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  1. New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Penco, Silvana; Buscema, Massimo; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Marocchi, Alessandro; Grossi, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31%) and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6%) respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%). This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg158cys; hepatic lipase

  2. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Summary Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community. PMID:26494436

  3. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001 PMID:24867637

  4. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  5. Identifying Specific Comprehension Deficits in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Diane Baty

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that educators may be missing an under-identified population of approximately 10 percent of typically developing children, who have fluent, age-appropriate decoding and word recognition skills, yet have specific difficulties with other higher-level text processing factors. These children are said to have specific comprehension…

  6. Patient Education: Identifying Risks and Self-Management Approaches for Adherence and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Buchhalter, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Patient education in epilepsy is one part of quality epilepsy care and is an evolving and growing field. Health outcomes, patient satisfaction, safety, patient/provider communication, and quality of life may all be affected by what people are taught (or not taught), what they understand, and how they use this information to make decisions and manage their health. Data regarding learning needs and interventions to address medication adherence and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy education can be used to guide clinicians in health care or community settings. PMID:27086989

  7. Unexpected lack of specificity of a rabbit polyclonal TAP-L (ABCB9) antibody

    PubMed Central

    van Endert, Peter; Lawand, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe the surprising non-specific reactivity in immunoblots of a rabbit polyclonal antibody (ref. Abcam 86222) expected to recognize the transporter associated with antigen processing like (TAP-L, ABCB9) protein. Although this antibody, according to company documentation, recognizes a band with the expected molecular weight of 84 kDa in HeLa, 293T and mouse NIH3T3 whole-cell lysates, we found that this band is also present in immunoblots of TAP-L deficient bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) whole-cell lysates in three independent replicates. We performed extensive verification by multiple PCR tests to confirm the complete absence of the ABCB9 gene in our TAP-L deficient mice. We conclude that the antibody tested cross-reacts with an unidentified protein present in TAP-L knockout cells, which coincidentally runs at the same molecular weight as TAP-L. These findings underline the pitfalls of antibody specificity testing in the absence of cells lacking expression of the target protein.

  8. Advance care planning: identifying system-specific barriers and facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, N.A.; Howlett, J.; Sharma, N.C.; Biondo, P.; Holroyd-Leduc, J.; Fassbender, K.; Simon, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (acp) is an important process in health care today. How to prospectively identify potential local barriers and facilitators to uptake of acp across a complex, multi-sector, publicly funded health care system and how to develop specific mitigating strategies have not been well characterized. Methods We surveyed a convenience sample of clinical and administrative health care opinion leaders across the province of Alberta to characterize system-specific barriers and facilitators to uptake of acp. The survey was based on published literature about the barriers to and facilitators of acp and on the Michie Theoretical Domains Framework. Results Of 88 surveys, 51 (58%) were returned. The survey identified system-specific barriers that could challenge uptake of acp. The factors were categorized into four main domains. Three examples of individual system-specific barriers were “insufficient public engagement and misunderstanding,” “conflict among different provincial health service initiatives,” and “lack of infrastructure.” Local system-specific barriers and facilitators were subsequently explored through a semi-structured informal discussion group involving key informants. The group identified approaches to mitigate specific barriers. Conclusions Uptake of acp is a priority for many health care systems, but bringing about change in multi-sector health care systems is complex. Identifying system-specific barriers and facilitators to the uptake of innovation are important elements of successful knowledge translation. We developed and successfully used a simple and inexpensive process to identify local system-specific barriers and enablers to uptake of acp, and to identify specific mitigating strategies. PMID:26300673

  9. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

  10. Potential Utility of Actuarial Methods for Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Nicholas; Newman, Isadore

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how actuarial methods can supplant discrepancy models and augment problem solving and Response to Intervention (RTI) efforts by guiding the process of identifying specific learning disabilities (SLD). Actuarial methods use routinized selection and execution of formulas derived from empirically established relationships to…

  11. Network Modeling Identifies Patient-specific Pathways in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Milani, Pamela; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Johnson, Hannah; Sio, Terence T.; Dalin, Simona; Iyekegbe, Dennis O.; White, Forest M.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of malignant human brain tumor. Molecular profiling experiments have revealed that these tumors are extremely heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is one of the principal challenges for developing targeted therapies. We hypothesize that despite the diverse molecular profiles, it might still be possible to identify common signaling changes that could be targeted in some or all tumors. Using a network modeling approach, we reconstruct the altered signaling pathways from tumor-specific phosphoproteomic data and known protein-protein interactions. We then develop a network-based strategy for identifying tumor specific proteins and pathways that were predicted by the models but not directly observed in the experiments. Among these hidden targets, we show that the ERK activator kinase1 (MEK1) displays increased phosphorylation in all tumors. By contrast, protein numb homolog (NUMB) is present only in the subset of the tumors that are the most invasive. Additionally, increased S100A4 is associated with only one of the tumors. Overall, our results demonstrate that despite the heterogeneity of the proteomic data, network models can identify common or tumor specific pathway-level changes. These results represent an important proof of principle that can improve the target selection process for tumor specific treatments. PMID:27354287

  12. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  13. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOEpatents

    Collart, Frank R.; Huberman, Eliezer

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  14. Brain-specific genes have identifier sequences in their introns.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, R J; Bloom, F E; Lai, C; Lerner, R A; Sutcliffe, J G

    1984-01-01

    The 82-nucleotide identifier (ID) sequence is present in the rat genome in 1-1.5 X 10(5) copies and in cDNA clones of precursors of brain-specific mRNAs. One brain-specific gene contains more than one ID sequence in its introns. There is an excess of ID sequences to brain genes, and some ID sequences appear to have been inserted as mobile elements into other genetic locations. Therefore, brain genes contain ID sequences in their introns, but not all ID sequences are located in brain gene introns. A brain ID consensus sequence has been obtained by comparing 8 ID nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:6583673

  15. Unexpected finding of feline-specific Giardia duodenalis assemblage F and Cryptosporidium felis in asymptomatic adult cattle in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Guillermo A; de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; Cano, Lourdes; de Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2015-04-30

    Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are common enteric protozoan parasites in production animals, including cattle. Typically, both the clinical outcome of these infections and the distribution of G. duodenalis assemblages and Cryptosporidium species are age-dependent, with the occurrence of diarrhoeal disease being mainly associated with young animals and sub-clinical, low intensity infections being predominantly found in adult animals. To investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in asymptomatic adult cattle, a total of 362 faecal samples were collected in four farms in the province of Álava, Northern Spain, between November 2011 and December 2012. The presence of G. duodenalis was estimated by real-time PCR, and the assemblages were determined by multilocus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species was carried out by sequencing of a partial fragment of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Overall, G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 68 (18.8%) and 45 (12.4%), respectively, of the 362 animals tested. Strikingly, four isolates representing two novel sub-types of G. duodenalis assemblage F were identified at the gdh, but not the bg, locus. This is the first report describing the presence of the feline-specific G. duodenalis assemblage F in bovine isolates. Additionally, five (three novel and two known) sub-types of G. duodenalis assemblage E were also identified at the gdh locus and a single one (assigned to sub-assemblage EII) at the bg locus. Of nine Cryptosporidium isolates, four (including a novel sub-type) were assigned to the cat-specific C. felis, two were typed as C. bovis, and the remaining three were only characterized at the genus level. Data presented here provide epidemiological and molecular evidence demonstrating that the host range specificity of G. duodenalis

  16. Methods for identifying subject-specific abnormalities in neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Bedrick, Edward J; Ling, Josef M; Toulouse, Trent; Dodd, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Algorithms that are capable of capturing subject-specific abnormalities (SSA) in neuroimaging data have long been an area of focus for diverse neuropsychiatric conditions such as multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and traumatic brain injury. Several algorithms have been proposed that define SSA in patients (i.e., comparison group) relative to image intensity levels derived from healthy controls (HC) (i.e., reference group) based on extreme values. However, the assumptions underlying these approaches have not always been fully validated, and may be dependent on the statistical distributions of the transformed data. The current study evaluated variations of two commonly used techniques ("pothole" method and standardization with an independent reference group) for identifying SSA using simulated data (derived from normal, t and chi-square distributions) and fractional anisotropy maps derived from 50 HC. Results indicated substantial group-wise bias in the estimation of extreme data points using the pothole method, with the degree of bias being inversely related to sample size. Statistical theory was utilized to develop a distribution-corrected z-score (DisCo-Z) threshold, with additional simulations demonstrating elimination of the bias and a more consistent estimation of extremes based on expected distributional properties. Data from previously published studies examining SSA in mild traumatic brain injury were then re-analyzed using the DisCo-Z method, with results confirming the evidence of group-wise bias. We conclude that the benefits of identifying SSA in neuropsychiatric research are substantial, but that proposed SSA approaches require careful implementation under the different distributional properties that characterize neuroimaging data. PMID:24931496

  17. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, Danielle J.; Patrick, Wayne M.; Gerth, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2′-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary–secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2′-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme–cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  18. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions. PMID:26034298

  19. Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities: Legislation, Regulation, and Court Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumeta, Rebecca O.; Zirkel, Perry A.; Danielson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Specific learning disability (SLD) identification and eligibility practices are evolving and sometimes contentious. This article describes the historical context and current status of the SLD definition, legislation, regulation, and case law related to the identification of students eligible for special education services. The first part traces…

  20. Network stratification analysis for identifying function-specific network layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanchao; Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Juan; Xu, Dong; Chen, Luonan

    2016-04-22

    A major challenge of systems biology is to capture the rewiring of biological functions (e.g. signaling pathways) in a molecular network. To address this problem, we proposed a novel computational framework, namely network stratification analysis (NetSA), to stratify the whole biological network into various function-specific network layers corresponding to particular functions (e.g. KEGG pathways), which transform the network analysis from the gene level to the functional level by integrating expression data, the gene/protein network and gene ontology information altogether. The application of NetSA in yeast and its comparison with a traditional network-partition both suggest that NetSA can more effectively reveal functional implications of network rewiring and extract significant phenotype-related biological processes. Furthermore, for time-series or stage-wise data, the function-specific network layer obtained by NetSA is also shown to be able to characterize the disease progression in a dynamic manner. In particular, when applying NetSA to hepatocellular carcinoma and type 1 diabetes, we can derive functional spectra regarding the progression of the disease, and capture active biological functions (i.e. active pathways) in different disease stages. The additional comparison between NetSA and SPIA illustrates again that NetSA could discover more complete biological functions during disease progression. Overall, NetSA provides a general framework to stratify a network into various layers of function-specific sub-networks, which can not only analyze a biological network on the functional level but also investigate gene rewiring patterns in biological processes. PMID:26879865

  1. Are Rogue Waves Really Unexpected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    An unexpected wave is defined by Gemmrich & Garrett (2008) as a wave that is much taller than a set of neighboring waves. Their definition of "unexpected" refers to a wave that is not anticipated by a casual observer. Clearly, unexpected waves defined in this way are predictable in a statistical sense. They can occur relatively often with a small or moderate crest height, but large unexpected waves that are rogue are rare. Here, this concept is elaborated and statistically described based on a third-order nonlinear model. In particular, the conditional return period of an unexpected wave whose crest exceeds a given threshold is developed. This definition leads to greater return periods or on average less frequent occurrences of unexpected waves than those implied by the conventional return periods not conditioned on a reference threshold. Ultimately, it appears that a rogue wave that is also unexpected would have a lower occurrence frequency than that of a usual rogue wave. As specific applications, the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events are examined in detail. Both waves appeared without warning and their crests were nearly $2$-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ wave crests, and thus unexpected. The two crest heights are nearly the same as the threshold~$h_{0.3\\cdot10^{6}}\\sim1.6H_{s}$ exceeded on average once every~$0.3\\cdot 10^{6}$ waves, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. In contrast, the Andrea and WACSIS events, as both rogue and unexpected, would occur slightly less often and on average once every~$3\\cdot10^{6}$ and~$0.6\\cdot10^6$ waves respectively.

  2. Quantitative specificity-based display library screening identifies determinants of antibody-epitope binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sejal S; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of molecular specificity in bimolecular systems, in vitro display technologies have been applied extensively for affinity maturation of peptides and antibodies without explicitly measuring the specificity of the desired interaction. We devised a general strategy to measure, screen, and evolve specificity of protein ligand interactions analogous to widely used affinity maturation strategies. The specificity of binding to target and nontarget antibodies labeled with spectrally distinct fluorophores was measured simultaneously in protein mixtures via multiparameter flow cytometry, thereby enabling screening for high target antibody specificity. Isolated antibody specific ligands exhibited varying specificity, revealing critical amino acid determinants for target recognition and nontarget avoidance in complex mixtures. Molecular specificity in the mixture was further enhanced by quantitative directed evolution, yielding a family of epitopes exhibiting improved specificities equivalent, or superior to, the native peptide antigen to which the antibody was raised. Specificity screening simultaneously favored affinity, yielding ligands with three-fold improved affinity relative to the parent epitope. Quantitative specificity screening will be useful to screen, evolve, and characterize the specificity of protein and peptide interactions for molecular recognition applications. PMID:19610073

  3. Comprehensive RNAi-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D C

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the responses of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of proteins in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual proteins. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in the involvement of members of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages depended on IRAK1, with knockdown of IRAK4 or IRAK2 having less of an effect. Consistent with species-specific roles for these kinases, IRAK4 orthologs failed to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and only mouse macrophages required the kinase activity of IRAK4 to mediate TLR responses. The identification of a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species, which could optimize therapeutic targeting to manipulate human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  4. Age-specific periictal electroclinical features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and potential risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

    PubMed

    Freitas, Joel; Kaur, Gurmeen; Fernandez, Guadalupe Baca-Vaca; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Kaffashi, Farhad; Loparo, Kenneth A; Rao, Shyam; Loplumlert, Jakrin; Kaiboriboon, Kitti; Amina, Shahram; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Lhatoo, Samden D

    2013-11-01

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) is the commonest seizure type associated with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). This study examined the semiological and electroencephalographic differences (EEG) in the GTCSs of adults as compared with those of children. The rationale lies on epidemiological observations that have noted a tenfold higher incidence of SUDEP in adults. We analyzed the video-EEG data of 105 GTCS events in 61 consecutive patients (12 children, 23 seizure events and 49 adults, 82 seizure events) recruited from the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. Semiological, EEG, and 3-channel EKG features were studied. Periictal seizure phase durations were analyzed including tonic, clonic, total seizure, postictal EEG suppression (PGES), and recovery phases. Heart rate variability (HRV) measures including RMSSD (root mean square successive difference of RR intervals), SDNN (standard deviation of NN intervals), and SDSD (standard deviation of differences) were analyzed (including low frequency/high frequency power ratios) during preictal baseline and ictal and postictal phases. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to find associations between electroclinical features. Separate subgroup analyses were carried out on adult and pediatric age groups as well as medication groups (no antiepileptic medication cessation versus unchanged or reduced medication) during admission. Major differences were seen in adult and pediatric seizures with total seizure duration, tonic phase, PGES, and recovery phases being significantly shorter in children (p<0.01). Generalized estimating equation analysis, using tonic phase duration as the dependent variable, found age to correlate significantly (p<0.001), and this remained significant during subgroup analysis (adults and children) such that each 0.12-second increase in tonic phase duration correlated with a 1-second increase in PGES duration. Postictal EEG suppression durations were on average 28s shorter in

  5. Human-specific CpG "beacons" identify loci associated with human-specific traits and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher G; Wilson, Gareth A; Butcher, Lee M; Roos, Christian; Walter, Lutz; Beck, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    Regulatory change has long been hypothesized to drive the delineation of the human phenotype from other closely related primates. Here we provide evidence that CpG dinucleotides play a special role in this process. CpGs enable epigenome variability via DNA methylation, and this epigenetic mark functions as a regulatory mechanism. Therefore, species-specific CpGs may influence species-specific regulation. We report non-polymorphic species-specific CpG dinucleotides (termed "CpG beacons") as a distinct genomic feature associated with CpG island (CGI) evolution, human traits and disease. Using an inter-primate comparison, we identified 21 extreme CpG beacon clusters (≥ 20/kb peaks, empirical p < 1.0 × 10(-3)) in humans, which include associations with four monogenic developmental and neurological disease related genes (Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p = 6.03 × 10(-3)). We also demonstrate that beacon-mediated CpG density gain in CGIs correlates with reduced methylation in these species in orthologous CGIs over time, via human, chimpanzee and macaque MeDIP-seq. Therefore mapping into both the genomic and epigenomic space the identified CpG beacon clusters define points of intersection where a substantial two-way interaction between genetic sequence and epigenetic state has occurred. Taken together, our data support a model for CpG beacons to contribute to CGI evolution from genesis to tissue-specific to constitutively active CGIs. PMID:22968434

  6. Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30: An RNA-binding zinc-finger protein with an unexpected 2Fe-2S cluster.

    PubMed

    Shimberg, Geoffrey D; Michalek, Jamie L; Oluyadi, Abdulafeez A; Rodrigues, Andria V; Zucconi, Beth E; Neu, Heather M; Ghosh, Shanchari; Sureschandra, Kanisha; Wilson, Gerald M; Stemmler, Timothy L; Michel, Sarah L J

    2016-04-26

    Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30) is a key protein involved in pre-mRNA processing. CPSF30 contains five Cys3His domains (annotated as "zinc-finger" domains). Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy, we report that CPSF30 is isolated with iron, in addition to zinc. Iron is present in CPSF30 as a 2Fe-2S cluster and uses one of the Cys3His domains; 2Fe-2S clusters with a Cys3His ligand set are rare and notably have also been identified in MitoNEET, a protein that was also annotated as a zinc finger. These findings support a role for iron in some zinc-finger proteins. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence anisotropy, we report that CPSF30 selectively recognizes the AU-rich hexamer (AAUAAA) sequence present in pre-mRNA, providing the first molecular-based evidence to our knowledge for CPSF30/RNA binding. Removal of zinc, or both zinc and iron, abrogates binding, whereas removal of just iron significantly lessens binding. From these data we propose a model for RNA recognition that involves a metal-dependent cooperative binding mechanism. PMID:27071088

  7. Identifying States along the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Hierarchy with Single Cell Specificity via Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Yelena; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A C; Kraft, Mary L

    2015-11-17

    A major challenge for expanding specific types of hematopoietic cells ex vivo for the treatment of blood cell pathologies is identifying the combinations of cellular and matrix cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to self-renew or differentiate into cell populations ex vivo. Microscale screening platforms enable minimizing the number of rare HSCs required to screen the effects of numerous cues on HSC fate decisions. These platforms create a strong demand for label-free methods that accurately identify the fate decisions of individual hematopoietic cells at specific locations on the platform. We demonstrate the capacity to identify discrete cells along the HSC differentiation hierarchy via multivariate analysis of Raman spectra. Notably, cell state identification is accurate for individual cells and independent of the biophysical properties of the functionalized polyacrylamide gels upon which these cells are cultured. We report partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models of single cell Raman spectra enable identifying four dissimilar hematopoietic cell populations across the HSC lineage specification. Successful discrimination was obtained for a population enriched for long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) versus their more differentiated progeny, including closely related short-term repopulating HSCs (ST-HSCs) and fully differentiated lymphoid (B cells) and myeloid (granulocytes) cells. The lineage-specific differentiation states of cells from these four subpopulations were accurately identified independent of the stiffness of the underlying biomaterial substrate, indicating subtle spectral variations that discriminated these populations were not masked by features from the culture substrate. This approach enables identifying the lineage-specific differentiation stages of hematopoietic cells on biomaterial substrates of differing composition and may facilitate correlating hematopoietic cell fate decisions with the extrinsic cues that

  8. The Experiences of Parents with Adolescents Identified as Having a Specific Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 6.6 million children in the United States who were deemed in 2008 to have a disability that required special instruction, over 39% were classified as specific learning disabled (SLD). This figure translates into a high number of people who are parenting a child identified as having a SLD. Bronfenbrenner's theory of the ecology of human…

  9. 40 CFR 148.18 - Waste specific prohibitions-newly listed and identified wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-newly listed and identified wastes. 148.18 Section 148.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE INJECTION RESTRICTIONS Prohibitions on Injection § 148.18 Waste...

  10. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  11. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  12. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  13. Competitive Metagenomic DNA Hybridization Identifies Host-Specific Microbial Genetic Markers in Cow Fecal Samples†

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lamendella, Regina; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host-specific markers. Here we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to identify host-specific genetic markers from fecal microbial community DNA. As a proof of concept, bovine fecal DNA was challenged against a porcine fecal DNA background to select for bovine-specific DNA sequences. Bioinformatic analyses of 380 bovine enriched metagenomic sequences indicated a preponderance of Bacteroidales-like regions predicted to encode membrane-associated and secreted proteins. Oligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to select Bacteroidales-like bovine GFE sequences exhibited extremely high specificity (>99%) in PCR assays with total fecal DNAs from 279 different animal sources. These primers also demonstrated a broad distribution of corresponding genetic markers (81% positive) among 148 different bovine sources. These data demonstrate that direct metagenomic DNA analysis by the competitive solution hybridization approach described is an efficient method for identifying potentially useful fecal genetic markers and for characterizing differences between environmental microbial communities. PMID:16751515

  14. Transcriptional Profiling Identifies Location-Specific and Breed-Specific Differentially Expressed Genes in Embryonic Myogenesis in Anas Platyrhynchos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Ping; Liu, He-He; Liu, Jun-Ying; Hu, Ji-Wei; Yan, Xi-Ping; Wang, Ding-Min-Cheng; Li, Liang; Wang, Ji-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and development are highly orchestrated processes involving significant changes in gene expressions. Differences in the location-specific and breed-specific genes and pathways involved have important implications for meat productions and meat quality. Here, RNA-Seq was performed to identify differences in the muscle deposition between two muscle locations and two duck breeds for functional genomics studies. To achieve those goals, skeletal muscle samples were collected from the leg muscle (LM) and the pectoral muscle (PM) of two genetically different duck breeds, Heiwu duck (H) and Peking duck (P), at embryonic 15 days. Functional genomics studies were performed in two experiments: Experiment 1 directly compared the location-specific genes between PM and LM, and Experiment 2 compared the two breeds (H and P) at the same developmental stage (embryonic 15 days). Almost 13 million clean reads were generated using Illumina technology (Novogene, Beijing, China) on each library, and more than 70% of the reads mapped to the Peking duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genome. A total of 168 genes were differentially expressed between the two locations analyzed in Experiment 1, whereas only 8 genes were differentially expressed when comparing the same location between two breeds in Experiment 2. Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways (KEGG) were used to functionally annotate DEGs (differentially expression genes). The DEGs identified in Experiment 1 were mainly involved in focal adhesion, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway and ECM-receptor interaction pathways (corrected P-value<0.05). In Experiment 2, the DEGs were associated with only the ribosome signaling pathway (corrected P-value<0.05). In addition, quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm 15 of the differentially expressed genes originally detected by RNA-Seq. A comparative transcript analysis of the leg and pectoral muscles of two duck breeds not only improves our

  15. Hypocretin neuron-specific transcriptome profiling identifies the sleep modulator Kcnh4a

    PubMed Central

    Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Elbaz, Idan; Diber, Alex; Dahary, Dvir; Gibbs-Bar, Liron; Alon, Shahar; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been conserved throughout evolution; however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of sleep are largely unknown. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate sleep\\wake states, feeding, stress, and reward. To elucidate the mechanism that enables these various functions and to identify sleep regulators, we combined fluorescence cell sorting and RNA-seq in hcrt:EGFP zebrafish. Dozens of Hcrt-neuron–specific transcripts were identified and comprehensive high-resolution imaging revealed gene-specific localization in all or subsets of Hcrt neurons. Clusters of Hcrt-neuron–specific genes are predicted to be regulated by shared transcription factors. These findings show that Hcrt neurons are heterogeneous and that integrative molecular mechanisms orchestrate their diverse functions. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kcnh4a, which is expressed in all Hcrt neurons, was silenced by the CRISPR-mediated gene inactivation system. The mutant kcnh4a (kcnh4a-/-) larvae showed reduced sleep time and consolidation, specifically during the night, suggesting that Kcnh4a regulates sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08638.001 PMID:26426478

  16. Exploiting MODIS Observation Geometry To Identify Crop Specific Time Series For Regional Agriculture Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveiller, Gregory; Lopez-Lozano, Raul

    2013-12-01

    Due to its spatial resolution, the MODIS instrument offers much potential to monitor specific crops from space. However, only some time series fall adequately in the target crop specific fields while others straddle across different land uses, which consequently dilutes the signal. According to the daily change in orbit, the MODIS observation footprint changes considerably from one day to the next, sampling the vicinity of the grid cell. This study proposes a method to identify which time series are suitable based on the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such daily observations, which are acquired with different observation geometries. The approach is demonstrated over a 30 by 30 km study site in South Dakota (USA) where the time series with high SNR are classified in an unsupervised way into clusters almost exclusively composed of crop specific time series.

  17. [Unexpected drug-interaction].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yutaka

    2002-02-01

    The case of a male patient suffering from chronic normal pressure hydrocephalus is outlined. Antidepressant and pravastatin were administered because of the patient's abulia and hypercholesterolemia, but neuroleptic malignant syndrome-like conditions developed. All physicians should suppose the occurrence of such an "unexpected drug-interaction" in any case. The author considered that a good sense of careful discernment and rapid reference system of medical information are "essential tools" for clinical management. PMID:11925849

  18. eQTL mapping identify insertion and deletion specific eQTLs in multiple tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinyan; Chen, Jun; Esparza, Jorge; Ding, Jun; Elder, James; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lee, Young-Ae; Lathrop, G. Mark; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Liang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    GenomeC wide gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping have been focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms and have helped interpret findings from diseases mapping studies. The functional effect of structure variants, especially short insertions and deletions (indel) has not been well investigated. Here we imputed 1,380,133 indels based on the latest 1000 Genomes Project panel into 3 eQTL datasets from multiple tissues. Imputation of indels increased 9.9% power and identified indel specific eQTLs for 325 genes. We found introns and vicinities of UTRs were more enriched of indel eQTLs and 3.6 (singleC tissue)C 9.2%(multiC tissue) of previous identified eSNPs were taggers of eindels. Functional analyses identified epigenetics marks, gene ontology categories and disease GWAS loci affected by SNPs and indels eQTLs showing tissueC consistent or tissueC specific effects. This study provides new insights into the underlying genetic architecture of gene expression across tissues and new resource to interpret function of diseases and traits associated structure variants. PMID:25951796

  19. eQTL mapping identifies insertion- and deletion-specific eQTLs in multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinyan; Chen, Jun; Esparza, Jorge; Ding, Jun; Elder, James T; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lee, Young-Ae; Mark Lathrop, G; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Liang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping have been focused on single-nucleotide polymorphisms and have helped interpret findings from diseases mapping studies. The functional effect of structure variants, especially short insertions and deletions (indel) has not been well investigated. Here we impute 1,380,133 indels based on the latest 1,000 Genomes Project panel into three eQTL data sets from multiple tissues. Imputation of indels increased 9.9% power and identifies indel-specific eQTLs for 325 genes. We find introns and vicinities of UTRs are more enriched of indel eQTLs and 3.6 (single-tissue)-9.2%(multi-tissue) of previous identified eSNPs were taggers of eindels. Functional analyses identifies epigenetics marks, gene ontology categories and disease GWAS loci affected by SNPs and indels eQTLs showing tissue-consistent or tissue-specific effects. This study provides new insights into the underlying genetic architecture of gene expression across tissues and new resource to interpret function of diseases and traits associated structure variants. PMID:25951796

  20. Alarming features: birds use specific acoustic properties to identify heterospecific alarm calls

    PubMed Central

    Fallow, Pamela M.; Pitcher, Benjamin J.; Magrath, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrates that eavesdrop on heterospecific alarm calls must distinguish alarms from sounds that can safely be ignored, but the mechanisms for identifying heterospecific alarm calls are poorly understood. While vertebrates learn to identify heterospecific alarms through experience, some can also respond to unfamiliar alarm calls that are acoustically similar to conspecific alarm calls. We used synthetic calls to test the role of specific acoustic properties in alarm call identification by superb fairy-wrens, Malurus cyaneus. Individuals fled more often in response to synthetic calls with peak frequencies closer to those of conspecific calls, even if other acoustic features were dissimilar to that of fairy-wren calls. Further, they then spent more time in cover following calls that had both peak frequencies and frequency modulation rates closer to natural fairy-wren means. Thus, fairy-wrens use similarity in specific acoustic properties to identify alarms and adjust a two-stage antipredator response. Our study reveals how birds respond to heterospecific alarm calls without experience, and, together with previous work using playback of natural calls, shows that both acoustic similarity and learning are important for interspecific eavesdropping. More generally, this study reconciles contrasting views on the importance of alarm signal structure and learning in recognition of heterospecific alarms. PMID:23303539

  1. Specific Energy as an Index to Identify the Critical Failure Mode Transition Depth in Rock Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xianqun; Xu, Chaoshui

    2016-04-01

    Rock cutting typically involves driving a rigid cutter across the rock surface at certain depth of cut and is used to remove rock material in various engineering applications. It has been established that there exist two distinct failure modes in rock cutting, i.e. ductile mode and brittle mode. The ductile mode takes precedence when the cut is shallow and the increase in the depth of cut leads to rock failure gradually shifted to brittle-dominant mode. The threshold depth or the critical transition depth, at which rock failure under cutting changes from the ductile to the brittle mode, is associated with not only the rock properties but also the cutting operational parameters and the understanding of this threshold is important to optimise the tool design and operational parameters. In this study, a new method termed the specific cutting energy transition model is proposed from an energy perspective which is demonstrated to be much more effective in identifying the critical transition depth compared with existing approaches. In the ductile failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be independent of the depth of cut; but in the brittle failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be dependent on the depth of cut following a power-law relationship. The critical transition depth is identified as the intersection point between these two relationships. Experimental tests on two types of rocks with different combinations of cutting velocity, depth of cut and back rake angle are conducted and the application of the proposed model on these cutting datasets has demonstrated that the model can provide a very effective tool to analyse the cutting mechanism and to identify the critical transition depth.

  2. Amygdala-enriched genes identified by microarray technology are restricted to specific amygdaloid subnuclei

    PubMed Central

    Zirlinger, Mariela; Kreiman, Gabriel; Anderson, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology represents a potentially powerful method for identifying cell type- and regionally restricted genes expressed in the brain. Here we have combined a microarray analysis of differential gene expression among five selected brain regions, including the amygdala, cerebellum, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and periaqueductal gray, with in situ hybridization. On average, 0.3% of the 34,000 genes interrogated were highly enriched in each of the five regions, relative to the others. In situ hybridization performed on a subset of amygdala-enriched genes confirmed in most cases the overall region-specificity predicted by the microarray data and identified additional sites of brain expression not examined on the microarrays. Strikingly, the majority of these genes exhibited boundaries of expression within the amygdala corresponding to cytoarchitectonically defined subnuclei. These results define a unique set of molecular markers for amygdaloid subnuclei and provide tools to genetically dissect their functional roles in different emotional behaviors. PMID:11320257

  3. High throughput screen identifies small molecule inhibitors specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoserine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  4. High Throughput Screen Identifies Small Molecule Inhibitors Specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphoserine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  5. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L.; Volmar, Keith E.; Loeza, S. Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Rashid, Naim U.; Williams, Lindsay A.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Chung, Alexander H.; Smyla, Jadwiga K.; Anderson, Judy M.; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here, we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, which includes primary, metastatic, and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stroma, and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor-specific subtypes including a “basal-like” subtype which has worse outcome, and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancer. Furthermore, we define “normal” and “activated” stromal subtypes which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insight into the molecular composition of PDAC which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies is critical. PMID:26343385

  6. A computation using mutually exclusive processing is sufficient to identify specific Hedgehog signaling components

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Spencer J.

    2013-01-01

    A system of more than one part can be deciphered by observing differences between the parts. A simple way to do this is by recording something absolute displaying a trait in one part and not in another: in other words, mutually exclusive computation. Conditional directed expression in vivo offers processing in more than one part of the system giving increased computation power for biological systems analysis. Here, I report the consideration of these aspects in the development of an in vivo screening assay that appears sufficient to identify components specific to a system. PMID:24391661

  7. WMAXC: a weighted maximum clique method for identifying condition-specific sub-network.

    PubMed

    Amgalan, Bayarbaatar; Lee, Hyunju

    2014-01-01

    Sub-networks can expose complex patterns in an entire bio-molecular network by extracting interactions that depend on temporal or condition-specific contexts. When genes interact with each other during cellular processes, they may form differential co-expression patterns with other genes across different cell states. The identification of condition-specific sub-networks is of great importance in investigating how a living cell adapts to environmental changes. In this work, we propose the weighted MAXimum clique (WMAXC) method to identify a condition-specific sub-network. WMAXC first proposes scoring functions that jointly measure condition-specific changes to both individual genes and gene-gene co-expressions. It then employs a weaker formula of a general maximum clique problem and relates the maximum scored clique of a weighted graph to the optimization of a quadratic objective function under sparsity constraints. We combine a continuous genetic algorithm and a projection procedure to obtain a single optimal sub-network that maximizes the objective function (scoring function) over the standard simplex (sparsity constraints). We applied the WMAXC method to both simulated data and real data sets of ovarian and prostate cancer. Compared with previous methods, WMAXC selected a large fraction of cancer-related genes, which were enriched in cancer-related pathways. The results demonstrated that our method efficiently captured a subset of genes relevant under the investigated condition. PMID:25148538

  8. WMAXC: A Weighted Maximum Clique Method for Identifying Condition-Specific Sub-Network

    PubMed Central

    Amgalan, Bayarbaatar; Lee, Hyunju

    2014-01-01

    Sub-networks can expose complex patterns in an entire bio-molecular network by extracting interactions that depend on temporal or condition-specific contexts. When genes interact with each other during cellular processes, they may form differential co-expression patterns with other genes across different cell states. The identification of condition-specific sub-networks is of great importance in investigating how a living cell adapts to environmental changes. In this work, we propose the weighted MAXimum clique (WMAXC) method to identify a condition-specific sub-network. WMAXC first proposes scoring functions that jointly measure condition-specific changes to both individual genes and gene-gene co-expressions. It then employs a weaker formula of a general maximum clique problem and relates the maximum scored clique of a weighted graph to the optimization of a quadratic objective function under sparsity constraints. We combine a continuous genetic algorithm and a projection procedure to obtain a single optimal sub-network that maximizes the objective function (scoring function) over the standard simplex (sparsity constraints). We applied the WMAXC method to both simulated data and real data sets of ovarian and prostate cancer. Compared with previous methods, WMAXC selected a large fraction of cancer-related genes, which were enriched in cancer-related pathways. The results demonstrated that our method efficiently captured a subset of genes relevant under the investigated condition. PMID:25148538

  9. Proteins in unexpected locations.

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, N R

    1996-01-01

    Members of all classes of proteins--cytoskeletal components, secreted growth factors, glycolytic enzymes, kinases, transcription factors, chaperones, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix proteins--have been identified in cellular compartments other than their conventional sites of action. Some of these proteins are expressed as distinct compartment-specific isoforms, have novel mechanisms for intercompartmental translocation, have distinct endogenous biological actions within each compartment, and are regulated in a compartment-specific manner as a function of physiologic state. The possibility that many, if not most, proteins have distinct roles in more than one cellular compartment has implications for the evolution of cell organization and may be important for understanding pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:8862516

  10. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  11. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  12. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  13. Cofactor modification analysis: a computational framework to identify cofactor specificity engineering targets for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Liu, Chengcheng; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors, such as NAD(H) and NADP(H), play important roles in energy transfer within the cells by providing the necessary redox carriers for a myriad of metabolic reactions, both anabolic and catabolic. Thus, it is crucial to establish the overall cellular redox balance for achieving the desired cellular physiology. Of several methods to manipulate the intracellular cofactor regeneration rates, altering the cofactor specificity of a particular enzyme is a promising one. However, the identification of relevant enzyme targets for such cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) is often very difficult and labor intensive. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more systematic approaches to find the cofactor engineering targets for strain improvement. Presented herein is a novel mathematical framework, cofactor modification analysis (CMA), developed based on the well-established constraints-based flux analysis, for the systematic identification of suitable CSE targets while exploring the global metabolic effects. The CMA algorithm was applied to E. coli using its genome-scale metabolic model, iJO1366, thereby identifying the growth-coupled cofactor engineering targets for overproducing four of its native products: acetate, formate, ethanol, and lactate, and three non-native products: 1-butanol, 1,4-butanediol, and 1,3-propanediol. Notably, among several target candidates for cofactor engineering, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) is the most promising enzyme; its cofactor modification enhanced both the desired product and biomass yields significantly. Finally, given the identified target, we further discussed potential mutational strategies for modifying cofactor specificity of GAPD in E. coli as suggested by in silico protein docking experiments. PMID:24372035

  14. Identifying functional cancer-specific miRNA-mRNA interactions in testicular germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Nafiseh; Fathy, Mahmood; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaie, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged between 15 and 35 and more than 90% of testicular neoplasms are originated at germ cells. Recent research has shown the impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) in different types of cancer, including testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs which affect the development and progression of cancer cells by binding to mRNAs and regulating their expressions. The identification of functional miRNA-mRNA interactions in cancers, i.e. those that alter the expression of genes in cancer cells, can help delineate post-regulatory mechanisms and may lead to new treatments to control the progression of cancer. A number of sequence-based methods have been developed to predict miRNA-mRNA interactions based on the complementarity of sequences. While necessary, sequence complementarity is, however, not sufficient for presence of functional interactions. Alternative methods have thus been developed to refine the sequence-based interactions using concurrent expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs. This study aims to find functional cancer-specific miRNA-mRNA interactions in TGCT. To this end, the sequence-based predicted interactions are first refined using an ensemble learning method, based on two well-known methods of learning miRNA-mRNA interactions, namely, TaLasso and GenMiR++. Additional functional analyses were then used to identify a subset of interactions to be most likely functional and specific to TGCT. The final list of 13 miRNA-mRNA interactions can be potential targets for identifying TGCT-specific interactions and future laboratory experiments to develop new therapies. PMID:27235586

  15. Identifying a Core RNA Polymerase Surface Critical for Interactions with a Sigma-Like Specificity Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cliften, Paul F.; Jang, Sei-Heon; Jaehning, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic interactions occurring between a core RNA polymerase (RNAP) and its initiation factors are critical for transcription initiation, but little is known about subunit interaction. In this work we have identified regions of the single-subunit yeast mitochondrial RNAP (Rpo41p) important for interaction with its sigma-like specificity factor (Mtf1p). Previously we found that the whole folded structure of both polypeptides as well as specific amino acids in at least three regions of Mtf1p are required for interaction. In this work we started with an interaction-defective point mutant in Mtf1p (V135A) and used a two-hybrid selection to isolate suppressing mutations in the core polymerase. We identified suppressors in three separate regions of the RNAP which, when modeled on the structure of the closely related phage T7 RNAP, appear to lie on one surface of the protein. Additional point mutations and biochemical assays were used to confirm the importance of each region for Rpo41p-Mtf1p interactions. Remarkably, two of the three suppressors are found in regions required by T7 RNAP for DNA sequence recognition and promoter melting. Although these essential regions of the phage RNAP are poorly conserved with the mitochondrial RNAPs, they are conserved among the mitochondrial enzymes. The organellar RNAPs appear to use this surface in an alternative way for interactions with their separate sigma-like specificity factor, which, like its bacterial counterpart, provides promoter recognition and DNA melting functions to the holoenzyme. PMID:10958696

  16. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells. PMID:22266579

  17. Hydrograph Separations can Identify Contaminant-Specific Pathways for Conservation Targeting in a Tile-Drained Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality issues continue to vex agriculture. Understanding contaminant-specific pathways could help clarify effective water quality management strategies in watersheds. Hypothesis: If conducted at nested scales, hydrograph separation techniques can identify contaminant-specific pathways that co...

  18. Identifying gender-specific developmental trajectories of nonviolent and violent delinquency from adolescence to young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao; Cleveland, H Harrington

    2013-04-01

    Most research examining gender differences in developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior does not consider subtypes of antisocial behavior and is difficult to generalize due to small non-representative samples. The current study investigated gender difference in developmental trajectories from adolescence to young adulthood while addressing those limitations. Analyses were limited to respondents ages 15 and 16 in wave 1 (16-17 in wave 2, and 21-22 in wave 3) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 6244, 49.5% males). Self-report nonviolent and violent delinquencies were simultaneously entered into latent class analysis. Four latent classes were identified: low, desister, decliner, and chronic (male-only). In addition to finding a male-specific chronic class, gender differences included differences in levels of nonviolent and violent delinquency between synonymous classes of males and females, and differences in prevalence of classes across genders. Neighborhood disadvantage and family support predicted trajectories. PMID:23375843

  19. Tumor cell-specific bioluminescence platform to identify stroma-induced changes to anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Weisberg, Ellen; Negri, Joseph M; Geer, D Corey; Klippel, Steffen; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Schlossman, Robert L; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kung, Andrew L; Griffin, James D; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2010-04-01

    Conventional anticancer drug screening is typically performed in the absence of accessory cells of the tumor microenvironment, which can profoundly alter antitumor drug activity. To address this limitation, we developed the tumor cell-specific in vitro bioluminescence imaging (CS-BLI) assay. Tumor cells (for example, myeloma, leukemia and solid tumors) stably expressing luciferase are cultured with nonmalignant accessory cells (for example, stromal cells) for selective quantification of tumor cell viability, in presence versus absence of stromal cells or drug treatment. CS-BLI is high-throughput scalable and identifies stroma-induced chemoresistance in diverse malignancies, including imatinib resistance in leukemic cells. A stroma-induced signature in tumor cells correlates with adverse clinical prognosis and includes signatures for activated Akt, Ras, NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, myc, hTERT and IRF4; for biological aggressiveness; and for self-renewal. Unlike conventional screening, CS-BLI can also identify agents with increased activity against tumor cells interacting with stroma. One such compound, reversine, shows more potent activity in an orthotopic model of diffuse myeloma bone lesions than in conventional subcutaneous xenografts. Use of CS-BLI, therefore, enables refined screening of candidate anticancer agents to enrich preclinical pipelines with potential therapeutics that overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance and can act in a synthetic lethal manner in the context of tumor-stroma interactions. PMID:20228816

  20. Joint-specific DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures in rheumatoid arthritis identify distinct pathogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Ai, Rizi; Hammaker, Deepa; Boyle, David L; Morgan, Rachel; Walsh, Alice M; Fan, Shicai; Firestein, Gary S; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stratifying patients on the basis of molecular signatures could facilitate development of therapeutics that target pathways specific to a particular disease or tissue location. Previous studies suggest that pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is similar in all affected joints. Here we show that distinct DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures not only discriminate RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from osteoarthritis FLS, but also distinguish RA FLS isolated from knees and hips. Using genome-wide methods, we show differences between RA knee and hip FLS in the methylation of genes encoding biological pathways, such as IL-6 signalling via JAK-STAT pathway. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes are identified between knee and hip FLS using RNA-sequencing. Double-evidenced genes that are both differentially methylated and expressed include multiple HOX genes. Joint-specific DNA signatures suggest that RA disease mechanisms might vary from joint to joint, thus potentially explaining some of the diversity of drug responses in RA patients. PMID:27282753

  1. Joint-specific DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures in rheumatoid arthritis identify distinct pathogenic processes

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Rizi; Hammaker, Deepa; Boyle, David L.; Morgan, Rachel; Walsh, Alice M.; Fan, Shicai; Firestein, Gary S.; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stratifying patients on the basis of molecular signatures could facilitate development of therapeutics that target pathways specific to a particular disease or tissue location. Previous studies suggest that pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is similar in all affected joints. Here we show that distinct DNA methylation and transcriptome signatures not only discriminate RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from osteoarthritis FLS, but also distinguish RA FLS isolated from knees and hips. Using genome-wide methods, we show differences between RA knee and hip FLS in the methylation of genes encoding biological pathways, such as IL-6 signalling via JAK-STAT pathway. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes are identified between knee and hip FLS using RNA-sequencing. Double-evidenced genes that are both differentially methylated and expressed include multiple HOX genes. Joint-specific DNA signatures suggest that RA disease mechanisms might vary from joint to joint, thus potentially explaining some of the diversity of drug responses in RA patients. PMID:27282753

  2. Tissue Microbiome Profiling Identifies an Enrichment of Specific Enteric Bacteria in Opisthorchis viverrini Associated Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chng, Kern Rei; Chan, Sock Hoai; Ng, Amanda Hui Qi; Li, Chenhao; Jusakul, Apinya; Bertrand, Denis; Wilm, Andreas; Choo, Su Pin; Tan, Damien Meng Yew; Lim, Kiat Hon; Soetinko, Roy; Ong, Choon Kiat; Duda, Dan G; Dima, Simona; Popescu, Irinel; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Feng, Zhu; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Teh, Bin Tean; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajaraphongsa; Khuntikeo, Narong; Tan, Patrick; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Ngeow, Joanne; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-06-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the primary cancer of the bile duct system. The role of bile duct tissue microbiomes in CCA tumorigenesis is unestablished. To address this, sixty primary CCA tumors and matched normals, from both liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) associated (OVa, n=28) and non-O. viverrini associated (non-OVa, n=32) cancers, were profiled using high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing. A distinct, tissue-specific microbiome dominated by the bacterial families Dietziaceae, Pseudomonadaceae and Oxalobacteraceae was observed in bile duct tissues. Systemic perturbation of the microbiome was noted in tumor and paired normal samples (vs non-cancer normals) for several bacterial families with a significant increase in Stenotrophomonas species distinguishing tumors vs paired normals. Comparison of parasite associated (OVa) vs non-associated (non-OVa) groups identified enrichment for specific enteric bacteria (Bifidobacteriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae). One of the enriched families, Bifidobacteriaceae, was found to be dominant in the O. viverrini microbiome, providing a mechanistic link to the parasite. Functional analysis and comparison of CCA microbiomes revealed higher potential for producing bile acids and ammonia in OVa tissues, linking the altered microbiota to carcinogenesis. These results define how the unique microbial communities resident in the bile duct, parasitic infections and the tissue microenvironment can influence each other, and contribute to cancer. PMID:27428430

  3. Identifying and functionally characterizing tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed human lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Chen, Hong; Ding, Na; Wang, Guangjuan; Xu, Juan; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in transcriptome sequencing have made it possible to distinguish ubiquitously expressed long non-coding RNAs (UE lncRNAs) from tissue-specific lncRNAs (TS lncRNAs), thereby providing clues to their cellular functions. Here, we assembled and functionally characterized a consensus lncRNA transcriptome by curating hundreds of RNA-seq datasets across normal human tissues from 16 independent studies. In total, 1,184 UE and 2,583 TS lncRNAs were identified. These different lncRNA populations had several distinct features. Specifically, UE lncRNAs were associated with genomic compaction and highly conserved exons and promoter regions. We found that UE lncRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional level (with especially strong regulation of enhancers) and are associated with epigenetic modifications and post-transcriptional regulation. Based on these observations we propose a novel way to predict the functions of UE and TS lncRNAs through analysis of their genomic location and similarities in epigenetic modifications. Our characterization of UE and TS lncRNAs may provide a foundation for lncRNA genomics and the delineation of complex disease mechanisms. PMID:26760768

  4. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    contribution of these sites to SNP genesis. Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in this study, it may become possible to scan genomic databases for such clustering of nucleotides in order to predict likely sites of future SNPs, and even the type of polymorphism most likely to occur. PMID:19331672

  5. A Machine Learning Approach for Identifying Novel Cell Type–Specific Transcriptional Regulators of Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsok; Tansey, Terese; Bloom, Molly J.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers integrate the contributions of multiple classes of transcription factors (TFs) to orchestrate the myriad spatio-temporal gene expression programs that occur during development. A molecular understanding of enhancers with similar activities requires the identification of both their unique and their shared sequence features. To address this problem, we combined phylogenetic profiling with a DNA–based enhancer sequence classifier that analyzes the TF binding sites (TFBSs) governing the transcription of a co-expressed gene set. We first assembled a small number of enhancers that are active in Drosophila melanogaster muscle founder cells (FCs) and other mesodermal cell types. Using phylogenetic profiling, we increased the number of enhancers by incorporating orthologous but divergent sequences from other Drosophila species. Functional assays revealed that the diverged enhancer orthologs were active in largely similar patterns as their D. melanogaster counterparts, although there was extensive evolutionary shuffling of known TFBSs. We then built and trained a classifier using this enhancer set and identified additional related enhancers based on the presence or absence of known and putative TFBSs. Predicted FC enhancers were over-represented in proximity to known FC genes; and many of the TFBSs learned by the classifier were found to be critical for enhancer activity, including POU homeodomain, Myb, Ets, Forkhead, and T-box motifs. Empirical testing also revealed that the T-box TF encoded by org-1 is a previously uncharacterized regulator of muscle cell identity. Finally, we found extensive diversity in the composition of TFBSs within known FC enhancers, suggesting that motif combinatorics plays an essential role in the cellular specificity exhibited by such enhancers. In summary, machine learning combined with evolutionary sequence analysis is useful for recognizing novel TFBSs and for facilitating the identification of cognate TFs that

  6. Theoretical and Numerical Modeling of Transport of Land Use-Specific Fecal Source Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, F. A.; Sirikanchana, K. J.; Bae, S.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial contamination in coastal and estuarine waters is of particular concern to public health officials. In this work, we advocate that well-formulated and developed mathematical and numerical transport models can be combined with modern molecular techniques in order to predict continuous concentrations of microbial indicators under diverse scenarios of interest, and that they can help in source identification of fecal pollution. As a proof of concept, we present initially the theory, numerical implementation and validation of one- and two-dimensional numerical models aimed at computing the distribution of fecal source identifiers in water bodies (based on Bacteroidales marker DNA sequences) coming from different land uses such as wildlife, livestock, humans, dogs or cats. These models have been developed to allow for source identification of fecal contamination in large bodies of water. We test the model predictions using diverse velocity fields and boundary conditions. Then, we present some preliminary results of an application of a three-dimensional water quality model to address the source of fecal contamination in the San Pablo Bay (SPB), United States, which constitutes an important sub-embayment of the San Francisco Bay. The transport equations for Bacteroidales include the processes of advection, diffusion, and decay of Bacteroidales. We discuss the validation of the developed models through comparisons of numerical results with field campaigns developed in the SPB. We determine the extent and importance of the contamination in the bay for two decay rates obtained from field observations, corresponding to total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells, respectively. Finally, we infer transport conditions in the SPB based on the numerical results, characterizing the fate of outflows coming from the Napa, Petaluma and Sonoma rivers.

  7. Identifying specific cues and contexts related to smoking craving for the development of effective virtual environments.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Ferrer-García, Marta; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Secades-Villa, Roberto; Carballo, José L

    2011-03-01

    Craving is considered the main variable associated with relapse after smoking cessation. Cue Exposure Therapy (CET) consists of controlled and repeated exposure to drug-related cues with the aim of extinguishing craving responses. Some virtual reality (VR) environments, such as virtual bars or parties, have previously shown their efficacy as tools for eliciting smoking craving. However, in order to adapt this technology to smoking cessation interventions, there is a need for more diverse environments that enhance the probability of generalization of extinction in real life. The main objective of this study was to identify frequent situations that produce smoking craving, as well as detecting specific craving cues in those contexts. Participants were 154 smokers who responded to an ad hoc self-administered inventory for assessing craving level in 12 different situations. Results showed that having a drink in a bar/pub at night, after having lunch/dinner in a restaurant and having a coffee in a cafe or after lunch/dinner at home were reported as the most craving-inducing scenarios. Some differences were found with regard to participants' gender, age, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. Females, younger people, and heavier smokers reported higher levels of craving in most situations. In general, the most widely cited specific cues across the contexts were people smoking, having a coffee, being with friends, and having finished eating. These results are discussed with a view to their consideration in the design of valid and reliable VR environments that could be used in the treatment of nicotine addicts who wish to give up smoking. PMID:20575707

  8. A machine learning approach for identifying novel cell type-specific transcriptional regulators of myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Taher, Leila; Kim, Yongsok; Tansey, Terese; Bloom, Molly J; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers integrate the contributions of multiple classes of transcription factors (TFs) to orchestrate the myriad spatio-temporal gene expression programs that occur during development. A molecular understanding of enhancers with similar activities requires the identification of both their unique and their shared sequence features. To address this problem, we combined phylogenetic profiling with a DNA-based enhancer sequence classifier that analyzes the TF binding sites (TFBSs) governing the transcription of a co-expressed gene set. We first assembled a small number of enhancers that are active in Drosophila melanogaster muscle founder cells (FCs) and other mesodermal cell types. Using phylogenetic profiling, we increased the number of enhancers by incorporating orthologous but divergent sequences from other Drosophila species. Functional assays revealed that the diverged enhancer orthologs were active in largely similar patterns as their D. melanogaster counterparts, although there was extensive evolutionary shuffling of known TFBSs. We then built and trained a classifier using this enhancer set and identified additional related enhancers based on the presence or absence of known and putative TFBSs. Predicted FC enhancers were over-represented in proximity to known FC genes; and many of the TFBSs learned by the classifier were found to be critical for enhancer activity, including POU homeodomain, Myb, Ets, Forkhead, and T-box motifs. Empirical testing also revealed that the T-box TF encoded by org-1 is a previously uncharacterized regulator of muscle cell identity. Finally, we found extensive diversity in the composition of TFBSs within known FC enhancers, suggesting that motif combinatorics plays an essential role in the cellular specificity exhibited by such enhancers. In summary, machine learning combined with evolutionary sequence analysis is useful for recognizing novel TFBSs and for facilitating the identification of cognate TFs that

  9. Probing cell type–specific functions of Gi in vivo identifies GPCR regulators of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Regard, Jean B.; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Cano, David A.; Camerer, Eric; Yin, Liya; Zheng, Yao-Wu; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Hebrok, Matthias; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo roles of the hundreds of mammalian G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are incompletely understood. To explore these roles, we generated mice expressing the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin, a known inhibitor of Gi/o signaling, under the control of the ROSA26 locus in a Cre recombinase–dependent manner (ROSA26PTX). Crossing ROSA26PTX mice to mice expressing Cre in pancreatic β cells produced offspring with constitutive hyperinsulinemia, increased insulin secretion in response to glucose, and resistance to diet-induced hyperglycemia. This phenotype underscored the known importance of Gi/o and hence of GPCRs for regulating insulin secretion. Accordingly, we quantified mRNA for each of the approximately 373 nonodorant GPCRs in mouse to identify receptors highly expressed in islets and examined the role of several. We report that 3-iodothyronamine, a thyroid hormone metabolite, could negatively and positively regulate insulin secretion via the Gi-coupled α2A-adrenergic receptor and the Gs-coupled receptor Taar1, respectively, and protease-activated receptor–2 could negatively regulate insulin secretion and may contribute to physiological regulation of glucose metabolism. The ROSA26PTX system used in this study represents a new genetic tool to achieve tissue-specific signaling pathway modulation in vivo that can be applied to investigate the role of Gi/o-coupled GPCRs in multiple cell types and processes. PMID:17992256

  10. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van't; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Berg, David Van Den; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  11. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  12. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  13. Specific inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 identified by high-throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Klaus; Grosskopf, Stefanie; Lum, Ching Tung; Würtele, Martin; Röder, Nadine; von Kries, Jens Peter; Rosario, Marta; Rademann, Jörg; Birchmeier, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 is a positive regulator of growth factor signaling. Gain-of-function mutations in several types of leukemia define Shp2 as a bona fide oncogene. We performed a high-throughput in silico screen for small-molecular-weight compounds that bind the catalytic site of Shp2. We have identified the phenylhydrazonopyrazolone sulfonate PHPS1 as a potent and cell-permeable inhibitor, which is specific for Shp2 over the closely related tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and PTP1B. PHPS1 inhibits Shp2-dependent cellular events such as hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF)-induced epithelial cell scattering and branching morphogenesis. PHPS1 also blocks Shp2-dependent downstream signaling, namely HGF/SF-induced sustained phosphorylation of the Erk1/2 MAP kinases and dephosphorylation of paxillin. Furthermore, PHPS1 efficiently inhibits activation of Erk1/2 by the leukemia-associated Shp2 mutant, Shp2-E76K, and blocks the anchorage-independent growth of a variety of human tumor cell lines. The PHPS compound class is therefore suitable for further development of therapeutics for the treatment of Shp2-dependent diseases. PMID:18480264

  14. RNAi screening identifies mediators of NOD2 signaling: Implications for spatial specificity of MDP recognition

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Simone; Grabe, Nils; Jacobs, Gunnar; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Till, Andreas; Häsler, Robert; Aden, Konrad; Paulsen, Maren; Arlt, Alexander; Kraemer, Lars; Hagemann, Nina; Erdmann, Kai Sven; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) receptor detects bacteria-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and activates the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we describe the regulatome of NOD2 signaling using a systematic RNAi screen. Using three consecutive screens, we identified a set of 20 positive NF-κB regulators including the known pathway members RIPK2, RELA, and BIRC4 (XIAP) as well as FRMPD2 (FERM and PDZ domain-containing 2). FRMPD2 interacts with NOD2 via leucine-rich repeats and forms a complex with the membrane-associated protein ERBB2IP. We demonstrate that FRMPD2 spatially assembles the NOD2-signaling complex, hereby restricting NOD2-mediated immune responses to the basolateral compartment of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. We show that genetic truncation of the NOD2 leucine-rich repeat domain, which is associated with Crohn disease, impairs the interaction with FRMPD2, and that intestinal inflammation leads to down-regulation of FRMPD2. These results suggest a structural mechanism for how polarity of epithelial cells acts on intestinal NOD-like receptor signaling to mediate spatial specificity of bacterial recognition and control of immune responses. PMID:23213202

  15. An unexpected tetanus case.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Egeli, Demet; Kahyaoglu, Bulent; Bahar, Mois; Etienne, Mill; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    1 million cases of tetanus are estimated to occur worldwide each year, with more than 200 000 deaths. Tetanus is a life-threatening but preventable disease caused by a toxin produced by Clostridium tetani-a Gram-positive bacillus found in high concentrations in soil and animal excrement. Tetanus is almost completely preventable by active immunisation, but very rarely unexpected cases can occur in individuals who have been previously vaccinated. We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 22-year-old woman that arose despite the protective antitoxin antibody in her serum. The patient received all her vaccinations in the USA; her last vaccination was 6 years ago. The case was unusual because the patient had received all standard vaccinations, had no defined port of entry at disease onset, and had symptoms lasting for 6 months. Tetanus can present with unusual clinical forms; therefore, the diagnosis and management of this rare but difficult disease should be updated. In this Grand Round, we review the clinical features, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of C tetani infections. PMID:27301930

  16. Identifying Country-Specific Cultures of Physics Education: A differential item functioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesic, Vanes

    2012-11-01

    In international large-scale assessments of educational outcomes, student achievement is often represented by unidimensional constructs. This approach allows for drawing general conclusions about country rankings with respect to the given achievement measure, but it typically does not provide specific diagnostic information which is necessary for systematic comparisons and improvements of educational systems. Useful information could be obtained by exploring the differences in national profiles of student achievement between low-achieving and high-achieving countries. In this study, we aimed to identify the relative weaknesses and strengths of eighth graders' physics achievement in Bosnia and Herzegovina in comparison to the achievement of their peers from Slovenia. For this purpose, we ran a secondary analysis of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 data. The student sample consisted of 4,220 students from Bosnia and Herzegovina and 4,043 students from Slovenia. After analysing the cognitive demands of TIMSS 2007 physics items, the correspondent differential item functioning (DIF)/differential group functioning contrasts were estimated. Approximately 40% of items exhibited large DIF contrasts, indicating significant differences between cultures of physics education in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovenia. The relative strength of students from Bosnia and Herzegovina showed to be mainly associated with the topic area 'Electricity and magnetism'. Classes of items which required the knowledge of experimental method, counterintuitive thinking, proportional reasoning and/or the use of complex knowledge structures proved to be differentially easier for students from Slovenia. In the light of the presented results, the common practice of ranking countries with respect to universally established cognitive categories seems to be potentially misleading.

  17. Genome-wide analysis identifies a role for common copy number variants in specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Nuala H; Ceroni, Fabiola; Reader, Rose H; Covill, Laura E; Knight, Julian C; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Bolton, Patrick F; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O'Hare, Anne; Baird, Gillian; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2015-10-01

    An exploratory genome-wide copy number variant (CNV) study was performed in 127 independent cases with specific language impairment (SLI), their first-degree relatives (385 individuals) and 269 population controls. Language-impaired cases showed an increased CNV burden in terms of the average number of events (11.28 vs 10.01, empirical P=0.003), the total length of CNVs (717 vs 513 Kb, empirical P=0.0001), the average CNV size (63.75 vs 51.6 Kb, empirical P=0.0005) and the number of genes spanned (14.29 vs 10.34, empirical P=0.0007) when compared with population controls, suggesting that CNVs may contribute to SLI risk. A similar trend was observed in first-degree relatives regardless of affection status. The increased burden found in our study was not driven by large or de novo events, which have been described as causative in other neurodevelopmental disorders. Nevertheless, de novo CNVs might be important on a case-by-case basis, as indicated by identification of events affecting relevant genes, such as ACTR2 and CSNK1A1, and small events within known micro-deletion/-duplication syndrome regions, such as chr8p23.1. Pathway analysis of the genes present within the CNVs of the independent cases identified significant overrepresentation of acetylcholine binding, cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity and MHC proteins as compared with controls. Taken together, our data suggest that the majority of the risk conferred by CNVs in SLI is via common, inherited events within a 'common disorder-common variant' model. Therefore the risk conferred by CNVs will depend upon the combination of events inherited (both CNVs and SNPs), the genetic background of the individual and the environmental factors. PMID:25585696

  18. Specification Search for Identifying the Correct Mean Trajectory in Polynomial Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-Man; Yoon, Myeongsun; Willson, Victor; Lai, Mark H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the optimal strategy for model specification search under the latent growth modeling (LGM) framework, specifically on searching for the correct polynomial mean or average growth model when there is no a priori hypothesized model in the absence of theory. In this simulation study, the effectiveness of different starting…

  19. The role of domain expertise and judgment in dealing with unexpected events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Janeen Adrion

    Unexpected events, particularly those creating surprise, interrupt ongoing mental and behavioral processes, creating an increased potential for unwanted outcomes to the situation. Human reactions to unexpected events vary. One can hypothesize a number of reasons for this variation, including level of domain expertise, previous experience with similar events, emotional connotation, and the contextual surround of the event. Whereas interrupting ongoing activities and focusing attention temporarily on a surprising event may be a useful evolutionary response to a threatening situation, the same process may be maladaptive in today's highly dynamic world. The purpose of this study was to investigate how different aspects of expertise affected one's ability to detect and react to an unexpected event. It was hypothesized that there were two general types of expertise, domain expertise and judgment (Hammond, 2000), which influenced one's performance on dealing with an unexpected event. The goal of the research was to parse out the relative contribution of domain expertise, so the role of judgment could be revealed. The research questions for this study were: (a) Can we identify specific knowledges and skills which enhance one's ability to deal with unexpected events? (b) Are these skills "automatically" included in domain expertise? (c) How does domain expertise improve or deter one's reaction and response to unexpected events? (d) What role does judgment play in responding to surprise? The general hypothesis was that good judgment would influence the process of surprise at different stages and in different ways than would domain expertise. The conclusions from this research indicated that good judgment had a significant positive effect in helping pilots deal with unexpected events. This was most pronounced when domain expertise was low.

  20. A sex-specific metabolite identified in a marine invertebrate utilizing phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kleps, Robert A; Myers, Terrell C; Lipcius, Romuald N; Henderson, Thomas O

    2007-01-01

    Hormone level differences are generally accepted as the primary cause for sexual dimorphism in animal and human development. Levels of low molecular weight metabolites also differ between men and women in circulating amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates and within brain tissue. While investigating the metabolism of blue crab tissues using Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, we discovered that only the male blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) contained a phosphorus compound with a chemical shift well separated from the expected phosphate compounds. Spectra obtained from male gills were readily differentiated from female gill spectra. Analysis from six years of data from male and female crabs documented that the sex-specificity of this metabolite was normal for this species. Microscopic analysis of male and female gills found no differences in their gill anatomy or the presence of parasites or bacteria that might produce this phosphorus compound. Analysis of a rare gynandromorph blue crab (laterally, half male and half female) proved that this sex-specificity was an intrinsic biochemical process and was not caused by any variations in the diet or habitat of male versus female crabs. The existence of a sex-specific metabolite is a previously unrecognized, but potentially significant biochemical phenomenon. An entire enzyme system has been synthesized and activated only in one sex. Unless blue crabs are a unique species, sex-specific metabolites are likely to be present in other animals. Would the presence or absence of a sex-specific metabolite affect an animal's development, anatomy and biochemistry? PMID:17712428

  1. Using Discrete Trial Training to Identify Specific Learning Impairments in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott S.; Hustyi, Kristin M.; Hammond, Jennifer L.; Hirt, Melissa; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether "discrete trial training" (DTT) could be used to identify learning impairments in mathematical reasoning in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Boys with FXS, aged 10-23 years, and age and IQ-matched controls, were trained to match fractions to pie-charts and pie-charts to decimals either on a computer or with a…

  2. Identifying Specific Sensory Modalities Maintaining the Stereotypy of Students with Multiple Profound Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Jung-Chang; Patterson, Tina G.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2003-01-01

    Four experiments with six students with multiple profound disabilities examined the function of behavioral stereotypies and sensory modalities maintaining them. Findings are discussed in terms of the sensory and social reinforcers that maintain stereotypy, assessment procedures used to identify reinforcers, and the interpretation of assessment…

  3. Defining the Undefinable: Operationalization of Methods to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities among Practicing School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Joseph M.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and consistent identification of students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs) is crucial; however, state and district guidelines regarding identification methods lack operationalization and are inconsistent throughout the United States. In the current study, the authors surveyed 471 school psychologists about "school" SLD…

  4. Identifying Learning Patterns of Children at Risk for Specific Reading Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbot, Baptiste; Krivulskaya, Suzanna; Hein, Sascha; Reich, Jodi; Thuma, Philip E.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Differences in learning patterns of vocabulary acquisition in children at risk (+SRD) and not at risk (-SRD) for Specific Reading Disability (SRD) were examined using a microdevelopmental paradigm applied to the multi-trial Foreign Language Learning Task (FLLT; Baddeley et al., 1995). The FLLT was administered to 905 children from rural…

  5. Identifying Facial Emotions: Valence Specific Effects and an Exploration of the Effects of Viewer Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansari, Ashok; Rodway, Paul; Goncalves, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The valence hypothesis suggests that the right hemisphere is specialised for negative emotions and the left hemisphere is specialised for positive emotions (Silberman & Weingartner, 1986). It is unclear to what extent valence-specific effects in facial emotion perception depend upon the gender of the perceiver. To explore this question 46…

  6. An Egg Apparatus-Specific Enhancer of Arabidopsis, Identified by Enhancer Detection1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Jefferson, Richard A.; Huttner, Eric; Moore, James M.; Gagliano, Wendy B.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Despite a central role in angiosperm reproduction, few gametophyte-specific genes and promoters have been isolated, particularly for the inaccessible female gametophyte (embryo sac). Using the Ds-based enhancer-detector line ET253, we have cloned an egg apparatus-specific enhancer (EASE) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The genomic region flanking the Ds insertion site was further analyzed by examining its capability to control gusA and GFP reporter gene expression in the embryo sac in a transgenic context. Through analysis of a 5′ and 3′ deletion series in transgenic Arabidopsis, the sequence responsible for egg apparatus-specific expression was delineated to 77 bp. Our data showed that this enhancer is unique in the Arabidopsis genome, is conserved among different accessions, and shows an unusual pattern of sequence variation. This EASE works independently of position and orientation in Arabidopsis but is probably not associated with any nearby gene, suggesting either that it acts over a large distance or that a cryptic element was detected. Embryo-specific ablation in Arabidopsis was achieved by transactivation of a diphtheria toxin gene under the control of the EASE. The potential application of the EASE element and similar control elements as part of an open-source biotechnology toolkit for apomixis is discussed. PMID:16258010

  7. Identifying Specific Language Impairment in Deaf Children Acquiring British Sign Language: Implications for Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Kathryn; Rowley, Katherine; Marshall, Chloe R.; Atkinson, Joanna R.; Herman, Rosalind; Woll, Bencie; Morgan, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first ever group study of specific language impairment (SLI) in users of sign language. A group of 50 children were referred to the study by teachers and speech and language therapists. Individuals who fitted pre-determined criteria for SLI were then systematically assessed. Here, we describe in detail the performance of 13…

  8. Identifying Country-Specific Cultures of Physics Education: A Differential Item Functioning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesic, Vanes

    2012-01-01

    In international large-scale assessments of educational outcomes, student achievement is often represented by unidimensional constructs. This approach allows for drawing general conclusions about country rankings with respect to the given achievement measure, but it typically does not provide specific diagnostic information which is necessary for…

  9. A Cytokine-Independent Approach To Identify Antigen-Specific Human Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells and Rare Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells in Blood.

    PubMed

    Dan, Jennifer M; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Weiskopf, Daniela; da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha M; Brigger, Matthew; Bothwell, Marcella; Sette, Alessandro; Crotty, Shane

    2016-08-01

    Detection of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells is central to the study of many human infectious diseases, vaccines, and autoimmune diseases. However, such cells are generally rare and heterogeneous in their cytokine profiles. Identification of Ag-specific germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells by cytokine production has been particularly problematic. The function of a GC Tfh cell is to selectively help adjacent GC B cells via cognate interaction; thus, GC Tfh cells may be stingy cytokine producers, fundamentally different from Th1 or Th17 cells in the quantities of cytokines produced. Conventional identification of Ag-specific cells by intracellular cytokine staining relies on the ability of the CD4(+) T cell to generate substantial amounts of cytokine. To address this problem, we have developed a cytokine-independent activation-induced marker (AIM) methodology to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in human lymphoid tissue. Whereas Group A Streptococcus-specific GC Tfh cells produced minimal detectable cytokines by intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM method identified 85-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. Intriguingly, these GC Tfh cells consistently expressed programmed death ligand 1 upon activation. AIM also detected non-Tfh cells in lymphoid tissue. As such, we applied AIM for identification of rare Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells in human peripheral blood. Dengue, tuberculosis, and pertussis vaccine-specific CD4(+) T cells were readily detectable by AIM. In summary, cytokine assays missed 98% of Ag-specific human GC Tfh cells, reflecting the biology of these cells, which could instead be sensitively identified by coexpression of TCR-dependent activation markers. PMID:27342848

  10. Specific PCR to identify the heavy-metal-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael P; Adley, Catherine C

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid detection of Cupriavidus metallidurans. PCR primers targeting the Signal transduction histidine kinase gene were designed and designated Cm-F1/Cm-R1. Strains of C. metallidurans were positively identified. The size of the PCR products was 437 bp, as expected. This PCR method enables monitoring of industrial, environmental and clinical sources for presence of C. metallidurans. PMID:21720772

  11. Culture, Threat, and Mental Illness Stigma: Identifying Culture-Specific Threat among Chinese-American Groups

    PubMed Central

    Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Kotabe, Hiroki; Link, Bruce G.; Saw, Anne; Wong, Gloria; Phelan, Jo C.

    2014-01-01

    We incorporate anthropological insights into a stigma framework to elucidate the role of culture in threat perception and stigma among Chinese groups. Prior work suggests that genetic contamination that jeopardizes the extension of one’s family lineage may comprise a culture-specific threat among Chinese groups. In Study 1, a national survey conducted from 2002–2003 assessed cultural differences in mental illness stigma and perceptions of threat in 56 Chinese-Americans and 589 European-Americans. Study 2 sought to empirically test this culture-specific threat of genetic contamination to lineage via a memory paradigm. Conducted from June to August 2010, 48 Chinese-American and 37 European-American university students in New York City read vignettes containing content referring to lineage or non-lineage concerns. Half the participants in each ethnic group were assigned to a condition in which the illness was likely to be inherited (genetic condition) and the rest read that the illness was unlikely to be inherited (non-genetic condition). Findings from Study 1 and 2 were convergent. In Study 1, culture-specific threat to lineage predicted cultural variation in stigma independently and after accounting for other forms of threat. In Study 2, Chinese-Americans in the genetic condition were more likely to accurately recall and recognize lineage content than the Chinese-Americans in the non-genetic condition, but that memorial pattern was not found for non-lineage content. The identification of this culture-specific threat among Chinese groups has direct implications for culturally-tailored anti-stigma interventions. Further, this framework might be implemented across other conditions and cultural groups to reduce stigma across cultures. PMID:23702210

  12. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  13. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  14. Metabolic reconstruction identifies strain-specific regulation of virulence in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Song, Carl; Chiasson, Melissa A; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Hung, Stacy S; Wasmuth, James; Grigg, Michael E; Parkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, metabolic potential is proving to be a critical determinant governing a pathogen's virulence as well as its capacity to expand its host range. To understand the potential contribution of metabolism to strain-specific infectivity differences, we present a constraint-based metabolic model of the opportunistic parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Dominated by three clonal strains (Type I, II, and III demonstrating distinct virulence profiles), T. gondii exhibits a remarkably broad host range. Integrating functional genomic data, our model (which we term as iCS382) reveals that observed strain-specific differences in growth rates are driven by altered capacities for energy production. We further predict strain-specific differences in drug susceptibilities and validate one of these predictions in a drug-based assay, with a Type I strain demonstrating resistance to inhibitors that are effective against a Type II strain. We propose that these observed differences reflect an evolutionary strategy that allows the parasite to extend its host range, as well as result in a subsequent partitioning into discrete strains that display altered virulence profiles across different hosts, different organs, and even cell types. PMID:24247825

  15. An Automated Method for Identifying Inconsistencies within Diagrammatic Software Requirements Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhong

    1997-01-01

    The development of large-scale, composite software in a geographically distributed environment is an evolutionary process. Often, in such evolving systems, striving for consistency is complicated by many factors, because development participants have various locations, skills, responsibilities, roles, opinions, languages, terminology and different degrees of abstraction they employ. This naturally leads to many partial specifications or viewpoints. These multiple views on the system being developed usually overlap. From another aspect, these multiple views give rise to the potential for inconsistency. Existing CASE tools do not efficiently manage inconsistencies in distributed development environment for a large-scale project. Based on the ViewPoints framework the WHERE (Web-Based Hypertext Environment for requirements Evolution) toolkit aims to tackle inconsistency management issues within geographically distributed software development projects. Consequently, WHERE project helps make more robust software and support software assurance process. The long term goal of WHERE tools aims to the inconsistency analysis and management in requirements specifications. A framework based on Graph Grammar theory and TCMJAVA toolkit is proposed to detect inconsistencies among viewpoints. This systematic approach uses three basic operations (UNION, DIFFERENCE, INTERSECTION) to study the static behaviors of graphic and tabular notations. From these operations, subgraphs Query, Selection, Merge, Replacement operations can be derived. This approach uses graph PRODUCTIONS (rewriting rules) to study the dynamic transformations of graphs. We discuss the feasibility of implementation these operations. Also, We present the process of porting original TCM (Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling) project from C++ to Java programming language in this thesis. A scenario based on NASA International Space Station Specification is discussed to show the applicability of our approach. Finally

  16. ApoE4-specific Misfolded Intermediate Identified by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Williams II, Benfeard; Convertino, Marino; Das, Jhuma; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the APOE gene, which encodes for three variants of Apolipoprotein E, namely E2, E3, E4, differing only by two amino acids at positions 112 and 158. ApoE4 is known to be the strongest risk factor for AD onset, while ApoE3 and ApoE2 are considered to be the AD-neutral and AD-protective isoforms, respectively. It has been hypothesized that the ApoE isoforms may contribute to the development of AD by modifying the homeostasis of ApoE physiological partners and AD-related proteins in an isoform-specific fashion. Here we find that, despite the high sequence similarity among the three ApoE variants, only ApoE4 exhibits a misfolded intermediate state characterized by isoform-specific domain-domain interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. The existence of an ApoE4-specific intermediate state can contribute to the onset of AD by altering multiple cellular pathways involved in ApoE-dependent lipid transport efficiency or in AD-related protein aggregation and clearance. We present what we believe to be the first structural model of an ApoE4 misfolded intermediate state, which may serve to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ApoE4 in AD pathogenesis. The knowledge of the structure for the ApoE4 folding intermediate provides a new platform for the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies to fight AD. PMID:26506597

  17. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. PMID:26424536

  18. Refining analyses of copy number variation identifies specific genes associated with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Coe, Bradley P; Witherspoon, Kali; Rosenfeld, Jill A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosco, Paolo; Friend, Kathryn L; Baker, Carl; Buono, Serafino; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H; Hoischen, Alex; Pfundt, Rolph; Krumm, Nik; Carvill, Gemma L; Li, Deana; Amaral, David; Brown, Natasha; Lockhart, Paul J; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Alberti, Antonino; Shaw, Marie; Pettinato, Rosa; Tervo, Raymond; de Leeuw, Nicole; Reijnders, Margot R F; Torchia, Beth S; Peeters, Hilde; O'Roak, Brian J; Fichera, Marco; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Shendure, Jay; Mefford, Heather C; Haan, Eric; Gécz, Jozef; de Vries, Bert B A; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-10-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are associated with many neurocognitive disorders; however, these events are typically large, and the underlying causative genes are unclear. We created an expanded CNV morbidity map from 29,085 children with developmental delay in comparison to 19,584 healthy controls, identifying 70 significant CNVs. We resequenced 26 candidate genes in 4,716 additional cases with developmental delay or autism and 2,193 controls. An integrated analysis of CNV and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data pinpointed 10 genes enriched for putative loss of function. Follow-up of a subset of affected individuals identified new clinical subtypes of pediatric disease and the genes responsible for disease-associated CNVs. These genetic changes include haploinsufficiency of SETBP1 associated with intellectual disability and loss of expressive language and truncations of ZMYND11 in individuals with autism, aggression and complex neuropsychiatric features. This combined CNV and SNV approach facilitates the rapid discovery of new syndromes and genes involved in neuropsychiatric disease despite extensive genetic heterogeneity. PMID:25217958

  19. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R; Mans, Dorus A; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J C; Coene, Karlien L M; Arts, Heleen H; Betts, Matthew J; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J F; Marcelis, Carlo L; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J P; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L; Blacque, Oliver E; Gibson, Toby J; Huynen, Martijn A; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B; Roepman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine. PMID:27173435

  20. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T.; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Coene, Karlien L. M.; Arts, Heleen H.; Betts, Matthew J.; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M.; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A.; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J. P.; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Gibson, Toby J.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E.; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H.; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B.; Roepman, Ronald; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Antony, Dinu; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Cirak, Sebahattin; Cosgrove, Catherine; Danecek, Petr; Durbin, Richard; Fitzpatrick, David; Floyd, Jamie; Reghan Foley, A.; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Joyce, Chris; McCarthy, Shane; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Payne, Felicity; Plagnol, Vincent; Raymond, Lucy; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert; Serra, Eva; Stalker, Jim; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Walter, Klaudia; Whittall, Ros; Williamson, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine. PMID:27173435

  1. Estimated incidence and risk factors of sudden unexpected death

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Chang; Mehta, Neil; Mounsey, Louisa; Nwosu, Anthony; Pursell, Irion; Chung, Eugene H; Mounsey, J Paul; Simpson, Ross J

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this manuscript, we estimate the incidence and identify risk factors for sudden unexpected death in a socioeconomically and racially diverse population in one county in North Carolina. Estimates of the incidence and risk factors contributing to sudden death vary widely. The Sudden Unexpected Death in North Carolina (SUDDEN) project is a population-based investigation of the incidence and potential causes of sudden death. Methods From 3 March 2013 to 2 March 2014, all out-of-hospital deaths in Wake County, North Carolina, were screened to identify presumed sudden unexpected death among free-living residents between the ages of 18 and 64 years. Death certificate, public and medical records were reviewed and adjudicated to confirm sudden unexpected death cases. Results Following adjudication, 190 sudden unexpected deaths including 122 men and 68 women were identified. Estimated incidence was 32.1 per 100 000 person-years overall: 42.7 among men and 22.4 among women. The majority of victims were white, unmarried men over age 55 years, with unwitnessed deaths at home. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia were common in men and women. African-American women dying from sudden unexpected death were over-represented. Women who were under age 55 years with coronary disease accounted for over half of female participants with coronary artery disease. Conclusions The overall estimated incidence of sudden unexpected death may account for approximately 10% of all deaths classified as ‘natural’. Women have a lower estimated incidence of sudden unexpected death than men. However, we found no major differences in age or comorbidities between men and women. African-Americans and young women with coronary disease are at risk for sudden unexpected death. PMID:27042316

  2. Cholinesterase-Targeting microRNAs Identified in silico Affect Specific Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hanin, Geula; Soreq, Hermona

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as important gene silencers affecting many target mRNAs. Here, we report the identification of 244 miRs that target the 3′-untranslated regions of different cholinesterase transcripts: 116 for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), 47 for the synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) splice variant, and 81 for the normally rare splice variant AChE-R. Of these, 11 and 6 miRs target both AChE-S and AChE-R, and AChE-R and BChE transcripts, respectively. BChE and AChE-S showed no overlapping miRs, attesting to their distinct modes of miR regulation. Generally, miRs can suppress a number of targets; thereby controlling an entire battery of functions. To evaluate the importance of the cholinesterase-targeted miRs in other specific biological processes we searched for their other experimentally validated target transcripts and analyzed the gene ontology enriched biological processes these transcripts are involved in. Interestingly, a number of the resulting categories are also related to cholinesterases. They include, for BChE, response to glucocorticoid stimulus, and for AChE, response to wounding and two child terms of neuron development: regulation of axonogenesis and regulation of dendrite morphogenesis. Importantly, all of the AChE-targeting miRs found to be related to these selected processes were directed against the normally rare AChE-R splice variant, with three of them, including the neurogenesis regulator miR-132, also directed against AChE-S. Our findings point at the AChE-R splice variant as particularly susceptible to miR regulation, highlight those biological functions of cholinesterases that are likely to be subject to miR post-transcriptional control, demonstrate the selectivity of miRs in regulating specific biological processes, and open new venues for targeted interference with these specific processes. PMID:22007158

  3. Trilinolein identified as a sex-specific component of tergal glands in alates of Coptotermes formosanus.

    PubMed

    Bland, John M; Park, Yong Ihl; Raina, Ashok K; Dickens, Joseph C; Hollister, Benedict

    2004-04-01

    Hexane extracts of the tergal glands from female alates of the Formosan subterranean termite Coptotermes formosanus were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation. Double bond configuration was determined by chemical modifications with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A single component, identified as the triacylglycerol, trilinolein, was unique to the female tergal glands. This compound was not found in other areas of the female alate abdomen or in the corresponding area of male alates. Neither gland extract nor trilinolein caused a behavioral response from male alates. However, significant differences were found between males and females for responses from neurons within sensilla of the maxillary palps. PMID:15260227

  4. In Vivo RNA Interference Screening Identifies a Leukemia-Specific Dependence on Integrin Beta 3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Peter G.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Hartwell, Kimberly A.; Chu, Lisa P.; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi V.; Puissant, Alexandre; Callahan, Kevin P.; Ashton, John; McConkey, Marie E.; Poveromo, Luke P.; Cowley, Glenn S.; Kharas, Michael G.; Labelle, Myriam; Shterental, Sebastian; Fujisaki, Joji; Silberstein, Lev; Alexe, Gabriela; Al-Hajj, Muhammad A.; Shelton, Christopher A.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Root, David E.; Scadden, David T.; Hynes, Richard O.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Jordan, Craig T.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We used an in vivo short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening approach to identify genes that are essential for MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that Integrin Beta 3 (Itgb3) is essential for murine leukemia cells in vivo, and for human leukemia cells in xenotransplantation studies. In leukemia cells, Itgb3 knockdown impaired homing, downregulated LSC transcriptional programs, and induced differentiation via the intracellular kinase, Syk. In contrast, loss of Itgb3 in normal HSPCs did not affect engraftment, reconstitution, or differentiation. Finally, we confirmed that Itgb3 is dispensable for normal hematopoiesis and required for leukemogenesis using an Itgb3 knockout mouse model. Our results establish the significance of the Itgb3 signaling pathway as a potential therapeutic target in AML. PMID:23770013

  5. Strength, Stability, and cis-Motifs of In silico Identified Phloem-Specific Promoters in Brassica juncea (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Bhatt, Deepa; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jain, Pradeep K.; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2016-01-01

    Aphids, a hemipteran group of insects pose a serious threat to many of the major crop species including Brassica oilseeds. Transgenic strategies for developing aphid-resistant plant types necessitate phloem-bound expression of the insecticidal genes. A few known phloem-specific promoters, in spite of tissue-specific activity fail to confer high level gene-expression. Here, we identified seven orthologues of phloem-specific promoters in B. juncea (Indian mustard), and experimentally validated their strength of expression in phloem exudates. Significant cis-motifs, globally occurring in phloem-specific promoters showed variable distribution frequencies in these putative phloem-specific promoters of B. juncea. In RT-qPCR based gene-expression study promoter of Glutamine synthetase 3A (GS3A) showed multifold higher activity compared to others, across the different growth stages of B. juncea plants. A statistical method employing four softwares was devised for rapidly analysing stability of the promoter-activities across the plant developmental stages. Different statistical softwares ranked these B. juncea promoters differently in terms of their stability in promoter-activity. Nevertheless, the consensus in output empirically suggested consistency in promoter-activity of the six B. juncea phloem- specific promoters including GS3A. The study identified suitable endogenous promoters for high level and consistent gene-expression in B. juncea phloem exudate. The study also demonstrated a rapid method of assessing species-specific strength and stability in expression of the endogenous promoters. PMID:27148290

  6. Strength, Stability, and cis-Motifs of In silico Identified Phloem-Specific Promoters in Brassica juncea (L.).

    PubMed

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Bhatt, Deepa; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jain, Pradeep K; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2016-01-01

    Aphids, a hemipteran group of insects pose a serious threat to many of the major crop species including Brassica oilseeds. Transgenic strategies for developing aphid-resistant plant types necessitate phloem-bound expression of the insecticidal genes. A few known phloem-specific promoters, in spite of tissue-specific activity fail to confer high level gene-expression. Here, we identified seven orthologues of phloem-specific promoters in B. juncea (Indian mustard), and experimentally validated their strength of expression in phloem exudates. Significant cis-motifs, globally occurring in phloem-specific promoters showed variable distribution frequencies in these putative phloem-specific promoters of B. juncea. In RT-qPCR based gene-expression study promoter of Glutamine synthetase 3A (GS3A) showed multifold higher activity compared to others, across the different growth stages of B. juncea plants. A statistical method employing four softwares was devised for rapidly analysing stability of the promoter-activities across the plant developmental stages. Different statistical softwares ranked these B. juncea promoters differently in terms of their stability in promoter-activity. Nevertheless, the consensus in output empirically suggested consistency in promoter-activity of the six B. juncea phloem- specific promoters including GS3A. The study identified suitable endogenous promoters for high level and consistent gene-expression in B. juncea phloem exudate. The study also demonstrated a rapid method of assessing species-specific strength and stability in expression of the endogenous promoters. PMID:27148290

  7. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Mandy K.; VanderMeer, Julia E.; Zhao, Jingjing; Eckalbar, Walter L.; Logan, Malcolm; Illing, Nicola; Pollard, Katherine S.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs) that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing. PMID:27019019

  8. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

    PubMed

    Booker, Betty M; Friedrich, Tara; Mason, Mandy K; VanderMeer, Julia E; Zhao, Jingjing; Eckalbar, Walter L; Logan, Malcolm; Illing, Nicola; Pollard, Katherine S; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-03-01

    The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs) that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing. PMID:27019019

  9. 40 CFR 268.38 - Waste specific prohibitions-newly identified organic toxicity characteristic wastes and newly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-newly identified organic toxicity characteristic wastes and newly listed coke by-product and chlorotoluene production wastes. 268.38 Section 268.38 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND...

  10. ESL Teachers' Perceptions of the Process for Identifying Adolescent Latino English Language Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlis, Emily C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the question "how do ESL teachers perceive the prereferral process for identifying adolescent Latino English language learners with specific learning disabilities?" The study fits within the Latino Critical Race Theory framework and employs an interpretive phenomenological qualitative research approach.…

  11. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  12. Novel small Cajal-body-specific RNAs identified in Drosophila: probing guide RNA function

    PubMed Central

    Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are modified post-transcriptionally by introduction of pseudouridines and 2′-O-methyl modifications, which are mediated by box H/ACA and box C/D guide RNAs, respectively. Because of their concentration in the nuclear Cajal body (CB), these guide RNAs are known as small CB-specific (sca) RNAs. In the cell, scaRNAs are associated with the WD-repeat protein WDR79. We used coimmunoprecipitation with WDR79 to recover seven new scaRNAs from Drosophila cell lysates. We demonstrated concentration of these new scaRNAs in the CB by in situ hybridization, and we verified experimentally that they can modify their putative target RNAs. Surprisingly, one of the new scaRNAs targets U6 snRNA, whose modification is generally assumed to occur in the nucleolus, not in the CB. Two other scaRNAs have dual guide functions, one for an snRNA and one for 28S rRNA. Again, the modification of 28S rRNA is assumed to take place in the nucleolus. These findings suggest that canonical scaRNAs may have functions in addition to their established role in modifying U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNAs. We discuss the likelihood that processing by scaRNAs is not limited to the CB. PMID:24149844

  13. Lipidomic analysis of fibroblasts from Zellweger spectrum disorder patients identifies disease-specific phospholipid ratios.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Katharina; Pras-Raves, Mia L; Vervaart, Martin A T; Luyf, Angela C M; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Wanders, Ronald J A; Waterham, Hans R; Vaz, Frédéric M

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles involved in various metabolic processes, including fatty acid and phospholipid homeostasis. The Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) represent a group of diseases caused by a defect in the biogenesis of peroxisomes. Accordingly, cells from ZSD patients are expected to have an altered composition of fatty acids and phospholipids. Using an LC/MS-based lipidomics approach, we show that the phospholipid composition is characteristically altered in cultured primary skin fibroblasts from ZSD patients when compared with healthy controls. We observed a marked overall increase of phospholipid species containing very long-chain fatty acids, and a decrease of phospholipid species with shorter fatty acid species in ZSD patient fibroblasts. In addition, we detected a distinct phosphatidylcholine profile in ZSD patients with a severe and mild phenotype when compared with control cells. Based on our data, we present a set of specific phospholipid ratios for fibroblasts that clearly discriminate between mild and severe ZSD patients, and those from healthy controls. Our findings will aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of ZSD patients, including an increasing number of mild patients in whom hardly any abnormalities are observed in biochemical parameters commonly used for diagnosis. PMID:27284103

  14. Cultured embryonic chick skeletal muscle cells contain specific receptors for a myotrophic factor identified as neutrotransferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Stamotos, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Cultured embryonic chick myotubes require iron during proliferation and differentiation. Ovotransferrin (OvoTF), the iron-binding protein of egg white, produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of myogenesis, as evaluated by a sensitive quantitative bioassay for acetylcholine receptors. Neurotransferrin, a myotrophic protein isolated from adult chicken sciatic nerve, is immunologically and physiologically very similar, if not identical, to OvoTf. Cultured embryonic chick spinal cord neurons were metabolically labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine, homogenized and subjected to immunoprecipitation with antibody against neurotransferrin. The authors demonstrated that neuronal cell enriched cultures synthesize and secrete neurotransferrin. The binding of OvoTf to cultured myotubes is specific, saturated at a concentration of 80 nM OvoTf and reversible. Binding of OvoTf to cultured myotubes occurs at 4/sup 0/C and at 37/sup 0/C. Internalization studies using /sup 125/I-ovotransferrin or /sup 55/Fe-OvoTf suggested that OvoTf is internalized, depleted of iron and then recycled intact to the extracellular milieu. Autoradiography of muscle cell cultures incubated with /sup 125/I-OvoTf revealed clusters of OvoTf receptors along the surface of the myotubes. Electron microscopy autoradiography of myotubes incubated with /sup 55/Fe-OvoTf showed that iron delivered by OvoTf is rapidly distributed throughout the cell. The results of the studies suggest that neurotransferrin may play a critical role during in vivo embryonic chick skeletal muscle development.

  15. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Timucin; Durası, İlknur Melis; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Tütüncü, Melih; Demirci, Nuri Onat; Saip, Sabahattin; Sezerman, O. Uğur; Siva, Aksel; Tahir Turanlı, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179). Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5) which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5) system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10) pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5). An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications. PMID:25942430

  16. Identifying specific language impairment in deaf children acquiring British Sign Language: implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Mason, Kathryn; Rowley, Katherine; Marshall, Chloe R; Atkinson, Joanna R; Herman, Rosalind; Woll, Bencie; Morgan, Gary

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the first ever group study of specific language impairment (SLI) in users of sign language. A group of 50 children were referred to the study by teachers and speech and language therapists. Individuals who fitted pre-determined criteria for SLI were then systematically assessed. Here, we describe in detail the performance of 13 signing deaf children aged 5-14 years on normed tests of British Sign Language (BSL) sentence comprehension, repetition of nonsense signs, expressive grammar and narrative skills, alongside tests of non-verbal intelligence and fine motor control. Results show these children to have a significant language delay compared to their peers matched for age and language experience. This impaired development cannot be explained by poor exposure to BSL, or by lower general cognitive, social, or motor abilities. As is the case for SLI in spoken languages, we find heterogeneity within the group in terms of which aspects of language are affected and the severity of the impairment. We discuss the implications of the existence of language impairments in a sign language for theories of SLI and clinical practice. PMID:20306624

  17. Identifying learning patterns of children at risk for Specific Reading Disability.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Baptiste; Krivulskaya, Suzanna; Hein, Sascha; Reich, Jodi; Thuma, Philip E; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2016-05-01

    Differences in learning patterns of vocabulary acquisition in children at risk (+SRD) and not at risk (-SRD) for Specific Reading Disability (SRD) were examined using a microdevelopmental paradigm applied to the multi-trial Foreign Language Learning Task (FLLT; Baddeley et al., 1995). The FLLT was administered to 905 children from rural Chitonga-speaking Zambia. A multi-group Latent Growth Curve Model (LGCM) was implemented to study interindividual differences in intraindividual change across trials. Results showed that the +SRD group recalled fewer words correctly in the first trial, learned at a slower rate during the subsequent trials, and demonstrated a more linear learning pattern compared to the -SRD group. This study illustrates the promise of LGCM applied to multi-trial learning tasks, by isolating three components of the learning process (initial recall, rate of learning, and functional pattern of learning). Implications of this microdevelopmental approach to SRD research in low-to-middle income countries are discussed. PMID:26037654

  18. Reliability analysis of the resting state can sensitively and specifically identify the presence of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, F M; Yang, M; Baxter, L; von Deneen, K M; Collingwood, J; He, G; White, K; Korenkevych, D; Savenkov, A; Heilman, K M; Gold, M; Liu, Y

    2013-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by a number of motor and behavioral abnormalities that could be considered deficits of a "no task" or "resting" state, including resting motor findings and defects in emerging from a resting state (e.g., resting tremor, elevated resting tone, abulia, akinesia, apathy). PET imaging, and recently, the MRI technique of continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) have shown evidence of changes in metabolic patterns in individuals with PD. The purpose of this study was to learn if the presence of PD could be "predicted" based on resting fluctuations of the BOLD signal. Participants were 15 healthy controls, 14 subjects with PD, and 1 subject who presented as a control but later developed PD. The amplitude of the low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was used as an index of brain activity level in the resting state. Participants with PD using this index showed a reliable decrease in activity in a number of regions, including the supplementary motor cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex, the right middle frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum (lobule VII/VIII) as well as increased activity in the right cerebellum (lobule IV/V). Using a cross validation approach we term "Reliability Mapping of Regional Differences" (RMRD) to analyze our sample, we were able to reliably distinguish participants with PD from controls with 92% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Our "pre-diagnostic" subject segregated in our analysis with the PD group. These results suggest that resting fMRI should be considered for development as a biomarker and analytical tool for evaluation of PD. PMID:21924367

  19. Identifying specific light inputs for each subgroup of brain clock neurons in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Klarsfeld, André; Picot, Marie; Vias, Carine; Chélot, Elisabeth; Rouyer, François

    2011-11-30

    In Drosophila, opsin visual photopigments as well as blue-light-sensitive cryptochrome (CRY) contribute to the synchronization of circadian clocks. We focused on the relatively simple larval brain, with nine clock neurons per hemisphere: five lateral neurons (LNs), four of which express the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) neuropeptide, and two pairs of dorsal neurons (DN1s and DN2s). CRY is present only in the PDF-expressing LNs and the DN1s. The larval visual organ expresses only two rhodopsins (RH5 and RH6) and projects onto the LNs. We recently showed that PDF signaling is required for light to synchronize the CRY(-) larval DN2s. We now show that, in the absence of functional CRY, synchronization of the DN1s also requires PDF, suggesting that these neurons have no direct connection with the visual system. In contrast, the fifth (PDF(-)) LN does not require the PDF-expressing cells to receive visual system inputs. All clock neurons are light-entrained by light-dark cycles in the rh5(2);cry(b), rh6(1) cry(b), and rh5(2);rh6(1) double mutants, whereas the triple mutant is circadianly blind. Thus, any one of the three photosensitive molecules is sufficient, and there is no other light input for the larval clock. Finally, we show that constant activation of the visual system can suppress molecular oscillations in the four PDF-expressing LNs, whereas, in the adult, this effect of constant light requires CRY. A surprising diversity and specificity of light input combinations thus exists even for this simple clock network. PMID:22131402

  20. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  1. Unexpected Outcomes from Teachers' TV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why she has unexpectedly become a fan of Teacher's TV. It started when she was asked to show some clips from Teachers' TV as part of a workshop she was leading. She dutifully accepted a CD containing three downloaded programmes about using ICT to teach mathematics and put it into her laptop. Within a few…

  2. Wilderness Emergency: Surviving the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fear, Gene

    In any unexpected survival experience, one must accept the situation with just what one has at the moment it happens, where it happens, and how it happens. Problem solving must be based on known body enemies that threaten life, their priority of influence, and their severity of threat to life. Solutions will depend on the body's energy supply,…

  3. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  4. Tantalizing Thanatos: unexpected links in death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isabelle; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Cell death is most frequently the result of apoptosis, an event that is often controlled by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). Recent data reveal unexpected functional links between apoptosis and autophagic cell death, in the sense that MMP can trigger autophagy of damaged mitochondria. Conversely, one of the major signal-transducing molecules involved in the activation of autophagy during apoptosis--the so-called DAP kinase--can induce cell death through MMP. Connections are also emerging between apoptosis, autophagy, replicative senescence and cancer-specific metabolic changes. PMID:12185842

  5. Genome of The Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Deelen, Joris; Isaacs, Aaron; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mbarek, Hamdi; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Verweij, Niek; van Enckevort, David J; Huffman, Jennifer E; White, Charles C; Feitosa, Mary F; Bartz, Traci M; Manichaikul, Ani; Joshi, Peter K; Peloso, Gina M; Deelen, Patrick; van Dijk, Freerk; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Francioli, Laurent C; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Franco, Oscar H; Mateo Leach, Irene; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J M; Uh, Hae-Won; Trochet, Holly; Hocking, Lynne J; Porteous, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J; Buckley, Brendan M; Brody, Jennifer A; Bis, Joshua C; Rotter, Jerome I; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Campbell, Harry; Duan, Qing; Lange, Leslie A; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Rich, Stephen S; Psaty, Bruce M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Kearney, Patricia M; Stott, David J; Adrienne Cupples, L; Jukema, J Wouter; van der Harst, Pim; Sijbrands, Eric J; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Swertz, Morris A; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; de Bakker, Paul I W; Eline Slagboom, P; Boomsma, Dorret I; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (~35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel created by the Genome of The Netherlands Project and perform association testing with blood lipid levels. We report the discovery of five novel associations at four loci (P value <6.61 × 10(-4)), including a rare missense variant in ABCA6 (rs77542162, p.Cys1359Arg, frequency 0.034), which is predicted to be deleterious. The frequency of this ABCA6 variant is 3.65-fold increased in the Dutch and its effect (βLDL-C=0.135, βTC=0.140) is estimated to be very similar to those observed for single variants in well-known lipid genes, such as LDLR. PMID:25751400

  6. Genetic Differences between Blight-Causing Erwinia Species with Differing Host Specificities, Identified by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W.

    2006-01-01

    PCR-based subtractive hybridization was used to isolate sequences from Erwinia amylovora strain Ea110, which is pathogenic on apples and pears, that were not present in three closely related strains with differing host specificities: E. amylovora MR1, which is pathogenic only on Rubus spp.; Erwinia pyrifoliae Ep1/96, the causal agent of shoot blight of Asian pears; and Erwinia sp. strain Ejp556, the causal agent of bacterial shoot blight of pear in Japan. In total, six subtractive libraries were constructed and analyzed. Recovered sequences included type III secretion components, hypothetical membrane proteins, and ATP-binding proteins. In addition, we identified an Ea110-specific sequence with homology to a type III secretion apparatus component of the insect endosymbiont Sodalis glossinidius, as well as an Ep1/96-specific sequence with homology to the Yersinia pestis effector protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH. PMID:16963554

  7. Genome of the Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Deelen, Joris; Isaacs, Aaron; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mbarek, Hamdi; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Verweij, Niek; van Enckevort, David J.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; White, Charles C.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Bartz, Traci M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Joshi, Peter K.; Peloso, Gina M.; Deelen, Patrick; van Dijk, Freerk; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Trochet, Holly; Hocking, Lynne J.; Porteous, David J.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Bis, Joshua C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Campbell, Harry; Duan, Qing; Lange, Leslie A.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Stott, David J.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Neerincx, Pieter B.T.; Elbers, Clara C.; Francesco Palamara, Pier; Pe'er, Itsik; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; van Oven, Mannis; Vermaat, Martijn; Li, Mingkun; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Stoneking, Mark; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Byelas, Heorhiy; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Amin, Najaf; Joeri van der Velde, K.; van Setten, Jessica; Kattenberg, Mathijs; van Schaik, Barbera D.C.; Bot, Jan; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Mei, Hailiang; Koval, Vyacheslav; Ye, Kai; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; Moed, Matthijs H.; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Sohail, Mashaal; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Marschall, Tobias; Schönhuth, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Platteel, Mathieu; Pitts, Steven J.; Potluri, Shobha; Cox, David R.; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; Wang, Jun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; Jukema, J. Wouter; van der Harst, Pim; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Swertz, Morris A.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (~35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel created by the Genome of the Netherlands Project and perform association testing with blood lipid levels. We report the discovery of five novel associations at four loci (P value <6.61 × 10−4), including a rare missense variant in ABCA6 (rs77542162, p.Cys1359Arg, frequency 0.034), which is predicted to be deleterious. The frequency of this ABCA6 variant is 3.65-fold increased in the Dutch and its effect (βLDL-C=0.135, βTC=0.140) is estimated to be very similar to those observed for single variants in well-known lipid genes, such as LDLR. PMID:25751400

  8. Methods to Identify Chromatin-Bound Protein Complexes: From Genome-Wide to Locus-Specific Approaches.

    PubMed

    Massie, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing approaches coupled with functional genomics experiments have facilitated a rapid growth in our understanding of chromatin biology, from genome-wide maps of transcription factor binding and histone modifications to insights into higher order chromatin organization under specific cellular conditions. However in most cases these methods require a prior knowledge of the system of interest (e.g., targets for immunoprecipitation or modulation) and therefore are limited in their utility to identify novel components of pathways or for the study of uncharacterized pathways. Several orthologous proteomics approaches have been developed recently that bridge this gap, allowing the identification of protein complexes globally or at specific genomic loci. In this chapter the relative advantages of each approach will be explored and a detailed protocol given for DNA pull-down of a specific androgen receptor (AR) genomic target. PMID:27246338

  9. Microarray Analysis of Developing Flax Hypocotyls Identifies Novel Transcripts Correlated with Specific Stages of Phloem Fibre Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Melissa J.; Deyholos, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Hypocotyls are a commonly used model to study primary growth in plants, since post-germinative hypocotyls increase in size by cell elongation rather than cell division. Flax hypocotyls produce phloem fibres in bundles one to two cell layers thick, parallel to the protoxylem poles of the stele. Cell wall deposition within these cells occurs rapidly at a well-defined stage of development. The aim was to identify transcripts associated with distinct stages of hypocotyl and phloem fibre development. Methods Stages of flax hypocotyl development were defined by analysing hypocotyl length in relation to fibre secondary wall deposition. Selected stages of development were used in microarray analyses to identify transcripts involved in the transition from elongation to secondary cell wall deposition in fibres. Expression of specific genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR and by enzymatic assays. Key Results Genes enriched in the elongation phase included transcripts related to cell-wall modification or primary-wall deposition. Transcripts specifically enriched at the transition between elongation and secondary wall deposition included β-galactosidase and arabinogalactan proteins. Later stages of wall development showed an increase in secondary metabolism-related transcripts, chitinases and glycosyl hydrolases including KORRIGAN. Microarray analysis also identified groups of transcription factors enriched at one or more stages of fibre development. Subsequent analysis of a differentially expressed β-galactosidase confirmed that the post-elongation increase in β-galactosidase enzyme activity was localized to phloem fibres. Conclusions Transcripts were identified associated with specific stages of hypocotyl development, in which phloem fibre cells were undergoing thickening of secondary walls. Temporal and spatial regulation of β-galactosidase activity suggests a role for this enzyme in remodelling of flax bast fibre cell walls during secondary cell wall

  10. A Pan-Cancer Modular Regulatory Network Analysis to Identify Common and Cancer-Specific Network Components

    PubMed Central

    Knaack, Sara A; Siahpirani, Alireza Fotuhi; Roy, Sushmita

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases including cancer are the result of perturbations to transcriptional regulatory networks that control context-specific expression of genes. A comparative approach across multiple cancer types is a powerful approach to illuminate the common and specific network features of this family of diseases. Recent efforts from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) have generated large collections of functional genomic data sets for multiple types of cancers. An emerging challenge is to devise computational approaches that systematically compare these genomic data sets across different cancer types that identify common and cancer-specific network components. We present a module- and network-based characterization of transcriptional patterns in six different cancers being studied in TCGA: breast, colon, rectal, kidney, ovarian, and endometrial. Our approach uses a recently developed regulatory network reconstruction algorithm, modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), within a stability selection framework to predict regulators for individual genes and gene modules. Our module-based analysis identifies a common theme of immune system processes in each cancer study, with modules statistically enriched for immune response processes as well as targets of key immune response regulators from the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) families. Comparison of the inferred regulatory networks from each cancer type identified a core regulatory network that included genes involved in chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and immune response. Regulatory network hubs included genes with known roles in specific cancer types as well as genes with potentially novel roles in different cancer types. Overall, our integrated module and network analysis recapitulated known themes in cancer biology and additionally revealed novel regulatory hubs that suggest a complex interplay of immune response, cell

  11. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Jerry R.; Bodfish, James W.

    2000-01-01

    Medical records of residents of a facility for persons with mental retardation from January 1, 1978, through December 31, 1997, were analyzed to identify incidence of sudden unexpected death for 180 individuals with and 125 without comorbid epilepsy. Eighty deaths were identified, with 55 occurring in those with epilepsy. (Contains 15 references.)…

  12. FACS array profiling identifies Ecto-5' nucleotidase as a striatopallidal neuron-specific gene involved in striatal-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Ena, Sabrina L; De Backer, Jean-François; Schiffmann, Serge N; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban

    2013-05-15

    The striatopallidal (STP) and striatonigral (STN) neurons constitute the main neuronal populations of the striatum. Despite the increasing knowledge concerning their involvement in multiple tasks associated with the striatum, it is still challenging to understand the precise differential functions of these two neuronal populations and to identify and study new genes involved in these functions. Here, we describe a reliable approach, applied on adult mouse brain, to generate specific STP and STN neuron gene profiles. STP and STN neurons were identified in the same animal using the transgenic Adora2A-Cre × Z/EG mouse model combined with retrograde labeling, respectively. Gene profiling was generated from FACS-purified neurons leading to the identification of new STP and STN neuron-specific genes. Knock-down models based on Cre-dependent lentiviral vector were developed to investigate their function either in striatal or in STP neurons. Thereby, we demonstrate that ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5e) is specifically expressed in STP neurons and is at the origin of most of the extracellular adenosine produced in the striatum. Behavioral analysis of striatal and STP neuron knock-down mouse models as well as NT5e knock-out mice demonstrates the implication of this STP neuron enzyme in motor learning. PMID:23678122

  13. A Thermodynamic-Based Interpretation of Protein Expression Heterogeneity in Different Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumors Identifies Tumor-Specific Unbalanced Processes.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M; Heath, James R; Levine, R D

    2016-07-01

    We describe a thermodynamic-motivated, information theoretic analysis of proteomic data collected from a series of 8 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. GBMs are considered here as prototypes of heterogeneous cancers. That heterogeneity is viewed here as manifesting in different unbalanced biological processes that are associated with thermodynamic-like constraints. The analysis yields a molecular description of a stable steady state that is common across all tumors. It also resolves molecular descriptions of unbalanced processes that are shared by several tumors, such as hyperactivated phosphoprotein signaling networks. Further, it resolves unbalanced processes that provide unique classifiers of tumor subgroups. The results of the theoretical interpretation are compared against those of statistical multivariate methods and are shown to provide a superior level of resolution for identifying unbalanced processes in GBM tumors. The identification of specific constraints for each GBM tumor suggests tumor-specific combination therapies that may reverse this imbalance. PMID:27035264

  14. The use of specific and generic primers to identify trypanosome infections of wild tsetse flies in Tanzania by PCR.

    PubMed

    Malele, Imna; Craske, Lisa; Knight, Claire; Ferris, Vanessa; Njiru, Zablon; Hamilton, Patrick; Lehane, Stella; Lehane, Mike; Gibson, Wendy

    2003-11-01

    The accurate identification of trypanosome species and subspecies remains a challenging task in the epidemiology of human and animal trypanosomiasis in tropical Africa. Currently, there are specific PCR tests to identify about 10 different species, subspecies or subgroups of African tsetse-transmitted trypanosomes. These PCR tests have been used here to identify trypanosomes in four species of tsetse (Glossina brevipalpis, G. pallidipes, G. swynnertoni, G. morsitans morsitans) from two areas of Tanzania. PCR using species-specific primers was performed on 1041 dissection-positive proboscides, giving an overall positive identification in 254 (24%). Of these, 61 proboscides (24%) contained two or more trypanosomes. The trypanosome with the greatest overall prevalence at both field sites was Trypanosoma simiae Tsavo, which was identified in a total of 118 infected tsetse proboscides (46%). At Pangani, T. godfreyi was found in G. pallidipes but not in G. brevipalpis, suggesting that these flies might have different susceptibility to this trypanosome or might have fed on a different range of hosts. A high proportion (about 75%) of trypanosome infections remained unidentified. To investigate the identity of these unidentified samples, we used primers complementary to the conserved regions of trypanosomal small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA) genes to amplify variable segments of the gene. Amplified DNA fragments were cloned, sequenced and compared with ssu rRNA genes on database of known trypanosome species. In this way, we have tentatively identified two new trypanosomes: a trypanosome related to Trypanosoma vivax and a trypanosome related to T. godfreyi. The T. godfreyi-related trypanosome occurred frequently in the Tanzanian field samples and appears to be widespread. Molecular identification of these two new trypanosomes should now facilitate their isolation and full biological characterisation. PMID:14636688

  15. Metabolomic analysis of polar metabolites in lipoprotein fractions identifies lipoprotein-specific metabolic profiles and their association with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Mattila, Ismo; Wiedmer, Susanne K; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Orešič, Matej

    2012-10-01

    While the molecular lipid composition of lipoproteins has been investigated in detail, little is known about associations of small polar metabolites with specific lipoproteins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the profiles of polar metabolites in different lipoprotein fractions, i.e., very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and two sub-fractions of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The VLDL, IDL, LDL, HDL(2), and HDL(3) fractions were isolated from serum of sixteen individuals having a broad range of insulin sensitivity and characterized using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The lipoprotein fractions had clearly different metabolite profiles, which correlated with the particle size and surface charge. Lipoprotein-specific associations of individual metabolites with insulin resistance were identified, particularly in VLDL and IDL fractions, even in the absence of such associations in serum. The results indicate that the polar molecules are strongly attached to the surface of the lipoproteins. Furthermore, strong lipoprotein-specific associations of metabolites with insulin resistance, as compared to their serum profiles, indicate that lipoproteins may be a rich source of tissue-specific metabolic biomarkers. PMID:22722885

  16. An Investigation to Validate the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) Test to Identify Children with Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    van der Lely, Heather K. J.; Payne, Elisabeth; McClelland, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Background The extraordinarily high incidence of grammatical language impairments in developmental disorders suggests that this uniquely human cognitive function is “fragile”. Yet our understanding of the neurobiology of grammatical impairments is limited. Furthermore, there is no “gold-standard” to identify grammatical impairments and routine screening is not undertaken. An accurate screening test to identify grammatical abilities would serve the research, health and education communities, further our understanding of developmental disorders, and identify children who need remediation, many of whom are currently un-diagnosed. A potential realistic screening tool that could be widely administered is the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) test – a 10 minute test that can be administered by professionals and non-professionals alike. Here we provide a further step in evaluating the validity and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the GAPS test in identifying children who have Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Methods and Findings We tested three groups of children; two groups aged 3;6–6:6, a typically developing (n = 30) group, and a group diagnosed with SLI: (n = 11) (Young (Y)-SLI), and a further group aged 6;9–8;11 with SLI (Older (O)-SLI) (n = 10) who were above the test age norms. We employed a battery of language assessments including the GAPS test to assess the children's language abilities. For Y-SLI children, analyses revealed a sensitivity and specificity at the 5th and 10th percentile of 1.00 and 0.98, respectively, and for O-SLI children at the 10th and 15th percentile .83 and .90, respectively. Conclusions The findings reveal that the GAPS is highly accurate in identifying impaired vs. non-impaired children up to 6;8 years, and has moderate-to-high accuracy up to 9 years. The results indicate that GAPS is a realistic tool for the early identification of grammatical abilities and impairment in young children. A larger

  17. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T M; Morris, G E

    1993-01-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random "libraries" of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25-60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1-41, and we now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 PMID:7684887

  18. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. )

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Identifier (ID) elements are not preferentially located to brain-specific genes: high ID element representation in other tissue-specific- and housekeeping genes of the rat.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Andrés; Capoano, Carlos A; González-López, Evangelina; Geisinger, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    BC1 is a short non-coding RNA from rodents, which is transcribed by RNA pol III. Its RNA is highly abundant in the brain, where it exerts a post-transcriptional regulatory role in dendrites. Upon transcription, retroposition and insertion, BC1 gives rise to a subclass of short interspersed repetitive sequences (SINEs) named identifier (ID) elements. IDs can become integrated inside non-coding regions of RNA pol II transcription units, and - although challenged by a couple of reports - their preferential location to brain-specific genes has been long proposed. Furthermore, an additional, cis-regulatory role in the control of brain-specific pol II-directed transcripts has been suggested for these sequences. In this work we used Northern blot and in silico analyses to examine IDs' location among pol II transcription units in different tissues, and in housekeeping genes. ID sequences appeared distributed in a similar fashion within tissue-specific hnRNA populations of the brain, testis and liver, and within housekeeping primary transcripts as well. Moreover, when the lengths of the unprocessed transcripts were considered, ID representation was higher in housekeeping ones. On the other hand, ID elements appeared similarly distributed among the different gene regions, with the obvious exclusion of those sequences where strict constraints for proper gene expression exist. Altogether, the widespread distribution of ID elements in all the analyzed genes - including housekeeping - and in all gene regions, suggests a random location, raising questions about the specific cis-regulatory role of those sequences. PMID:24125954

  20. Omics of Brucella: Species-Specific sRNA-Mediated Gene Ontology Regulatory Networks Identified by Computational Biology.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Sridhar, Jayavel; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-06-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic infectious disease, brucellosis. Brucella species are currently intensively studied with a view to developing novel global health diagnostics and therapeutics. In this context, small RNAs (sRNAs) are one of the emerging topical areas; they play significant roles in regulating gene expression and cellular processes in bacteria. In the present study, we forecast sRNAs in three Brucella species that infect humans, namely Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis, using a computational biology analysis. We combined two bioinformatic algorithms, SIPHT and sRNAscanner. In B. melitensis 16M, 21 sRNA candidates were identified, of which 14 were novel. Similarly, 14 sRNAs were identified in B. abortus, of which four were novel. In B. suis, 16 sRNAs were identified, and five of them were novel. TargetRNA2 software predicted the putative target genes that could be regulated by the identified sRNAs. The identified mRNA targets are involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, nucleotide, and coenzyme metabolism and transport, energy production and conversion, replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Additionally, the Gene Ontology (GO) network analysis revealed the species-specific, sRNA-based regulatory networks in B. melitensis, B. abortus, and B. suis. Taken together, although sRNAs are veritable modulators of gene expression in prokaryotes, there are few reports on the significance of sRNAs in Brucella. This report begins to address this literature gap by offering a series of initial observations based on computational biology to pave the way for future experimental analysis of sRNAs and their targets to explain the complex pathogenesis of Brucella. PMID:27223678

  1. Sex-Specific Regulation of Mitochondrial DNA Levels: Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    López, Sonia; Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Casademont, Jordi; Blangero, John; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Lathrop, Mark; Almasy, Laura; Soria, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels have been associated with common diseases in humans. We investigated the genetic mechanism that controls mtDNA levels using genome-wide linkage analyses in families from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia Project (GAIT). We measure mtDNA levels by quantitative real-time PCR in 386 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. A variance component linkage method using 485 microsatellites was conducted to evaluate linkage and to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in the control of mtDNA levels. The heritalibility of mtDNA levels was 0.33 (p = 1.82e-05). We identified a QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD = 2.21) using all of the subjects, independently on their sex. When females and males were analysed separately, three QTLs were identified. Females showed the same QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD = 3.09), indicating that the QTL identified in the analysis using all of the subjects was a strong female QTL, and another one on Chromosome 3 (LOD = 2.67), whereas in males a QTL was identified on Chromosome 1 (LOD = 2.81). These QTLs were fine-mapped to find associations with mtDNA levels. The most significant SNP association was for the rs10888838 on Chromosome 1 in males. This SNP mapped to the gene MRPL37, involved in mitochondrial protein translation. The rs2140855 on Chromosome 2 showed association in the analysis using all of the subjects. It was near the gene CMPK2, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme of the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Our results provide evidence of a sex-specific genetic mechanism for the control of mtDNA levels and provide a framework to identify new genes that influence mtDNA levels. PMID:22916149

  2. Sex-specific regulation of mitochondrial DNA levels: genome-wide linkage analysis to identify quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    López, Sonia; Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Casademont, Jordi; Blangero, John; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Lathrop, Mark; Almasy, Laura; Soria, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels have been associated with common diseases in humans. We investigated the genetic mechanism that controls mtDNA levels using genome-wide linkage analyses in families from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia Project (GAIT). We measure mtDNA levels by quantitative real-time PCR in 386 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. A variance component linkage method using 485 microsatellites was conducted to evaluate linkage and to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in the control of mtDNA levels. The heritalibility of mtDNA levels was 0.33 (p=1.82e-05). We identified a QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD=2.21) using all of the subjects, independently on their sex. When females and males were analysed separately, three QTLs were identified. Females showed the same QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD=3.09), indicating that the QTL identified in the analysis using all of the subjects was a strong female QTL, and another one on Chromosome 3 (LOD=2.67), whereas in males a QTL was identified on Chromosome 1 (LOD=2.81). These QTLs were fine-mapped to find associations with mtDNA levels. The most significant SNP association was for the rs10888838 on Chromosome 1 in males. This SNP mapped to the gene MRPL37, involved in mitochondrial protein translation. The rs2140855 on Chromosome 2 showed association in the analysis using all of the subjects. It was near the gene CMPK2, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme of the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Our results provide evidence of a sex-specific genetic mechanism for the control of mtDNA levels and provide a framework to identify new genes that influence mtDNA levels. PMID:22916149

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Genes Responsible for Tissue-Specific Pigmentation in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jong Hwa; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Seungill; Soh, Hye Yeon; Shin, Hosub; Jang, Hosung; Ryu, Ju Hyun; Kim, Ahyeong; Yun, Kil-Young; Kim, Shinje; Kim, Ki Sun; Choi, Doil; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) is commonly found in temperate climate regions and widely used for lawns, in part, owing to its uniform green color. However, some zoysiagrass cultivars accumulate red to purple pigments in their spike and stolon tissues, thereby decreasing the aesthetic value. Here we analyzed the anthocyanin contents of two zoysiagrass cultivars ‘Anyang-jungji’ (AJ) and ‘Greenzoa’ (GZ) that produce spikes and stolons with purple and green colors, respectively, and revealed that cyanidin and petunidin were primarily accumulated in the pigmented tissues. In parallel, we performed a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified differentially expressed genes between the two cultivars. We found that two anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) were preferentially upregulated in the purple AJ spike upon pigmentation. Both ANS and DFR genes were also highly expressed in other zoysiagrass cultivars with purple spikes and stolons, but their expression levels were significantly low in the cultivars with green tissues. We observed that recombinant ZjDFR1 and ZjANS1 proteins successfully catalyze the conversions of dihydroflavonols into leucoanthocyanidins and leucoanthocyanidins into anthocyanidins, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that upregulation of ANS and DFR is responsible for tissue-specific anthocyanin biosynthesis and differential pigmentation in zoysiagrass. The present study also demonstrates the feasibility of a de novo transcriptome analysis to identify the key genes associated with specific traits, even in the absence of reference genome information. PMID:25905914

  4. Identifying and tracing potential energy surfaces of electronic excitations with specific character via their transition origins: application to oxirane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Hao; Zuehlsdorff, T J; Payne, M C; Hine, N D M

    2015-05-14

    We show that the transition origins of electronic excitations identified by quantified natural transition orbital (QNTO) analysis can be employed to connect potential energy surfaces (PESs) according to their character across a wide range of molecular geometries. This is achieved by locating the switching of transition origins of adiabatic potential surfaces as the geometry changes. The transition vectors for analysing transition origins are provided by linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We study the photochemical CO ring opening of oxirane as an example and show that the results corroborate the traditional Gomer-Noyes mechanism derived experimentally. The knowledge of specific states for the reaction also agrees well with that given by previous theoretical work using TDDFT surface-hopping dynamics that was validated by high-quality quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We also show that QNTO can be useful for considerably larger and more complex systems: by projecting the excitations to those of a reference oxirane molecule, the approach is able to identify and analyse specific excitations of a trans-2,3-diphenyloxirane molecule. PMID:25875632

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies peanut allergy-specific loci and evidence of epigenetic mediation in US children.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiumei; Hao, Ke; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Hansen, Kasper D; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xin; Thornton, Timothy A; Caruso, Deanna; Keet, Corinne A; Sun, Yifei; Wang, Guoying; Luo, Wei; Kumar, Rajesh; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Singh, Anne Marie; Kim, Jennifer S; Story, Rachel E; Gupta, Ruchi S; Gao, Peisong; Chen, Zhu; Walker, Sheila O; Bartell, Tami R; Beaty, Terri H; Fallin, M Daniele; Schleimer, Robert; Holt, Patrick G; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Wood, Robert A; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Weeks, Daniel E; Wang, Xiaobin

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy (FA) affects 2%-10% of US children and is a growing clinical and public health problem. Here we conduct the first genome-wide association study of well-defined FA, including specific subtypes (peanut, milk and egg) in 2,759 US participants (1,315 children and 1,444 parents) from the Chicago Food Allergy Study, and identify peanut allergy (PA)-specific loci in the HLA-DR and -DQ gene region at 6p21.32, tagged by rs7192 (P=5.5 × 10(-8)) and rs9275596 (P=6.8 × 10(-10)), in 2,197 participants of European ancestry. We replicate these associations in an independent sample of European ancestry. These associations are further supported by meta-analyses across the discovery and replication samples. Both single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with differential DNA methylation levels at multiple CpG sites (P<5 × 10(-8)), and differential DNA methylation of the HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 genes partially mediate the identified SNP-PA associations. This study suggests that the HLA-DR and -DQ gene region probably poses significant genetic risk for PA. PMID:25710614

  6. Genome-wide association study and targeted metabolomics identifies sex-specific association of CPS1 with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartiala, Jaana A.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Wang, Zeneng; Crow, Amanda L.; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Willenborg, Christina; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites derived from dietary choline and L-carnitine, such as trimethylamine N-oxide and betaine, have recently been identified as novel risk factors for atherosclerosis in mice and humans. We sought to identify genetic factors associated with plasma betaine levels and determine their effect on risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified two significantly associated loci on chromosomes 2q34 and 5q14.1. The lead variant on 2q24 (rs715) localizes to carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the first committed reaction and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle. Rs715 is also significantly associated with decreased levels of urea cycle metabolites and increased plasma glycine levels. Notably, rs715 yield a strikingly significant and protective association with decreased risk of CAD in only women. These results suggest that glycine metabolism and/or the urea cycle represent potentially novel sex-specific mechanisms for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822151

  7. Genome-wide association study and targeted metabolomics identifies sex-specific association of CPS1 with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hartiala, Jaana A; Tang, W H Wilson; Wang, Zeneng; Crow, Amanda L; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Willenborg, Christina; Hazen, Stanley L; Allayee, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites derived from dietary choline and L-carnitine, such as trimethylamine N-oxide and betaine, have recently been identified as novel risk factors for atherosclerosis in mice and humans. We sought to identify genetic factors associated with plasma betaine levels and determine their effect on risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified two significantly associated loci on chromosomes 2q34 and 5q14.1. The lead variant on 2q24 (rs715) localizes to carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the first committed reaction and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle. Rs715 is also significantly associated with decreased levels of urea cycle metabolites and increased plasma glycine levels. Notably, rs715 yield a strikingly significant and protective association with decreased risk of CAD in only women. These results suggest that glycine metabolism and/or the urea cycle represent potentially novel sex-specific mechanisms for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822151

  8. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Iksoo; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data) to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket) for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively. PMID:26406920

  9. [Unexpected revision procedures treating ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Pommer, A; Breuer, R; Hullmann, S; Heyde, D V; Dávid, A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the risk factors associated with unexpected second procedures and strategies of revision surgery. Within a 5 year period 647 patients with closed ankle fractures AO type 44 were identified of which 77 (11.9%) needed revision surgery. Complications were addressed to 4 main groups: deep infections (IG) were seen in 29 patients (4.5%), problems with primary wound closure (WG) in 22 patients (3.4%), insufficient reduction (KG) in 22 patients (3.4%) and other causes (RG) included 4 patients (0.6%). Significant predictive factors for soft tissue complications were higher age, comorbidities with peripheral arteriosclerosis, high American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score and diabetes mellitus. AO 44 type B2 and B3 fractures were often associated with soft tissue problems. The more complex fracture types AO 44 C1-C3 and A2-A3 were significantly associated with problems of insufficient congruency post-surgery. The distribution of the mean revision rate was significantly different (p<0.01) for all groups: IG 4.59, WG 3.5, KG 1.55, RG 1.25. In summary, we strongly recommend immediate reduction of displaced fractures and to consider a more detailed fracture classification. To reduce the amount of unexpected ankle procedures individual risk factors should be weighed against the advantages of optimal open reduction and internal fixation. PMID:21165587

  10. Comparative Genome-Wide Screening Identifies a Conserved Doxorubicin Repair Network That Is Diploid Specific in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Westmoreland, Tammy J.; Wickramasekara, Sajith M.; Guo, Andrew Y.; Selim, Alice L.; Winsor, Tiffany S.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Craig B.

    2009-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) induces DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage. In order to identify conserved genes that mediate DOX resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid deletion collection and identified 376 deletion strains in which exposure to DOX was lethal or severely reduced growth fitness. This diploid screen identified 5-fold more DOX resistance genes than a comparable screen using the isogenic haploid derivative. Since DSB damage is repaired primarily by homologous recombination in yeast, and haploid cells lack an available DNA homolog in G1 and early S phase, this suggests that our diploid screen may have detected the loss of repair functions in G1 or early S phase prior to complete DNA replication. To test this, we compared the relative DOX sensitivity of 30 diploid deletion mutants identified under our screening conditions to their isogenic haploid counterpart, most of which (n = 26) were not detected in the haploid screen. For six mutants (bem1Δ, ctf4Δ, ctk1Δ, hfi1Δ,nup133Δ, tho2Δ) DOX-induced lethality was absent or greatly reduced in the haploid as compared to the isogenic diploid derivative. Moreover, unlike WT, all six diploid mutants displayed severe G1/S phase cell cycle progression defects when exposed to DOX and some were significantly enhanced (ctk1Δ and hfi1Δ) or deficient (tho2Δ) for recombination. Using these and other “THO2-like” hypo-recombinogenic, diploid-specific DOX sensitive mutants (mft1Δ, thp1Δ, thp2Δ) we utilized known genetic/proteomic interactions to construct an interactive functional genomic network which predicted additional DOX resistance genes not detected in the primary screen. Most (76%) of the DOX resistance genes detected in this diploid yeast screen are evolutionarily conserved suggesting the human orthologs are candidates for mediating DOX resistance by impacting on checkpoint and recombination functions in G1 and/or early S phases. PMID:19503795

  11. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  12. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  13. Analysis of endogenous peptides bound by soluble MHC class I molecules: a novel approach for identifying tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Patoka, Renana; Ziv, Tamar; Kessler, Ofra; Tzehoval, Esther; Eisenbach, Lea; Zavazava, Nicholas; Admon, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at comprehensive cataloging of peptides presented within the context of different human leukocyte antigens (HLA) expressed by cells of various tissue origins, both in health and in disease. Of major interest are peptides presented on cancer cells, which include peptides derived from tumor antigens that are of interest for immunotherapy. Here, HLA-restricted tumor-specific antigens were identified by transfecting human breast, ovarian and prostate tumor cell lines with truncated genes of HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Soluble HLA secreted by these cell lines were purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed by nano-capillary electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Typically, a large peptide pool was recovered and sequenced including peptides derived from MAGE-B2 and mucin and other new tumor-derived antigens that may serve as potential candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:11782012

  14. A novel 95-kilodalton antigen of Wuchereria bancrofti infective larvae identified by species-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Burkot, T R; Kwan-Lim, G E; Maizels, R M

    1996-01-01

    CBA and BALB/c mice produced polyspecific and monospecific polyclonal antibody responses, respectively, following immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti stage-3 larvae. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced from the immunized BALB/c mouse. These MAbs (both isotype M) recognized a previously undescribed highly expressed W. bancrofti antigen present in stage-3 larvae. The epitopes bound by the MAbs appear to be species specific for W. bancrofti since the MAbs did not bind to antigens of either nine other nematode species or two vector species in Western blots (immunoblots). Phosphorylcholine epitopes, responsible for immunological cross-reactivity among nematodes, were identified only on a 200-kDa antigen and not on the 95-kDa molecule. The targets of these immunoglobulin M MAbs are not carbohydrate epitopes. PMID:8550196

  15. Specific renal parenchymal-derived urinary extracellular vesicles identify age-associated structural changes in living donor kidneys.

    PubMed

    Turco, Anne E; Lam, Wing; Rule, Andrew D; Denic, Aleksandar; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M; Larson, Joseph J; Kremers, Walter K; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive tests to identify age and early disease-associated pathology within the kidney are needed. Specific populations of urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs) could potentially be used for such a diagnostic test. Random urine samples were obtained from age- and sex-stratified living kidney donors before kidney donation. A biopsy of the donor kidney was obtained at the time of transplantation to identify nephron hypertrophy (larger glomerular volume, cortex per glomerulus and mean profile tubular area) and nephrosclerosis (% fibrosis, % glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis). Renal parenchymal-derived EVs in cell-free urine were quantified by digital flow cytometry. The relationship between these EV populations and structural pathology on the kidney biopsy was assessed. Clinical characteristics of the kidney donors (n=138, age range: 20-70 years, 50% women) were within the normative range. Overall, urine from women contained more EVs than that from men. The number of exosomes, juxtaglomerular cells and podocyte marker-positive EVs decreased (p<0.05) with increasing age. There were fewer total EVs as well as EVs positive for mesangial cell, parietal cell, descending limb of Henle's loop (simple squamous epithelium), collecting tubule-intercalated cell and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 markers (p<0.05) in persons with nephron hypertrophy. The number of EVs positive for intercellular adhesion molecule-1, juxtaglomerular cell, podocyte, parietal cell, proximal tubular epithelial cell, distal tubular epithelial cell and collecting duct cells were fewer (p<0.05) in persons with nephrosclerosis. EVs carrying markers of cells from the renal pelvis epithelium did not associate with any indices of nephron hypertrophy or nephrosclerosis. Therefore, specific populations of EVs derived from cells of the glomerulus and nephron associate with underlying kidney structural changes. Further validation of these findings in other cohorts is needed to determine their

  16. Specific renal parenchymal-derived urinary extracellular vesicles identify age-associated structural changes in living donor kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Anne E.; Lam, Wing; Rule, Andrew D.; Denic, Aleksandar; Lieske, John C.; Miller, Virginia M.; Larson, Joseph J.; Kremers, Walter K.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive tests to identify age and early disease-associated pathology within the kidney are needed. Specific populations of urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs) could potentially be used for such a diagnostic test. Random urine samples were obtained from age- and sex-stratified living kidney donors before kidney donation. A biopsy of the donor kidney was obtained at the time of transplantation to identify nephron hypertrophy (larger glomerular volume, cortex per glomerulus and mean profile tubular area) and nephrosclerosis (% fibrosis, % glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis). Renal parenchymal-derived EVs in cell-free urine were quantified by digital flow cytometry. The relationship between these EV populations and structural pathology on the kidney biopsy was assessed. Clinical characteristics of the kidney donors (n=138, age range: 20–70 years, 50% women) were within the normative range. Overall, urine from women contained more EVs than that from men. The number of exosomes, juxtaglomerular cells and podocyte marker–positive EVs decreased (p<0.05) with increasing age. There were fewer total EVs as well as EVs positive for mesangial cell, parietal cell, descending limb of Henle's loop (simple squamous epithelium), collecting tubule-intercalated cell and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 markers (p<0.05) in persons with nephron hypertrophy. The number of EVs positive for intercellular adhesion molecule-1, juxtaglomerular cell, podocyte, parietal cell, proximal tubular epithelial cell, distal tubular epithelial cell and collecting duct cells were fewer (p<0.05) in persons with nephrosclerosis. EVs carrying markers of cells from the renal pelvis epithelium did not associate with any indices of nephron hypertrophy or nephrosclerosis. Therefore, specific populations of EVs derived from cells of the glomerulus and nephron associate with underlying kidney structural changes. Further validation of these findings in other cohorts is needed to determine their

  17. Meta-analysis of lipid-traits in Hispanics identifies novel loci, population-specific effects, and tissue-specific enrichment of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Below, Jennifer E.; Parra, Esteban J.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Torres, Jason; Krithika, S.; Candille, Sophie; Lu, Yingchang; Manichakul, Ani; Peralta-Romero, Jesus; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Morris, Andrew P.; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin; Wang, Xin-Qun; Taylor, Kent D.; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen S.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Tang, Hua; Cox, Nancy J.; Cruz, Miguel; Hanis, Craig L.; Valladares-Salgado, Adan

    2016-01-01

    We performed genome-wide meta-analysis of lipid traits on three samples of Mexican and Mexican American ancestry comprising 4,383 individuals, and followed up significant and highly suggestive associations in three additional Hispanic samples comprising 7,876 individuals. Genome-wide significant signals were observed in or near CELSR2, ZNF259/APOA5, KANK2/DOCK6 and NCAN/MAU2 for total cholesterol, LPL, ABCA1, ZNF259/APOA5, LIPC and CETP for HDL cholesterol, CELSR2, APOB and NCAN/MAU2 for LDL cholesterol, and GCKR, TRIB1, ZNF259/APOA5 and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides. Linkage disequilibrium and conditional analyses indicate that signals observed at ABCA1 and LIPC for HDL cholesterol and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides are independent of previously reported lead SNP associations. Analyses of lead SNPs from the European Global Lipids Genetics Consortium (GLGC) dataset in our Hispanic samples show remarkable concordance of direction of effects as well as strong correlation in effect sizes. A meta-analysis of the European GLGC and our Hispanic datasets identified five novel regions reaching genome-wide significance: two for total cholesterol (FN1 and SAMM50), two for HDL cholesterol (LOC100996634 and COPB1) and one for LDL cholesterol (LINC00324/CTC1/PFAS). The top meta-analysis signals were found to be enriched for SNPs associated with gene expression in a tissue-specific fashion, suggesting an enrichment of tissue-specific function in lipid-associated loci. PMID:26780889

  18. Meta-analysis of lipid-traits in Hispanics identifies novel loci, population-specific effects, and tissue-specific enrichment of eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Below, Jennifer E; Parra, Esteban J; Gamazon, Eric R; Torres, Jason; Krithika, S; Candille, Sophie; Lu, Yingchang; Manichakul, Ani; Peralta-Romero, Jesus; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Morris, Andrew P; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin; Wang, Xin-Qun; Taylor, Kent D; Ida Chen, Y-D; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Loos, Ruth J F; Tang, Hua; Cox, Nancy J; Cruz, Miguel; Hanis, Craig L; Valladares-Salgado, Adan

    2016-01-01

    We performed genome-wide meta-analysis of lipid traits on three samples of Mexican and Mexican American ancestry comprising 4,383 individuals, and followed up significant and highly suggestive associations in three additional Hispanic samples comprising 7,876 individuals. Genome-wide significant signals were observed in or near CELSR2, ZNF259/APOA5, KANK2/DOCK6 and NCAN/MAU2 for total cholesterol, LPL, ABCA1, ZNF259/APOA5, LIPC and CETP for HDL cholesterol, CELSR2, APOB and NCAN/MAU2 for LDL cholesterol, and GCKR, TRIB1, ZNF259/APOA5 and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides. Linkage disequilibrium and conditional analyses indicate that signals observed at ABCA1 and LIPC for HDL cholesterol and NCAN/MAU2 for triglycerides are independent of previously reported lead SNP associations. Analyses of lead SNPs from the European Global Lipids Genetics Consortium (GLGC) dataset in our Hispanic samples show remarkable concordance of direction of effects as well as strong correlation in effect sizes. A meta-analysis of the European GLGC and our Hispanic datasets identified five novel regions reaching genome-wide significance: two for total cholesterol (FN1 and SAMM50), two for HDL cholesterol (LOC100996634 and COPB1) and one for LDL cholesterol (LINC00324/CTC1/PFAS). The top meta-analysis signals were found to be enriched for SNPs associated with gene expression in a tissue-specific fashion, suggesting an enrichment of tissue-specific function in lipid-associated loci. PMID:26780889

  19. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Lu; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chen, Yi-Jin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena. PMID:19272175

  20. Identifying type 1 diabetes candidate genes by DNA microarray analysis of islet-specific CD4 + T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory J; Frielle, Christine; Brucklacher, Robert M; Salzberg, Anna C; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells and is fatal unless treated with insulin. During the last four decades, multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) susceptibility/resistance loci that regulate T1D development have been identified in humans and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, an established animal model for T1D. However, the exact mechanisms by which these loci confer diabetes risk and the identity of the causative genes remain largely elusive. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms that control the function of diabetogenic T cells, we conducted DNA microarray analysis in islet-specific CD4 + T cells from BDC2.5 TCR transgenic NOD mice that contain the Idd9 locus from T1D-susceptible NOD mice or T1D-resistant C57BL/10 mice. Here we describe in detail the contents and analyses for these gene expression data associated with our previous study [1]. Gene expression data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (accession number GSE64674). PMID:26484253

  1. Novel chemical library screen identifies naturally occurring plant products that specifically disrupt glioblastoma-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Barone, Amy; Marasa, Jayne; Taylor, Sara; Jackson, Erin; Warrington, Nicole M; Rao, Shyam; Kim, Albert H; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B

    2015-07-30

    Tumor growth is not solely a consequence of autonomous tumor cell properties. Rather, tumor cells act upon and are acted upon by their microenvironment. It is tumor tissue biology that ultimately determines tumor growth. Thus, we developed a compound library screen for agents that could block essential tumor-promoting effects of the glioblastoma (GBM) perivascular stem cell niche (PVN). We modeled the PVN with three-dimensional primary cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in Matrigel. We previously demonstrated stimulated growth of GBM cells in this PVN model and used this to assay PVN function. We screened the Microsource Spectrum Collection library for drugs that specifically blocked PVN function, without any direct effect on GBM cells themselves. Three candidate PVN-disrupting agents, Iridin, Tigogenin and Triacetylresveratrol (TAR), were identified and evaluated in secondary in vitro screens against a panel of primary GBM isolates as well as in two different in vivo intracranial models. Iridin and TAR significantly inhibited intracranial tumor growth and prolonged survival in these mouse models. Together these data identify Iridin and TAR as drugs with novel GBM tissue disrupting effects and validate the importance of preclinical screens designed to address tumor tissue function rather than the mechanisms of autonomous tumor cell growth. PMID:26286961

  2. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus tigurinus Strains Identifies Genetic Elements Specifically and Uniquely Present in Highly Virulent Strains

    PubMed Central

    Diene, Seydina M.; François, Patrice; Zbinden, Andrea; Entenza, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is responsible for severe invasive infections such as infective endocarditis, spondylodiscitis and meningitis. As described, S. tigurinus isolates AZ_3aT and AZ_14 were highly virulent (HV phenotype) in an experimental model of infective endocarditis and showed enhanced adherence and invasion of human endothelial cells when compared to low virulent S. tigurinus isolate AZ_8 (LV phenotype). Here, we sought whether genetic determinants could explain the higher virulence of AZ_3aT and AZ_14 isolates. Several genetic determinants specific to the HV strains were identified through extensive comparative genomics amongst which some were thought to be highly relevant for the observed HV phenotype. These included i) an iron uptake and metabolism operon, ii) an ascorbate assimilation operon, iii) a newly acquired PI-2-like pilus islets described for the first time in S. tigurinus, iv) a hyaluronate metabolism operon, v) an Entner-Doudoroff pathway of carbohydrates metabolism, and vi) an alternate pathways for indole biosynthesis. We believe that the identified genomic features could largely explain the phenotype of high infectivity of the two HV S. tigurinus strains. Indeed, these features include determinants that could be involved at different stages of the disease such as survival of S. tigurinus in blood (iron uptake and ascorbate metabolism operons), initial attachment of bacterial pathogen to the damaged cardiac tissue and/or vegetation that formed on site (PI-2-like pilus islets), tissue invasion (hyaluronate operon and Entner-Doudoroff pathway) and regulation of pathogenicity (indole biosynthesis pathway). PMID:27505001

  3. Chromatin accessibility maps of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identify subtype-specific epigenome signatures and transcription regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Rendeiro, André F; Schmidl, Christian; Strefford, Jonathan C; Walewska, Renata; Davis, Zadie; Farlik, Matthias; Oscier, David; Bock, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is characterized by substantial clinical heterogeneity, despite relatively few genetic alterations. To provide a basis for studying epigenome deregulation in CLL, here we present genome-wide chromatin accessibility maps for 88 CLL samples from 55 patients measured by the ATAC-seq assay. We also performed ChIPmentation and RNA-seq profiling for ten representative samples. Based on the resulting data set, we devised and applied a bioinformatic method that links chromatin profiles to clinical annotations. Our analysis identified sample-specific variation on top of a shared core of CLL regulatory regions. IGHV mutation status-which distinguishes the two major subtypes of CLL-was accurately predicted by the chromatin profiles and gene regulatory networks inferred for IGHV-mutated versus IGHV-unmutated samples identified characteristic differences between these two disease subtypes. In summary, we discovered widespread heterogeneity in the chromatin landscape of CLL, established a community resource for studying epigenome deregulation in leukaemia and demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale chromatin accessibility mapping in cancer cohorts and clinical research. PMID:27346425

  4. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus tigurinus Strains Identifies Genetic Elements Specifically and Uniquely Present in Highly Virulent Strains.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; François, Patrice; Zbinden, Andrea; Entenza, José Manuel; Resch, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is responsible for severe invasive infections such as infective endocarditis, spondylodiscitis and meningitis. As described, S. tigurinus isolates AZ_3aT and AZ_14 were highly virulent (HV phenotype) in an experimental model of infective endocarditis and showed enhanced adherence and invasion of human endothelial cells when compared to low virulent S. tigurinus isolate AZ_8 (LV phenotype). Here, we sought whether genetic determinants could explain the higher virulence of AZ_3aT and AZ_14 isolates. Several genetic determinants specific to the HV strains were identified through extensive comparative genomics amongst which some were thought to be highly relevant for the observed HV phenotype. These included i) an iron uptake and metabolism operon, ii) an ascorbate assimilation operon, iii) a newly acquired PI-2-like pilus islets described for the first time in S. tigurinus, iv) a hyaluronate metabolism operon, v) an Entner-Doudoroff pathway of carbohydrates metabolism, and vi) an alternate pathways for indole biosynthesis. We believe that the identified genomic features could largely explain the phenotype of high infectivity of the two HV S. tigurinus strains. Indeed, these features include determinants that could be involved at different stages of the disease such as survival of S. tigurinus in blood (iron uptake and ascorbate metabolism operons), initial attachment of bacterial pathogen to the damaged cardiac tissue and/or vegetation that formed on site (PI-2-like pilus islets), tissue invasion (hyaluronate operon and Entner-Doudoroff pathway) and regulation of pathogenicity (indole biosynthesis pathway). PMID:27505001

  5. Novel chemical library screen identifies naturally occurring plant products that specifically disrupt glioblastoma-endothelial cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Marasa, Jayne; Taylor, Sara; Jackson, Erin; Warrington, Nicole M.; Rao, Shyam; Kim, Albert H.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor growth is not solely a consequence of autonomous tumor cell properties. Rather, tumor cells act upon and are acted upon by their microenvironment. It is tumor tissue biology that ultimately determines tumor growth. Thus, we developed a compound library screen for agents that could block essential tumor-promoting effects of the glioblastoma (GBM) perivascular stem cell niche (PVN). We modeled the PVN with three-dimensional primary cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in Matrigel. We previously demonstrated stimulated growth of GBM cells in this PVN model and used this to assay PVN function. We screened the Microsource Spectrum Collection library for drugs that specifically blocked PVN function, without any direct effect on GBM cells themselves. Three candidate PVN-disrupting agents, Iridin, Tigogenin and Triacetylresveratrol (TAR), were identified and evaluated in secondary in vitro screens against a panel of primary GBM isolates as well as in two different in vivo intracranial models. Iridin and TAR significantly inhibited intracranial tumor growth and prolonged survival in these mouse models. Together these data identify Iridin and TAR as drugs with novel GBM tissue disrupting effects and validate the importance of preclinical screens designed to address tumor tissue function rather than the mechanisms of autonomous tumor cell growth. PMID:26286961

  6. Serum Metabolomics to Identify the Liver Disease-Specific Biomarkers for the Progression of Hepatitis to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Cheng, Jianhua; Fan, Chunlei; Shi, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yuan; Sun, Bo; Ding, Huiguo; Hu, Chengjin; Dong, Fangting; Yan, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that has region specific etiologies. Unfortunately, 85% of cases of HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Reliable biomarkers for the early diagnosis of HCC are urgently required to reduced mortality and therapeutic expenditure. We established a non-targeted gas chromatography–time of flight–mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) metabolomics method in conjunction with Random Forests (RF) analysis based on 201 serum samples from healthy controls (NC), hepatitis B virus (HBV), liver cirrhosis (LC) and HCC patients to explore the metabolic characteristics in the progression of hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Ultimately, 15 metabolites were identified intimately associated with the process. Phenylalanine, malic acid and 5-methoxytryptamine for HBV vs. NC, palmitic acid for LC vs. HBV, and asparagine and β-glutamate for HCC vs. LC were screened as the liver disease-specific potential biomarkers with an excellent discriminant performance. All the metabolic perturbations in these liver diseases are associated with pathways for energy metabolism, macromolecular synthesis, and maintaining the redox balance to protect tumor cells from oxidative stress. PMID:26658617

  7. Serum Metabolomics to Identify the Liver Disease-Specific Biomarkers for the Progression of Hepatitis to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rong; Cheng, Jianhua; Fan, Chunlei; Shi, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yuan; Sun, Bo; Ding, Huiguo; Hu, Chengjin; Dong, Fangting; Yan, Xianzhong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that has region specific etiologies. Unfortunately, 85% of cases of HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Reliable biomarkers for the early diagnosis of HCC are urgently required to reduced mortality and therapeutic expenditure. We established a non-targeted gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) metabolomics method in conjunction with Random Forests (RF) analysis based on 201 serum samples from healthy controls (NC), hepatitis B virus (HBV), liver cirrhosis (LC) and HCC patients to explore the metabolic characteristics in the progression of hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Ultimately, 15 metabolites were identified intimately associated with the process. Phenylalanine, malic acid and 5-methoxytryptamine for HBV vs. NC, palmitic acid for LC vs. HBV, and asparagine and β-glutamate for HCC vs. LC were screened as the liver disease-specific potential biomarkers with an excellent discriminant performance. All the metabolic perturbations in these liver diseases are associated with pathways for energy metabolism, macromolecular synthesis, and maintaining the redox balance to protect tumor cells from oxidative stress.

  8. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; McEwen, Daniel C.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Dossey, Aaron T.; Li, Eric C.; Kozlov, Andrew N.; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  9. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; McEwen, Daniel C; Garrett, Timothy J; Dossey, Aaron T; Li, Eric C; Kozlov, Andrew N; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  10. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  11. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  12. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus. These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  13. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Collins, Ben C.; Pennington, Stephen R.; Gallagher, William M.; Tabb, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications. PMID:21214251

  14. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    /Significance This study allowed us to identify potential markers of early sex differentiation in the oyster C. gigas, an alternative hermaphrodite mollusk. We also provided new highly valuable information on genes specifically expressed by mature spermatozoids and mature oocytes. PMID:22590533

  15. Task-specific Aspects of Goal-directed Word Generation Identified via Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Klovatch, Ilana; Nathan, Dana; Oren, Noga; Hendler, Talma

    2016-09-01

    Generating words according to a given rule relies on retrieval-related search and postretrieval control processes. Using fMRI, we recently characterized neural patterns of word generation in response to episodic, semantic, and phonemic cues by comparing free recall of wordlists, category fluency, and letter fluency [Shapira-Lichter, I., Oren, N., Jacob, Y., Gruberger, M., & Hendler, T. Portraying the unique contribution of the default mode network to internally driven mnemonic processes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A., 110, 4950-4955, 2013]. Distinct selectivity for each condition was evident, representing discrete aspects of word generation-related memory retrieval. For example, the precuneus, implicated in processing spatiotemporal information, emerged as a key contributor to the episodic condition, which uniquely requires this information. Gamma band is known to play a central role in memory, and increased gamma power has been observed before word generation. Yet, gamma modulation in response to task demands has not been investigated. To capture the task-specific modulation of gamma power, we analyzed the EEG data recorded simultaneously with the aforementioned fMRI, focusing on the activity locked to and immediately preceding word articulation. Transient increases in gamma power were identified in a parietal electrode immediately before episodic and semantic word generation, however, within a different time frame relative to articulation. Gamma increases were followed by an alpha-theta decrease in the episodic condition, a gamma decrease in the semantic condition. This pattern indicates a task-specific modulation of the gamma signal corresponding to the specific demands of each word generation task. The gamma power and fMRI signal from the precuneus were correlated during the episodic condition, implying the existence of a common cognitive construct uniquely required for this task, possibly the reactivation or processing of

  16. The O-glycomap of Lubricin, a Novel Mucin Responsible for Joint Lubrication, Identified by Site-specific Glycopeptide Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A.; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H.; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2014-01-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  17. The O-glycomap of lubricin, a novel mucin responsible for joint lubrication, identified by site-specific glycopeptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2014-12-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  18. Sudden unexpected death, epilepsy and familial cardiac pathology.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, A J; Thompson, T; Vohra, J K; O'Brien, T J; Winship, I

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of epilepsy in a cohort of patients who suffered a sudden unexpected death (SUDEP), and determined the proportion of the deaths that were related to an identifiable underlying familial cardiac pathology. Epilepsy is common in people who experience a sudden unexpected death, with approximately a quarter having identifiable familial electrophysiological abnormalities. Familial cardiac pathology may be an important cause of SUDEP. A retrospective evaluation was performed of 74 families that were referred to the Royal Melbourne Hospital Cardiac Genetic Clinic over a 5 year period for investigation following a family member's sudden, presumed cardiac, death. This state-wide referral clinic includes all patients who have died from a sudden unexpected death in whom the cause of death is unascertained. An epilepsy diagnosis was categorised as either definite, probable, possible or unlikely. The family members underwent comprehensive clinical evaluations and investigations in an attempt to identify a familial cardiac cause for the sudden unexpected death. Our findings suggest that systematic referral to a cardiac genetics service is warranted for the first degree relatives of people with epilepsy who experience a sudden unexplained death, for further evaluation and to identify those who are at higher risk for sudden death. Interventions may then be instituted to potentially reduce this risk. PMID:26195332

  19. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(P)H. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of the soybean genome sequence allows us to identify and analyze soybean putative P450s at a genome scale. Co-expression analysis using an available soybean microarray and Illumina sequencing data provides clues for functional annotation of these enzymes. This approach is based on the assumption that genes that have similar expression patterns across a set of conditions may have a functional relationship. Results We have identified a total number of 332 full-length P450 genes and 378 pseudogenes from the soybean genome. From the full-length sequences, 195 genes belong to A-type, which could be further divided into 20 families. The remaining 137 genes belong to non-A type P450s and are classified into 28 families. A total of 178 probe sets were found to correspond to P450 genes on the Affymetrix soybean array. Out of these probe sets, 108 represented single genes. Using the 28 publicly available microarray libraries that contain organ-specific information, some tissue-specific P450s were identified. Similarly, stress responsive soybean P450s were retrieved from 99 microarray soybean libraries. We also utilized Illumina transcriptome sequencing technology to analyze the expressions of all 332 soybean P450 genes. This dataset contains total RNAs isolated from nodules, roots, root tips, leaves, flowers, green pods, apical meristem, mock-inoculated and Bradyrhizobium japonicum-infected root hair cells. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these P450 genes were analyzed and the expression of a representative set of genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR. We performed the co-expression analysis on many of the 108 P450 genes on the Affymetrix arrays. First we confirmed that CYP93C5 (an isoflavone synthase gene) is

  20. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  1. Unexpected features of the dark proteome

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S.; Buckley, Michael J.; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S.; Hammang, Christopher J.; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the “dark” proteome–that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44–54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  2. Unexpected development of artistic talents

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N

    2005-01-01

    The development of exceptional and unexpected artistic skills at any age must be a matter of curiosity. This can occur among young children with severe learning difficulties, especially if they are autistic. Some examples of these so called idiot-savants are given, and the way in which their brains may function. It is also true that elderly people who suffer from frontotemporal dementia can find that they are able to express themselves in remarkable art forms. This can occur in other types of dementia, but then more often it is the changes that result in the paintings of established artists, for example in the paintings of de Kooning. Possible links between these two phenomenon are discussed, and it is suggested that in both instances it may be that if the brain is relieved of a number of functions it can concentrate on the remaining ones. Ways in which this may operate in both groups are reviewed. PMID:16344297

  3. Unexpected development of artistic talents.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N

    2005-12-01

    The development of exceptional and unexpected artistic skills at any age must be a matter of curiosity. This can occur among young children with severe learning difficulties, especially if they are autistic. Some examples of these so called idiot-savants are given, and the way in which their brains may function. It is also true that elderly people who suffer from frontotemporal dementia can find that they are able to express themselves in remarkable art forms. This can occur in other types of dementia, but then more often it is the changes that result in the paintings of established artists, for example in the paintings of de Kooning. Possible links between these two phenomenon are discussed, and it is suggested that in both instances it may be that if the brain is relieved of a number of functions it can concentrate on the remaining ones. Ways in which this may operate in both groups are reviewed. PMID:16344297

  4. Association-heterogeneity mapping identifies an Asian-specific association of the GTF2I locus with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Ikari, Katsunori; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Considerable sharing of disease alleles among populations is well-characterized in autoimmune disorders (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis), but there are some exceptional loci showing heterogenic association among populations. Here we investigated genetic variants with distinct effects on the development of rheumatoid arthritis in Asian and European populations. Ancestry-related association heterogeneity was examined using Cochran’s homogeneity tests for the disease association data from large Asian (n = 14,465; 9,299 discovery subjects and 5,166 validation subjects; 4 collections) and European (n = 45,790; 11 collections) rheumatoid arthritis case-control cohorts with Immunochip and genome-wide SNP array data. We identified significant heterogeneity between the two ancestries for the common variants in the GTF2I locus (PHeterogeneity = 9.6 × 10−9 at rs73366469) and showed that this heterogeneity was due to an Asian-specific association effect (ORMeta = 1.37 and PMeta = 4.2 × 10−13 in Asians; ORMeta = 1.00 and PMeta = 1.00 in Europeans). Trans-ancestral comparison and bioinfomatics analysis revealed a plausibly causal or disease-variant-tagging SNP (rs117026326; in linkage disequilibrium with rs73366469), whose minor allele is common in Asians but rare in Europeans. In conclusion, we identified largest-ever effect on Asian rheumatoid arthritis across human non-HLA regions at GTF2I by heterogeneity mapping followed by replication studies, and pinpointed a possible causal variant. PMID:27272985

  5. Association-heterogeneity mapping identifies an Asian-specific association of the GTF2I locus with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Ikari, Katsunori; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Nath, Swapan K; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Considerable sharing of disease alleles among populations is well-characterized in autoimmune disorders (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis), but there are some exceptional loci showing heterogenic association among populations. Here we investigated genetic variants with distinct effects on the development of rheumatoid arthritis in Asian and European populations. Ancestry-related association heterogeneity was examined using Cochran's homogeneity tests for the disease association data from large Asian (n = 14,465; 9,299 discovery subjects and 5,166 validation subjects; 4 collections) and European (n = 45,790; 11 collections) rheumatoid arthritis case-control cohorts with Immunochip and genome-wide SNP array data. We identified significant heterogeneity between the two ancestries for the common variants in the GTF2I locus (PHeterogeneity = 9.6 × 10(-9) at rs73366469) and showed that this heterogeneity was due to an Asian-specific association effect (ORMeta = 1.37 and PMeta = 4.2 × 10(-13) in Asians; ORMeta = 1.00 and PMeta = 1.00 in Europeans). Trans-ancestral comparison and bioinfomatics analysis revealed a plausibly causal or disease-variant-tagging SNP (rs117026326; in linkage disequilibrium with rs73366469), whose minor allele is common in Asians but rare in Europeans. In conclusion, we identified largest-ever effect on Asian rheumatoid arthritis across human non-HLA regions at GTF2I by heterogeneity mapping followed by replication studies, and pinpointed a possible causal variant. PMID:27272985

  6. Identifying risk factors for exposure to culturable allergenic moulds in energy efficient homes by using highly specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Richard A; Le Cocq, Kate; Nikolaou, Vasilis; Osborne, Nicholas J; Thornton, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in identifying culturable allergenic fungi present in visible mould growth in energy efficient homes, and to identify risk factors for exposure to these known allergenic fungi. Swabs were taken from fungal contaminated surfaces and culturable yeasts and moulds isolated by using mycological culture. Soluble antigens from cultures were tested by ELISA using mAbs specific to the culturable allergenic fungi Aspergillus and Penicillium spp., Ulocladium, Alternaria, and Epicoccum spp., Cladosporium spp., Fusarium spp., and Trichoderma spp. Diagnostic accuracies of the ELISA tests were determined by sequencing of the internally transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)-5.8S-ITS2-encoding regions of recovered fungi following ELISA. There was 100% concordance between the two methods, with ELISAs providing genus-level identity and ITS sequencing providing species-level identities (210 out of 210 tested). Species of Aspergillus/Penicillium, Cladosporium, Ulocladium/Alternaria/Epicoccum, Fusarium and Trichoderma were detected in 82% of the samples. The presence of condensation was associated with an increased risk of surfaces being contaminated by Aspergillus/Penicillium spp. and Cladosporium spp., whereas moisture within the building fabric (water ingress/rising damp) was only associated with increased risk of Aspergillus/Penicillium spp. Property type and energy efficiency levels were found to moderate the risk of indoor surfaces becoming contaminated with Aspergillus/Penicillium and Cladosporium which in turn was modified by the presence of condensation, water ingress and rising damp, consistent with previous literature. PMID:26546982

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analyses of Avirulent, Virulent, and Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identify Strain-specific Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Kumari, Sangeeta; Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Kalam, Haroon; Arora, Divya; Jain, Neharika; Kumaar, Lakshmi Krishna; Samal, Areejit; Rao, Kanury V. S.; Kumar, Dhiraj; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an adaptable intracellular pathogen, existing in both dormant as well as active disease-causing states. Here, we report systematic proteomic analyses of four strains, H37Ra, H37Rv, and clinical isolates BND and JAL, to determine the differences in protein expression patterns that contribute to their virulence and drug resistance. Resolution of lysates of the four strains by liquid chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry analysis, identified a total of 2161 protein groups covering ∼54% of the predicted M. tuberculosis proteome. Label-free quantification analysis of the data revealed 257 differentially expressed protein groups. The differentially expressed protein groups could be classified into seven K-means cluster bins, which broadly delineated strain-specific variations. Analysis of the data for possible mechanisms responsible for drug resistance phenotype of JAL suggested that it could be due to a combination of overexpression of proteins implicated in drug resistance and the other factors. Expression pattern analyses of transcription factors and their downstream targets demonstrated substantial differential modulation in JAL, suggesting a complex regulatory mechanism. Results showed distinct variations in the protein expression patterns of Esx and mce1 operon proteins in JAL and BND strains, respectively. Abrogating higher levels of ESAT6, an important Esx protein known to be critical for virulence, in the JAL strain diminished its virulence, although it had marginal impact on the other strains. Taken together, this study reveals that strain-specific variations in protein expression patterns have a meaningful impact on the biology of the pathogen. PMID:27151218

  8. Structural imaging biomarkers of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias; Scott, Catherine; Micallef, Caroline; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Thom, Maria; Harper, Ronald M.; Sander, Josemir W.; Vos, Sjoerd B.; Duncan, John S.; Lhatoo, Samden

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a major cause of premature death in people with epilepsy. We aimed to assess whether structural changes potentially attributable to sudden death pathogenesis were present on magnetic resonance imaging in people who subsequently died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. In a retrospective, voxel-based analysis of T1 volume scans, we compared grey matter volumes in 12 cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (two definite, 10 probable; eight males), acquired 2 years [median, interquartile range (IQR) 2.8] before death [median (IQR) age at scanning 33.5 (22) years], with 34 people at high risk [age 30.5 (12); 19 males], 19 at low risk [age 30 (7.5); 12 males] of sudden death, and 15 healthy controls [age 37 (16); seven males]. At-risk subjects were defined based on risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy identified in a recent combined risk factor analysis. We identified increased grey matter volume in the right anterior hippocampus/amygdala and parahippocampus in sudden death cases and people at high risk, when compared to those at low risk and controls. Compared to controls, posterior thalamic grey matter volume, an area mediating oxygen regulation, was reduced in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and subjects at high risk. The extent of reduction correlated with disease duration in all subjects with epilepsy. Increased amygdalo-hippocampal grey matter volume with right-sided changes is consistent with histo-pathological findings reported in sudden infant death syndrome. We speculate that the right-sided predominance reflects asymmetric central influences on autonomic outflow, contributing to cardiac arrhythmia. Pulvinar damage may impair hypoxia regulation. The imaging findings in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and people at high risk may be useful as a biomarker for risk-stratification in future studies. PMID:26264515

  9. Microplate-Based Assay for Identifying Small Molecules That Bind a Specific Intersubunit Interface within the Assembled HIV-1 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Halambage, Upul D.; Wong, Jason P.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of >30 effective drugs for managing HIV-1 infection, no current therapy is curative, and long-term management is challenging owing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants. Identification of drugs against novel HIV-1 targets would expand the current treatment options and help to control resistance. The highly conserved HIV-1 capsid protein represents an attractive target because of its multiple roles in replication of the virus. However, the low antiviral potencies of the reported HIV-1 capsid–targeting inhibitors render them unattractive for therapeutic development. To facilitate the identification of more-potent HIV-1 capsid inhibitors, we developed a scintillation proximity assay to screen for small molecules that target a biologically active and specific intersubunit interface in the HIV-1 capsid. The assay, which is based on competitive displacement of a known capsid-binding small-molecule inhibitor, exhibited a signal-to-noise ratio of >9 and a Z factor of >0.8. In a pilot screen of a chemical library containing 2,400 druglike compounds, we obtained a hit rate of 1.8%. This assay has properties that are suitable for screening large compound libraries to identify novel HIV-1 capsid ligands with antiviral activity. PMID:26077250

  10. Microplate-based assay for identifying small molecules that bind a specific intersubunit interface within the assembled HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Halambage, Upul D; Wong, Jason P; Melancon, Bruce J; Lindsley, Craig W; Aiken, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Despite the availability of >30 effective drugs for managing HIV-1 infection, no current therapy is curative, and long-term management is challenging owing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants. Identification of drugs against novel HIV-1 targets would expand the current treatment options and help to control resistance. The highly conserved HIV-1 capsid protein represents an attractive target because of its multiple roles in replication of the virus. However, the low antiviral potencies of the reported HIV-1 capsid-targeting inhibitors render them unattractive for therapeutic development. To facilitate the identification of more-potent HIV-1 capsid inhibitors, we developed a scintillation proximity assay to screen for small molecules that target a biologically active and specific intersubunit interface in the HIV-1 capsid. The assay, which is based on competitive displacement of a known capsid-binding small-molecule inhibitor, exhibited a signal-to-noise ratio of >9 and a Z factor of >0.8. In a pilot screen of a chemical library containing 2,400 druglike compounds, we obtained a hit rate of 1.8%. This assay has properties that are suitable for screening large compound libraries to identify novel HIV-1 capsid ligands with antiviral activity. PMID:26077250

  11. Peripheral Blood Cell Gene Expression Diagnostic for Identifying Symptomatic Transthyretin Amyloidosis Patients: Male and Female Specific Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Sunil M.; Novais, Marta; Whisenant, Thomas; Gelbart, Terri; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Coelho, Teresa; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases remains challenging because of variable disease penetrance. Currently, patients must have an amyloid positive tissue biopsy to be eligible for disease-modifying therapies. Endomyocardial biopsies are typically amyloid positive when cardiomyopathy is suspected, but this disease manifestation is generally diagnosed late. Early diagnosis is often difficult because patients exhibit apparent symptoms of polyneuropathy, but have a negative amyloid biopsy. Thus, there is a pressing need for an additional early diagnostic strategy for TTR-aggregation-associated polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Methods and Findings: Global peripheral blood cell mRNA expression profiles from 263 tafamidis-treated and untreated V30M Familiar Amyloid Neuropathy patients, asymptomatic V30M carriers, and healthy, age- and sex-matched controls without TTR mutations were used to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic patients. We demonstrate that blood cell gene expression patterns reveal sex-independent, as well as male- and female-specific inflammatory signatures in symptomatic FAP patients, but not in asymptomatic carriers. These signatures differentiated symptomatic patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers with >80% accuracy. There was a global downregulation of the eIF2 pathway and its associated genes in all symptomatic FAP patients. We also demonstrated that the molecular scores based on these signatures significantly trended toward normalized values in an independent cohort of 46 FAP patients after only 3 months of tafamidis treatment. Conclusions: This study identifies novel molecular signatures that differentiate symptomatic FAP patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers as well as affected males and females. We envision using this approach, initially in parallel with amyloid biopsies, to identify individuals who are asymptomatic gene carriers that may convert to FAP patients. Upon further validation

  12. Integrative Genomic Analyses Identify BRF2 as a Novel Lineage-Specific Oncogene in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, William W.; Chari, Raj; Coe, Bradley P.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Garnis, Cathie; Malloff, Chad A.; Campbell, Jennifer; Williams, Ariane C.; Hwang, Dorothy; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Buys, Timon P. H.; Yee, John; English, John C.; MacAulay, Calum; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditionally, non-small cell lung cancer is treated as a single disease entity in terms of systemic therapy. Emerging evidence suggests the major subtypes—adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC)—respond differently to therapy. Identification of the molecular differences between these tumor types will have a significant impact in designing novel therapies that can improve the treatment outcome. Methods and Findings We used an integrative genomics approach, combing high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression microarray profiles, to compare AC and SqCC tumors in order to uncover alterations at the DNA level, with corresponding gene transcription changes, which are selected for during development of lung cancer subtypes. Through the analysis of multiple independent cohorts of clinical tumor samples (>330), normal lung tissues and bronchial epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushing in smokers without lung cancer, we identified the overexpression of BRF2, a gene on Chromosome 8p12, which is specific for development of SqCC of lung. Genetic activation of BRF2, which encodes a RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription initiation factor, was found to be associated with increased expression of small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) that are involved in processes essential for cell growth, such as RNA splicing. Ectopic expression of BRF2 in human bronchial epithelial cells induced a transformed phenotype and demonstrates downstream oncogenic effects, whereas RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown suppressed growth and colony formation of SqCC cells overexpressing BRF2, but not AC cells. Frequent activation of BRF2 in >35% preinvasive bronchial carcinoma in situ, as well as in dysplastic lesions, provides evidence that BRF2 expression is an early event in cancer development of this cell lineage. Conclusions This is the first study, to our knowledge, to show that the focal amplification of a gene in Chromosome 8p12, plays

  13. Fenofibrate unexpectedly induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice lacking MuRF1.

    PubMed

    Parry, Traci L; Desai, Gopal; Schisler, Jonathan C; Li, Luge; Quintana, Megan T; Stanley, Natalie; Lockyer, Pamela; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    The muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is critical in regulating both pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. Previous work from our group has identified MuRF1's ability to inhibit serum response factor and insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathways (via targeted inhibition of cJun as underlying mechanisms). More recently, we have identified that MuRF1 inhibits fatty acid metabolism by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) for nuclear export via mono-ubiquitination. Since MuRF1-/- mice have an estimated fivefold increase in PPARα activity, we sought to determine how challenge with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate, a PPARα ligand, would affect the heart physiologically. In as little as 3 weeks, feeding with fenofibrate/chow (0.05% wt/wt) induced unexpected pathological cardiac hypertrophy not present in age-matched sibling wild-type (MuRF1+/+) mice, identified by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, and increased beta-myosin heavy chain, brain natriuretic peptide, and skeletal muscle α-actin mRNA. In addition to pathological hypertrophy, MuRF1-/- mice had an unexpected differential expression in genes associated with the pleiotropic effects of fenofibrate involved in the extracellular matrix, protease inhibition, hemostasis, and the sarcomere. At both 3 and 8 weeks of fenofibrate treatment, the differentially expressed MuRF1-/- genes most commonly had SREBP-1 and E2F1/E2F promoter regions by TRANSFAC analysis (54 and 50 genes, respectively, of the 111 of the genes >4 and <-4 log fold change; P ≤ .0004). These studies identify MuRF1's unexpected regulation of fenofibrate's pleiotropic effects and bridges, for the first time, MuRF1's regulation of PPARα, cardiac hypertrophy, and hemostasis. PMID:26764147

  14. Cdc25B Dual-Specificity Phosphatase Inhibitors Identified in a High-Throughput Screen of the NIH Compound Library

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Caleb A.; Tierno, Marni Brisson; Shun, Tong Ying; Shinde, Sunita N.; Paquette, William D.; Brummond, Kay M.; Wipf, Peter; Lazo, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The University of Pittsburgh Molecular Library Screening Center (Pittsburgh, PA) conducted a screen with the National Institutes of Health compound library for inhibitors of in vitro cell division cycle 25 protein (Cdc25) B activity during the pilot phase of the Molecular Library Screening Center Network. Seventy-nine (0.12%) of the 65,239 compounds screened at 10 μM met the active criterion of ≥50% inhibition of Cdc25B activity, and 25 (31.6%) of these were confirmed as Cdc25B inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <50 μM. Thirteen of the Cdc25B inhibitors were represented by singleton chemical structures, and 12 were divided among four clusters of related structures. Thirteen (52%) of the Cdc25B inhibitor hits were quinone-based structures. The Cdc25B inhibitors were further characterized in a series of in vitro secondary assays to confirm their activity, to determine their phosphatase selectivity against two other dual-specificity phosphatases, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 and MKP-3, and to examine if the mechanism of Cdc25B inhibition involved oxidation and inactivation. Nine Cdc25B inhibitors did not appear to affect Cdc25B through a mechanism involving oxidation because they did not generate detectable amounts of H2O2 in the presence of dithiothreitol, and their Cdc25B IC50 values were not significantly affected by exchanging the dithiothreitol for β-mercaptoethanol or reduced glutathione or by adding catalase to the assay. Six of the nonoxidative hits were selective for Cdc25B inhibition versus MKP-1 and MKP-3, but only the two bisfuran-containing hits, PubChem substance identifiers 4258795 and 4260465, significantly inhibited the growth of human MBA-MD-435 breast and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. To confirm the structure and biological activity of 4260465, the compound was resynthesized along with two analogs. Neither of the substitutions to the two analogs was tolerated, and only the

  15. Coupling genetics and proteomics to identify aphid proteins associated with vector-specific transmission of Polerovirus (Luteoviridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV) is transmitted specifically by the aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Schizaphis graminum in a circulative nonpropagative manner. The high level of vector-specificity results from the vector aphids having the functional components of the receptor-mediated endocyto...

  16. Evaluation of the Technical Adequacy of Three Methods for Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities Based on Cognitive Discrepancies

    PubMed Central

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Branum-Martin, Lee; Francis, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This study used simulation techniques to evaluate the technical adequacy of three methods for the identification of specific learning disabilities via patterns of strengths and weaknesses in cognitive processing. Latent and observed data were generated and the decision-making process of each method was applied to assess concordance in classification for specific learning disabilities between latent and observed levels. The results showed that all three methods had excellent specificity and negative predictive values, but low to moderate sensitivity and very low positive predictive values. Only a very small percentage of the population (1%–2%) met criteria for specific learning disabilities. In addition to substantial psychometric issues underlying these methods, general application did not improve the efficiency of the decision model, may not be cost effective because of low base rates, and may result in many children receiving instruction that is not optimally matched to their specific needs. PMID:23060685

  17. Frequency and Factors Associated with Unexpected Death in an Acute Palliative Care Unit: Expect the Unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Sebastian; Chisholm, Gary; Santos, Renata Dos; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2015-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the frequency of unexpected death and its associated factors in a palliative care setting. Objectives To determine the frequency of unexpected death in two acute palliative care units (APCUs); to compare the frequency of signs of impending death between expected and unexpected deaths; and to determine the predictors associated with unexpected death. Methods In this prospective, longitudinal, observational study, consecutive patients admitted to two APCUs were enrolled and physical signs of impending death were documented twice daily until discharge or death. Physicians were asked to complete a survey within 24 hours of APCU death. The death was considered unexpected if the physician answered “yes” to the question “Were you surprised by the timing of the death?” Results In total, 193 of 203 after-death assessments (95%) were collected for analysis. Nineteen of 193 patients died unexpectedly (10%). Signs of impending death, including nonreactive pupils, inability to close eyelids, decreased response to verbal stimuli, drooping of nasolabial folds, peripheral cyanosis, pulselessness of the radial artery, and respiration with mandibular movement, were documented more frequently in expected deaths than unexpected deaths (P < 0.05). Longer disease duration was associated with unexpected death (33 months vs. 12 months, P=0.009). Conclusion Unexpected death occurred in an unexpectedly high proportion of patients in the APCU setting, and was associated with fewer signs of impending death. Our findings highlight the need for palliative care teams to be prepared for the unexpected. PMID:25499421

  18. NEW POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR KINASES IDENTIFIED IN TOMATO, MAIZE AND ARABIDOPSIS: THE TOMATO KINASES SHOW OVERLAPPING BUT DISTINCT LOCALIZATOIN PATTERNS ON POLLEN TUBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously characterized LePRKl and LePRK2, pollen-specific receptor kinases from tomato (Mushietti et al., 1998). Here we identify a similar receptor kinase from maize, ZmPRKl, that is also specifically expressed late in pollen development, and a third pollen receptor kinase from tomato, LePRK3...

  19. MUSI: an integrated system for identifying multiple specificity from very large peptide or nucleic acid data sets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, TaeHyung; Tyndel, Marc S.; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Bader, Gary D.; Gfeller, David; Kim, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide recognition domains and transcription factors play crucial roles in cellular signaling. They bind linear stretches of amino acids or nucleotides, respectively, with high specificity. Experimental techniques that assess the binding specificity of these domains, such as microarrays or phage display, can retrieve thousands of distinct ligands, providing detailed insight into binding specificity. In particular, the advent of next-generation sequencing has recently increased the throughput of such methods by several orders of magnitude. These advances have helped reveal the presence of distinct binding specificity classes that co-exist within a set of ligands interacting with the same target. Here, we introduce a software system called MUSI that can rapidly analyze very large data sets of binding sequences to determine the relevant binding specificity patterns. Our pipeline provides two major advances. First, it can detect previously unrecognized multiple specificity patterns in any data set. Second, it offers integrated processing of very large data sets from next-generation sequencing machines. The results are visualized as multiple sequence logos describing the different binding preferences of the protein under investigation. We demonstrate the performance of MUSI by analyzing recent phage display data for human SH3 domains as well as microarray data for mouse transcription factors. PMID:22210894

  20. Plasmodium falciparum Gametocyte-Specific Antibody Profiling Reveals Boosting through Natural Infection and Identifies Potential Markers of Gametocyte Exposure.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jeff; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Waisberg, Michael; Felgner, Philip L; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Ongoiba, Aissata; Kayentao, Kassoum; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D; Williamson, Kim C

    2015-11-01

    Malaria elimination efforts would benefit from vaccines that block transmission of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes from humans to mosquitoes. A clear understanding of gametocyte-specific antibody responses in exposed populations could help determine whether transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) would be boosted by natural gametocyte exposure, and also inform the development of serologic tools to monitor gametocyte exposure in populations targeted for malaria elimination. To this end, plasma was collected from Malian children and adults before and after the 6-month malaria season and probed against a microarray containing 1,204 P. falciparum proteins. Using publicly available proteomic data, we classified 91 proteins as gametocyte specific and 69 as proteins not expressed by gametocytes. The overall breadth and magnitude of gametocyte-specific IgG responses increased during the malaria season, although they were consistently lower than IgG responses to nongametocyte antigens. Notably, IgG specific for the TBV candidates Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 increased during the malaria season. In addition, IgGs specific for the gametocyte proteins Pfmdv1, Pfs16, PF3D7_1346400, and PF3D7_1024800 were detected in nearly all subjects, suggesting that seroconversion to these proteins may be a sensitive indicator of gametocyte exposure, although further studies are needed to determine the specificity and kinetics of these potential serologic markers. These findings suggest that TBV-induced immunity would be boosted through natural gametocyte exposure, and that antibody responses to particular antigens may reliably indicate gametocyte exposure. PMID:26283330

  1. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  2. Managing the Unexpected: Complexity as Distributed Sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weick, Karl E.

    In 1998 the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) published a statement of their strategy entitled "Preventing Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Strategy for the 21st Century." They described their central challenge this way: "because we do not know what new diseases will arise, we must always be prepared for the unexpected" (p. vii). Soon after they published that statement CDC was confronted with an unexpected emerging disease, the West Nile Virus, which they misdiagnosed initially.

  3. The Impact of Identifying a Specific Purpose and External Audience for Writing on Second Graders' Writing Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Meghan K.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CCSS) emphasize the importance of writing and specify that students should write for external, and, at times, unfamiliar audiences. Given the relationship between audience specification and quality writing in older…

  4. Mitochondrial electron transport chain identified as a novel molecular target of SPIO nanoparticles mediated cancer-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Chengyong; Jiang, Shengwei; Jin, Haijing; Chen, Shuzhen; Lin, Gan; Yao, Huan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Mi, Peng; Ji, Zhiliang; Lin, Yuchun; Lin, Zhongning; Liu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are highly cytotoxic and target cancer cells with high specificity; however, the mechanism by which SPIONs induce cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity remains unclear. Herein, the molecular mechanism of SPION-induced cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity to cancer cells is clarified through DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. SPIONs can interference with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) in cancer cells, which further affects the production of ATP, mitochondrial membrane potential, and microdistribution of calcium, and induces cell apoptosis. Additionally, SPIONs induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria; these reactive oxygen species trigger cancer-specific cytotoxicity due to the lower antioxidative capacity of cancer cells. Moreover, the DNA microarray and gene ontology analyses revealed that SPIONs elevate the expression of metallothioneins in both normal and cancer cells but decrease the expression of METC genes in cancer cells. Overall, these results suggest that SPIONs induce cancer cell death by targeting the METC, which is helpful for designing anti-cancer nanotheranostics and evaluating the safety of future nanomedicines. PMID:26773667

  5. Evidence for Shared Deficits in Identifying Emotions from Faces and from Voices in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lauren J.; Maybery, Murray T.; Grayndler, Luke; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: While autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and specific language impairment (SLI) have traditionally been conceptualized as distinct disorders, recent findings indicate that the boundaries between these two conditions are not clear-cut. While considerable research has investigated overlap in the linguistic characteristics of ASD and SLI,…

  6. Students with Specific Spelling Disability: A Collective Case Study Identifying the Experiential and Behavioral Causes for the Discrepancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Michael Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine potential causes for the reading and spelling discrepancies of 26 middle school students. All were proficient in reading, but non-proficient in spelling, a pattern typical in students with Specific Spelling Disability (SSD). The focus of the study was on linguistic knowledge while encoding and decoding, plus…

  7. A novel PCR technique using Alu-specific primers to identify unknown flanking sequences from the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, M.; Poussin, K.; Brechot, C.; Paterlini, P.

    1995-09-20

    The rapid and reproducible identification of new cellular DNA sequences is difficult to achieve with the currently available procedures. Here we describe a novel approach based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer specific to the known sequence and another directed to a human Alu repeat. To avoid undesirable amplifications between Alu sequences, primers are constructed with dUTPs and destroyed by uracil DNA glycosylase treatment after 10 initial cycles of amplification. Only desirable fragments are then further amplified with specific primers to the known region and to a tag sequence introduced in the Alu-specific primer. Using this protocol, we have successfully indentified cellular sequences flanking integrated hepatitis B virus DNA from the human genome of three hepatoma tissues. The method enables a direct specific amplification without any ligation or nonspecific annealing steps as required by previous PCR-based protocols. This rapid and straightforward approach will be a powerful tool for the study of viral integration sites, but is also widely applicable to other studies of the human genome. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Toward Greater Specificity in Identifying Associations among Interparental Aggression, Child Emotional Reactivity to Conflict, and Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Martin, Meredith J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined specific forms of emotional reactivity to conflict and temperamental emotionality as explanatory mechanisms in pathways among interparental aggression and child psychological problems. Participants of the multimethod, longitudinal study included 201 two-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced elevated violence…

  9. Core Subjects at the End of Primary School: Identifying and Explaining Relative Strengths of Children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Kevin; Mok, Pearl L. H.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Background: In general, children with specific language impairment (SLI) tend to fall behind their typically developing (TD) peers in educational attainment. Less is known about how children with SLI fare in particular areas of the curriculum and what predicts their levels of performance. Aims: To compare the distributions of performance of…

  10. Development of a PubMed Based Search Tool for Identifying Sex and Gender Specific Health Literature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Michael M.; Simonsen, Cheryl K.; Wilson, Joanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An effective literature search strategy is critical to achieving the aims of Sex and Gender Specific Health (SGSH): to understand sex and gender differences through research and to effectively incorporate the new knowledge into the clinical decision making process to benefit both male and female patients. The goal of this project was to develop and validate an SGSH literature search tool that is readily and freely available to clinical researchers and practitioners. Methods: PubMed, a freely available search engine for the Medline database, was selected as the platform to build the SGSH literature search tool. Combinations of Medical Subject Heading terms, text words, and title words were evaluated for optimal specificity and sensitivity. The search tool was then validated against reference bases compiled for two disease states, diabetes and stroke. Results: Key sex and gender terms and limits were bundled to create a search tool to facilitate PubMed SGSH literature searches. During validation, the search tool retrieved 50 of 94 (53.2%) stroke and 62 of 95 (65.3%) diabetes reference articles selected for validation. A general keyword search of stroke or diabetes combined with sex difference retrieved 33 of 94 (35.1%) stroke and 22 of 95 (23.2%) diabetes reference base articles, with lower sensitivity and specificity for SGSH content. Conclusions: The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center SGSH PubMed Search Tool provides higher sensitivity and specificity to sex and gender specific health literature. The tool will facilitate research, clinical decision-making, and guideline development relevant to SGSH. PMID:26555409

  11. 40 CFR 268.38 - Waste specific prohibitions-newly identified organic toxicity characteristic wastes and newly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 261.32 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers K141, K142, K143, K144, K145, K147, K148, K149, K150, and... following wastes that are specified in 40 CFR 261.24, Table 1 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers: D012, D013... covered by the extension. (e) To determine whether a hazardous waste identified in this section...

  12. 40 CFR 268.38 - Waste specific prohibitions-newly identified organic toxicity characteristic wastes and newly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 261.32 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers K141, K142, K143, K144, K145, K147, K148, K149, K150, and... following wastes that are specified in 40 CFR 261.24, Table 1 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers: D012, D013... covered by the extension. (e) To determine whether a hazardous waste identified in this section...

  13. 40 CFR 268.38 - Waste specific prohibitions-newly identified organic toxicity characteristic wastes and newly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 261.32 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers K141, K142, K143, K144, K145, K147, K148, K149, K150, and... following wastes that are specified in 40 CFR 261.24, Table 1 as EPA Hazardous Waste numbers: D012, D013... covered by the extension. (e) To determine whether a hazardous waste identified in this section...

  14. Insights from Smart Meters. Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors and Characteristics that drive savings in Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles A.

    2014-12-01

    In this report, we use smart meter data to analyze specific actions, behaviors, and characteristics that drive energy savings in a behavior-based (BB) program. Specifically, we examine a Home Energy Report (HER) program. These programs typically obtain 1% to 3% annual savings, and recent studies have shown hourly savings of between 0.5% and 3%. But what is driving these savings? What types of households tend to be “high-savers”, and what behaviors are they adopting? There are several possibilities: one-time behaviors (e.g., changing thermostat settings); reoccurring habitual behaviors (e.g., turning off lights); and equipment purchase behaviors (e.g., energy efficient appliances), and these may vary across households, regions, and over time.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Saiga, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  16. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters.

    PubMed

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Ten Hove, Colette A; Saiga, Shunsuke; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-06-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  17. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  18. Pre-study feasibility and identifying sensitivity analyses for protocol pre-specification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Girman, Cynthia J; Faries, Douglas; Ryan, Patrick; Rotelli, Matt; Belger, Mark; Binkowitz, Bruce; O'Neill, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The use of healthcare databases for comparative effectiveness research (CER) is increasing exponentially despite its challenges. Researchers must understand their data source and whether outcomes, exposures and confounding factors are captured sufficiently to address the research question. They must also assess whether bias and confounding can be adequately minimized. Many study design characteristics may impact on the results; however, minimal if any sensitivity analyses are typically conducted, and those performed are post hoc. We propose pre-study steps for CER feasibility assessment and to identify sensitivity analyses that might be most important to pre-specify to help ensure that CER produces valid interpretable results. PMID:24969153

  19. Pan-genome analyses identify lineage- and niche-specific markers of evolution and adaptation in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of complete bacterial genomes has created new opportunities for reconstructing bacterial evolution, but it has also highlighted the difficulty to fully understand the genomic and functional variations occurring among different lineages. Using the class Epsilonproteobacteria as a case study, we investigated the composition, flexibility, and function of its pan-genomes. Models were constructed to extrapolate the expansion of pan-genomes at three different taxonomic levels. The results show that, for Epsilonproteobacteria the seemingly large genome variations among strains of the same species are less noticeable when compared with groups at higher taxonomic ranks, indicating that genome stability is imposed by the potential existence of taxonomic boundaries. The analyses of pan-genomes has also defined a set of universally conserved core genes, based on which a phylogenetic tree was constructed to confirm that thermophilic species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents represent the most ancient lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria. Moreover, by comparing the flexible genome of a chemoautotrophic deep-sea vent species to (1) genomes of species belonging to the same genus, but inhabiting different environments, and (2) genomes of other vent species, but belonging to different genera, we were able to delineate the relative importance of lineage-specific versus niche-specific genes. This result not only emphasizes the overall importance of phylogenetic proximity in shaping the variable part of the genome, but also highlights the adaptive functions of niche-specific genes. Overall, by modeling the expansion of pan-genomes and analyzing core and flexible genes, this study provides snapshots on how the complex processes of gene acquisition, conservation, and removal affect the evolution of different species, and contribute to the metabolic diversity and versatility of Epsilonproteobacteria. PMID:24678308

  20. Screening a limited structure-based library identifies UDP-GalNAc-specific mutants of alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tumbale, Percy; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K Ravi; Brew, Keith

    2008-12-01

    Complex glycans have important roles in biological recognition processes and considerable pharmaceutical potential. The synthesis of novel glycans can be facilitated by engineering glycosyltransferases to modify their substrate specificities. The choice of sites to modify requires the knowledge of the structures of enzyme-substrate complexes while the complexity of protein structures necessitates the exploration of a large array of multisite mutations. The retaining glycosyltransferase, alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the alpha-Gal epitope, has strict specificity for UDP-galactose as a donor substrate. Based on the structure of a complex of UDP-galactose with alpha3GT, the specificity for the galactose moiety can be partly attributed to residues that interact with the galactose 2-OH group, particularly His280 and Ala282. With the goal of engineering a variant of bovine alpha3GT with GalNAc transferase activity, we constructed a limited library of 456 alpha3GT mutants containing 19 alternative amino acids at position 280, two each at 281 and 282 and six at position 283. Clones (1500) were screened by assaying partially purified bacterially expressed variants for GalNAc transferase activity. Mutants with the highest levels of GalNAc transferase activity, AGGL or GGGL, had substitutions at all four sites. The AGGL mutant had slightly superior GalNAc transferase activity amounting to about 3% of the activity of the wild-type enzyme with UDP-Gal. This mutant had a low activity with UDP-Gal; its crystallographic structure suggests that the smaller side chains at residues 280-282 form a pocket to accommodate the larger acetamido group of GalNAc. Mutational studies indicate that Leu283 is important for stability in this mutant. PMID:18782853

  1. Mold Species in Dust from the International Space Station Identified and Quantified by Mold Specific Quantitative PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Wong, Wing; Kuo, C. Mike; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Dust was collected over a period of several weeks in 2007 from various HEPA filters in the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The dust was returned on the Space Shuttle Atlantis, mixed, sieved, and the DNA was extracted. Using a DNA-based method called mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR), 39 molds were measured in the dust. Opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus flavus and A. niger and toxin producers Penicillium chrysogenum and P. brevicompactum were found at relatively high concentrations (compared to U.S. homes). No cells of the opportunistic pathogens A. fumigatus, A. terreus, Fusarium solani or Candida albicans were detected.

  2. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  4. Identifying consumer preferences for specific beef flavor characteristics in relation to cattle production and postmortem processing parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Quinn, T G; Woerner, D R; Engle, T E; Chapman, P L; Legako, J F; Brooks, J C; Belk, K E; Tatum, J D

    2016-02-01

    Sensory analysis of ground LL samples representing 12 beef product categories was conducted in 3 different regions of the U.S. to identify flavor preferences of beef consumers. Treatments characterized production-related flavor differences associated with USDA grade, cattle type, finishing diet, growth enhancement, and postmortem aging method. Consumers (N=307) rated cooked samples for 12 flavors and overall flavor desirability. Samples were analyzed to determine fatty acid content. Volatile compounds produced by cooking were extracted and quantified. Overall, consumers preferred beef that rated high for beefy/brothy, buttery/beef fat, and sweet flavors and disliked beef with fishy, livery, gamey, and sour flavors. Flavor attributes of samples higher in intramuscular fat with greater amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids and lesser proportions of saturated, odd-chain, omega-3, and trans fatty acids were preferred by consumers. Of the volatiles identified, diacetyl and acetoin were most closely correlated with desirable ratings for overall flavor and dimethyl sulfide was associated with an undesirable sour flavor. PMID:26560806

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Samuel K; Didelot, Xavier; Meric, Guillaume; Torralbo, Alicia; Jolley, Keith A; Kelly, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Maiden, Martin C J; Parkhill, Julian; Falush, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminated meat and poultry. We applied our association mapping method to identify the factors responsible for adaptation to cattle and chickens among 192 Campylobacter isolates from these and other host sources. Phylogenetic analysis implied frequent host switching but also showed that some lineages were strongly associated with particular hosts. A seven-gene region with a host association signal was found. Genes in this region were almost universally present in cattle but were frequently absent in isolates from chickens and wild birds. Three of the seven genes encoded vitamin B5 biosynthesis. We found that isolates from cattle were better able to grow in vitamin B5-depleted media and propose that this difference may be an adaptation to host diet. PMID:23818615

  7. B-Cell and Monocyte Contribution to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Identified by Cell-Type-Specific Differential Expression Analysis in RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Dominguez, Nicolas; Bean, Krista; Macwana, Susan R.; Roberts, Virginia; Glass, Edmund; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by complex interplay among immune cell types. SLE activity is experimentally assessed by several blood tests, including gene expression profiling of heterogeneous populations of cells in peripheral blood. To better understand the contribution of different cell types in SLE pathogenesis, we applied the two methods in cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, csSAM and DSection, to identify cell-type-specific gene expression differences in heterogeneous gene expression measures obtained using RNA-seq technology. We identified B-cell-, monocyte-, and neutrophil-specific gene expression differences. Immunoglobulin-coding gene expression was altered in B-cells, while a ribosomal signature was prominent in monocytes. On the contrary, genes differentially expressed in the heterogeneous mixture of cells did not show any functional enrichment. Our results identify antigen binding and structural constituents of ribosomes as functions altered by B-cell- and monocyte-specific gene expression differences, respectively. Finally, these results position both csSAM and DSection methods as viable techniques for cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, which may help uncover pathogenic, cell-type-specific processes in SLE. PMID:26512198

  8. Analysis of five chronic inflammatory diseases identifies 27 new associations and highlights disease-specific patterns at shared loci.

    PubMed

    Ellinghaus, David; Jostins, Luke; Spain, Sarah L; Cortes, Adrian; Bethune, Jörn; Han, Buhm; Park, Yu Rang; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Pouget, Jennie G; Hübenthal, Matthias; Folseraas, Trine; Wang, Yunpeng; Esko, Tonu; Metspalu, Andres; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H; Weersma, Rinse K; Collij, Valerie; D'Amato, Mauro; Halfvarson, Jonas; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Lieb, Wolfgang; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J; Hofmann, Andrea; Schreiber, Stefan; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Brunak, Søren; Dale, Anders M; Trembath, Richard C; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Elder, James T; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Andreassen, Ole A; McGovern, Dermot P; Karlsen, Tom H; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Parkes, Miles; Brown, Matthew A; Franke, Andre

    2016-05-01

    We simultaneously investigated the genetic landscape of ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis to investigate pleiotropy and the relationship between these clinically related diseases. Using high-density genotype data from more than 86,000 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 244 independent multidisease signals, including 27 new genome-wide significant susceptibility loci and 3 unreported shared risk loci. Complex pleiotropy was supported when contrasting multidisease signals with expression data sets from human, rat and mouse together with epigenetic and expressed enhancer profiles. The comorbidities among the five immune diseases were best explained by biological pleiotropy rather than heterogeneity (a subgroup of cases genetically identical to those with another disease, possibly owing to diagnostic misclassification, molecular subtypes or excessive comorbidity). In particular, the strong comorbidity between primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease is likely the result of a unique disease, which is genetically distinct from classical inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes. PMID:26974007

  9. Sequencing of the genus Arabidopsis identifies a complex history of nonbifurcating speciation and abundant trans-specific polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Polina Yu; Hohmann, Nora; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Ali, Jamshaid; Muir, Graham; Guggisberg, Alessia; Paape, Tim; Schmid, Karl; Fedorenko, Olga M; Holm, Svante; Säll, Torbjörn; Schlötterer, Christian; Marhold, Karol; Widmer, Alex; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute; Koch, Marcus A; Nordborg, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    The notion of species as reproductively isolated units related through a bifurcating tree implies that gene trees should generally agree with the species tree and that sister taxa should not share polymorphisms unless they diverged recently and should be equally closely related to outgroups. It is now possible to evaluate this model systematically. We sequenced multiple individuals from 27 described taxa representing the entire Arabidopsis genus. Cluster analysis identified seven groups, corresponding to described species that capture the structure of the genus. However, at the level of gene trees, only the separation of Arabidopsis thaliana from the remaining species was universally supported, and, overall, the amount of shared polymorphism demonstrated that reproductive isolation was considerably more recent than the estimated divergence times. We uncovered multiple cases of past gene flow that contradict a bifurcating species tree. Finally, we showed that the pattern of divergence differs between gene ontologies, suggesting a role for selection. PMID:27428747

  10. Identifying specific beliefs to target to improve restaurant employees' intentions for performing three important food safety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Valerie K; Brannon, Laura A; Shanklin, Carol W; Howells, Amber D; Roberts, Kevin R

    2008-06-01

    Current national food safety training programs appear ineffective at improving food safety practices in foodservice operations, given the substantial number of Americans affected by foodborne illnesses after eating in restaurants each year. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) was used to identify important beliefs that may be targeted to improve foodservice employees' intentions for three food safety behaviors that have the most substantial affect on public health: hand washing, using thermometers, and proper handling of food contact surfaces. In a cross-sectional design, foodservice employees (n=190) across three midwestern states completed a survey assessing TpB components and knowledge for the three food safety behaviors. Multiple regression analyses were performed on the TpB components for each behavior. Independent-samples t tests identified TpB beliefs that discriminated between participants who absolutely intend to perform the behaviors and those with lower intention. Employees' attitudes were the one consistent predictor of intentions for performing all three behaviors. However, a unique combination of important predictors existed for each separate behavior. Interventions for improving employees' behavioral intentions for food safety should focus on TpB components that predict intentions for each behavior and should bring all employees' beliefs in line with those of the employees who already intend to perform the food safety behaviors. Registered dietitians; dietetic technicians, registered; and foodservice managers can use these results to enhance training sessions and motivational programs to improve employees' food safety behaviors. Results also assist these professionals in recognizing their responsibility for enforcing and providing adequate resources for proper food safety behaviors. PMID:18502232

  11. Using gene chips to identify organ-specific, smooth muscle responses to experimental diabetes: potential applications to urological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tar, Moses; Valcic, Mira; Knoll, Abraham; Melman, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify early diabetes-related alterations in gene expression in bladder and erectile tissue that would provide novel diagnostic and therapeutic treatment targets to prevent, delay or ameliorate the ensuing bladder and erectile dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS The RG-U34A rat GeneChip® (Affymetrix Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) oligonucleotide microarray (containing ≈8799 genes) was used to evaluate gene expression in corporal and male bladder tissue excised from rats 1 week after confirmation of a diabetic state, but before demonstrable changes in organ function in vivo. A conservative analytical approach was used to detect alterations in gene expression, and gene ontology (GO) classifications were used to identify biological themes/pathways involved in the aetiology of the organ dysfunction. RESULTS In all, 320 and 313 genes were differentially expressed in bladder and corporal tissue, respectively. GO analysis in bladder tissue showed prominent increases in biological pathways involved in cell proliferation, metabolism, actin cytoskeleton and myosin, as well as decreases in cell motility, and regulation of muscle contraction. GO analysis in corpora showed increases in pathways related to ion channel transport and ion channel activity, while there were decreases in collagen I and actin genes. CONCLUSIONS The changes in gene expression in these initial experiments are consistent with the pathophysiological characteristics of the bladder and erectile dysfunction seen later in the diabetic disease process. Thus, the observed changes in gene expression might be harbingers or biomarkers of impending organ dysfunction, and could provide useful diagnostic and therapeutic targets for a variety of progressive urological diseases/conditions (i.e. lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia, erectile dysfunction, etc.). PMID:17313427

  12. Genome-wide Association Study of Platelet Count Identifies Ancestry-Specific Loci in Hispanic/Latino Americans.

    PubMed

    Schick, Ursula M; Jain, Deepti; Hodonsky, Chani J; Morrison, Jean V; Davis, James P; Brown, Lisa; Sofer, Tamar; Conomos, Matthew P; Schurmann, Claudia; McHugh, Caitlin P; Nelson, Sarah C; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Stilp, Adrienne; Plantinga, Anna; Baier, Leslie; Bien, Stephanie A; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Laurie, Cecelia A; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Yongmei; Auer, Paul L; Franceschini, Nora; Szpiro, Adam; Rice, Ken; Kerr, Kathleen F; Rotter, Jerome I; Hanson, Robert L; Papanicolaou, George; Rich, Stephen S; Loos, Ruth J F; Browning, Brian L; Browning, Sharon R; Weir, Bruce S; Laurie, Cathy C; Mohlke, Karen L; North, Kari E; Thornton, Timothy A; Reiner, Alex P

    2016-02-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of platelet count in 12,491 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos by using a mixed-model method that accounts for admixture and family relationships. We discovered and replicated associations with five genes (ACTN1, ETV7, GABBR1-MOG, MEF2C, and ZBTB9-BAK1). Our strongest association was with Amerindian-specific variant rs117672662 (p value = 1.16 × 10(-28)) in ACTN1, a gene implicated in congenital macrothrombocytopenia. rs117672662 exhibited allelic differences in transcriptional activity and protein binding in hematopoietic cells. Our results underscore the value of diverse populations to extend insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26805783

  13. Genome-wide Association Study of Platelet Count Identifies Ancestry-Specific Loci in Hispanic/Latino Americans

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Jain, Deepti; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Morrison, Jean V.; Davis, James P.; Brown, Lisa; Sofer, Tamar; Conomos, Matthew P.; Schurmann, Claudia; McHugh, Caitlin P.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Stilp, Adrienne; Plantinga, Anna; Baier, Leslie; Bien, Stephanie A.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Taylor, Kent D.; Liu, Yongmei; Auer, Paul L.; Franceschini, Nora; Szpiro, Adam; Rice, Ken; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hanson, Robert L.; Papanicolaou, George; Rich, Stephen S.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Browning, Brian L.; Browning, Sharon R.; Weir, Bruce S.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; North, Kari E.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of platelet count in 12,491 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos by using a mixed-model method that accounts for admixture and family relationships. We discovered and replicated associations with five genes (ACTN1, ETV7, GABBR1-MOG, MEF2C, and ZBTB9-BAK1). Our strongest association was with Amerindian-specific variant rs117672662 (p value = 1.16 × 10−28) in ACTN1, a gene implicated in congenital macrothrombocytopenia. rs117672662 exhibited allelic differences in transcriptional activity and protein binding in hematopoietic cells. Our results underscore the value of diverse populations to extend insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26805783

  14. Towards Greater Specificity in Identifying Associations Among Interparental Aggression, Child Emotional Reactivity to Conflict, and Child Problems

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Martin, Meredith J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined specific forms of emotional reactivity to conflict and temperamental emotionality as explanatory mechanisms in pathways among interparental aggression and child psychological problems. Participants of the multi-method, longitudinal study included 201 two-year-old children and their mothers who had experienced elevated violence in the home. Consistent with emotional security theory, autoregressive structural equation model analyses indicated that children’s fearful reactivity to conflict was the only consistent mediator in the associations among interparental aggression and their internalizing and externalizing symptoms one year later. Pathways remained significant across maternal and observer ratings of children’s symptoms and with the inclusion of other predictors and mediators, including children’s sad and angry forms of reactivity to conflict, temperamental emotionality, gender, and socioeconomic status. PMID:22716918

  15. A Morphometric Screen Identifies Specific Roles for Microtubule-Regulating Genes in Neuronal Development of P19 Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Julia; Duong, Thanh-Thuy; Dehmelt, Leif

    2013-01-01

    The first morphological change after neuronal differentiation is the microtubule-dependent initiation of thin cell protrusions called neurites. Here we performed a siRNA-based morphometric screen in P19 stem cells to evaluate the role of 408 microtubule-regulating genes during this early neuromorphogenesis step. This screen uncovered several novel regulatory factors, including specific complex subunits of the microtubule motor dynein involved in neurite initiation and a novel role for the microtubule end-binding protein EB2 in attenuation of neurite outgrowth. Epistasis analysis suggests that competition between EB1 and EB2 regulates neurite length, which links its expression to neurite outgrowth. We propose a model that explains how microtubule regulators can mediate cellular morphogenesis during the early steps of neuronal development by controlling microtubule stabilization and organizing dynein-generated forces. PMID:24260302

  16. IDENTIFYING MICROORGANISMS INVOLVED IN SPECIFIC IN SITU FUNCTIONS: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR RRNA GENE-BASED POPULATION STUDIES AND SEQUENCE-SELECTIVE PCR ASSAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter examines experimental design considerations for a population-based approach for identifying microorganisms involved in specific in situ functions. Here, the term function is used in its broadest sense, and may refer to any number of defined biochemical, physiological or ecological pheno...

  17. Stromal Transcriptional Profiles Reveal Hierarchies of Anatomical Site, Serum Response and Disease and Identify Disease Specific Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Parsonage, Greg N.; Legault, Holly M.; O’Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J.; Thomas, Andrew M.; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D.; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25807374

  18. Proteomic Profiling of Paraffin-Embedded Samples Identifies Metaplasia-Specific and Early-Stage Gastric Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Whitwell, Corbin; Nam, Ki Taek; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ming; LaFleur, Bonnie; Liebler, Daniel C.; Goldenring, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis and curative resection are the predominant factors associated with increased survival in patients with gastric cancer. However, most gastric cancer cases are still diagnosed at later stages. Since most pathologic specimens are archived as FFPE samples, the ability to use them to generate expression profiles can greatly improve cancer biomarker discovery. We sought to uncover new biomarkers for stomach preneoplastic metaplasias and neoplastic lesions by generating proteome profiles using FFPE samples. We combined peptide isoelectric focusing and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis to generate proteomic profiles from FFPE samples of intestinal-type gastric cancer, metaplasia, and normal mucosa. The expression patterns of selected proteins were analyzed by immunostaining first in single tissue sections from normal stomach, metaplasia, and gastric cancer and later in larger tissue array cohorts. We detected 60 proteins up-regulated and 87 proteins down-regulated during the progression from normal mucosa to metaplasia to gastric cancer. Two of the up-regulated proteins, LTF and DMBT1, were validated as specific markers for spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing metaplasia and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. In cancers, significantly lower levels of DMBT1 or LTF correlated with more advanced disease and worse prognosis. Thus, proteomic profiling using FFPE samples has led to the identification of two novel markers for stomach metaplasias and gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:22944598

  19. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population. PMID:25276827

  20. Identifying social characteristics of health-related information seeker: a gender-specific approach for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    While health information-seeking behavior as an indicator of health communication of patients including cancer survivors has been researched, few studies have focused on how socioeconomic position and media use combine to influence health-related information seekers. This study examined social characteristics of health information-seeking behavior taking into account an individual's socioeconomic position and their media use in Korea, a developed country. The data for this study came from a survey of 1,010 respondents drawn from a nationally representative sample in the Republic of Korea. We conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses for gender-specific effects. We found that men who reported high household income were one and half times more likely to seek health information than those with low income status. We also found that women who performed Internet searches by computer at home were almost two times more likely to seek health information than those who did not. Similar results were found for men as well. Our analyses revealed that socioeconomic position and media use are associated with health information-seeking behavior by gender. Studies on information seekers may bring us more effective health promotion and relevant intervention for people with chronic conditions including cancer survivors. PMID:25773838

  1. Specific inhibitors for identifying pathways for methane production from carbon monoxide by a nonadapted anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Silvia Sancho; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R

    2014-06-01

    Specific inhibitors such as 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and vancomycin were employed in activity batch tests to decipher metabolic pathways that are preferentially used by a mixed anaerobic consortium (sludge from an anaerobic digester) to transform carbon monoxide (CO) into methane (CH4). We first evaluated the inhibitory effect of both BES and vancomycin on the microbial community, as well as the efficiency and stability of vancomycin at 35 °C, over time. The activity tests with CO2-H2, CO, glucose, acetate, formate, propionate, butyrate, methanol, and ethanol showed that vancomycin does not inhibit some Gram-negative bacteria, and 50 mmol/L BES effectively blocks CH4 production in the sludge. However, when sludge was incubated with propionate, butyrate, methanol, or ethanol as the sole energy and carbon source, methanogenesis was only partially inhibited by BES. Separate tests showed that 0.07 mmol/L vancomycin is enough to maintain its inhibitory efficiency and stability in the population for at least 32 days at 35 °C. Using the inhibitors above, it was demonstrated that CO conversion to CH4 is an indirect, 2-step process, in which the CO is converted first to acetate and subsequently to CH4. PMID:24896194

  2. Specific Responses of Salmonella enterica to Tomato Varieties and Fruit Ripeness Identified by In Vivo Expression Technology

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Jason T.; Arrach, Nabil; Alagely, Ali; McClelland, Michael; Teplitski, Max

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent outbreaks of vegetable-associated gastroenteritis suggest that enteric pathogens colonize, multiply and persist in plants for extended periods of time, eventually infecting people. Genetic and physiological pathways, by which enterics colonize plants, are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand interactions between Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium and tomatoes, a gfp-tagged Salmonella promoter library was screened inside red ripe fruits. Fifty-one unique constructs that were potentially differentially regulated in tomato relative to in vitro growth were identified. The expression of a subset of these promoters was tested in planta using recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) and fitness of the corresponding mutants was tested. Gene expression in Salmonella was affected by fruit maturity and tomato cultivar. A putative fadH promoter was upregulated most strongly in immature tomatoes. Expression of the fadH construct depended on the presence of linoleic acid, which is consistent with the reduced accumulation of this compound in mature tomato fruits. The cysB construct was activated in the fruit of cv. Hawaii 7997 (resistant to a race of Ralstonia solanacearum) more strongly than in the universally susceptible tomato cv. Bonny Best. Known Salmonella motility and animal virulence genes (hilA, flhDC, fliF and those encoded on the pSLT virulence plasmid) did not contribute significantly to fitness of the bacteria inside tomatoes, even though deletions of sirA and motA modestly increased fitness of Salmonella inside tomatoes. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals the genetic basis of the interactions of Salmonella with plant hosts. Salmonella relies on a distinct set of metabolic and regulatory genes, which are differentially regulated in planta in response to host genotype and fruit maturity. This enteric pathogen colonizes tissues of tomatoes differently than plant pathogens, and relies

  3. Mantle Branch-Specific RNA Sequences of Moon Scallop Amusium pleuronectes to Identify Shell Color-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-heng; Zhao, Xiao-xia; Deng, Yue-wen; Jiao, Yu; Du, Xiao-dong

    2015-01-01

    Amusium pleuronectes (Linnaeus) that secretes red- and white-colored valves in two branches of mantle tissues is an excellent model for shell color research. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing and profiling were applied in this project to reveal the detailed molecular mechanism of this phenotype differentiation. In this study, 50,796,780 and 54,361,178 clean reads were generated from the left branch (secreting red valve, RS) and right branch (secreting white valve, WS) using the Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. De novo assembly generated 149,375 and 176,652 unigenes with an average length of 764 bp and 698 bp in RS and WS, respectively. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathway analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes were involved in 228 signaling pathways, and 43 genes were significantly enriched (P<0.01). Nineteen of 20 differentially expressed vitellogenin genes showed significantly high expression in RS, which suggested that they probably played a crucial role in organic pigment assembly and transportation of the shell. Moreover, 687 crystal formation-related (or biomineralization-related) genes were detected in A. pleuronectes, among which 144 genes exhibited significant difference between the two branches. Those genes could be classified into shell matrix framework participants, crystal nucleation and growth-related elements, upstream regulation factors, Ca level regulators, and other classifications. We also identified putative SNP and SSR markers from these samples which provided the markers for genetic diversity analysis, genetic linkage, QTL analysis. These results provide insight into the complexity of shell color differentiation in A. pleuronectes so as valuable resources for further research. PMID:26496197

  4. Core subjects at the end of primary school: identifying and explaining relative strengths of children with specific language impairment (SLI)

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Kevin; Mok, Pearl L H; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Background In general, children with specific language impairment (SLI) tend to fall behind their typically developing (TD) peers in educational attainment. Less is known about how children with SLI fare in particular areas of the curriculum and what predicts their levels of performance. Aims To compare the distributions of performance of children with SLI in three core school subjects (English, Mathematics and Science); to test the possibility that performance would vary across the core subjects; and to examine the extent to which language impairment predicts performance. Methods & Procedures This study was conducted in England and reports historical data on educational attainments. Teacher assessment and test scores of 176 eleven-year-old children with SLI were examined in the three core subjects and compared with known national norms. Possible predictors of performance were measured, including language ability at ages 7 and 11, educational placement type, and performance IQ. Outcomes & Results Children with SLI, compared with national norms, were found to be at a disadvantage in core school subjects. Nevertheless, some children attained the levels expected of TD peers. Performance was poorest in English; relative strengths were indicated in Science and, to a lesser extent, in Mathematics. Language skills were significant predictors of performance in all three core subjects. PIQ was the strongest predictor for Mathematics. For Science, both early language skills at 7 years and PIQ made significant contributions. Conclusions & Implications Language impacts on the school performance of children with SLI, but differentially across subjects. English for these children is the most challenging of the core subjects, reflecting the high levels of language demand it incurs. Science is an area of relative strength and mathematics appears to be intermediate, arguably because some tasks in these subjects can be performed with less reliance on verbal processing. Many children

  5. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2014-03-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  6. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun

    2014-01-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  7. NK Cell-Specific Gata3 Ablation Identifies the Maturation Program Required for Bone Marrow Exit and Control of Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Alaa Kassim; Oh, Jun Seok; Vivier, Eric; Busslinger, Meinrad; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-02-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes capable of eliciting an innate immune response to pathogens. NK cells develop and become mature in the bone marrow (BM) before they migrate out to peripheral organs. Although the developmental program leading to mature NK cells has been studied in the context of several transcription factors, the stage-specific role of GATA3 in NK cell development has been incompletely understood. Using NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice in which Gata3 deficiency was induced as early as the immature stage of NK cell differentiation, we demonstrated that GATA3 is required for the NK cell maturation beyond the CD27 single-positive stage and is indispensable for the maintenance of liver-resident NK cells. The frequencies of NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice were found higher in the BM but lower in peripheral organs compared with control littermates, indicating that GATA3 controls the maturation program required for BM egress. Despite the defect in maturation, upon murine CMV infection, NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice expanded vigorously, achieving NK cell frequencies surpassing those in controls and therefore provided comparable protection. The heightened proliferation of NK cells from NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice was cell intrinsic and associated with enhanced upregulation of CD25 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GATA3 is a critical regulator for NK cell terminal maturation and egress out of the BM and that immature NK cells present in the periphery of NKp46-Cre-Gata3(fl/fl) mice can rapidly expand and provide a reservoir of NK cells capable of mounting an efficient cytotoxic response upon virus infection. PMID:26773150

  8. LC-QTOF-MS identification of porcine-specific peptide in heat treated pork identifies candidate markers for meat species determination.

    PubMed

    Sarah, S A; Faradalila, W N; Salwani, M S; Amin, I; Karsani, S A; Sazili, A Q

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify porcine-specific peptide markers from thermally processed meat that could differentiate pork from beef, chevon and chicken meat. In the initial stage, markers from tryptic digested protein of chilled, boiled and autoclaved pork were identified using LC-QTOF-MS. An MRM method was then established for verification. A thorough investigation of LC-QTOF-MS data showed that only seven porcine-specific peptides were consistently detected. Among these peptides, two were derived from lactate dehydrogenase, one from creatine kinase, and four from serum albumin protein. However, MRM could only detect four peptides (EVTEFAK, LVVITAGAR, FVIER and TVLGNFAAFVQK) that were consistently present in pork samples. In conclusion, meat species determination through a tandem mass spectrometry platform shows high potential in providing scientifically valid and reliable results even at peptide level. Besides, the specificity and selectivity offered by the proteomics approach also provide a robust platform for Halal authentication. PMID:26775957

  9. Species-specific considerations in using the fish embryo test as an alternative to identify endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Viktoria; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hecker, Markus; Schäfers, Christoph; Fischer, Rainer; Fenske, Martina

    2014-10-01

    A number of regulations have been implemented that aim to control the release of potentially adverse endocrine disrupters into the aquatic environment based on evidence from laboratory studies. Currently, such studies rely on testing approaches with adult fish because reliable alternatives have not been validated so far. Fish embryo tests have been proposed as such an alternative, and here we compared two species (medaka and zebrafish) to determine their suitability for the assessment of substances with estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity. Changes in gene expression (in here the phrase gene expression is used synonymously to gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is additionally regulated, e.g., by translation and protein stability) patterns between the two species were compared in short term embryo exposure tests (medaka: 7-day post fertilization [dpf]; zebrafish: 48 and 96h post fertilization [hpf]) by using relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The tested genes were related to the hypothalamic-gonadal-axis and early steroidogenesis. Test chemicals included 17α-ethinylestradiol and flutamide as estrogenic and anti-androgenic reference compounds, respectively, as well as five additional substances with endocrine activities, namely bisphenol A, genistein, prochloraz, linuron and propanil. Estrogenic responses were comparable in 7-dpf medaka and 48/96-hpf zebrafish embryos and included transcriptional upregulation of aromatase b, vitellogenin 1 as well as steroidogenic genes, suggesting that both species reliably detected exposure to estrogenic compounds. However, anti-androgenic responses differed between the two species, with each species providing specific information concerning the mechanism of anti-androgenic disruption in fish embryos. Although small but significant changes in the expression of selected genes was observed in 48-hpf zebrafish embryos, exposure prolonged to 96hpf was necessary to obtain a response indicative

  10. Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Richard D; Kinney, Hannah C; Willinger, Marian

    2016-06-01

    In March 2015, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development held a workshop entitled "Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood: New Opportunities." Its objective was to advance efforts to understand and ultimately prevent sudden deaths in early life, by considering their pathogenesis as a potential continuum with some commonalities in biological origins or pathways. A second objective of this meeting was to highlight current issues surrounding the classification of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and the implications of variations in the use of the term "SIDS" in forensic practice, and pediatric care and research. The proceedings reflected the most current knowledge and understanding of the origins and biology of vulnerability to sudden unexpected death, and its environmental triggers. Participants were encouraged to consider the application of new technologies and "omics" approaches to accelerate research. The major advances in delineating the intrinsic vulnerabilities to sudden death in early life have come from epidemiologic, neural, cardiac, metabolic, genetic, and physiologic research, with some commonalities among cases of unexplained stillbirth, SIDS, and sudden unexplained death in childhood observed. It was emphasized that investigations of sudden unexpected death are inconsistent, varying by jurisdiction, as are the education, certification practices, and experience of death certifiers. In addition, there is no practical consensus on the use of "SIDS" as a determination in cause of death. Major clinical, forensic, and scientific areas are identified for future research. PMID:27230764