtyping strategy in two adolescent samples. PMID:17949682

  19. Translocations activating IRF4 identify a subtype of germinal center-derived B-cell lymphoma affecting predominantly children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Philipp, Claudia; Oschlies, Ilske; Kohler, Christian W; Kreuz, Markus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Burkhardt, Birgit; Trautmann, Heiko; Gesk, Stefan; Andrusiewicz, Miroslaw; Berger, Hilmar; Fey, Miriam; Harder, Lana; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Mahn, Friederike; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Pellissery, Shoji; Pott, Christiane; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Reiter, Alfred; Richter, Julia; Rosolowski, Maciej; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trümper, Lorenz; Wessendorf, Swen; Spang, Rainer; Küppers, Ralf; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2011-07-01

    The prognosis of germinal center-derived B-cell (GCB) lymphomas, including follicular lymphoma and diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), strongly depends on age. Children have a more favorable outcome than adults. It is not known whether this is because of differences in host characteristics, treatment protocols, or tumor biology, including the presence of chromosomal alterations. By screening for novel IGH translocation partners in pediatric and adult lymphomas, we identified chromosomal translocations juxtaposing the IRF4 oncogene next to one of the immunoglobulin (IG) loci as a novel recurrent aberration in mature B-cell lymphoma. FISH revealed 20 of 427 lymphomas to carry an IG/IRF4-fusion. Those were predominantly GCB-type DLBCL or follicular lymphoma grade 3, shared strong expression of IRF4/MUM1 and BCL6, and lacked PRDM1/BLIMP1 expression and t(14;18)/BCL2 breaks. BCL6 aberrations were common. The gene expression profile of IG/IRF4-positive lymphomas differed from other subtypes of DLBCL. A classifier for IG/IRF4 positivity containing 27 genes allowed accurate prediction. IG/IRF4 positivity was associated with young age and a favorable outcome. Our results suggest IRF4 translocations to be primary alterations in a molecularly defined subset of GCB-derived lymphomas. The probability for this subtype of lymphoma significantly decreases with age, suggesting that diversity in tumor biology might contribute to the age-dependent differences in prognosis of lymphoma. PMID:21487109

  20. Genes associated with histopathologic features of triple negative breast tumors predict molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Visscher, Daniel W; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Rüdiger, Thomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S; Southey, Melissa C; Olson, Janet E; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-05-01

    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified. PMID:27083182

  1. Array comparative genomic hybridization identifies a distinct DNA copy number profile in renal cell cancer associated with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Koski, Taru A; Lehtonen, Heli J; Jee, Kowan J; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Joosse, Simon A; Vahteristo, Pia; Kiuru, Maija; Karhu, Auli; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Vanharanta, Sakari; Lehtonen, Rainer; Edgren, Henrik; Nederlof, Petra M; Hietala, Marja; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Herva, Riitta; Knuutila, Sakari; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Launonen, Virpi

    2009-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a tumor predisposition syndrome with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis as well as renal cell cancer (RCC) as its clinical manifestations. HLRCC is caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (fumarase) gene. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify the specific copy number changes characterizing the HLRCC-associated RCCs. The study material comprised formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded renal tumors obtained from Finnish patients with HLRCC. All 11 investigated tumors displayed the papillary type 2 histopathology typical for HLRCC renal tumors. The most frequent copy number changes detected in at least 3/11 (27%) of the tumors were gains in chromosomes 2, 7, and 17, and losses in 13q12.3-q21.1, 14, 18, and X. These findings provide genetic evidence for a distinct copy number profile in HLRCC renal tumors compared with sporadic RCC tumors of the same histopathological subtype, and delineate chromosomal regions that associate with this very aggressive form of RCC. PMID:19373782

  2. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T G; Holden, Mathew T G; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L; Parkhill, Julian; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A.; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J.; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L.; Parkhill, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  5. Hemagglutination-inhibition assay for influenza virus subtype identification and the detection and quantitation of serum antibodies to influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Janice C

    2014-01-01

    Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay is a classical laboratory procedure for the classification or subtyping of hemagglutinating viruses. For influenza virus, HI assay is used to identify the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of an unknown isolate or the HA subtype specificity of antibodies to influenza virus. Since the HI assay is quantitative it is frequently applied to evaluate the antigenic relationships between different influenza virus isolates of the same subtype. The basis of the HI test is inhibition of hemagglutination with subtype-specific antibodies. The HI assay is a relatively inexpensive procedure utilizing standard laboratory equipment, is less technical than molecular tests, and is easily completed within several hours. However when working with uncharacterized viruses or antibody subtypes the library of reference reagents required for identifying antigenically distinct influenza viruses and or antibody specificities from multiple lineages of a single hemagglutinin subtype requires extensive laboratory support for the production and optimization of reagents. PMID:24899416

  6. High Throughput Kinomic Profiling of Human Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Identifies Kinase Activity Dependent Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amitkumar; Welaya, Karim; Chen, Dongquan; Duarte, Christine W.; Ghatalia, Pooja; Arafat, Waleed; Madan, Ankit; Sudarshan, Sunil; Naik, Gurudatta; Grizzle, William E.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of kinase-targeted agents in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CC-RCC), comprehensive kinase activity evaluation (kinomic profiling) of these tumors is lacking. Thus, kinomic profiling of CC-RCC may assist in devising a classification system associated with clinical outcomes, and help identify potential therapeutic targets. Fresh frozen CC-RCC tumor lysates from 41 clinically annotated patients who had localized disease at diagnosis were kinomically profiled using the PamStation®12 high-content phospho-peptide substrate microarray system (PamGene International). Twelve of these patients also had matched normal kidneys available that were also profiled. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and supervised comparisons based on tumor vs. normal kidney and clinical outcome (tumor recurrence) were performed and coupled with advanced network modeling and upstream kinase prediction methods. Unsupervised clustering analysis of localized CC-RCC tumors identified 3 major kinomic groups associated with inflammation (A), translation initiation (B), and immune response and cell adhesions (C) processes. Potential driver kinases implicated include PFTAIRE (PFTK1), PKG1, and SRC, which were identified in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Of the 9 patients who had tumor recurrence, only one was found in Group B. Supervised analysis showed decreased kinase activity of CDK1 and RSK1-4 substrates in those which progressed compared to others. Twelve tumors with matching normal renal tissue implicated increased PIM’s and MAPKAPK’s in tumors compared to adjacent normal renal tissue. As such, comprehensive kinase profiling of CC-RCC tumors could provide a functional classification strategy for patients with localized disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26406598

  7. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M.; Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design. PMID:25866966

  8. Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; Wadsworth, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children ages 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013) and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal…

  9. A novel split kinesin assay identifies motor proteins that interact with distinct vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Brian; Decker, Helena; Bentley, Marvin; Luisi, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the kinesin motors that interact with different vesicle populations is a longstanding and challenging problem with implications for many aspects of cell biology. Here we introduce a new live-cell assay to assess kinesin–vesicle interactions and use it to identify kinesins that bind to vesicles undergoing dendrite-selective transport in cultured hippocampal neurons. We prepared a library of “split kinesins,” comprising an axon-selective kinesin motor domain and a series of kinesin tail domains that can attach to their native vesicles; when the split kinesins were assembled by chemical dimerization, bound vesicles were misdirected into the axon. This method provided highly specific results, showing that three Kinesin-3 family members—KIF1A, KIF13A, and KIF13B—interacted with dendritic vesicle populations. This experimental paradigm allows a systematic approach to evaluate motor–vesicle interactions in living cells. PMID:22908316

  10. Identifying the distinct phases of THz waves from K-valley electrons in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, Muhammad; Yim, Jong-Hyuk Jho, Young-Dahl; Kim, Changyoung

    2013-12-04

    The polarity change of THz electromagnetic waves radiated from single-crystalline graphite and polycrystalline graphite films has been studied to identify the main generation mechanism in conventional reflective THz time-domain spectroscopy scheme. The excitation wavelength variation around the K-valley produces no significant changes in THz field strength. We further found that THz waves become fully dispersed without polarity change in lateral detection geometry.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori from Malaysia identifies three distinct lineages suggestive of differential evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Mariappan, Vanitha; Baddam, Ramani; Lankapalli, Aditya K.; Shaik, Sabiha; Goh, Khean-Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Perkins, Tim; Benghezal, Mohammed; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Marshall, Barry J.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-01-01

    The discordant prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its related diseases, for a long time, fostered certain enigmatic situations observed in the countries of the southern world. Variation in H. pylori infection rates and disease outcomes among different populations in multi-ethnic Malaysia provides a unique opportunity to understand dynamics of host–pathogen interaction and genome evolution. In this study, we extensively analyzed and compared genomes of 27 Malaysian H. pylori isolates and identified three major phylogeographic lineages: hspEastAsia, hpEurope and hpSouthIndia. The analysis of the virulence genes within the core genome, however, revealed a comparable pathogenic potential of the strains. In addition, we identified four genes limited to strains of East-Asian lineage. Our analyses identified a few strain-specific genes encoding restriction modification systems and outlined 311 core genes possibly under differential evolutionary constraints, among the strains representing different ethnic groups. The cagA and vacA genes also showed variations in accordance with the host genetic background of the strains. Moreover, restriction modification genes were found to be significantly enriched in East-Asian strains. An understanding of these variations in the genome content would provide significant insights into various adaptive and host modulation strategies harnessed by H. pylori to effectively persist in a host-specific manner. PMID:25452339

  12. Using networks to identify fine structural differences between functionally distinct protein states.

    PubMed

    Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2004-08-31

    The vast increase in available data from the "-omics" revolution has enabled the fields of structural proteomics and structure prediction to make great progress in assigning realistic three-dimensional structures to each protein molecule. The challenge now lies in determining the fine structural details that endow unique functions to sequences that assume a common fold. Similar problems are encountered in understanding how distinct conformations contribute to different phases of a single protein's dynamic function. However, efforts are hampered by the complexity of these large, three-dimensional molecules. To overcome this limitation, structural data have been recast as two-dimensional networks. This analysis greatly reduces visual complexity but retains information about individual residues. Such diagrams are very useful for comparing multiple structures, including (1) homologous proteins, (2) time points throughout a dynamics simulation, and (3) functionally different conformations of a given protein. Enhanced structural examination results in new functional hypotheses to test experimentally. Here, network representations were key to discerning a difference between unliganded and inducer-bound lactose repressor protein (LacI), which were previously presumed to be identical structures. Further, the interface of unliganded LacI was surprisingly similar to that of the K84L variant and various structures generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Apo-LacI appears to be poised to adopt the conformation of either the DNA- or inducer-bound structures, and the K84L mutation appears to freeze the structure partway through the conformational transition. Additional examination of the effector binding pocket results in specific hypotheses about how inducer, anti-inducer, and neutral sugars exert their effects on repressor function. PMID:15323549

  13. Distinct and Conserved Prominin-1/CD133–Positive Retinal Cell Populations Identified across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jászai, József; Fargeas, Christine A.; Graupner, Sylvi; Tanaka, Elly M.; Brand, Michael; Huttner, Wieland B.; Corbeil, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133) plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts—except for the axolotl—were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells), but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL). In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b), a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6–positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1–positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1–positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1–expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies. PMID:21407811

  14. The stereotypy-inducing and OCD-like effects of chronic ‘binge’ cocaine are modulated by distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, A; Keyworth, HL; Yoo, JH; Chen, Y; Kitchen, I; Bailey, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE High rates of cigarette smoking occur in cocaine-dependent individuals, reflecting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cocaine-elicited behaviour. This study was designed to assess the contribution of different nAChR subtypes to the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic cocaine treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cocaine (15 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered to male C57BL/6J mice in a chronic ‘binge’ paradigm, with and without the coadministration of the α7 preferring nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) or the β2* nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE; 2 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the effect of cocaine exposure on α7 and α4β2* nAChRs, and on the high-affinity choline transporter. KEY RESULTS MLA+cocaine administration induced an intense self-grooming behaviour, indicating a likely role for α7 nAChRs in modulating this anxiogenic, compulsive-like effect of cocaine. In the major island of Calleja, a key area of action for neuroleptics, MLA+cocaine reduced choline transporter binding compared with cocaine (with or without DHβE) administration. DHβE treatment prevented the induction of stereotypy sensitisation to cocaine but prolonged locomotor sensitisation, implicating heteromeric β2* nAChRs in the neuroadaptations mediating cocaine-induced behavioural sensitisation. ‘Binge’ cocaine treatment region-specifically increased α4β2* nAChR binding in the midbrain dopaminergic regions: ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We have shown a differential, subtype-selective, contribution of nAChRs to the behavioural and neurochemical sequelae of chronic cocaine administration. These data support the clinical utility of targeting specific nAChR subtypes for the alleviation of cocaine-abuse symptomatology. PMID:22568685

  15. 'Gene shaving' as a method for identifying distinct sets of genes with similar expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; Eisen, Michael B; Alizadeh, Ash; Levy, Ronald; Staudt, Louis; Chan, Wing C; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Background: Large gene expression studies, such as those conducted using DNA arrays, often provide millions of different pieces of data. To address the problem of analyzing such data, we describe a statistical method, which we have called 'gene shaving'. The method identifies subsets of genes with coherent expression patterns and large variation across conditions. Gene shaving differs from hierarchical clustering and other widely used methods for analyzing gene expression studies in that genes may belong to more than one cluster, and the clustering may be supervised by an outcome measure. The technique can be 'unsupervised', that is, the genes and samples are treated as unlabeled, or partially or fully supervised by using known properties of the genes or samples to assist in finding meaningful groupings. Results: We illustrate the use of the gene shaving method to analyze gene expression measurements made on samples from patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The method identifies a small cluster of genes whose expression is highly predictive of survival. Conclusions: The gene shaving method is a potentially useful tool for exploration of gene expression data and identification of interesting clusters of genes worth further investigation. PMID:11178228

  16. Two distinct subpopulations of neurons in the thalamic intergeniculate leaflet identified by subthreshold currents.

    PubMed

    Chrobok, Lukasz; Palus, Katarzyna; Lewandowski, Marian Henryk

    2016-08-01

    The intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) is a flat retinorecipient thalamic structure implicated in orchestrating circadian rhythm, historically considered to be a subdivision of the neighboring ventrolateral geniculate nucleus (VLG). IGL consists of two main neuronal subpopulations: enkephalinergic and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-synthesizing cells. These cell types have different functions, connectivity and firing pattern in vivo, which suggest that they have different membrane currents to support their functional differences. We therefore performed patch-clamp experiments combined with immunohistochemical staining to clarify possible differences in the subthreshold currents of IGL neurons. Our results suggest that IGL neurons can be divided into two subpopulations based on two ionic currents. A T-type calcium current (IT) was identified in neurons that do not synthesise NPY, whereas all NPY-positive neurons were found to express a marked A-type potassium current (IA). Due to the fact that the clear electrophysiological discriminants between IGL and VLG are lacking, we decided to compare the amplitudes of the identified currents between those two structures. Our data suggest that VLG neurons can be characterized by a high amplitude IT and a low IA. Finally, we compared both currents with WAG/Rij rats, a well-established model of absence epilepsy, with co-occurring retinal pathologies, sleep-onset disturbances, and seizures exhibiting circadian rhythmicity. Data presented in this study uncovered pathologies in the IT exhibiting neurons of the IGL and VLG. In conclusion, the data presented here suggest that different subthreshold current expression supports the functional differences of thalamic nuclei. Those differences are promising for possible pharmacological manipulations of specified cell types in pathophysiologies including absence epilepsy. PMID:27208616

  17. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n = 13) and soft tissue (n = 5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  18. HydroCalc Proteome: a tool to identify distinct characteristics of effector proteins.

    PubMed

    da Silva, G J; da Silva, R G T M; Silva, V A; C Caritá, E; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is associated with secretion of effector proteins into intra- and extracellular spaces. These proteins interfere with cellular processes such as inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, induction of apoptosis and autophagy, activation and suppression of kinases, regulation of receptor activity, and modulation of transcription factors. Knowledge regarding the characteristics of these proteins would assist in pathogenicity studies, and help to identify possible and novel targets for antibacterial drugs. Amino acid hydropathy is a property that can affect behavior patterns in effector proteins. The HydroCalc Proteome tool analyzes total hydropathy, average hydropathy, C-terminal hydropathy, C-terminal load, and basic polar amino acids at the C-terminus. These five properties could contribute to the identification of proteins with an effector potential. HydroCalc Proteome is a web tool that provides a simple interface for the analysis of hydropathy properties in proteins. This tool permits the analysis of a single protein or even the complete proteome, which cannot be achieved by using other hydropathy tools. The tool displays the result of five properties related to effector proteins in a single table. The HydroCalc Proteome (www.gmb.bio.br/hydrocalc) is a powerful tool for protein analysis, and can contribute to the study of effector proteins. PMID:27525880

  19. Identified motor terminals in Drosophila larvae show distinct differences in morphology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lnenicka, G. A.; Keshishian, H.

    2000-01-01

    In Drosophila, the type I motor terminals innervating the larval ventral longitudinal muscle fibers 6 and 7 have been the most popular preparation for combining synaptic studies with genetics. We have further characterized the normal morphological and physiological properties of these motor terminals and the influence of muscle size on terminal morphology. Using dye-injection and physiological techniques, we show that the two axons supplying these terminals have different innervation patterns: axon 1 innervates only muscle fibers 6 and 7, whereas axon 2 innervates all of the ventral longitudinal muscle fibers. This difference in innervation pattern allows the two axons to be reliably identified. The terminals formed by axons 1 and 2 on muscle fibers 6 and 7 have the same number of branches; however, axon 2 terminals are approximately 30% longer than axon 1 terminals, resulting in a corresponding greater number of boutons for axon 2. The axon 1 boutons are approximately 30% wider than the axon 2 boutons. The excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) produced by axon 1 is generally smaller than that produced by axon 2, although the size distributions show considerable overlap. Consistent with vertebrate studies, there is a correlation between muscle fiber size and terminal size. For a single axon, terminal area and length, the number of terminal branches, and the number of boutons are all correlated with muscle fiber size, but bouton size is not. During prolonged repetitive stimulation, axon 2 motor terminals show synaptic depression, whereas axon 1 EPSPs facilitate. The response to repetitive stimulation appears to be similar at all motor terminals of an axon. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  1. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  2. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  3. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) within the European marine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snow, M.; Cunningham, C.O.; Melvin, W.T.; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay (RPA) has been used to detect nucleotide sequence variation within the nucleoprotein gene of 39 viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates of European marine origin. The classification of VHSV isolates based on RPA cleavage patterns permitted the identification of ten distinct groups of viruses based on differences at the molecular level. The nucleotide sequence of representatives of each of these groupings was determined and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This revealed grouping of the European marine isolates of VHSV into three genotypes circulating within distinct geographic areas. A fourth genotype was identified comprising isolates originating from North America. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that VHSV isolates recovered from wild caught fish around the British Isles were genetically related to isolates responsible for losses in farmed turbot. Furthermore, a relationship between naturally occurring marine isolates and VHSV isolates causing mortality among rainbow trout in continental Europe was demonstrated. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus within the European marine environment. Virus Res. 63, 35-44. Available from: 

  4. Comparative proteomic analyses of two reovirus T3D subtypes and comparison to T1L identifies multiple novel proteins in key cellular pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Berard, Alicia R; Severini, Alberto; Coombs, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Viruses induce changes in the host to facilitate replication and evade the immune response. These changes are reflected by the host's proteome, including differences in protein abundance. Focusing on up and down regulated proteins after a virus infects the cell will lead to a characterization of the host response to infection, and may give insight into how viruses modulate proteins to evade host defense responses. We previously used SILAC to examine host proteomic changes in protein abundance in HEK293 cells infected with reovirus type 1, strain Lang (T1L). For the present study, we extended this analysis by determining cell protein alterations induced by two different reovirus subtypes, a less pathogenic type 3 Dearing (T3D(F)) isolate, and a more pathogenic isolate named T3D(C) that is presently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer oncolytic agent. This comparison of host proteome regulation showed that T3D(C) had a more marked effect on DNA replication proteins, recombination and repair, as well as immunological, apoptotic, and survival cell functions. We also identified several proteins not previously identified in any virus infection; branched chain amino-acid transaminase 2 (BCAT), paternally expressed 10 (PEG10), target of myb1 (TOM1), histone cluster 2 H4b (HIST2H4B) and tubulin beta 4B (TUBB4B). PMID:25900405

  5. Candidate PET Radioligand Development for Neurofibrillary Tangles: Two Distinct Radioligand Binding Sites Identified in Postmortem Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lisheng; Qu, Baoxi; Hurtle, Bryan T; Dadiboyena, Sureshbabu; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Pike, Victor W

    2016-07-20

    [(18)F]THK-523 and [(18)F]807 are promising radioligands for imaging neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) with positron emission tomography (PET) in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and traumatic brain injury. Although [(18)F]THK-523 and [(18)F]T807 are considered high-affinity selective radioligands for NFTs, uncertainty has existed as to whether PET radioligands for imaging NFTs bind to the same molecular site because in vitro assays for ligands binding to NFTs have been lacking. We labeled THK-523 and T807 with tritium to serve as reference radioligands for in vitro binding assays with AD brain homogenates for newly synthesized ligands. With these radioligands, we identified two distinct binding sites for small molecules, one site with high affinity for THK-523 and the other with high affinity for T807. Moreover, binding assays with [(3)H]PIB confirmed that the two newly identified binding sites are also distinct from the thioflavin-T binding site where all current clinically useful PET radioligands for imaging β-amyloid plaque bind with high affinity. The two newly identified binding sites are considered to reside on NFTs rather than on β-amyloid plaques. Furthermore, we applied all three binding assays to a set of newly prepared compounds, based on chain modifications to THK-523. Some compounds with high affinity and selectivity for the THK-523 binding site emerged from this set, including one with amenability to labeling with fluorine-18, namely, ligand 10b. PMID:27171905

  6. Identifying Distinct Geographic Health Service Environments in British Columbia, Canada: Cluster Analysis of Population-Based Administrative Data.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, M Ruth

    2016-08-01

    Definitions of "urban" and "rural" developed for general purposes may not reflect the organization and delivery of healthcare. This research used cluster analysis to group Local Health Areas based on the distribution of healthcare spending across service categories. Though total spending was similar, the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria were identified as distinct from non-metropolitan and remote communities, based on the distribution of healthcare spending alone. Non-metropolitan communities with large community hospitals and greater physician supply were further distinguished from those with fewer healthcare resources. This approach may be useful to other researchers and service planners. PMID:27585025

  7. Genome-wide analysis identifies 16q deletion associated with survival, molecular subtypes, mRNA expression, and germline haplotypes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nordgard, Silje H; Johansen, Fredrik E; Alnaes, Grethe I G; Bucher, Elmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Naume, Bjørn; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2008-08-01

    Breast carcinomas are characterized by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) with biological and clinical significance. This explorative study integrated CNA, expression, and germline genotype data of 112 early-stage breast cancer patients. Recurrent CNAs differed substantially between tumor subtypes classified according to expression pattern. Deletion of 16q was overrepresented in Luminal A, and a predictor of good prognosis, both overall and for the nonluminal A subgroups. The deleted region most significantly associated with survival mapped to 16q22.2, harboring the genes TXNL4B and DXH38, whose expression was strongly correlated with the deletion. The area most frequently deleted resided on 16q23.1, 3.5 MB downstream of the area most significantly associated with survival, and included the tumor suppressor gene ADAMTS18 and the cell recognition gene CNTNAP4. Whole-genome association analysis identified germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their corresponding haplotypes, residing on several different chromosomes, to be associated with deletion of 16q. The genes where these SNPs reside encode proteins involved in the extracellular matrix (CHST3 and SPOCK2), in regulation of the cell cycle (JMY, PTPRN2, and Cwf19L2) and chromosome stability (KPNB1). PMID:18398821

  8. Comparative expression profiling for human endoplasmic reticulum-resident aminopeptidases 1 and 2 in normal kidney versus distinct renal cell carcinoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Christine G; Buettner-Herold, Maike; Kamphausen, Esther; Bertz, Simone; Hartmann, Arndt; Seliger, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Altered expression of the ER-resident aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 might play an important role in shaping the MHC class I-presented peptide repertoire, but their function in tumors has not been determined in detail. Thus, the expression of ERAP1, ERAP2 and HLA class I heavy chain (HC) was analysed in various renal tumor types and corresponding kidney parenchyma by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, comparative expression profilings of untreated versus interferon (IFN)-γ-treated RCC cell lines were performed applying qRT-PCR, Western blot and/or flow cytometry. Normal kidney tissues showed strong ERAP1 staining in the proximal tubules of 57.4 % of cases, in the distal tubules of 94.3 % of cases and in the medulla of 88.6 % of cases, whereas high ERAP2 levels were observed in the medulla of 77.1 % of cases and in both, proximal and distal tubules of about 88 % of cases. Imbalanced, downregulated and RCC subtype-specific ERAP1 or ERAP2 expression was detected in 12.7 % or 43.8 % of samples analyzed, respectively. A coordinated downregulation of ERAPs was found in 4.8 %, an upregulation of ERAP1 or ERAP2 in 22.8 % or 2.0 % of RCC lesions. No association exists between ERAP and HLA class I HC expression for any tissue type. A heterogeneous constitutive ERAP expression pattern was also detected in RCC cell lines with lower ERAP2 than ERAP1 expression levels, which was in 11/17 RCC cell lines inducible by IFN-γ. Conclusively, ERAP1 and ERAP2 might be involved in the development of immune escape mechanisms of RCC. PMID:23696916

  9. Diffusion-weighted MRI derived apparent diffusion coefficient identifies prognostically distinct subgroups of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Lober, Robert M; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tang, Yujie; Barnes, Patrick D; Edwards, Michael S; Vogel, Hannes; Fisher, Paul G; Monje, Michelle; Yeom, Kristen W

    2014-03-01

    While pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) remain fatal, recent data have shown subgroups with distinct molecular biology and clinical behavior. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted MRI can be used as a prognostic marker to stratify DIPG subsets with distinct clinical behavior. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values derived from diffusion-weighted MRI were computed in 20 consecutive children with treatment-naïve DIPG tumors. The median ADC for the cohort was used to stratify the tumors into low and high ADC groups. Survival, gender, therapy, and potential steroid effects were compared between the ADC groups. Median age at diagnosis was 6.6 (range 2.3-13.2) years, with median follow-up seven (range 1-36) months. There were 14 boys and six girls. Seventeen patients received radiotherapy, five received chemotherapy, and six underwent cerebrospinal fluid diversion. The median ADC of 1,295 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s for the cohort partitioned tumors into low or high diffusion groups, which had distinct median survivals of 3 and 13 months, respectively (log-rank p < 0.001). Low ADC tumors were found only in boys, whereas high ADC tumors were found in both boys and girls. Available tissue specimens in three low ADC tumors demonstrated high-grade histology, whereas one high ADC tumor demonstrated low-grade histology with a histone H3.1 K27M mutation and high-grade metastatic lesion at autopsy. ADC derived from diffusion-weighted MRI may identify prognostically distinct subgroups of pediatric DIPG. PMID:24522717

  10. Histopathology of duodenal mucosal lesions in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease: statistical analysis to identify distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Hardee, Steven; Alper, Arik; Pashankar, Dinesh S; Morotti, Raffaella A

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGT) are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Pediatric patients have a higher incidence of IBD-associated gastritis and duodenitis than do adults. This study aimed to identify histopathologic features of duodenal lesions in the pediatric population that are characteristic of IBD, compared to duodenal pathology of different etiopathogenesis. We performed a retrospective analysis of UGT biopsies from pediatric patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of duodenitis (0-18 years of age) over a 7-year period. We identified 40 cases of duodenitis associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and 10 cases associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) and compared the histopathologic characteristics of the duodenitis with age-matched controls consisting of 40 cases duodenitis associated with celiac disease and 40 non-Helicobacter pylori-associated (NOS) etiology duodenitis cases. The histologic features that were evaluated included presence of granulomas, duodenal cryptitis, erosion, lamina propria eosinophils, villous blunting, increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and crypt hyperplasia, among others. Additionally, we evaluated the presence of associated gastritis in all of these groups. Statistical analysis to identify significant differences was performed using Kruskal-Wallis testing. Cryptitis was the most distinctive feature of IBD-associated duodenitis. Granulomas were exceptionally rare. The severity of villous blunting and presence of IELs was significantly different in the IBD versus the celiac group. There is a significant overlap with duodenal lesions of different etiopathogenesis, including villous blunting and eosinophilia. With the exclusion of granulomas, cryptitis seems the most distinctive feature of the duodenal lesions associated with IBD. PMID:25207874

  11. Anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis identify a distinct clinical phenotype: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the frequency and associated clinical phenotype of anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in a large UK based, predominantly Caucasian, cohort of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods Serum samples and clinical data were obtained from 285 patients with JDM recruited to the UK Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort and Biomarker Study. The presence of anti-MDA5 antibodies was determined by immunoprecipitation and confirmed by ELISA using recombinant MDA5 protein. Results were compared with matched clinical data, muscle biopsies (scored by an experienced paediatric neuropathologist) and chest imaging (reviewed by an experienced paediatric radiologist). Results Anti-MDA5 antibodies were identified in 7.4% of JDM patients and were associated with a distinct clinical phenotype including skin ulceration (P = 0.03) oral ulceration (P = 0.01), arthritis (P <0.01) and milder muscle disease both clinically (as determined by Childhood Myositis Assessment Score (P = 0.03)) and histologically (as determined by a lower JDM muscle biopsy score (P <0.01)) than patients who did not have anti-MDA5 antibodies. A greater proportion of children with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies achieved disease inactivity at two years post-diagnosis according to PRINTO criteria (P = 0.02). A total of 4 out of 21 children with anti-MDA5 had interstitial lung disease; none had rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Conclusions Anti-MDA5 antibodies can be identified in a small but significant proportion of patients with JDM and identify a distinctive clinical sub-group. Screening for anti-MDA5 autoantibodies at diagnosis would be useful to guide further investigation for lung disease, inform on prognosis and potentially confirm the diagnosis, as subtle biopsy changes could otherwise be missed. PMID:24989778

  12. Distinct Kv Channel Subtypes Contribute to Differences in Spike Signaling Properties in the Axon Initial Segment and Presynaptic Boutons of Cerebellar Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Matthew J. M.; Tranquil, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The discrete arrangement of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels in axons may impart functional advantages in action potential (AP) signaling yet, in compact cell types, the organization of Kv channels is poorly understood. We find that in cerebellar stellate cell interneurons of mice, the composition and influence of Kv channels populating the axon is diverse and depends on location allowing axonal compartments to differentially control APs in a local manner. Kv1 channels determine AP repolarization at the spike initiation site but not at more distal sites, limiting the expression of use-dependent spike broadening to the most proximal axon region, likely a key attribute informing spiking phenotype. Local control of AP repolarization at presynaptic boutons depends on Kv3 channels keeping APs brief, thus limiting Ca2+ influx and synaptic strength. These observations suggest that AP repolarization is tuned by the local influence of distinct Kv channel types, and this organization enhances the functional segregation of axonal compartments. PMID:24806686

  13. A Formal Method for Identifying Distinct States of Variability in Time-varying Sources: Sgr A* as an Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, L.; Witzel, G.; Longstaff, F. A.; Ghez, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Continuously time variable sources are often characterized by their power spectral density and flux distribution. These quantities can undergo dramatic changes over time if the underlying physical processes change. However, some changes can be subtle and not distinguishable using standard statistical approaches. Here, we report a methodology that aims to identify distinct but similar states of time variability. We apply this method to the Galactic supermassive black hole, where 2.2 μm flux is observed from a source associated with Sgr A* and where two distinct states have recently been suggested. Our approach is taken from mathematical finance and works with conditional flux density distributions that depend on the previous flux value. The discrete, unobserved (hidden) state variable is modeled as a stochastic process and the transition probabilities are inferred from the flux density time series. Using the most comprehensive data set to date, in which all Keck and a majority of the publicly available Very Large Telescope data have been merged, we show that Sgr A* is sufficiently described by a single intrinsic state. However, the observed flux densities exhibit two states: noise dominated and source dominated. Our methodology reported here will prove extremely useful to assess the effects of the putative gas cloud G2 that is on its way toward the black hole and might create a new state of variability.

  14. A formal method for identifying distinct states of variability in time-varying sources: SGR A* as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.; Witzel, G.; Ghez, A. M.; Longstaff, F. A.

    2014-08-10

    Continuously time variable sources are often characterized by their power spectral density and flux distribution. These quantities can undergo dramatic changes over time if the underlying physical processes change. However, some changes can be subtle and not distinguishable using standard statistical approaches. Here, we report a methodology that aims to identify distinct but similar states of time variability. We apply this method to the Galactic supermassive black hole, where 2.2 μm flux is observed from a source associated with Sgr A* and where two distinct states have recently been suggested. Our approach is taken from mathematical finance and works with conditional flux density distributions that depend on the previous flux value. The discrete, unobserved (hidden) state variable is modeled as a stochastic process and the transition probabilities are inferred from the flux density time series. Using the most comprehensive data set to date, in which all Keck and a majority of the publicly available Very Large Telescope data have been merged, we show that Sgr A* is sufficiently described by a single intrinsic state. However, the observed flux densities exhibit two states: noise dominated and source dominated. Our methodology reported here will prove extremely useful to assess the effects of the putative gas cloud G2 that is on its way toward the black hole and might create a new state of variability.

  15. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of α- or γ-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, David T.; Huwe, Janice; Diliberto, Janet; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of α- and γ-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. α- or γ-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hours post-exposure to investigate tissue metabolite levels. Extractable and non-extractable HBCD metabolites were quantitated in liver, blood, fat, brain, bile, urine and feces and characterized by LC/MS (ESI-). Metabolites identified were distinct between the two stereoisomers. In mice exposed to α-HBCD, four hydroxylated metabolites were detected in fecal extracts, and one of these metabolite isomers was consistently characterized in liver, brain, and adipose tissue extracts. In contrast, mice exposed to γ-HBCD contained multiple isomers of monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, and dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecadiene in the feces while only a single monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecane metabolite was measured in liver and adipose tissue. Both stereoisomers were transformed to metabolites which formed covalent bonds to proteins and/or lipids in the gut as evidenced by high fecal non-extractables. Although the potential toxicity of these free and bound metabolites remains to be determined, the presence of distinct metabolic products from the two main HBCD stereoisomers should allow biomarkers to be selected that may aid in characterizing sources of HBCD exposure. PMID:23171393

  16. Subtyping Stuttering II

    PubMed Central

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  17. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  18. An integrated genomic analysis identifies clinically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma characterized by abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR and NF1

    PubMed Central

    Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Miller, C. Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P.; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O’Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A.; Gabrie, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T.; Wilson, Richard K.; Speed, Terence P.; Gray, Joe W.; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently catalogued recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multi-dimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relation between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype with greatest benefit in Classical and no benefit in Proneural. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies. PMID:20129251

  19. Distinct APC Subtypes Drive Spatially Segregated CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Effector Activity during Skin Infection with HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Bethany L.; Bedoui, Sammy; Hor, Jyh Liang; Mueller, Scott N.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Hollett, Natasha A.; Heath, William R.; Tscharke, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient infection control requires potent T-cell responses at sites of pathogen replication. However, the regulation of T-cell effector function in situ remains poorly understood. Here, we show key differences in the regulation of effector activity between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells during skin infection with HSV-1. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells disseminated widely throughout the skin and draining lymph nodes (LN), clearly exceeding the epithelial distribution of infectious virus. By contrast, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were only found within the infected epidermal layer of the skin and associated hair follicles. Mechanistically, while various subsets of lymphoid- and skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) elicited IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells responded exclusively to infected epidermal cells directly presenting viral antigen. Notably, uninfected cross-presenting DCs from both skin and LNs failed to trigger IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we describe a previously unappreciated complexity in the regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity that is subset-specific, microanatomically distinct and involves largely non-overlapping types of antigen-presenting cells (APC). PMID:25121482

  20. First-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound binds to a pharmacologically distinct TRH receptor subtype in human brain and is effective in neurodegenerative models.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Julie A; Boyle, Noreen T; Cole, Natalie; Slator, Gillian R; Colivicchi, M Alessandra; Stefanini, Chiara; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Scalabrino, Gaia A; Ryan, Sinead M; Elamin, Marwa; Walsh, Cathal; Vajda, Alice; Goggin, Margaret M; Campbell, Matthew; Mash, Deborah C; O'Mara, Shane M; Brayden, David J; Callanan, John J; Tipton, Keith F; Della Corte, Laura; Hunter, Jackie; O'Boyle, Kathy M; Williams, Carvell H; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-02-01

    JAK4D, a first-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound, is a prospective therapeutic candidate offering a multifaceted approach to treating neurodegeneration and other CNS conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the ability of JAK4D to bind to TRH receptors in human brain and to evaluate its neuropharmacological effects in neurodegenerative animal models. Additionally, JAK4D brain permeation was examined in mouse, and initial toxicology was assessed in vivo and in vitro. We report that JAK4D bound selectively with nanomolar affinity to native TRH receptors in human hippocampal tissue and showed for the first time that these receptors are pharmacologically distinct from TRH receptors in human pituitary, thus revealing a new TRH receptor subtype which represents a promising neurotherapeutic target in human brain. Systemic administration of JAK4D elicited statistically significant and clinically-relevant neuroprotective effects in three established neurodegenerative animal models: JAK4D reduced cognitive deficits when administered post-insult in a kainate (KA)-induced rat model of neurodegeneration; it protected against free radical release and neuronal damage evoked by intrastriatal microdialysis of KA in rat; and it reduced motor decline, weight loss, and lumbar spinal cord neuronal loss in G93A-SOD1 transgenic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis mice. Ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and a clean initial toxicology profile were also shown. In light of these findings, JAK4D is an important tool for investigating the hitherto-unidentified central TRH receptor subtype reported herein and an attractive therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25281210

  1. Characterization of Samples Identified as Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 without Subtype by Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II Assay Using the New Abbott HCV Genotype Plus RUO Test

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Camelia; Ebel, Anne; Reinhardt, Birgit; Merlin, Sandra; Proust, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping continues to be relevant for therapeutic strategies. Some samples are reported as genotype 1 (gt 1) without subtype by the Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II (GT II) test. To characterize such samples further, the Abbott HCV Genotype Plus RUO (Plus) assay, which targets the core region for gt 1a, gt 1b, and gt 6 detection, was evaluated as a reflex test in reference to NS5B or 5′-untranslated region (UTR)/core region sequencing. Of 3,626 routine samples, results of gt 1 without subtype were received for 171 samples (4.7%), accounting for 11.5% of gt 1 specimens. The Plus assay and sequencing were applied to 98 of those samples. NS5B or 5′-UTR/core region sequencing was successful for 91/98 specimens (92.9%). Plus assay and sequencing results were concordant for 87.9% of specimens (80/91 samples). Sequencing confirmed Plus assay results for 82.6%, 85.7%, 100%, and 89.3% of gt 1a, gt 1b, gt 6, and non-gt 1a/1b/6 results, respectively. Notably, 12 gt 6 samples that had been identified previously as gt 1 without subtype were assigned correctly here; for 25/28 samples reported as “not detected” by the Plus assay, sequencing identified the samples as gt 1 with subtypes other than 1a/1b. The genetic variability of HCV continues to present challenges for the current genotyping platforms regardless of the applied methodology. Samples identified by the GT II assay as gt 1 without subtype can be further resolved and reliably characterized by the new Plus assay. PMID:26582834

  2. High-throughput bacterial SNP typing identifies distinct clusters of Salmonella Typhi causing typhoid in Nepalese children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, which remains an important public health issue in many developing countries. Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, is an area of high incidence and the pediatric population appears to be at high risk of exposure and infection. Methods We recently defined the population structure of S. Typhi, using new sequencing technologies to identify nearly 2,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be used as unequivocal phylogenetic markers. Here we have used the GoldenGate (Illumina) platform to simultaneously type 1,500 of these SNPs in 62 S. Typhi isolates causing severe typhoid in children admitted to Patan Hospital in Kathmandu. Results Eight distinct S. Typhi haplotypes were identified during the 20-month study period, with 68% of isolates belonging to a subclone of the previously defined H58 S. Typhi. This subclone was closely associated with resistance to nalidixic acid, with all isolates from this group demonstrating a resistant phenotype and harbouring the same resistance-associated SNP in GyrA (Phe83). A secondary clone, comprising 19% of isolates, was observed only during the second half of the study. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of SNP typing for monitoring bacterial populations over a defined period in a single endemic setting. We provide evidence for genotype introduction and define a nalidixic acid resistant subclone of S. Typhi, which appears to be the dominant cause of severe pediatric typhoid in Kathmandu during the study period. PMID:20509974

  3. Novel Human Embryonic Stem Cell Regulators Identified by Conserved and Distinct CpG Island Methylation State

    PubMed Central

    Pells, Steve; Koutsouraki, Eirini; Morfopoulou, Sofia; Valencia-Cadavid, Sara; Tomlinson, Simon R.; Kalathur, Ravi; Futschik, Matthias E.; De Sousa, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) undergo epigenetic changes in vitro which may compromise function, so an epigenetic pluripotency “signature” would be invaluable for line validation. We assessed Cytosine-phosphate-Guanine Island (CGI) methylation in hESCs by genomic DNA hybridisation to a CGI array, and saw substantial variation in CGI methylation between lines. Comparison of hESC CGI methylation profiles to corresponding somatic tissue data and hESC mRNA expression profiles identified a conserved hESC-specific methylation pattern associated with expressed genes. Transcriptional repressors and activators were over-represented amongst genes whose associated CGIs were methylated or unmethylated specifically in hESCs, respectively. Knockdown of candidate transcriptional regulators (HMGA1, GLIS2, PFDN5) induced differentiation in hESCs, whereas ectopic expression in fibroblasts modulated iPSC colony formation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed interaction between the candidates and the core pluripotency transcription factor network. We thus identify novel pluripotency genes on the basis of a conserved and distinct epigenetic configuration in human stem cells. PMID:26151932

  4. Colocalization of allatotropin and tachykinin-related peptides with classical transmitters in physiologically distinct subtypes of olfactory local interneurons in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Fusca, Debora; Schachtner, Joachim; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2015-07-01

    In the insect antennal lobe different types of local interneurons mediate complex excitatory and inhibitory interactions between the glomerular pathways to structure the spatiotemporal representation of odors. Mass spectrometric and immunohistochemical studies have shown that in local interneurons classical neurotransmitters are likely to colocalize with a variety of substances that can potentially act as cotransmitters or neuromodulators. In the antennal lobe of the cockroach Periplaneta americana, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been identified as the potential inhibitory transmitter of spiking type I local interneurons, whereas acetylcholine is most likely the excitatory transmitter of nonspiking type IIa1 local interneurons. This study used whole-cell patch clamp recordings combined with single-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry to test if the GABAergic type I local interneurons and the cholinergic type IIa1 local interneurons express allatotropin and tachykinin-related neuropeptides (TKRPs). These are two of the most abundant types of peptides in the insect antennal lobe. GABA-like and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-like immunoreactivity were used as markers for GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. About 50% of the GABA-like immunoreactive (-lir) spiking type I local interneurons were allatotropin-lir, and ∼ 40% of these neurons were TKRP-lir. About 20% of nonspiking ChAT-lir type IIa1 local interneurons were TKRP-lir. Our results suggest that in subpopulations of GABAergic and cholinergic local interneurons, allatotropin and TKRPs might act as cotransmitters or neuromodulators. To unequivocally assign neurotransmitters, cotransmitters, and neuromodulators to identified classes of antennal lobe neurons is an important step to deepen our understanding of information processing in the insect olfactory system. PMID:25678036

  5. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Wu, Jun; Hernaez, Ruben; Kim, Lauren J; Palmer, Cameron D; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E; Launer, Lenore J; Nalls, Michael A; Clark, Jeanne M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Butler, Johannah L; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; Voight, Benjamin F; Carr, J Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F; Harris, Tamara B; Fox, Caroline S; Smith, Albert V; Kao, W H Linda; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2011-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (∼26%-27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ∼2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10(-8)) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT-assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits. PMID:21423719

  6. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies Variants Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease That Have Distinct Effects on Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Cameron D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E.; Launer, Lenore J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Butler, Johannah L.; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (∼26%–27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ∼2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10−8) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT–assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits. PMID:21423719

  7. A Newly Identified Extrinsic Input Triggers a Distinct Gastric Mill Rhythm via Activation of Modulatory Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Dawn M.; White, Rachel S.; Saideman, Shari R.; Cook, Aaron; Christie, Andrew E.; Nadim, Farzan; Nusbaum, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal network flexibility enables animals to respond appropriately to changes in their internal and external states. We are using the isolated crab stomatogastric nervous system to determine how extrinsic inputs contribute to network flexibility. The stomatogastric system includes the well-characterized gastric mill (chewing) and pyloric (filtering of chewed food) motor circuits in the stomatogastric ganglion. Projection neurons with somata in the commissural ganglia (CoGs) regulate these rhythms. Previous work characterized a unique gastric mill rhythm that occurred spontaneously in some preparations, but whose origin remained undetermined. This rhythm includes a distinct protractor phase activity pattern, during which all active gastric mill circuit and projection neurons fire in a pyloric rhythm-timed activity pattern instead of the tonic firing pattern exhibited by these neurons during previously studied gastric mill rhythms. Here we identify a new extrinsic input, the post-oesophageal commissure (POC) neurons, relatively brief stimulation (30 sec) of which triggers a long-lasting (tens of minutes) activation of this novel gastric mill rhythm at least in part via its lasting activation of CoG projection neurons, including the previously identified MCN1 and CPN2. Immunocytochemical and electrophysiological data suggest that the POC neurons excite MCN1 and CPN2 by release of the neuropeptide Cancer borealis tachykinin-related peptide Ia (CabTRP Ia). These data further suggest that the CoG arborization of the POC neurons comprises the previously identified anterior commissural organ (ACO), a CabTRP Ia-containing neurohemal organ. This endocrine pathway thus appears to also have paracrine actions that include activation of a novel and lasting gastric mill rhythm. PMID:18310125

  8. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules. PMID:26842724

  9. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules.

  10. Subtypes of major depression: latent class analysis in depressed Han Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Aggen, S.; Shi, S.; Gao, J.; Li, Y.; Tao, M.; Zhang, K.; Wang, X.; Gao, C.; Yang, L.; Liu, Y.; Li, K.; Shi, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, L.; Zhang, J.; Du, B.; Jiang, G.; Shen, J.; Zhang, Z.; Liang, W.; Sun, J.; Hu, J.; Liu, T.; Wang, X.; Miao, G.; Meng, H.; Li, Y.; Hu, C.; Li, Y.; Huang, G.; Li, G.; Ha, B.; Deng, H.; Mei, Q.; Zhong, H.; Gao, S.; Sang, H.; Zhang, Y.; Fang, X.; Yu, F.; Yang, D.; Liu, T.; Chen, Y.; Hong, X.; Wu, W.; Chen, G.; Cai, M.; Song, Y.; Pan, J.; Dong, J.; Pan, R.; Zhang, W.; Shen, Z.; Liu, Z.; Gu, D.; Wang, X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Q.; Flint, J.; Kendler, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite substantial research, uncertainty remains about the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of major depression (MD). Can meaningful and valid subtypes be identified and would they be stable cross-culturally? Method Symptoms at their lifetime worst depressive episode were assessed at structured psychiatric interview in 6008 women of Han Chinese descent, age ≥30 years, with recurrent DSM-IV MD. Latent class analysis (LCA) was performed in Mplus. Results Using the nine DSM-IV MD symptomatic A criteria, the 14 disaggregated DSM-IV criteria and all independently assessed depressive symptoms (n=27), the best LCA model identified respectively three, four and six classes. A severe and non-suicidal class was seen in all solutions, as was a mild/moderate subtype. An atypical class emerged once bidirectional neurovegetative symptoms were included. The non-suicidal class demonstrated low levels of worthlessness/guilt and hopelessness. Patterns of co-morbidity, family history, personality, environmental precipitants, recurrence and body mass index (BMI) differed meaningfully across subtypes, with the atypical class standing out as particularly distinct. Conclusions MD is a clinically complex syndrome with several detectable subtypes with distinct clinical and demographic correlates. Three subtypes were most consistently identified in our analyses: severe, atypical and non-suicidal. Severe and atypical MD have been identified in multiple prior studies in samples of European ethnicity. Our non-suicidal subtype, with low levels of guilt and hopelessness, may represent a pathoplastic variant reflecting Chinese cultural influences. PMID:25065911

  11. Distinct Characteristics of Small Cell Lung Cancer Correlate With Central or Peripheral Origin: Subtyping Based on Location and Expression of Transcription Factor TTF-1.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisaku; Motoi, Noriko; Ono, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Hironori; Ohyanagi, Fumiyoshi; Nishio, Makoto; Okumura, Sakae; Ichinose, Masakazu; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2015-12-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is a type of lung cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation and a poor prognosis that is widely believed to arise in the central lung. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is a peripheral marker of lung adenocarcinoma that is also highly expressed in SCLC. In this study, we examined whether SCLC is really a central-type tumor and the relationship between tumor location, TTF-1 expression and prognosis of SCLC.Ninety six SCLCs, diagnosed from biopsies or surgical materials, for which detailed computed tomography (CT) images were available, were collected consecutively from Japanese patients between 2004 and 2011. We examined the location of the primary tumor (central or peripheral) using thin-sliced CT, a TTF-1 immunohistochemical expression, and clinicopathology including prognosis.Of the 96 SCLCs, 74% (71/96) were of the peripheral type and found to have a significantly worse prognosis than central-type tumors. TTF-1 immunoreactivity was identified in 79 tumors (82%), 78% of which (62/79) were of the peripheral type and 22% of which were central. TTF-1 expression was significantly correlated with peripheral location (P = 0.030). Multivariate analysis revealed that high TNM stages and the peripheral location were independent markers for poor survival.The majority of SCLCs were of the peripheral type. The peripheral-type SCLC expressed TTF-1 more frequently and had a poorer prognosis than central-type tumors did. Further analysis on original sites of SCLC, using molecular methodology, or based on another ethnicity, should be warranted. PMID:26705222

  12. A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Widen, Steven G.; Wood, Thomas G.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; Vasilakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors. PMID:26903607

  13. A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Vasilakis, Nikolaos

    2016-05-01

    Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors. PMID:26903607

  14. Natural diversity in the model legume Medicago truncatula allows identifying distinct genetic mechanisms conferring partial resistance to Verticillium wilt

    PubMed Central

    Gentzbittel, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a major threat to alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and many other crops. The model legume Medicago truncatula was used as a host for studying resistance and susceptibility to Verticillium albo-atrum. In addition to presenting well-established genetic resources, this wild plant species enables to investigate biodiversity of the response to the pathogen and putative crosstalk between disease and symbiosis. Symptom scoring after root inoculation and modelling of disease curves allowed assessing susceptibility levels in recombinant lines of three crosses between susceptible and resistant lines, in a core collection of 32 lines, and in mutants affected in symbiosis with rhizobia. A GFP-expressing V. albo-atrum strain was used to study colonization of susceptible plants. Symptoms and colonization pattern in infected M. truncatula plants were typical of Verticillium wilt. Three distinct major quantitative trait loci were identified using a multicross, multisite design, suggesting that simple genetic mechanisms appear to control Verticillium wilt resistance in M. truncatula lines A17 and DZA45.5. The disease functional parameters varied largely in lines of the core collection. This biodiversity with regard to disease response encourages the development of association genetics and ecological approaches. Several mutants of the resistant line, impaired in different steps of rhizobial symbiosis, were affected in their response to V. albo-atrum, which suggests that mechanisms involved in the establishment of symbiosis or disease might have some common regulatory control points. PMID:23213135

  15. Etiologic Heterogeneity Among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Slager, Susan L.; Cerhan, James R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Skibola, Christine F.; Bracci, Paige M.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Monnereau, Alain; Turner, Jennifer J.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Adami, Hans-Olov; Chang, Ellen T.; Glimelius, Bengt; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Crosignani, Paolo; di Lollo, Simonetta; Miligi, Lucia; Nanni, Oriana; Ramazzotti, Valerio; Rodella, Stefania; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Stagnaro, Emanuele; Tumino, Rosario; Vindigni, Carla; Vineis, Paolo; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadié, Marc; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Colt, Joanne S.; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rothman, Nathaniel; Severson, Richard K.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Call, Timothy G.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Liebow, Mark; Blair, Aaron; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Smith, Alex; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Connors, Joseph M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Spinelli, John J.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Holford, Theodore R.; Lan, Qing; Zheng, Tongzhang; Orsi, Laurent; Dal Maso, Luigino; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Serraino, Diego; Bernstein, Leslie; Levine, Alexandra; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Clarke, Christina A.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Foran, James M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Paltiel, Ora; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sampson, Joshua N.

    2014-01-01

    teacher generally were restricted to marginal zone lymphoma, Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and/or lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Conclusions Using a novel approach to investigate etiologic heterogeneity among NHL subtypes, we identified risk factors that were common among subtypes as well as risk factors that appeared to be distinct among individual or a few subtypes, suggesting both subtype-specific and shared underlying mechanisms. Further research is needed to test putative mechanisms, investigate other risk factors (eg, other infections, environmental exposures, and diet), and evaluate potential joint effects with genetic susceptibility. PMID:25174034

  16. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio help identify patients with lung cancer, but do not differentiate between lung cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Igor; Kukulj, Suzana; Samaržija, Miroslav; Jeleč, Vjekoslav; Žarak, Marko; Orehovec, Biserka; Taradi, Ida; Romić, Dominik; Kolak, Toni; Patrlj, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the diagnostic value of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in lung cancer (LC). We compared the ratios between healthy participants and all LC patients, as well patients with different pathohistological LC subtypes. Methods We retrieved the data on neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet levels in 449 patients with different pathohistological LC subtypes (non-small cell LC, small-cell LC, atypical or metastatic LC, neuroendocrine, and sarcomatoid carcinoma) and 47 healthy controls. NLR and PLR were calculated by dividing the absolute number of neutrophils or platelets with the absolute number of lymphocytes. Results There were significant differences in both NLR and PLR (P < 0.001) between all LC patients and the control group, but there were no differences between patients with different LC subtypes. Reciever operating characteristics analysis for NLR showed the optimal cut-off value of 2.71, with a sensitivity of 77.05% and specificity of 87.23%. The optimal cut-off value for PLR was 182.31, with a sensitivity of 51.09% and specificity of 91.49%. Conclusion The results showed that the NLR and PLR may have added value in the early diagnosis of LC, but further research is needed to confirm these results. PMID:27374830

  17. Catatonia in Autism: A Distinct Subtype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, M.; Quinlan, P.; Ghaziuddin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Catatonia is a life-threatening disorder characterized by motor abnormalities, mutism, and disturbances of behaviour, which is increasingly being diagnosed in persons with autism. In this report, we describe the presentation and course of catatonia in an adolescent with autism who responded to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The illness started…

  18. Increase of HIV-1 subtype A in Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Müller-Trutwin, M C; Chaix, M L; Letourneur, F; Bégaud, E; Beaumont, D; Deslandres, A; You, B; Morvan, J; Mathiot, C; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Saragosti, S

    1999-06-01

    The concomitant presence of five distinct HIV-1 subtypes and of unclassified HIV-1 was reported in Bangui, Central African Republic (C.A.R.) between 1990 and 1991. This previous study was conducted in individuals belonging to the C.A.R. Armed Forces (FACA) Cohort and in patients from the University Hospital of Baugui. To follow the HIV-1 subtype distribution in Bangui over time, we conducted a cross-sectional surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes between 1987 and 1997 in three groups of individuals in Bangui: 47 men belonging to the FACA Cohort, 38 patients from the CNHUB hospital, and 51 individuals consulting the sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic. One hundred and ten HIV-1 were subtyped by heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) and/or sequencing of env regions encompassing the V3 domain. By comparing the HIV-1 distribution in two time periods (1987-1991 and 1991-1996) in the FACA cohort, we observed a significant increase of subtype A from 43.7% to 83.9%. This subtype distribution does not seem specific to the FACA cohort, in that subtype A accounted for 46.7% of the HIV-1 infections in CNHUB patients in the first time period studied and for 69.6% in the second time period. In STD patients, subtype A infections were predominant in 1995 (72.7%) and 1997 (89.7%). Subtype E viruses could be identified in the second time period, but represented only between 6.5% and 21.8% of the infections in the three groups of individuals studied. Other subtypes (B, C, H) and non-classified HIV-1 in C2-V3 were detected with only a 3.2% to 9.1% frequency for each in the second time period. Phylogenetic analysis excluded infection by a single source for the individuals included in the study. Our data demonstrate an increase in the proportion of HIV-1 subtype A infections in Bangui that raises the question of a preferential transmissibility of specific HIV-1 variants. PMID:10360809

  19. Resolving Tumor Heterogeneity: Genes Involved in Chordoma Cell Development Identified by Low-Template Analysis of Morphologically Distinct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karin; Meditz, Katharina; Kolb, Dagmar; Feichtinger, Julia; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Quehenberger, Franz; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Rinner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous) cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold) and U-CH1 (3.7-fold) cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold) and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold) were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology. PMID:24503940

  20. Functional Analysis of Dishevelled-3 Phosphorylation Identifies Distinct Mechanisms Driven by Casein Kinase 1ϵ and Frizzled5*

    PubMed Central

    Bernatík, Ondřej; Šedová, Kateřina; Schille, Carolin; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Červenka, Igor; Trantírek, Lukáš; Schambony, Alexandra; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Bryja, Vítězslav

    2014-01-01

    Dishevelled-3 (Dvl3), a key component of the Wnt signaling pathways, acts downstream of Frizzled (Fzd) receptors and gets heavily phosphorylated in response to pathway activation by Wnt ligands. Casein kinase 1ϵ (CK1ϵ) was identified as the major kinase responsible for Wnt-induced Dvl3 phosphorylation. Currently it is not clear which Dvl residues are phosphorylated and what is the consequence of individual phosphorylation events. In the present study we employed mass spectrometry to analyze in a comprehensive way the phosphorylation of human Dvl3 induced by CK1ϵ. Our analysis revealed >50 phosphorylation sites on Dvl3; only a minority of these sites was found dynamically induced after co-expression of CK1ϵ, and surprisingly, phosphorylation of one cluster of modified residues was down-regulated. Dynamically phosphorylated sites were analyzed functionally. Mutations within PDZ domain (S280A and S311A) reduced the ability of Dvl3 to activate TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor)-driven transcription and induce secondary axis in Xenopus embryos. In contrast, mutations of clustered Ser/Thr in the Dvl3 C terminus prevented ability of CK1ϵ to induce electrophoretic mobility shift of Dvl3 and its even subcellular localization. Surprisingly, mobility shift and subcellular localization changes induced by Fzd5, a Wnt receptor, were in all these mutants indistinguishable from wild type Dvl3. In summary, our data on the molecular level (i) support previous the assumption that CK1ϵ acts via phosphorylation of distinct residues as the activator as well as the shut-off signal of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and (ii) suggest that CK1ϵ acts on Dvl via different mechanism than Fzd5. PMID:24993822

  1. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  2. European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs: Surveillance Programs, Diagnostic Tools and Swine Influenza Virus Subtypes Identified in 14 European Countries from 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gaëlle; Larsen, Lars E.; Dürrwald, Ralf; Foni, Emanuela; Harder, Timm; Van Reeth, Kristien; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Reid, Scott M.; Dan, Adam; Maldonado, Jaime; Huovilainen, Anita; Billinis, Charalambos; Davidson, Irit; Agüero, Montserrat; Vila, Thaïs; Hervé, Séverine; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Chiapponi, Chiara; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kyriakis, Constantinos S.; Brown, Ian H.; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010–2013) aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections. PMID:25542013

  3. α-Conotoxins Identify the α3β4* Subtype as the Predominant Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Expressed in Human Adrenal Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; McIntosh, J Michael; Azam, Layla; Lindstrom, Jon; Lucero, Linda; Whiteaker, Paul; Passas, Juan; Blázquez, Jesús; Albillos, Almudena

    2015-11-01

    Ligands that selectively inhibit human α3β2 and α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) and not the closely related α3β4 and α6β4 subtypes are lacking. Current α-conotoxins (α-Ctxs) that discriminate among these nAChR subtypes in rat fail to discriminate among the human receptor homologs. In this study, we describe the development of α-Ctx LvIA(N9R,V10A) that is 3000-fold more potent on oocyte-expressed human α3β2 than α3β4 and 165-fold more potent on human α6/α3β2β3 than α6/α3β4 nAChRs. This analog was used in conjuction with three other α-Ctx analogs and patch-clamp electrophysiology to characterize the nAChR subtypes expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells. LvIA(N9R,V10A) showed little effect on the acetylcholine-evoked currents in these cells at concentrations expected to inhibit nAChRs with β2 ligand-binding sites. In contrast, the β4-selective α-Ctx BuIA(T5A,P6O) inhibited >98% of the acetylcholine-evoked current, indicating that most of the heteromeric receptors contained β4 ligand-binding sites. Additional studies using the α6-selective α-Ctx PeIA(A7V,S9H,V10A,N11R,E14A) indicated that the predominant heteromeric nAChR expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells is the α3β4* subtype (asterisk indicates the possible presence of additional subunits). This conclusion was supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments of human adrenal medulla gland and of cultured human adrenal chromaffin cells that demonstrated prominent expression of RNAs for α3, α5, α7, β2, and β4 subunits and a low abundance of RNAs for α2, α4, α6, and α10 subunits. PMID:26330550

  4. Resolution of Novel Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Subtypes by Global Phosphotyrosine Profiling.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Emily S; Su, Shih-Ping; Nagrial, Adnan M; Hochgräfe, Falko; Pajic, Marina; Lehrbach, Gillian M; Parton, Robert G; Yap, Alpha S; Horvath, Lisa G; Chang, David K; Biankin, Andrew V; Wu, Jianmin; Daly, Roger J

    2016-08-01

    Comprehensive characterization of signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) promises to enhance our understanding of the molecular aberrations driving this devastating disease, and may identify novel therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers that enable stratification of patients for optimal therapy. Here, we use immunoaffinity-coupled high-resolution mass spectrometry to characterize global tyrosine phosphorylation patterns across two large panels of human PDAC cell lines: the ATCC series (19 cell lines) and TKCC series (17 cell lines). This resulted in the identification and quantification of over 1800 class 1 tyrosine phosphorylation sites and the consistent segregation of both PDAC cell line series into three subtypes with distinct tyrosine phosphorylation profiles. Subtype-selective signaling networks were characterized by identification of subtype-enriched phosphosites together with pathway and network analyses. This revealed that the three subtypes characteristic of the ATCC series were associated with perturbations in signaling networks associated with cell-cell adhesion and epithelial-mesenchyme transition, mRNA metabolism, and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, respectively. Specifically, the third subtype exhibited enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple RTKs including the EGFR, ERBB3 and MET. Interestingly, a similar RTK-enriched subtype was identified in the TKCC series, and 'classifier' sites for each series identified using Random Forest models were able to predict the subtypes of the alternate series with high accuracy, highlighting the conservation of the three subtypes across the two series. Finally, RTK-enriched cell lines from both series exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the small molecule EGFR inhibitor erlotinib, indicating that their phosphosignature may provide a predictive biomarker for response to this targeted therapy. These studies highlight how resolution of subtype-selective signaling networks can provide a

  5. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  6. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  7. Zebrafish Mnx proteins specify one motoneuron subtype and suppress acquisition of interneuron characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Precise matching between motoneuron subtypes and the muscles they innervate is a prerequisite for normal behavior. Motoneuron subtype identity is specified by the combination of transcription factors expressed by the cell during its differentiation. Here we investigate the roles of Mnx family transcription factors in specifying the subtypes of individually identified zebrafish primary motoneurons. Results Zebrafish has three Mnx family members. We show that each of them has a distinct and temporally dynamic expression pattern in each primary motoneuron subtype. We also show that two Mnx family members are expressed in identified VeLD interneurons derived from the same progenitor domain that generates primary motoneurons. Surprisingly, we found that Mnx proteins appear unnecessary for differentiation of VeLD interneurons or the CaP motoneuron subtype. Mnx proteins are, however, required for differentiation of the MiP motoneuron subtype. We previously showed that MiPs require two temporally-distinct phases of Islet1 expression for normal development. Here we show that in the absence of Mnx proteins, the later phase of Islet1 expression is initiated but not sustained, and MiPs become hybrids that co-express morphological and molecular features of motoneurons and V2a interneurons. Unexpectedly, these hybrid MiPs often extend CaP-like axons, and some MiPs appear to be entirely transformed to a CaP morphology. Conclusions Our results suggest that Mnx proteins promote MiP subtype identity by suppressing both interneuron development and CaP axon pathfinding. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of transcription factors that act to distinguish CaP and MiP subtype identities. Our results also suggest that MiP motoneurons are more similar to V2 interneurons than are CaP motoneurons. PMID:23122226

  8. Validity of DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom dimensions and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Willcutt, Erik G; Nigg, Joel T; Pennington, Bruce F; Solanto, Mary V; Rohde, Luis A; Tannock, Rosemary; Loo, Sandra K; Carlson, Caryn L; McBurnett, Keith; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2012-11-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) specify two dimensions of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms that are used to define three nominal subtypes: predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type (ADHD-H), predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I), and combined type (ADHD-C). To aid decision making for DSM-5 and other future diagnostic systems, a comprehensive literature review and meta-analysis of 546 studies was completed to evaluate the validity of the DSM-IV model of ADHD. Results indicated that DSM-IV criteria identify individuals with significant and persistent impairment in social, academic, occupational, and adaptive functioning when intelligence, demographic factors, and concurrent psychopathology are controlled. Available data overwhelmingly support the concurrent, predictive, and discriminant validity of the distinction between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms, and indicate that nearly all differences among the nominal subtypes are consistent with the relative levels of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms that define the subtypes. In contrast, the DSM-IV subtype model is compromised by weak evidence for the validity of ADHD-H after first grade, minimal support for the distinction between ADHD-I and ADHD-C in studies of etiological influences, academic and cognitive functioning, and treatment response, and the marked longitudinal instability of all three subtypes. Overall, we conclude that the DSM-IV ADHD subtypes provide a convenient clinical shorthand to describe the functional and behavioral correlates of current levels of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms, but do not identify discrete subgroups with sufficient long-term stability to justify the classification of distinct forms of the disorder. Empirical support is stronger for an alternative model that would replace the subtypes with dimensional

  9. In vivo onset and duration of action varies for botulinum neurotoxin A subtypes 1-5.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Whitemarsh, Regina C M; Bradshaw, Marite; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-12-01

    To date, over 40 subtypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) have been identified. BoNTs are classified into 7 serotypes distinguished primarily by their antigenic properties, but also characterized by their unique SNARE targets and cleavage sites, host specificity, and duration of action. Sequencing efforts in the last decade have identified several subtypes within the serotypes. Subtypes are currently defined as distinct based solely on amino acid sequence comparison, with a similarity cut-off of 2.5% difference. Ten subtypes have been identified for BoNT/A, which is the serotype associated with the most severe human botulism and also the most commonly used serotype for clinical purposes. Analyses of several of these subtypes have revealed distinct characteristics, ranging from differences in cell entry and enzyme kinetics to differences in potency in mice and cell-model specific potency. A long-term activity study in cultured primary neurons has indicated that BoNT/A1, 2, 4, and 5 have a similar duration of action, whereas BoNT/A3 has a significantly shorter duration of action. This report describes an in vivo mouse study, showing that after local injection BoNT/A2 resulted in faster onset of local paralysis than BoNT/A1, 3, 4, and 5, whereas BoNT/A3 resulted in significantly faster recovery of motor-neuron deficiency. PMID:26130522

  10. Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Brian D.; Jovanović, Bojana; Chen, Xi; Estrada, Monica V.; Johnson, Kimberly N.; Shyr, Yu; Moses, Harold L.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical

  11. Distinct photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy signatures for identifying highly crystalline WS2 monolayers produced by different growth methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCreary, Amber; Berkdemir, Ayse; Wang, Junjie; Nguyen, Minh An; Elías, Ana Laura; Perea-López, Néstor; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kabius, Bernd; Carozo, Victor; Cullen, David A.; et al

    2016-03-08

    We report that transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as WS2 show exciting promise in electronic and optoelectronic applications. Significant variations in the transport, Raman, and photoluminescence (PL) can be found in the literature, yet it is rarely addressed why this is. In this report, Raman and PL of monolayered WS2 produced via different methods are studied and distinct features that indicate the degree of crystallinity of the material are observed. While the intensity of the LA(M) Raman mode is found to be a useful indicator to assess the crystallinity, PL is drastically more sensitive to the quality of the materialmore » than Raman spectroscopy. We also show that even exfoliated crystals, which are usually regarded as the most pristine material, can contain large amounts of defects that would not be apparent without Raman and PL measurements. Ultimately, these findings can be applied to the understanding of other two-dimensional heterostructured systems.« less

  12. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies factors required for distinct stages of C. elegans piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wee-Siong Sho; Seah, Jun Wen Eugene; Harrison, Emily J.; Chen, Caifu; Hammell, Christopher M.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In animals, piRNAs and their associated Piwi proteins guard germ cell genomes against mobile genetic elements via an RNAi-like mechanism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, 21U-RNAs comprise the piRNA class, and these collaborate with 22G RNAs via unclear mechanisms to discriminate self from nonself and selectively and heritably silence the latter. Recent work indicates that 21U-RNAs are post-transcriptional processing products of individual transcription units that produce ∼26-nucleotide capped precursors. However, nothing is known of how the expression of precursors is controlled or how primary transcripts give rise to mature small RNAs. We conducted a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify components of the 21U biogenesis machinery. Screening by direct, quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based measurements of mature 21U-RNA levels, we identified 22 genes important for 21U-RNA production, termed TOFUs (Twenty-One-u Fouled Ups). We also identified seven genes that normally repress 21U production. By measuring mature 21U-RNA and precursor levels for the seven strongest hits from the screen, we assigned factors to discrete stages of 21U-RNA production. Our work identifies for the first time factors separately required for the transcription of 21U precursors and the processing of these precursors into mature 21U-RNAs, thereby providing a resource for studying the biogenesis of this important small RNA class. PMID:24696458

  13. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  14. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Deepika; Paoloni, Melissa; Shukradas, Shweta; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Craig, Bruce A; Ramos-Vara, José A; Hahn, Noah; Bonney, Patty L; Khanna, Chand; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-01-01

    More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC) this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well. PMID:26352142

  15. Comparative Gene Expression Analyses Identify Luminal and Basal Subtypes of Canine Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma That Mimic Patterns in Human Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Deepika; Paoloni, Melissa; Shukradas, Shweta; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Craig, Bruce A.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Hahn, Noah; Bonney, Patty L.; Khanna, Chand; Knapp, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    More than 160,000 people are expected to die from invasive urothelial carcinoma (iUC) this year worldwide. Research in relevant animal models is essential to improving iUC management. Naturally-occurring canine iUC closely resembles human iUC in histopathology, metastatic behavior, and treatment response, and could provide a relevant model for human iUC. The molecular characterization of canine iUC, however, has been limited. Work was conducted to compare gene expression array results between tissue samples from iUC and normal bladder in dogs, with comparison to similar expression array data from human iUC and normal bladder in the literature. Considerable similarities between enrichment patterns of genes in canine and human iUC were observed. These included patterns mirroring basal and luminal subtypes initially observed in human breast cancer and more recently noted in human iUC. Canine iUC samples also exhibited enrichment for genes involved in P53 pathways, as has been reported in human iUC. This is particularly relevant as drugs targeting these genes/pathways in other cancers could be repurposed to treat iUC, with dogs providing a model to optimize therapy. As part of the validation of the results and proof of principal for evaluating individualized targeted therapy, the overexpression of EGFR in canine bladder iUC was confirmed. The similarities in gene expression patterns between dogs and humans add considerably to the value of naturally-occurring canine iUC as a relevant and much needed animal model for human iUC. Furthermore, the finding of expression patterns that cross different pathologically-defined cancers could allow studies of dogs with iUC to help optimize cancer management across multiple cancer types. The work is also expected to lead to a better understanding of the biological importance of the gene expression patterns, and the potential application of the cross-species comparisons approach to other cancer types as well. PMID:26352142

  16. Cognitive subtypes of mathematics learning difficulties in primary education.

    PubMed

    Bartelet, Dimona; Ansari, Daniel; Vaessen, Anniek; Blomert, Leo

    2014-03-01

    It has been asserted that children with mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) constitute a heterogeneous group. To date, most researchers have investigated differences between predefined MLD subtypes. Specifically MLD children are frequently categorized a priori into groups based on the presence or absence of an additional disorder, such as a reading disorder, to examine cognitive differences between MLD subtypes. In the current study 226 third to six grade children (M age=131 months) with MLD completed a selection of number specific and general cognitive measures. The data driven approach was used to identify the extent to which performance of the MLD children on these measures could be clustered into distinct groups. In particular, after conducting a factor analysis, a 200 times repeated K-means clustering approach was used to classify the children's performance. Results revealed six distinguishable clusters of MLD children, specifically (a) a weak mental number line group, (b) weak ANS group, (c) spatial difficulties group, (d) access deficit group, (e) no numerical cognitive deficit group and (f) a garden-variety group. These findings imply that different cognitive subtypes of MLD exist and that these can be derived from data-driven approaches to classification. These findings strengthen the notion that MLD is a heterogeneous disorder, which has implications for the way in which intervention may be tailored for individuals within the different subtypes. PMID:24461344

  17. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology. PMID:26847489

  18. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  19. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  20. Transcriptome profiling of developing photoreceptor subtypes reveals candidate genes involved in avian photoreceptor diversification

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Jennifer M.; Lawrence, Karen A.; Hadzic, Tarik; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Avian photoreceptors are a diverse class of neurons, comprised of four single cones, the two members of the double cone, and rods. The signaling events and transcriptional regulators driving the differentiation of these diverse photoreceptors are currently unknown. In addition, many distinctive features of photoreceptor subtypes, including spectral tuning, oil droplet size and pigmentation, synaptic targets and spatial patterning, have been well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these attributes have not been explored. To identify genes specifically expressed in distinct chicken (Gallus gallus) photoreceptor subtypes, we developed fluorescent reporters that label photoreceptor subpopulations, isolated these subpopulations using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and subjected them to next-generation sequencing. By comparing the expression profiles of photoreceptors labeled with rhodopsin, red opsin, green opsin, and violet opsin reporters, we have identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that may underlie the distinctive features of these photoreceptor subtypes. These genes are involved in a variety of processes, including phototransduction, transcriptional regulation, cell adhesion, maintenance of intra- and extra-cellular structure, and metabolism. Of particular note are a variety of differentially expressed transcription factors, which may drive and maintain photoreceptor diversity, and cell adhesion molecules that may mediate spatial patterning of photoreceptors and act to establish retinal circuitry. These analyses provide a framework for future studies that will dissect the role of these various factors in the differentiation of avian photoreceptor subtypes. PMID:25349106

  1. Transcriptome profiling of developing photoreceptor subtypes reveals candidate genes involved in avian photoreceptor diversification.

    PubMed

    Enright, Jennifer M; Lawrence, Karen A; Hadzic, Tarik; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-03-01

    Avian photoreceptors are a diverse class of neurons, comprised of four single cones, the two members of the double cone, and rods. The signaling events and transcriptional regulators driving the differentiation of these diverse photoreceptors are largely unknown. In addition, many distinctive features of photoreceptor subtypes, including spectral tuning, oil droplet size and pigmentation, synaptic targets, and spatial patterning, have been well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these attributes have not been explored. To identify genes specifically expressed in distinct chicken (Gallus gallus) photoreceptor subtypes, we developed fluorescent reporters that label photoreceptor subpopulations, isolated these subpopulations by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and subjected them to next-generation sequencing. By comparing the expression profiles of photoreceptors labeled with rhodopsin, red opsin, green opsin, and violet opsin reporters, we have identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that may underlie the distinctive features of these photoreceptor subtypes. These genes are involved in a variety of processes, including phototransduction, transcriptional regulation, cell adhesion, maintenance of intra- and extracellular structure, and metabolism. Of particular note are a variety of differentially expressed transcription factors, which may drive and maintain photoreceptor diversity, and cell adhesion molecules, which may mediate spatial patterning of photoreceptors and act to establish retinal circuitry. These analyses provide a framework for future studies that will dissect the role of these various factors in the differentiation of avian photoreceptor subtypes. PMID:25349106

  2. An EST-based analysis identifies new genes and reveals distinctive gene expression features of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coffee is one of the world's most important crops; it is consumed worldwide and plays a significant role in the economy of producing countries. Coffea arabica and C. canephora are responsible for 70 and 30% of commercial production, respectively. C. arabica is an allotetraploid from a recent hybridization of the diploid species, C. canephora and C. eugenioides. C. arabica has lower genetic diversity and results in a higher quality beverage than C. canephora. Research initiatives have been launched to produce genomic and transcriptomic data about Coffea spp. as a strategy to improve breeding efficiency. Results Assembling the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of C. arabica and C. canephora produced by the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project and the Nestlé-Cornell Consortium revealed 32,007 clusters of C. arabica and 16,665 clusters of C. canephora. We detected different GC3 profiles between these species that are related to their genome structure and mating system. BLAST analysis revealed similarities between coffee and grape (Vitis vinifera) genes. Using KA/KS analysis, we identified coffee genes under purifying and positive selection. Protein domain and gene ontology analyses suggested differences between Coffea spp. data, mainly in relation to complex sugar synthases and nucleotide binding proteins. OrthoMCL was used to identify specific and prevalent coffee protein families when compared to five other plant species. Among the interesting families annotated are new cystatins, glycine-rich proteins and RALF-like peptides. Hierarchical clustering was used to independently group C. arabica and C. canephora expression clusters according to expression data extracted from EST libraries, resulting in the identification of differentially expressed genes. Based on these results, we emphasize gene annotation and discuss plant defenses, abiotic stress and cup quality-related functional categories. Conclusion We present the first comprehensive genome-wide transcript

  3. Quantitative Morphometry of Electrophysiologically Identified CA3b Interneurons Reveals Robust Local Geometry and Distinct Cell Classes

    PubMed Central

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Brown, Kerry M.; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J. Patrick; Galvan, E. J.; Perez-Rosello, T.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. We investigated the branching and spatial patterns, plus the membrane and synaptic properties, of rat CA3b R and L-M interneurons digitally reconstructed after intracellular labeling. We found considerable variability within but no difference between the two layers, and no correlation between morphological and biophysical properties. Nevertheless, two cell types were identified based on the number of dendritic bifurcations, with significantly different anatomical and electrophysiological features. Axons generally branched an order of magnitude more than dendrites. However, interneurons on both sides of the R/L-M boundary revealed surprisingly modular axo-dendritic arborizations with consistently uniform local branch geometry. Both axons and dendrites followed a lamellar organization, and axons displayed a spatial preference towards the fissure. Moreover, only a small fraction of the axonal arbor extended to the outer portion of the invaded volume, and tended to return towards the proximal region. In contrast, dendritic trees demonstrated more limited but isotropic volume occupancy. These results suggest a role of predominantly local feedforward and lateral inhibitory control for both R and L-M interneurons. Such role may be essential to balance the extensive recurrent excitation of area CA3 underlying hippocampal autoassociative memory function. PMID:19496174

  4. Identifying distinct phytoplankton regions based on ocean colour data supplemented by in-situ and model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Solva; Hátún, Hjálmar; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Hansen, Bogi

    2016-04-01

    The Faroe Shelf hosts a rich and diverse marine ecosystem, which sustains a large portion of the economy of the Islands. The primary production, even though often referred to as being important to the higher trophic levels, is still not thoroughly understood. A high resolution chlorophyll time series from coastal station S, dating back to 1997, has given valuable information about the phytoplankton concentrations on the central shelf, and interannual fluctuations (with a factor of 4-5) in this time series have been linked to several other biological indicators. However, with regards to phytoplankton and primary production farther off-shore, only CTD fluorescence observations from research cruises are available and a thorough analysis of these temporally and spatially scattered data is difficult to conduct and yet to be done. Thus, the spatial extent of the region, for which the station S phytoplankton concentrations are representative, is not well defined. In this study we compare satellite ocean colour data from 1998-2015 with in-situ data from station S and identify the region which station S represents. Moreover, we use the ocean colour data to identity biogeographical regions in which phytoplankton is uniquely and coherently varying and compare these with the breeding and feeding grounds of commercially important fish stocks. The surface chlorophyll pattern does not necessarily represent the primary production in the water column. We therefore supplement the results with hydrographic observations and model simulations and from these extract information about the total carbon production in the various regions. The ocean colour data are consistent with the in-situ observations and the results from combining these with the other data types have enhanced our understanding of timing and strength of the phytoplankton spring bloom farther off-shore and contribute to the understanding of the shelf ecosystem in general.

  5. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B Nef Primary Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Foster, John L.; Molina, Rene P.; Luo, Tianci; Arora, Vivek K.; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized the functional integrity of seven primary Nef isolates: five from a long-term nonprogressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individual and one each from two patients with AIDS. One of the seven Nefs was defective for CD4 downregulation, two others were defective for PAK-2 activation, and one Nef was defective for PAK-2 activation and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I downregulation. Five of the Nefs were tested and found to be functional for the enhancement of virus particle infectivity. The structural basis for each of the functional defects has been analyzed by constructing a consensus nef, followed by mutational analysis of the variant amino acid residues. Mutations A29V and F193I were deleterious to CD4 downregulation and PAK-2 activation, respectively, while S189R rendered Nef defective for both MHC class I downregulation and PAK-2 activation. A search of the literature identified HIVs from five patients with Nefs predominantly mutated at F193 and from one patient with Nefs predominantly mutated at A29. A29 is highly conserved in all HIV subtypes except for subtype E. F193 is conserved in subtype B (and possibly in the closely related subtype D), but none of the other HIV group M subtypes. Our results suggest that functional distinctions may exist between HIV subtypes. PMID:11160665

  6. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 subtypes in EBV-associated lymphomas from Brazil and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, J; Gray, D; Pinto-Paes, R; Barrezueta, L F; Armstrong, A A; Alexander, F A; McGeoch, D J; Jarrett, R F

    1999-10-01

    EBNA-1 is the only viral protein consistently expressed in all cells latently infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). There is a high frequency of sequence variation within functionally important domains of EBNA-1, with five subtypes identified. Individuals may be infected with multiple EBV strains (classified according to EBNA-1 subtype), but Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) tumours carry a single subtype and exhibit some subtype preference. Subtype variation has also been related to geographical location. In the present study EBNA-1 polymorphisms were examined in a series of haematological malignancies from two distinct geographical regions, Brazil and the United Kingdom. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the carboxy-terminal region of EBNA-1 in 34 cases revealed six distinct sequences, some of which are novel. A new subtype, named V-Ala, was identified. EBNA-1 subtype in tumours differed markedly according to geographical location. In contrast to previous studies, we found evidence of EBNA-1 sequence variation within individual BL tumour samples. PMID:10573169

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome: evidence for warm and cold subtypes in a large prospective clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Maihöfner, Christian; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Perez, Roberto S G M; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Brunner, Florian; Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja; Mackey, Sean; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Livshitz, Anatoly; Harden, R Norman

    2016-08-01

    Limited research suggests that there may be Warm complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Cold CRPS subtypes, with inflammatory mechanisms contributing most strongly to the former. This study for the first time used an unbiased statistical pattern recognition technique to evaluate whether distinct Warm vs Cold CRPS subtypes can be discerned in the clinical population. An international, multisite study was conducted using standardized procedures to evaluate signs and symptoms in 152 patients with clinical CRPS at baseline, with 3-month follow-up evaluations in 112 of these patients. Two-step cluster analysis using automated cluster selection identified a 2-cluster solution as optimal. Results revealed a Warm CRPS patient cluster characterized by a warm, red, edematous, and sweaty extremity and a Cold CRPS patient cluster characterized by a cold, blue, and less edematous extremity. Median pain duration was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the Warm CRPS (4.7 months) than in the Cold CRPS subtype (20 months), with pain intensity comparable. A derived total inflammatory score was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in the Warm CRPS group (compared with Cold CRPS) at baseline but diminished significantly (P < 0.001) over the follow-up period, whereas this score did not diminish in the Cold CRPS group (time × subtype interaction: P < 0.001). Results support the existence of a Warm CRPS subtype common in patients with acute (<6 months) CRPS and a relatively distinct Cold CRPS subtype most common in chronic CRPS. The pattern of clinical features suggests that inflammatory mechanisms contribute most prominently to the Warm CRPS subtype but that these mechanisms diminish substantially during the first year postinjury. PMID:27023422

  8. DFNA8/12 Caused by TECTA Mutations is the Most Identified Subtype of Non-syndromic Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Morín, Matías; Meyer, Nicole C.; Mayo, Fernando; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mencía, Angeles; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Nishimura, Carla J.; Workman, Heather; DeLuca, Adam P.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Taylor, Kyle R.; Tompkins, Bruce; Goodman, Corey W.; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Van Wesemael, Maarten; Lachlan, K.; Shearer, A. Eliot; Braun, Terry A.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Kremer, Hannie; Van Camp, Guy; Moreno, Felipe; Casavant, Thomas L.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8/DFNA12 (DFNA8/12), a type of autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from ADNSHL families. Three additional families (Spanish, Belgian and English) known to be linked to DFNA8/12 were also included in the screening. In an additional cohort of 835 American ADNSHL families, we preselected 73 probands for TECTA screening based on audiometric data. In aggregate, we identified 23 TECTA mutations in this process. Remarkably 20 of these mutations are novel, more than doubling the number of reported TECTA ADNSHL mutations from 13 to 33. Mutations lie in all domains of the α-tectorin protein, including those for the first time identified in the entactin domain, the vWFD1, vWFD2 and vWFD3 repeats, and the D1-D2 and TIL2 connectors. While the majority are private mutations, four of them – p.Cys1036Tyr, p.Cys1837Gly, p.Thr1866Met and p.Arg1890Cys – were observed in more than one unrelated family. For two of these mutations founder effects were also confirmed. Our data validate previously observed genotype-phenotype correlations in DFNA8/12 and introduce new correlations. Specifically, mutations in the N-terminal region of α-tectorin (entactin domain, vWFD1 and vWFD2) lead to mid frequency NSHL, a phenotype previously associated only with mutations in the ZP domain. Collectively, our results indicate that DFNA8/12 hearing loss is a frequent type of ADNSHL. PMID:21520338

  9. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  10. A network-assisted co-clustering algorithm to discover cancer subtypes based on gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer subtype information is critically important for understanding tumor heterogeneity. Existing methods to identify cancer subtypes have primarily focused on utilizing generic clustering algorithms (such as hierarchical clustering) to identify subtypes based on gene expression data. The network-level interaction among genes, which is key to understanding the molecular perturbations in cancer, has been rarely considered during the clustering process. The motivation of our work is to develop a method that effectively incorporates molecular interaction networks into the clustering process to improve cancer subtype identification. Results We have developed a new clustering algorithm for cancer subtype identification, called “network-assisted co-clustering for the identification of cancer subtypes” (NCIS). NCIS combines gene network information to simultaneously group samples and genes into biologically meaningful clusters. Prior to clustering, we assign weights to genes based on their impact in the network. Then a new weighted co-clustering algorithm based on a semi-nonnegative matrix tri-factorization is applied. We evaluated the effectiveness of NCIS on simulated datasets as well as large-scale Breast Cancer and Glioblastoma Multiforme patient samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. NCIS was shown to better separate the patient samples into clinically distinct subtypes and achieve higher accuracy on the simulated datasets to tolerate noise, as compared to consensus hierarchical clustering. Conclusions The weighted co-clustering approach in NCIS provides a unique solution to incorporate gene network information into the clustering process. Our tool will be useful to comprehensively identify cancer subtypes that would otherwise be obscured by cancer heterogeneity, using high-throughput and high-dimensional gene expression data. PMID:24491042